How is it said?

Jandbnerja Hola! Here are Billy and Charlie, sunbathing on our balcony. We've had some dull and even wet days, but now the sun is shining again.

We've visited the Alhambra in Grenada, and the Cuevas de Nerja — the very impressive caves near here, and for something entirely different, I went with my sister to the local short mat bowling club. It was a lot of fun. I might take it up when we get home, largely because everyone was so laid back and friendly. Reflection

How it is said.

For my blog, however, I'm going to do a bit on pronunciation and other complexities of English for Americans, and I'm hoping for some feedback from either side about what puzzles and confuses, and whether it matters. I'm tweeting about these things, and extra examples would be useful.

When reading a book it might not matter if we "hear" a sound wrong, but it bothers me. For years I "heard" chagrin as chargin. When I realized the error, it took a while for the real pronunciation to sound right to me. Has that ever happened to you?

AnothGok2er example was Lymond, the hero of Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond Chronicles. I, like many readers, heard it as Li-mond.  It was only when Dorothy began talking about the books that we learned it was Lymond. I can't explain that one because the Y does suggest the long sound. It didn't take long for that one to feel right for me.

But it is disconcerting to find we've been hearing a word in a wrong way, isn't it.

When is a peer not a tent, but another is a box?

A big confusion in historical romance is Duke. Americans tend to say dook, but in a British context it's djuke, or juke, as in box.

Another tricky one is marquis/marquess. I always use marquess because it avoids the trap of people thinking it's mar-kee, like the tent. Both spellings are pronounced markwess.

Then there's lieutenant. The American pronunciation is logical, I grant you, but if that officer is British he's a leftenant.

The traps of Geography.

Let's add in some of the trickier counties. Derby is, of course, pronounced Darby, and thus Derbyshire is pronounced Darbyshuh. Huh? (Picture to the right is from the Derbyshire Peak District. ) Peak

When pronouncing counties, emphasis is nearly always on the first syllable, and the shire at the end is always swallowed into a soft afterthought sort of shur or shuh. Worcestershire is WUSStershuh. Yorkshire is YORKshuh.

I don't claim this is logical. In Devon there's a place called Teignmouth, which is at the mouth of the River Teign. The river is pronounced tayn, but the town is pronounced Tinmouth. 

Yes, you now have permission to tear your hair out!

Questions

So, do you care whether you're hearing words "in English" when you read an English-set book?

What are your favourite odd English pronunciations? (We'll leave out the Featherstonehaugh, which might be apocryphal.)

Have you ever gone along for ages with a wrong pronunciation in your head?

What odd pronunciations are there in other countries?

A prize! Forbmag

I'm going to pick from among the interesting responses to find a winner for a copy of Forbidden Magic, which will be out soon. There's an excerpt here.

I don't think there are any odd pronunciations there, except perhaps a sheelagh-na-gig, but it is pretty well as it looks. That's an ancient female figure exposing her genitals, and the stone carvings were generally in church walls, which raises all sorts of interesting questions! 

There's more, including an image, here.

You can see why Meg's embarrassed to admit to owning such a thing!

One last thing — I have a Georgian e-story out now — The Demon's Bride. (Not The Demon's Mistress, which is Regency. I didn't set out to confuse. The stories came over 10 years apart, and I'd forgotten the title of he first.)

A Georgian rake, a vicar's daughter, and the rising of the great earth demon Waldborg one dark night in Suffolk, all for $2.99. How can you go wrong? Kindle US has it discounted to $2.39. Enjoy! 

Now for the test. You knew there was a test, yes? Say after me, "The Duke of Derbyshire is not the Lord Lieutenant of Worcestershire."

There, that was easy, yes?

All best wishes,

Jo

 

 

 

 

 

 

155 thoughts on “How is it said?”

  1. I had a friend whose mother always read ‘unshed tears’ as “unsh’d” rather than ‘un-shed’, and alwys vaguely wondered what kind of tears these were. Ah, the perils of reading!

    Reply
  2. I had a friend whose mother always read ‘unshed tears’ as “unsh’d” rather than ‘un-shed’, and alwys vaguely wondered what kind of tears these were. Ah, the perils of reading!

    Reply
  3. I had a friend whose mother always read ‘unshed tears’ as “unsh’d” rather than ‘un-shed’, and alwys vaguely wondered what kind of tears these were. Ah, the perils of reading!

    Reply
  4. I had a friend whose mother always read ‘unshed tears’ as “unsh’d” rather than ‘un-shed’, and alwys vaguely wondered what kind of tears these were. Ah, the perils of reading!

    Reply
  5. I had a friend whose mother always read ‘unshed tears’ as “unsh’d” rather than ‘un-shed’, and alwys vaguely wondered what kind of tears these were. Ah, the perils of reading!

    Reply
  6. I am now anxiously awaiting some stories on hunky-punks! I must admit that i never thought that Marquess had a w in the pronunciation – I always thought it was Mark ess or possible Mar quee. The things I can learn from reading romance!

    Reply
  7. I am now anxiously awaiting some stories on hunky-punks! I must admit that i never thought that Marquess had a w in the pronunciation – I always thought it was Mark ess or possible Mar quee. The things I can learn from reading romance!

    Reply
  8. I am now anxiously awaiting some stories on hunky-punks! I must admit that i never thought that Marquess had a w in the pronunciation – I always thought it was Mark ess or possible Mar quee. The things I can learn from reading romance!

    Reply
  9. I am now anxiously awaiting some stories on hunky-punks! I must admit that i never thought that Marquess had a w in the pronunciation – I always thought it was Mark ess or possible Mar quee. The things I can learn from reading romance!

    Reply
  10. I am now anxiously awaiting some stories on hunky-punks! I must admit that i never thought that Marquess had a w in the pronunciation – I always thought it was Mark ess or possible Mar quee. The things I can learn from reading romance!

    Reply
  11. Ruthven is Riven, right? Leicester is Lester. Cholmondeley is Chumley. In America, Taliaferro is Tolliver. As someone who used to teach little kids to read and always broke words apart, I wonder where the missing letters and syllables go, LOL. English, both UK and North American versions of it, is pretty impossible.
    When I first read the story of Archimedes, I read Eureka as Erkaroo. My parents teased me for years. And imagine my utter disgrace to discover I called Georgette Heyer Georgette Higher instead of Georgette Hair.

    Reply
  12. Ruthven is Riven, right? Leicester is Lester. Cholmondeley is Chumley. In America, Taliaferro is Tolliver. As someone who used to teach little kids to read and always broke words apart, I wonder where the missing letters and syllables go, LOL. English, both UK and North American versions of it, is pretty impossible.
    When I first read the story of Archimedes, I read Eureka as Erkaroo. My parents teased me for years. And imagine my utter disgrace to discover I called Georgette Heyer Georgette Higher instead of Georgette Hair.

    Reply
  13. Ruthven is Riven, right? Leicester is Lester. Cholmondeley is Chumley. In America, Taliaferro is Tolliver. As someone who used to teach little kids to read and always broke words apart, I wonder where the missing letters and syllables go, LOL. English, both UK and North American versions of it, is pretty impossible.
    When I first read the story of Archimedes, I read Eureka as Erkaroo. My parents teased me for years. And imagine my utter disgrace to discover I called Georgette Heyer Georgette Higher instead of Georgette Hair.

