How are you reading these days?

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

I’m been ruminating on how many different ways we can consume books these days.  There’s classic print, of course, still a favorite for many readers, including me.  I like being able to flip through the pages and read in the bathtub without worrying about dropping an e-reader into the water, with expensive consequences.

Traditional Print:

Heck, I bought my present house because I’d run out of space for bookshelves in my former townhouse.  Now I’m running out of space in this place, and I don’t have the energy to move again, so I need to get better at thinning the Bookshelvesherd!  (Those aren't actually my bookshelves, but you get the idea.)

As a writer, there are the books I have as a reader—tons of fiction in multiple genres, and I hate getting rid of anything I might read again, and who knows what I might want to reread? Plus, there are books written by friends that I cherish.  A lot of books. <G>

Then there are the research—or potential research—books that I buy as a writer, and I don’t want to get rid of them, either.  Part of it is sheer packrat-itis, but even in the days of the internet, there are times when a book will give you more of the detail a story needs than anything you’ll find online. 

Plus, print books last well.  Even mass market paperbacks can be readable for decades.  There’s no need to worry that the software or the distribution platform will change or fail and you’ll lose all the e-books you’ve bought.

E-books:

But the space advantages of an e-reader are hard to ignore.  Hundreds of books on one little device the size of a single book!  E-readers are great for travel because you can get so many books on them.  If I’m going on a trip of a week or more, by the time I pack my books and all the electronics I need, there is no room left for clothes, so an e-reader is a blessing. 

But they have their downside. Flying home from Rome to Washington, DC several years ago, my Nook ran out of charge halfway across the Atlantic.  I can’t really blame the device—I knew it was running rather low, but I hadn’t been able to recharge it before leaving Italy.  Luckily, I had a print book on the airplane to read for the rest of the trip.

Another great blessing of e-books is that they make older books that have gone out of print available again.  I love reading books I hadn’t been able to find, and I love that my own backlist titles are available for anyone who might be interested.

E-editions also make all kind of play projects avail.  Wenches Susan King and Pat Rice and I decided it would be fun to do an e-book anthology of three Christmas novellas that have been unavailable for years.  So Christmas Roses will be available in September. 

BookCoverPreview front[--FinalI’m also one of a small group of writers who chat back and forth daily.  When we realized that several of us had done cat short stories, someone suggested that it might be nice to do an anthology of pet stories with proceeds to go to charity.  The Sound and the Furry is just out in e-book and POD editions, and the picture on the cover is my sweet Fluffster, who made her transition before last Christmas at a fairly advanced age.  She was a very photogenic lady.

The anthology is fun and furry <G>, and the dozen authors are from the US, the UK, Canada, and Australia.  A nice global spread, so the charity we chose is the IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare.  There are no end of the interesting things that can be done with e-publishing!

Print on Demand:

There’s also Print on Demand (POD) which enables people who prefer to read print to buy a print version of a book that is primarily available in e-editions.  Each book is printed basically to order–there are no print runs or cartons of the book in a warehouse. 

Thunder and RosesPOD books are large paperbacks and the pricing is similar to what conventional trade paperbacks cost.  I just released a POD edition of my bestselling e-book,Thunder and Roses.  I don’t expect to sell many, and there is much less profit than on an e-book, but that’s okay—I just want my readers to be able to get print if they prefer.  We played with the formatting to get the price as affordable as possible while still being readable.  (It’s not a large print edition, though.) 

Audiobooks:

And then there’s reading that is actually listening.  Everything I’ve mentioned so far Never Less Than a Lady audiois really just formats for reading things with our eyes, but audio is a different game entirely.  I know several people, including our Word Wenches whipmistress, Sherrie Holmes, who “read” most of their books in audio form.  There are a lot of reasons for doing this, including eye problems and long commutes

It used to be super-cool for an author to have audiobooks made of her stories—it was one of the signs of career growth.  Most of my books published in the last sixteen years have audio versions, which has been great. But I’ve also received queries from people who would like audio editions of earlier books. 

Well, audio is another area where the walls are being kicked down, and not surprisingly, Amazon is leading the way, as they did with e-books.  Their ACX.com (Audio Creation Exchange) subsidiary is basically a platform where anyone can do audio books relatively easily, and then have them distributed to Audible (another Amazon subsidiary), Amazon, and I think iTunes. 

It’s a great site to explore, with over 11,000 narrator/producers listed.  You can search for narrator by genre, gender, accent, style and price.  However, while formatting for POD is not very expensive, audio production is pricey: narrators are highly skilled professionals.  Many are trained actors, and even among actors, not everyone has the gift for storytelling and interpreting different voices and characters. Talent commands a good price, and that’s as it should be. 

Flowers from the StormI’m in the process of producing my first indie audiobook, and again I’m choosing Thunder and Roses because of its popularity.  Currently I’m looking for a narrator and I’ve received several good auditions. A major factor in choosing a narrator is how well they do voices of both genders.

The legendary Laura Kinsale is now producing audiobooks of her backlist, and she’s found the most amazing narrator, an English actor called Nicholas Boulton.  He sounds exactly the way a Regency hero ought to!  The best narrators have fans would be happy to listen to them read the phone book. <G>

So—how do you like your books?  Are you a hybrid reader, or faithful to one format?  What books might you like to see in a different format?  And what formats might we see in the future?  There's film, but that's so expensive it's not even worth talking about. <G>

Mary Jo, mostly faithful to print, but not above flirting elsewhere

PS: Happy Canada Day to our Canadian readers!