    Reply
  14. Ruthven is Riven, right? Leicester is Lester. Cholmondeley is Chumley. In America, Taliaferro is Tolliver. As someone who used to teach little kids to read and always broke words apart, I wonder where the missing letters and syllables go, LOL. English, both UK and North American versions of it, is pretty impossible.
    When I first read the story of Archimedes, I read Eureka as Erkaroo. My parents teased me for years. And imagine my utter disgrace to discover I called Georgette Heyer Georgette Higher instead of Georgette Hair.

    Reply
  15. Ruthven is Riven, right? Leicester is Lester. Cholmondeley is Chumley. In America, Taliaferro is Tolliver. As someone who used to teach little kids to read and always broke words apart, I wonder where the missing letters and syllables go, LOL. English, both UK and North American versions of it, is pretty impossible.
    When I first read the story of Archimedes, I read Eureka as Erkaroo. My parents teased me for years. And imagine my utter disgrace to discover I called Georgette Heyer Georgette Higher instead of Georgette Hair.

    Reply
  16. Would a publisher perhaps be amenable to including a pronounciation guide in the beginning of a book? Then we’d be sure to hear the words correctly.
    Using Maggie’s example, I would never have known that Cholmondeley is Chumley, if it wasn’t clarified within the story.
    It was during my first trip to rural England that I realized this propensity to swallow swathes of syllables in placenames. Thus the long names also go by quickly. So I was prepared on my subsequent trips for Leicestershire and Hertfordshire and also Alnwick. (Ahln-wick is how I said it; Ah-nick is how everyone else said it.)

    Reply
  17. Would a publisher perhaps be amenable to including a pronounciation guide in the beginning of a book? Then we’d be sure to hear the words correctly.
    Using Maggie’s example, I would never have known that Cholmondeley is Chumley, if it wasn’t clarified within the story.
    It was during my first trip to rural England that I realized this propensity to swallow swathes of syllables in placenames. Thus the long names also go by quickly. So I was prepared on my subsequent trips for Leicestershire and Hertfordshire and also Alnwick. (Ahln-wick is how I said it; Ah-nick is how everyone else said it.)

    Reply
  18. Would a publisher perhaps be amenable to including a pronounciation guide in the beginning of a book? Then we’d be sure to hear the words correctly.
    Using Maggie’s example, I would never have known that Cholmondeley is Chumley, if it wasn’t clarified within the story.
    It was during my first trip to rural England that I realized this propensity to swallow swathes of syllables in placenames. Thus the long names also go by quickly. So I was prepared on my subsequent trips for Leicestershire and Hertfordshire and also Alnwick. (Ahln-wick is how I said it; Ah-nick is how everyone else said it.)

    Reply
  19. Would a publisher perhaps be amenable to including a pronounciation guide in the beginning of a book? Then we’d be sure to hear the words correctly.
    Using Maggie’s example, I would never have known that Cholmondeley is Chumley, if it wasn’t clarified within the story.
    It was during my first trip to rural England that I realized this propensity to swallow swathes of syllables in placenames. Thus the long names also go by quickly. So I was prepared on my subsequent trips for Leicestershire and Hertfordshire and also Alnwick. (Ahln-wick is how I said it; Ah-nick is how everyone else said it.)

    Reply
  20. Would a publisher perhaps be amenable to including a pronounciation guide in the beginning of a book? Then we’d be sure to hear the words correctly.
    Using Maggie’s example, I would never have known that Cholmondeley is Chumley, if it wasn’t clarified within the story.
    It was during my first trip to rural England that I realized this propensity to swallow swathes of syllables in placenames. Thus the long names also go by quickly. So I was prepared on my subsequent trips for Leicestershire and Hertfordshire and also Alnwick. (Ahln-wick is how I said it; Ah-nick is how everyone else said it.)

    Reply
  21. It took me years to figure out I was pronouncing these words wrong. I finally learned the proper way when I met my very dear friend Carol who is British by birth. She gave me an education on pronunciation and titles I’ll never forget and we laughed several days away as she told me my southern drawl had to go before I could speak proper English..lol. Love you Carol!!

    Reply
  22. It took me years to figure out I was pronouncing these words wrong. I finally learned the proper way when I met my very dear friend Carol who is British by birth. She gave me an education on pronunciation and titles I’ll never forget and we laughed several days away as she told me my southern drawl had to go before I could speak proper English..lol. Love you Carol!!

    Reply
  23. It took me years to figure out I was pronouncing these words wrong. I finally learned the proper way when I met my very dear friend Carol who is British by birth. She gave me an education on pronunciation and titles I’ll never forget and we laughed several days away as she told me my southern drawl had to go before I could speak proper English..lol. Love you Carol!!

    Reply
  24. It took me years to figure out I was pronouncing these words wrong. I finally learned the proper way when I met my very dear friend Carol who is British by birth. She gave me an education on pronunciation and titles I’ll never forget and we laughed several days away as she told me my southern drawl had to go before I could speak proper English..lol. Love you Carol!!

    Reply
  25. It took me years to figure out I was pronouncing these words wrong. I finally learned the proper way when I met my very dear friend Carol who is British by birth. She gave me an education on pronunciation and titles I’ll never forget and we laughed several days away as she told me my southern drawl had to go before I could speak proper English..lol. Love you Carol!!

    Reply
  26. Back in the dim and distant past when I was in high school we had to give oral book reports. I had read Scott’s Kenilworth and in giving my report I must have tried every conceivable way to pronounce Leicester. It wasn’t until I was finished that the teacher took pity and told me it was pronounced Lester.
    And then there was chaos. I read it as chay-os and it was years before I realized it was the same as the kay-os my mother said my room was.

    Reply
  27. Back in the dim and distant past when I was in high school we had to give oral book reports. I had read Scott’s Kenilworth and in giving my report I must have tried every conceivable way to pronounce Leicester. It wasn’t until I was finished that the teacher took pity and told me it was pronounced Lester.
    And then there was chaos. I read it as chay-os and it was years before I realized it was the same as the kay-os my mother said my room was.

    Reply
  28. Back in the dim and distant past when I was in high school we had to give oral book reports. I had read Scott’s Kenilworth and in giving my report I must have tried every conceivable way to pronounce Leicester. It wasn’t until I was finished that the teacher took pity and told me it was pronounced Lester.
    And then there was chaos. I read it as chay-os and it was years before I realized it was the same as the kay-os my mother said my room was.

    Reply
  29. Back in the dim and distant past when I was in high school we had to give oral book reports. I had read Scott’s Kenilworth and in giving my report I must have tried every conceivable way to pronounce Leicester. It wasn’t until I was finished that the teacher took pity and told me it was pronounced Lester.
    And then there was chaos. I read it as chay-os and it was years before I realized it was the same as the kay-os my mother said my room was.

    Reply
  30. Back in the dim and distant past when I was in high school we had to give oral book reports. I had read Scott’s Kenilworth and in giving my report I must have tried every conceivable way to pronounce Leicester. It wasn’t until I was finished that the teacher took pity and told me it was pronounced Lester.
    And then there was chaos. I read it as chay-os and it was years before I realized it was the same as the kay-os my mother said my room was.

    Reply
  31. I’ve been aware of swallowed letters since infancy, when I carefully sounded out the word “island” as “is land,” which makes total sense. Not until I heard a news commentator keep talking about a hurricane approaching an “i-land” did it finally dawn on me that the English language is insane.
    And the Brits don’t have total claim to fame on mispronounced place names. You really don’t want to know how Kentuckians pronounce the towns of Cairo and Versailles, among many other similar Americanisms.
    And for words that take years to overcome bad pronunciation, imagine all of us who grew up in a time when the word vagina was never said aloud!

    Reply
  32. I’ve been aware of swallowed letters since infancy, when I carefully sounded out the word “island” as “is land,” which makes total sense. Not until I heard a news commentator keep talking about a hurricane approaching an “i-land” did it finally dawn on me that the English language is insane.
    And the Brits don’t have total claim to fame on mispronounced place names. You really don’t want to know how Kentuckians pronounce the towns of Cairo and Versailles, among many other similar Americanisms.
    And for words that take years to overcome bad pronunciation, imagine all of us who grew up in a time when the word vagina was never said aloud!

    Reply
  33. I’ve been aware of swallowed letters since infancy, when I carefully sounded out the word “island” as “is land,” which makes total sense. Not until I heard a news commentator keep talking about a hurricane approaching an “i-land” did it finally dawn on me that the English language is insane.
    And the Brits don’t have total claim to fame on mispronounced place names. You really don’t want to know how Kentuckians pronounce the towns of Cairo and Versailles, among many other similar Americanisms.
    And for words that take years to overcome bad pronunciation, imagine all of us who grew up in a time when the word vagina was never said aloud!

    Reply
  34. I’ve been aware of swallowed letters since infancy, when I carefully sounded out the word “island” as “is land,” which makes total sense. Not until I heard a news commentator keep talking about a hurricane approaching an “i-land” did it finally dawn on me that the English language is insane.
    And the Brits don’t have total claim to fame on mispronounced place names. You really don’t want to know how Kentuckians pronounce the towns of Cairo and Versailles, among many other similar Americanisms.
    And for words that take years to overcome bad pronunciation, imagine all of us who grew up in a time when the word vagina was never said aloud!

    Reply
  35. I’ve been aware of swallowed letters since infancy, when I carefully sounded out the word “island” as “is land,” which makes total sense. Not until I heard a news commentator keep talking about a hurricane approaching an “i-land” did it finally dawn on me that the English language is insane.
    And the Brits don’t have total claim to fame on mispronounced place names. You really don’t want to know how Kentuckians pronounce the towns of Cairo and Versailles, among many other similar Americanisms.
    And for words that take years to overcome bad pronunciation, imagine all of us who grew up in a time when the word vagina was never said aloud!

    Reply
  36. Primer is a word that drives me crazy.
    I’ve always, until recently, heard it as PrYmer, as in a book used by Primary school students (also pronounce PrYmary)
    But, it is also pronounced Primmer, which to my ears sounds pretentious.

    Reply
  37. Primer is a word that drives me crazy.
    I’ve always, until recently, heard it as PrYmer, as in a book used by Primary school students (also pronounce PrYmary)
    But, it is also pronounced Primmer, which to my ears sounds pretentious.

    Reply
  38. Primer is a word that drives me crazy.
    I’ve always, until recently, heard it as PrYmer, as in a book used by Primary school students (also pronounce PrYmary)
    But, it is also pronounced Primmer, which to my ears sounds pretentious.

    Reply
  39. Primer is a word that drives me crazy.
    I’ve always, until recently, heard it as PrYmer, as in a book used by Primary school students (also pronounce PrYmary)
    But, it is also pronounced Primmer, which to my ears sounds pretentious.

    Reply
  40. Primer is a word that drives me crazy.
    I’ve always, until recently, heard it as PrYmer, as in a book used by Primary school students (also pronounce PrYmary)
    But, it is also pronounced Primmer, which to my ears sounds pretentious.

    Reply
  41. Pat, I heard “is-land” too early on. Another early error was “mausoleum.” I said “mouse-o-lee-um” until my uncle corrected me. And, oh yes, to Southern place names such as Cairo (Karo), Arab (A-RAB), and Albany (All-benny). Even Southerners don’t always agree. Beaufort is “Bu-fort” in SC and “Bow-fort” in NC.
    Authors names have also given me trouble. I not only mispronounced “Heyer” for years but also “Balogh” and “Kleypas.”

    Reply
  42. Pat, I heard “is-land” too early on. Another early error was “mausoleum.” I said “mouse-o-lee-um” until my uncle corrected me. And, oh yes, to Southern place names such as Cairo (Karo), Arab (A-RAB), and Albany (All-benny). Even Southerners don’t always agree. Beaufort is “Bu-fort” in SC and “Bow-fort” in NC.
    Authors names have also given me trouble. I not only mispronounced “Heyer” for years but also “Balogh” and “Kleypas.”

    Reply
  43. Pat, I heard “is-land” too early on. Another early error was “mausoleum.” I said “mouse-o-lee-um” until my uncle corrected me. And, oh yes, to Southern place names such as Cairo (Karo), Arab (A-RAB), and Albany (All-benny). Even Southerners don’t always agree. Beaufort is “Bu-fort” in SC and “Bow-fort” in NC.
    Authors names have also given me trouble. I not only mispronounced “Heyer” for years but also “Balogh” and “Kleypas.”

    Reply
  44. Pat, I heard “is-land” too early on. Another early error was “mausoleum.” I said “mouse-o-lee-um” until my uncle corrected me. And, oh yes, to Southern place names such as Cairo (Karo), Arab (A-RAB), and Albany (All-benny). Even Southerners don’t always agree. Beaufort is “Bu-fort” in SC and “Bow-fort” in NC.
    Authors names have also given me trouble. I not only mispronounced “Heyer” for years but also “Balogh” and “Kleypas.”

    Reply
  45. Pat, I heard “is-land” too early on. Another early error was “mausoleum.” I said “mouse-o-lee-um” until my uncle corrected me. And, oh yes, to Southern place names such as Cairo (Karo), Arab (A-RAB), and Albany (All-benny). Even Southerners don’t always agree. Beaufort is “Bu-fort” in SC and “Bow-fort” in NC.
    Authors names have also given me trouble. I not only mispronounced “Heyer” for years but also “Balogh” and “Kleypas.”

    Reply
  46. Aloha! Since my mother hails from Devon, I had some training in how to pronounce:
    Torquay: Tor-key, not Tor-kway
    Barnstaple: Barn-sta-ple, not Barn-staple
    Widecombe: Wi-di-cum, not Wyde-comb.
    And most Americans mispronounce Hawaiian words including Hawaii itself – it is Ha-va-ee. Hawaiian letters follow European pronunciations, for example, w is pronounced like v. The most obvious mispronunciation is Princes Likelike, Lee-kay, lee-kay, not lyke-lyke.

    Reply
  47. Aloha! Since my mother hails from Devon, I had some training in how to pronounce:
    Torquay: Tor-key, not Tor-kway
    Barnstaple: Barn-sta-ple, not Barn-staple
    Widecombe: Wi-di-cum, not Wyde-comb.
    And most Americans mispronounce Hawaiian words including Hawaii itself – it is Ha-va-ee. Hawaiian letters follow European pronunciations, for example, w is pronounced like v. The most obvious mispronunciation is Princes Likelike, Lee-kay, lee-kay, not lyke-lyke.

    Reply
  48. Aloha! Since my mother hails from Devon, I had some training in how to pronounce:
    Torquay: Tor-key, not Tor-kway
    Barnstaple: Barn-sta-ple, not Barn-staple
    Widecombe: Wi-di-cum, not Wyde-comb.
    And most Americans mispronounce Hawaiian words including Hawaii itself – it is Ha-va-ee. Hawaiian letters follow European pronunciations, for example, w is pronounced like v. The most obvious mispronunciation is Princes Likelike, Lee-kay, lee-kay, not lyke-lyke.

    Reply
  49. Aloha! Since my mother hails from Devon, I had some training in how to pronounce:
    Torquay: Tor-key, not Tor-kway
    Barnstaple: Barn-sta-ple, not Barn-staple
    Widecombe: Wi-di-cum, not Wyde-comb.
    And most Americans mispronounce Hawaiian words including Hawaii itself – it is Ha-va-ee. Hawaiian letters follow European pronunciations, for example, w is pronounced like v. The most obvious mispronunciation is Princes Likelike, Lee-kay, lee-kay, not lyke-lyke.

    Reply
  50. Aloha! Since my mother hails from Devon, I had some training in how to pronounce:
    Torquay: Tor-key, not Tor-kway
    Barnstaple: Barn-sta-ple, not Barn-staple
    Widecombe: Wi-di-cum, not Wyde-comb.
    And most Americans mispronounce Hawaiian words including Hawaii itself – it is Ha-va-ee. Hawaiian letters follow European pronunciations, for example, w is pronounced like v. The most obvious mispronunciation is Princes Likelike, Lee-kay, lee-kay, not lyke-lyke.

    Reply
  51. Oh, I love this stuff. Just in general, Americans tend to pronounce all the syllables, thanks to Noah Webster and his dictionary, whereas the British swallow them. Hard to believe we’re all speaking the same language.
    From what I learned, “marquess” is Victorian. In the Regency and earlier, the nobleman was a marquis, pronounced “MAR quis”, which is the Anglicized version of the French “MAR quee”. Ain’t this fun?
    And I remember Lord Peter Wimsey using “ain’t” in the Dorothy L. Sayers mysteries.

    Reply
  52. Oh, I love this stuff. Just in general, Americans tend to pronounce all the syllables, thanks to Noah Webster and his dictionary, whereas the British swallow them. Hard to believe we’re all speaking the same language.
    From what I learned, “marquess” is Victorian. In the Regency and earlier, the nobleman was a marquis, pronounced “MAR quis”, which is the Anglicized version of the French “MAR quee”. Ain’t this fun?
    And I remember Lord Peter Wimsey using “ain’t” in the Dorothy L. Sayers mysteries.

    Reply
  53. Oh, I love this stuff. Just in general, Americans tend to pronounce all the syllables, thanks to Noah Webster and his dictionary, whereas the British swallow them. Hard to believe we’re all speaking the same language.
    From what I learned, “marquess” is Victorian. In the Regency and earlier, the nobleman was a marquis, pronounced “MAR quis”, which is the Anglicized version of the French “MAR quee”. Ain’t this fun?
    And I remember Lord Peter Wimsey using “ain’t” in the Dorothy L. Sayers mysteries.

    Reply
  54. Oh, I love this stuff. Just in general, Americans tend to pronounce all the syllables, thanks to Noah Webster and his dictionary, whereas the British swallow them. Hard to believe we’re all speaking the same language.
    From what I learned, “marquess” is Victorian. In the Regency and earlier, the nobleman was a marquis, pronounced “MAR quis”, which is the Anglicized version of the French “MAR quee”. Ain’t this fun?
    And I remember Lord Peter Wimsey using “ain’t” in the Dorothy L. Sayers mysteries.

    Reply
  55. Oh, I love this stuff. Just in general, Americans tend to pronounce all the syllables, thanks to Noah Webster and his dictionary, whereas the British swallow them. Hard to believe we’re all speaking the same language.
    From what I learned, “marquess” is Victorian. In the Regency and earlier, the nobleman was a marquis, pronounced “MAR quis”, which is the Anglicized version of the French “MAR quee”. Ain’t this fun?
    And I remember Lord Peter Wimsey using “ain’t” in the Dorothy L. Sayers mysteries.

    Reply
  56. There is a town near me called Bronson. Even in the same town, some say BRUN-sun, and some say BRON-sun. The first is considered correct by those who have lived there the longest.

    Reply
  57. There is a town near me called Bronson. Even in the same town, some say BRUN-sun, and some say BRON-sun. The first is considered correct by those who have lived there the longest.

    Reply
  58. There is a town near me called Bronson. Even in the same town, some say BRUN-sun, and some say BRON-sun. The first is considered correct by those who have lived there the longest.

    Reply
  59. There is a town near me called Bronson. Even in the same town, some say BRUN-sun, and some say BRON-sun. The first is considered correct by those who have lived there the longest.

    Reply
  60. There is a town near me called Bronson. Even in the same town, some say BRUN-sun, and some say BRON-sun. The first is considered correct by those who have lived there the longest.

    Reply
  61. As a child, I thought “awry” was pronounced “aw-ree,” and there was another, completely different word out there spelled “arigh.” And I was, um, 20 or so before I realized that “Maori” was “Mao-ree” rather “may-O-ree.”
    As for British pronunciations, the year I lived in England I once had a conversation about how to get somewhere that was baffling for 10 minutes until my housemate realized that my “Bel-vwahr” Street was her “Beaver” Street. (Spelling: “Belvoir.”) And I’m kinda proud of myself for figuring out all on my own that Colquhoun got turned into Calhoun upon crossing the Atlantic.

    Reply
  62. As a child, I thought “awry” was pronounced “aw-ree,” and there was another, completely different word out there spelled “arigh.” And I was, um, 20 or so before I realized that “Maori” was “Mao-ree” rather “may-O-ree.”
    As for British pronunciations, the year I lived in England I once had a conversation about how to get somewhere that was baffling for 10 minutes until my housemate realized that my “Bel-vwahr” Street was her “Beaver” Street. (Spelling: “Belvoir.”) And I’m kinda proud of myself for figuring out all on my own that Colquhoun got turned into Calhoun upon crossing the Atlantic.

    Reply
  63. As a child, I thought “awry” was pronounced “aw-ree,” and there was another, completely different word out there spelled “arigh.” And I was, um, 20 or so before I realized that “Maori” was “Mao-ree” rather “may-O-ree.”
    As for British pronunciations, the year I lived in England I once had a conversation about how to get somewhere that was baffling for 10 minutes until my housemate realized that my “Bel-vwahr” Street was her “Beaver” Street. (Spelling: “Belvoir.”) And I’m kinda proud of myself for figuring out all on my own that Colquhoun got turned into Calhoun upon crossing the Atlantic.

    Reply
  64. As a child, I thought “awry” was pronounced “aw-ree,” and there was another, completely different word out there spelled “arigh.” And I was, um, 20 or so before I realized that “Maori” was “Mao-ree” rather “may-O-ree.”
    As for British pronunciations, the year I lived in England I once had a conversation about how to get somewhere that was baffling for 10 minutes until my housemate realized that my “Bel-vwahr” Street was her “Beaver” Street. (Spelling: “Belvoir.”) And I’m kinda proud of myself for figuring out all on my own that Colquhoun got turned into Calhoun upon crossing the Atlantic.

    Reply
  65. As a child, I thought “awry” was pronounced “aw-ree,” and there was another, completely different word out there spelled “arigh.” And I was, um, 20 or so before I realized that “Maori” was “Mao-ree” rather “may-O-ree.”
    As for British pronunciations, the year I lived in England I once had a conversation about how to get somewhere that was baffling for 10 minutes until my housemate realized that my “Bel-vwahr” Street was her “Beaver” Street. (Spelling: “Belvoir.”) And I’m kinda proud of myself for figuring out all on my own that Colquhoun got turned into Calhoun upon crossing the Atlantic.

    Reply
  66. I thought that Nova Scotia was pronounced Nova Scot-ee-a, and for a long time I preferred my incorrect pronunciation with the hard “t” to the correct one. In the end I gave up on my idiosyncratic pronunciation, as a desire to be understood won out over personal esthetics.
    Having lived in Massachusetts for many years, I knew how to pronounce some English names, as New England towns were often named for their English counterparts (e.g., Worcester, a city about an hour outside of Boston). Other names remained a mystery, however, until I heard them pronounced in a movie, TV show (BBC productions shown on Masterpiece Theater were very helpful), a few from announcers in train stations, and, for Ruthven, from Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore”. Diana Gabaldon has a character named Laoghaire, and it took a stay in Dublin to learn that it was pronounced Leary or Leara (can’t quite spell it as pronounced); the house we stayed in was near Dun Laoghaire. And, like Susanna Fraser, I had an epiphany on that trip and realized that MacDermaid became McDermott when it crossed from the Old World to the New.

    Reply
  67. I thought that Nova Scotia was pronounced Nova Scot-ee-a, and for a long time I preferred my incorrect pronunciation with the hard “t” to the correct one. In the end I gave up on my idiosyncratic pronunciation, as a desire to be understood won out over personal esthetics.
    Having lived in Massachusetts for many years, I knew how to pronounce some English names, as New England towns were often named for their English counterparts (e.g., Worcester, a city about an hour outside of Boston). Other names remained a mystery, however, until I heard them pronounced in a movie, TV show (BBC productions shown on Masterpiece Theater were very helpful), a few from announcers in train stations, and, for Ruthven, from Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore”. Diana Gabaldon has a character named Laoghaire, and it took a stay in Dublin to learn that it was pronounced Leary or Leara (can’t quite spell it as pronounced); the house we stayed in was near Dun Laoghaire. And, like Susanna Fraser, I had an epiphany on that trip and realized that MacDermaid became McDermott when it crossed from the Old World to the New.

    Reply
  68. I thought that Nova Scotia was pronounced Nova Scot-ee-a, and for a long time I preferred my incorrect pronunciation with the hard “t” to the correct one. In the end I gave up on my idiosyncratic pronunciation, as a desire to be understood won out over personal esthetics.
    Having lived in Massachusetts for many years, I knew how to pronounce some English names, as New England towns were often named for their English counterparts (e.g., Worcester, a city about an hour outside of Boston). Other names remained a mystery, however, until I heard them pronounced in a movie, TV show (BBC productions shown on Masterpiece Theater were very helpful), a few from announcers in train stations, and, for Ruthven, from Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore”. Diana Gabaldon has a character named Laoghaire, and it took a stay in Dublin to learn that it was pronounced Leary or Leara (can’t quite spell it as pronounced); the house we stayed in was near Dun Laoghaire. And, like Susanna Fraser, I had an epiphany on that trip and realized that MacDermaid became McDermott when it crossed from the Old World to the New.

    Reply
  69. I thought that Nova Scotia was pronounced Nova Scot-ee-a, and for a long time I preferred my incorrect pronunciation with the hard “t” to the correct one. In the end I gave up on my idiosyncratic pronunciation, as a desire to be understood won out over personal esthetics.
    Having lived in Massachusetts for many years, I knew how to pronounce some English names, as New England towns were often named for their English counterparts (e.g., Worcester, a city about an hour outside of Boston). Other names remained a mystery, however, until I heard them pronounced in a movie, TV show (BBC productions shown on Masterpiece Theater were very helpful), a few from announcers in train stations, and, for Ruthven, from Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore”. Diana Gabaldon has a character named Laoghaire, and it took a stay in Dublin to learn that it was pronounced Leary or Leara (can’t quite spell it as pronounced); the house we stayed in was near Dun Laoghaire. And, like Susanna Fraser, I had an epiphany on that trip and realized that MacDermaid became McDermott when it crossed from the Old World to the New.

    Reply
  70. I thought that Nova Scotia was pronounced Nova Scot-ee-a, and for a long time I preferred my incorrect pronunciation with the hard “t” to the correct one. In the end I gave up on my idiosyncratic pronunciation, as a desire to be understood won out over personal esthetics.
    Having lived in Massachusetts for many years, I knew how to pronounce some English names, as New England towns were often named for their English counterparts (e.g., Worcester, a city about an hour outside of Boston). Other names remained a mystery, however, until I heard them pronounced in a movie, TV show (BBC productions shown on Masterpiece Theater were very helpful), a few from announcers in train stations, and, for Ruthven, from Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore”. Diana Gabaldon has a character named Laoghaire, and it took a stay in Dublin to learn that it was pronounced Leary or Leara (can’t quite spell it as pronounced); the house we stayed in was near Dun Laoghaire. And, like Susanna Fraser, I had an epiphany on that trip and realized that MacDermaid became McDermott when it crossed from the Old World to the New.

    Reply
  71. Hold on, how does Lisa Kleypas pronounce her name?
    I’ve been following Jo’s pronunciation Tweets – some I know, some I’m horribly wrong on. And if English counties aren’t difficult enough, I have ancestors from Wales, and the thought of reading some of those place names makes me shudder.

    Reply
  72. Hold on, how does Lisa Kleypas pronounce her name?
    I’ve been following Jo’s pronunciation Tweets – some I know, some I’m horribly wrong on. And if English counties aren’t difficult enough, I have ancestors from Wales, and the thought of reading some of those place names makes me shudder.

    Reply
  73. Hold on, how does Lisa Kleypas pronounce her name?
    I’ve been following Jo’s pronunciation Tweets – some I know, some I’m horribly wrong on. And if English counties aren’t difficult enough, I have ancestors from Wales, and the thought of reading some of those place names makes me shudder.

    Reply
  74. Hold on, how does Lisa Kleypas pronounce her name?
    I’ve been following Jo’s pronunciation Tweets – some I know, some I’m horribly wrong on. And if English counties aren’t difficult enough, I have ancestors from Wales, and the thought of reading some of those place names makes me shudder.

    Reply
  75. Hold on, how does Lisa Kleypas pronounce her name?
    I’ve been following Jo’s pronunciation Tweets – some I know, some I’m horribly wrong on. And if English counties aren’t difficult enough, I have ancestors from Wales, and the thought of reading some of those place names makes me shudder.

    Reply
  76. I know I always pronounce the river Thames incorrectly because I have heard it on television and didn’t even realize what they were referring to.

    Reply
  77. I know I always pronounce the river Thames incorrectly because I have heard it on television and didn’t even realize what they were referring to.

    Reply
  78. I know I always pronounce the river Thames incorrectly because I have heard it on television and didn’t even realize what they were referring to.

    Reply
  79. I know I always pronounce the river Thames incorrectly because I have heard it on television and didn’t even realize what they were referring to.

    Reply
  80. I know I always pronounce the river Thames incorrectly because I have heard it on television and didn’t even realize what they were referring to.

    Reply
  81. What a fun discussion!
    I must admit to a fairly recent correction of a DECADES-long mispronunciation in my head as I read “valet” in countless Britain-based novels. It wasn’t until I watched Gosford Park (& followed it up with some research) that I learned the English do not say “valay” but “vallet”.

    Reply
  82. What a fun discussion!
    I must admit to a fairly recent correction of a DECADES-long mispronunciation in my head as I read “valet” in countless Britain-based novels. It wasn’t until I watched Gosford Park (& followed it up with some research) that I learned the English do not say “valay” but “vallet”.

    Reply
  83. What a fun discussion!
    I must admit to a fairly recent correction of a DECADES-long mispronunciation in my head as I read “valet” in countless Britain-based novels. It wasn’t until I watched Gosford Park (& followed it up with some research) that I learned the English do not say “valay” but “vallet”.

    Reply
  84. What a fun discussion!
    I must admit to a fairly recent correction of a DECADES-long mispronunciation in my head as I read “valet” in countless Britain-based novels. It wasn’t until I watched Gosford Park (& followed it up with some research) that I learned the English do not say “valay” but “vallet”.

    Reply
  85. What a fun discussion!
    I must admit to a fairly recent correction of a DECADES-long mispronunciation in my head as I read “valet” in countless Britain-based novels. It wasn’t until I watched Gosford Park (& followed it up with some research) that I learned the English do not say “valay” but “vallet”.

    Reply
  86. Janga, thanks. I’ve been thinking Kleypas correctly (is this where I admit that I had Heyer wrong?).
    And to Kim in Hawaii, I was recently on the Big Island and almost drove off the highway each time I passed one particular road sign and could never get the name right in my head.

    Reply
  87. Janga, thanks. I’ve been thinking Kleypas correctly (is this where I admit that I had Heyer wrong?).
    And to Kim in Hawaii, I was recently on the Big Island and almost drove off the highway each time I passed one particular road sign and could never get the name right in my head.

    Reply
  88. Janga, thanks. I’ve been thinking Kleypas correctly (is this where I admit that I had Heyer wrong?).
    And to Kim in Hawaii, I was recently on the Big Island and almost drove off the highway each time I passed one particular road sign and could never get the name right in my head.

    Reply
  89. Janga, thanks. I’ve been thinking Kleypas correctly (is this where I admit that I had Heyer wrong?).
    And to Kim in Hawaii, I was recently on the Big Island and almost drove off the highway each time I passed one particular road sign and could never get the name right in my head.

    Reply
  90. Janga, thanks. I’ve been thinking Kleypas correctly (is this where I admit that I had Heyer wrong?).
    And to Kim in Hawaii, I was recently on the Big Island and almost drove off the highway each time I passed one particular road sign and could never get the name right in my head.

    Reply
  91. The trick word of my youth was “ebullient”; I wanted it to be EB-yoo-lent instead of the proper eh-BOOL-yent.
    But my ongoing issue with English is that we have way more vowel sounds than we have vowel letters, or even vowel letter combinations to represent them! For example, how does one represent the vowel sound in “should”, “good”, and “put”? (Cf. “shout”, “fool”, and “cup”.) Dictionaries have legends, but I do phonetic renderings of other languages for my local chorale, and folks ignore legends. How to get across the distinction between German “muss” and English “muss”?? (The former is that “should/good/put” vowel sound.) I tear my hair!

    Reply
  92. The trick word of my youth was “ebullient”; I wanted it to be EB-yoo-lent instead of the proper eh-BOOL-yent.
    But my ongoing issue with English is that we have way more vowel sounds than we have vowel letters, or even vowel letter combinations to represent them! For example, how does one represent the vowel sound in “should”, “good”, and “put”? (Cf. “shout”, “fool”, and “cup”.) Dictionaries have legends, but I do phonetic renderings of other languages for my local chorale, and folks ignore legends. How to get across the distinction between German “muss” and English “muss”?? (The former is that “should/good/put” vowel sound.) I tear my hair!

    Reply
  93. The trick word of my youth was “ebullient”; I wanted it to be EB-yoo-lent instead of the proper eh-BOOL-yent.
    But my ongoing issue with English is that we have way more vowel sounds than we have vowel letters, or even vowel letter combinations to represent them! For example, how does one represent the vowel sound in “should”, “good”, and “put”? (Cf. “shout”, “fool”, and “cup”.) Dictionaries have legends, but I do phonetic renderings of other languages for my local chorale, and folks ignore legends. How to get across the distinction between German “muss” and English “muss”?? (The former is that “should/good/put” vowel sound.) I tear my hair!

    Reply
  94. The trick word of my youth was “ebullient”; I wanted it to be EB-yoo-lent instead of the proper eh-BOOL-yent.
    But my ongoing issue with English is that we have way more vowel sounds than we have vowel letters, or even vowel letter combinations to represent them! For example, how does one represent the vowel sound in “should”, “good”, and “put”? (Cf. “shout”, “fool”, and “cup”.) Dictionaries have legends, but I do phonetic renderings of other languages for my local chorale, and folks ignore legends. How to get across the distinction between German “muss” and English “muss”?? (The former is that “should/good/put” vowel sound.) I tear my hair!

    Reply
  95. The trick word of my youth was “ebullient”; I wanted it to be EB-yoo-lent instead of the proper eh-BOOL-yent.
    But my ongoing issue with English is that we have way more vowel sounds than we have vowel letters, or even vowel letter combinations to represent them! For example, how does one represent the vowel sound in “should”, “good”, and “put”? (Cf. “shout”, “fool”, and “cup”.) Dictionaries have legends, but I do phonetic renderings of other languages for my local chorale, and folks ignore legends. How to get across the distinction between German “muss” and English “muss”?? (The former is that “should/good/put” vowel sound.) I tear my hair!

    Reply
  96. Also, I live not too far from Connecticut’s river Thames, pronounced just like it’s spelled, “thayms”. It’s not surprising when national broadcasters pronounce it “Tems”, but I do wince when local broadcasters mispronounce the one in London.
    On the Thames and now a part of London is the former village of Mortlake. I’m told that the name is pronounced as it is spelled, but I live in an area named for it, and in historical records, this Connecticut place is spelled — presumably phonetically — as “Morthlick”. (But everyone I’ve ever heard locally uses the sounds-like-it-looks pronunciation.)

    Reply
  97. Also, I live not too far from Connecticut’s river Thames, pronounced just like it’s spelled, “thayms”. It’s not surprising when national broadcasters pronounce it “Tems”, but I do wince when local broadcasters mispronounce the one in London.
    On the Thames and now a part of London is the former village of Mortlake. I’m told that the name is pronounced as it is spelled, but I live in an area named for it, and in historical records, this Connecticut place is spelled — presumably phonetically — as “Morthlick”. (But everyone I’ve ever heard locally uses the sounds-like-it-looks pronunciation.)

    Reply
  98. Also, I live not too far from Connecticut’s river Thames, pronounced just like it’s spelled, “thayms”. It’s not surprising when national broadcasters pronounce it “Tems”, but I do wince when local broadcasters mispronounce the one in London.
    On the Thames and now a part of London is the former village of Mortlake. I’m told that the name is pronounced as it is spelled, but I live in an area named for it, and in historical records, this Connecticut place is spelled — presumably phonetically — as “Morthlick”. (But everyone I’ve ever heard locally uses the sounds-like-it-looks pronunciation.)

    Reply
  99. Also, I live not too far from Connecticut’s river Thames, pronounced just like it’s spelled, “thayms”. It’s not surprising when national broadcasters pronounce it “Tems”, but I do wince when local broadcasters mispronounce the one in London.
    On the Thames and now a part of London is the former village of Mortlake. I’m told that the name is pronounced as it is spelled, but I live in an area named for it, and in historical records, this Connecticut place is spelled — presumably phonetically — as “Morthlick”. (But everyone I’ve ever heard locally uses the sounds-like-it-looks pronunciation.)

    Reply
  100. Also, I live not too far from Connecticut’s river Thames, pronounced just like it’s spelled, “thayms”. It’s not surprising when national broadcasters pronounce it “Tems”, but I do wince when local broadcasters mispronounce the one in London.
    On the Thames and now a part of London is the former village of Mortlake. I’m told that the name is pronounced as it is spelled, but I live in an area named for it, and in historical records, this Connecticut place is spelled — presumably phonetically — as “Morthlick”. (But everyone I’ve ever heard locally uses the sounds-like-it-looks pronunciation.)

    Reply
  101. Marvelous post, Jo !
    I realize now how fortunate I was to live in England for a few years, even if I was just a child. I learned a great deal about how to pronounce words like Derbyshire and Leicester. (Or should I say learnt?) I have been listening to Richard Armitage’s readings of Georgette Heyer’s books and in addition to being a great lesson in pronunciation it is a lovely vacation from the world of mangled English in which I live. (“Do y’all got anymore of those cimamen rolls?” Well, why ain’t you got none?” SHUDDER)
    I recently finished Earl Spencer’s book about his ancestral home – Althorp. He took great care to let the reader know it is actually pronounced Althrup.
    I studied German for a number of years in grad school. My German professor was terribly pleased with my German accent save for one word. I could not pronounce schwester (sister) to save my life! And when I returned after two years in Salzburg he nearly wept in despair. I had acquired a Bavarian accent! His Berlin schooled personage said with a sniff “That accent makes you sound like a peasant!”
    And by the way, in Hochdeutsch (High German) the word zwie is pronounced tsvi with a long i sound. However in Bavaria it is pronounced tsvo with a long o.

    Reply
  102. Marvelous post, Jo !
    I realize now how fortunate I was to live in England for a few years, even if I was just a child. I learned a great deal about how to pronounce words like Derbyshire and Leicester. (Or should I say learnt?) I have been listening to Richard Armitage’s readings of Georgette Heyer’s books and in addition to being a great lesson in pronunciation it is a lovely vacation from the world of mangled English in which I live. (“Do y’all got anymore of those cimamen rolls?” Well, why ain’t you got none?” SHUDDER)
    I recently finished Earl Spencer’s book about his ancestral home – Althorp. He took great care to let the reader know it is actually pronounced Althrup.
    I studied German for a number of years in grad school. My German professor was terribly pleased with my German accent save for one word. I could not pronounce schwester (sister) to save my life! And when I returned after two years in Salzburg he nearly wept in despair. I had acquired a Bavarian accent! His Berlin schooled personage said with a sniff “That accent makes you sound like a peasant!”
    And by the way, in Hochdeutsch (High German) the word zwie is pronounced tsvi with a long i sound. However in Bavaria it is pronounced tsvo with a long o.

    Reply
  103. Marvelous post, Jo !
    I realize now how fortunate I was to live in England for a few years, even if I was just a child. I learned a great deal about how to pronounce words like Derbyshire and Leicester. (Or should I say learnt?) I have been listening to Richard Armitage’s readings of Georgette Heyer’s books and in addition to being a great lesson in pronunciation it is a lovely vacation from the world of mangled English in which I live. (“Do y’all got anymore of those cimamen rolls?” Well, why ain’t you got none?” SHUDDER)
    I recently finished Earl Spencer’s book about his ancestral home – Althorp. He took great care to let the reader know it is actually pronounced Althrup.
    I studied German for a number of years in grad school. My German professor was terribly pleased with my German accent save for one word. I could not pronounce schwester (sister) to save my life! And when I returned after two years in Salzburg he nearly wept in despair. I had acquired a Bavarian accent! His Berlin schooled personage said with a sniff “That accent makes you sound like a peasant!”
    And by the way, in Hochdeutsch (High German) the word zwie is pronounced tsvi with a long i sound. However in Bavaria it is pronounced tsvo with a long o.

    Reply
  104. Marvelous post, Jo !
    I realize now how fortunate I was to live in England for a few years, even if I was just a child. I learned a great deal about how to pronounce words like Derbyshire and Leicester. (Or should I say learnt?) I have been listening to Richard Armitage’s readings of Georgette Heyer’s books and in addition to being a great lesson in pronunciation it is a lovely vacation from the world of mangled English in which I live. (“Do y’all got anymore of those cimamen rolls?” Well, why ain’t you got none?” SHUDDER)
    I recently finished Earl Spencer’s book about his ancestral home – Althorp. He took great care to let the reader know it is actually pronounced Althrup.
    I studied German for a number of years in grad school. My German professor was terribly pleased with my German accent save for one word. I could not pronounce schwester (sister) to save my life! And when I returned after two years in Salzburg he nearly wept in despair. I had acquired a Bavarian accent! His Berlin schooled personage said with a sniff “That accent makes you sound like a peasant!”
    And by the way, in Hochdeutsch (High German) the word zwie is pronounced tsvi with a long i sound. However in Bavaria it is pronounced tsvo with a long o.

    Reply
  105. Marvelous post, Jo !
    I realize now how fortunate I was to live in England for a few years, even if I was just a child. I learned a great deal about how to pronounce words like Derbyshire and Leicester. (Or should I say learnt?) I have been listening to Richard Armitage’s readings of Georgette Heyer’s books and in addition to being a great lesson in pronunciation it is a lovely vacation from the world of mangled English in which I live. (“Do y’all got anymore of those cimamen rolls?” Well, why ain’t you got none?” SHUDDER)
    I recently finished Earl Spencer’s book about his ancestral home – Althorp. He took great care to let the reader know it is actually pronounced Althrup.
    I studied German for a number of years in grad school. My German professor was terribly pleased with my German accent save for one word. I could not pronounce schwester (sister) to save my life! And when I returned after two years in Salzburg he nearly wept in despair. I had acquired a Bavarian accent! His Berlin schooled personage said with a sniff “That accent makes you sound like a peasant!”
    And by the way, in Hochdeutsch (High German) the word zwie is pronounced tsvi with a long i sound. However in Bavaria it is pronounced tsvo with a long o.

    Reply
  106. Ms. Jo…
    Interesting column.
    My DW’s dad was from Bournemouth. She frequently “corrects” my pronouncation of some word that to her upbringing conflicts with my midwest upbringing. We have lively arguments as to which one is correct.

    Reply
  107. Ms. Jo…
    Interesting column.
    My DW’s dad was from Bournemouth. She frequently “corrects” my pronouncation of some word that to her upbringing conflicts with my midwest upbringing. We have lively arguments as to which one is correct.

    Reply
  108. Ms. Jo…
    Interesting column.
    My DW’s dad was from Bournemouth. She frequently “corrects” my pronouncation of some word that to her upbringing conflicts with my midwest upbringing. We have lively arguments as to which one is correct.

    Reply
  109. Ms. Jo…
    Interesting column.
    My DW’s dad was from Bournemouth. She frequently “corrects” my pronouncation of some word that to her upbringing conflicts with my midwest upbringing. We have lively arguments as to which one is correct.

    Reply
  110. Ms. Jo…
    Interesting column.
    My DW’s dad was from Bournemouth. She frequently “corrects” my pronouncation of some word that to her upbringing conflicts with my midwest upbringing. We have lively arguments as to which one is correct.

    Reply
  111. The first time I had occasion to say the word whore aloud, I pronounced it with the H. My friends laughed, of course, but I had never heard it out loud before. I guess I lived in a more refined household than I would have thought.
    As for other problematical pronunciations, I rely on Jo’s old dictum that any English name you can’t pronounce is pronounced ‘fanshaw’.

    Reply
  112. The first time I had occasion to say the word whore aloud, I pronounced it with the H. My friends laughed, of course, but I had never heard it out loud before. I guess I lived in a more refined household than I would have thought.
    As for other problematical pronunciations, I rely on Jo’s old dictum that any English name you can’t pronounce is pronounced ‘fanshaw’.

    Reply
  113. The first time I had occasion to say the word whore aloud, I pronounced it with the H. My friends laughed, of course, but I had never heard it out loud before. I guess I lived in a more refined household than I would have thought.
    As for other problematical pronunciations, I rely on Jo’s old dictum that any English name you can’t pronounce is pronounced ‘fanshaw’.

    Reply
  114. The first time I had occasion to say the word whore aloud, I pronounced it with the H. My friends laughed, of course, but I had never heard it out loud before. I guess I lived in a more refined household than I would have thought.
    As for other problematical pronunciations, I rely on Jo’s old dictum that any English name you can’t pronounce is pronounced ‘fanshaw’.

    Reply
  115. The first time I had occasion to say the word whore aloud, I pronounced it with the H. My friends laughed, of course, but I had never heard it out loud before. I guess I lived in a more refined household than I would have thought.
    As for other problematical pronunciations, I rely on Jo’s old dictum that any English name you can’t pronounce is pronounced ‘fanshaw’.

    Reply
  116. I will not pronounce primer primmer. It makes no sense on any level unless someone wants to suggest how prim it is. So there!
    And, she mutters, a scone is pronounced like one not like stone. That’s a north v south issue in England, and I always reckon that people who eat scone-is-like-stone, probably make them with eggs and cream and all kinds of fancy stuff instead of an honest quick bread of flour, butter, and milk.
    Sometimes pronunciations have passion behind them!
    Great responses here. Fun to read.
    Jo

    Reply
  117. I will not pronounce primer primmer. It makes no sense on any level unless someone wants to suggest how prim it is. So there!
    And, she mutters, a scone is pronounced like one not like stone. That’s a north v south issue in England, and I always reckon that people who eat scone-is-like-stone, probably make them with eggs and cream and all kinds of fancy stuff instead of an honest quick bread of flour, butter, and milk.
    Sometimes pronunciations have passion behind them!
    Great responses here. Fun to read.
    Jo

    Reply
  118. I will not pronounce primer primmer. It makes no sense on any level unless someone wants to suggest how prim it is. So there!
    And, she mutters, a scone is pronounced like one not like stone. That’s a north v south issue in England, and I always reckon that people who eat scone-is-like-stone, probably make them with eggs and cream and all kinds of fancy stuff instead of an honest quick bread of flour, butter, and milk.
    Sometimes pronunciations have passion behind them!
    Great responses here. Fun to read.
    Jo

    Reply
  119. I will not pronounce primer primmer. It makes no sense on any level unless someone wants to suggest how prim it is. So there!
    And, she mutters, a scone is pronounced like one not like stone. That’s a north v south issue in England, and I always reckon that people who eat scone-is-like-stone, probably make them with eggs and cream and all kinds of fancy stuff instead of an honest quick bread of flour, butter, and milk.
    Sometimes pronunciations have passion behind them!
    Great responses here. Fun to read.
    Jo

    Reply
  120. I will not pronounce primer primmer. It makes no sense on any level unless someone wants to suggest how prim it is. So there!
    And, she mutters, a scone is pronounced like one not like stone. That’s a north v south issue in England, and I always reckon that people who eat scone-is-like-stone, probably make them with eggs and cream and all kinds of fancy stuff instead of an honest quick bread of flour, butter, and milk.
    Sometimes pronunciations have passion behind them!
    Great responses here. Fun to read.
    Jo

    Reply
  121. My favourite is a little village in Gwent called Beddau. Not pronounced (as the English would) Bed-eye, nor as the North Walians would Beth-eye(…Dd in Welsh alphabet is Th.)
    This is South Wales ,so is pronounced as -wait for it – Bather, -cracks me up every time !

    Reply
  122. My favourite is a little village in Gwent called Beddau. Not pronounced (as the English would) Bed-eye, nor as the North Walians would Beth-eye(…Dd in Welsh alphabet is Th.)
    This is South Wales ,so is pronounced as -wait for it – Bather, -cracks me up every time !

    Reply
  123. My favourite is a little village in Gwent called Beddau. Not pronounced (as the English would) Bed-eye, nor as the North Walians would Beth-eye(…Dd in Welsh alphabet is Th.)
    This is South Wales ,so is pronounced as -wait for it – Bather, -cracks me up every time !

    Reply
  124. My favourite is a little village in Gwent called Beddau. Not pronounced (as the English would) Bed-eye, nor as the North Walians would Beth-eye(…Dd in Welsh alphabet is Th.)
    This is South Wales ,so is pronounced as -wait for it – Bather, -cracks me up every time !

    Reply
  125. My favourite is a little village in Gwent called Beddau. Not pronounced (as the English would) Bed-eye, nor as the North Walians would Beth-eye(…Dd in Welsh alphabet is Th.)
    This is South Wales ,so is pronounced as -wait for it – Bather, -cracks me up every time !

    Reply
  126. Oops, I didn’t know Georgette “Hair,” either. My gaffes were bo-DEECE for bodice, for which friends mocked me for years, and DEHB-uh-kull for debacle. Great thread!

    Reply
  127. Oops, I didn’t know Georgette “Hair,” either. My gaffes were bo-DEECE for bodice, for which friends mocked me for years, and DEHB-uh-kull for debacle. Great thread!

    Reply
  128. Oops, I didn’t know Georgette “Hair,” either. My gaffes were bo-DEECE for bodice, for which friends mocked me for years, and DEHB-uh-kull for debacle. Great thread!

    Reply
  129. Oops, I didn’t know Georgette “Hair,” either. My gaffes were bo-DEECE for bodice, for which friends mocked me for years, and DEHB-uh-kull for debacle. Great thread!

    Reply
  130. Oops, I didn’t know Georgette “Hair,” either. My gaffes were bo-DEECE for bodice, for which friends mocked me for years, and DEHB-uh-kull for debacle. Great thread!

    Reply
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