 

185 thoughts on “How are you reading these days?”

  1. I picked up my kindle the other day and I couldn’t it to go on at first, and I thought, rats, stupid thing is broken. Then I realized I didn’t care. I don’t really like reading that way. I like pages, I like flipping back and forth, I like how books look on my shelves, I think print on paper is easier on my aging eyes.
    I have kindle on my smartphone for ‘just in case’, but I wouldn’t choose to read that way; besides it eats battery life.
    I fiddled with the kindle and it’s working again, and you know what? I still don’t care. At this time there’s nothing I want to read that I can’t get in print, one way or another.
    The only thing that is useful is that the kindle text is searchable, which is handy when involved in some Heyer or Austen discussion. But that’s it, really. And that’s not enough.
    If it does break, I doubt I will replace it.

    Reply
  2. I picked up my kindle the other day and I couldn’t it to go on at first, and I thought, rats, stupid thing is broken. Then I realized I didn’t care. I don’t really like reading that way. I like pages, I like flipping back and forth, I like how books look on my shelves, I think print on paper is easier on my aging eyes.
    I have kindle on my smartphone for ‘just in case’, but I wouldn’t choose to read that way; besides it eats battery life.
    I fiddled with the kindle and it’s working again, and you know what? I still don’t care. At this time there’s nothing I want to read that I can’t get in print, one way or another.
    The only thing that is useful is that the kindle text is searchable, which is handy when involved in some Heyer or Austen discussion. But that’s it, really. And that’s not enough.
    If it does break, I doubt I will replace it.

    Reply
  3. I picked up my kindle the other day and I couldn’t it to go on at first, and I thought, rats, stupid thing is broken. Then I realized I didn’t care. I don’t really like reading that way. I like pages, I like flipping back and forth, I like how books look on my shelves, I think print on paper is easier on my aging eyes.
    I have kindle on my smartphone for ‘just in case’, but I wouldn’t choose to read that way; besides it eats battery life.
    I fiddled with the kindle and it’s working again, and you know what? I still don’t care. At this time there’s nothing I want to read that I can’t get in print, one way or another.
    The only thing that is useful is that the kindle text is searchable, which is handy when involved in some Heyer or Austen discussion. But that’s it, really. And that’s not enough.
    If it does break, I doubt I will replace it.

    Reply
  4. I picked up my kindle the other day and I couldn’t it to go on at first, and I thought, rats, stupid thing is broken. Then I realized I didn’t care. I don’t really like reading that way. I like pages, I like flipping back and forth, I like how books look on my shelves, I think print on paper is easier on my aging eyes.
    I have kindle on my smartphone for ‘just in case’, but I wouldn’t choose to read that way; besides it eats battery life.
    I fiddled with the kindle and it’s working again, and you know what? I still don’t care. At this time there’s nothing I want to read that I can’t get in print, one way or another.
    The only thing that is useful is that the kindle text is searchable, which is handy when involved in some Heyer or Austen discussion. But that’s it, really. And that’s not enough.
    If it does break, I doubt I will replace it.

    Reply
  5. I picked up my kindle the other day and I couldn’t it to go on at first, and I thought, rats, stupid thing is broken. Then I realized I didn’t care. I don’t really like reading that way. I like pages, I like flipping back and forth, I like how books look on my shelves, I think print on paper is easier on my aging eyes.
    I have kindle on my smartphone for ‘just in case’, but I wouldn’t choose to read that way; besides it eats battery life.
    I fiddled with the kindle and it’s working again, and you know what? I still don’t care. At this time there’s nothing I want to read that I can’t get in print, one way or another.
    The only thing that is useful is that the kindle text is searchable, which is handy when involved in some Heyer or Austen discussion. But that’s it, really. And that’s not enough.
    If it does break, I doubt I will replace it.

    Reply
  6. I read more or less every book still on paper, since I don´t have an e-reader.
    I do however have the Kindle app for my laptop, but since I work on it every day and do beta-reading on it, I prefer reading actual books when I read for entertainment 🙂
    I read now and then ebooks on my laptop, but mostly only when I can´t get them in paper format.

    Reply
  7. I read more or less every book still on paper, since I don´t have an e-reader.
    I do however have the Kindle app for my laptop, but since I work on it every day and do beta-reading on it, I prefer reading actual books when I read for entertainment 🙂
    I read now and then ebooks on my laptop, but mostly only when I can´t get them in paper format.

    Reply
  8. I read more or less every book still on paper, since I don´t have an e-reader.
    I do however have the Kindle app for my laptop, but since I work on it every day and do beta-reading on it, I prefer reading actual books when I read for entertainment 🙂
    I read now and then ebooks on my laptop, but mostly only when I can´t get them in paper format.

    Reply
  9. I read more or less every book still on paper, since I don´t have an e-reader.
    I do however have the Kindle app for my laptop, but since I work on it every day and do beta-reading on it, I prefer reading actual books when I read for entertainment 🙂
    I read now and then ebooks on my laptop, but mostly only when I can´t get them in paper format.

    Reply
  10. I read more or less every book still on paper, since I don´t have an e-reader.
    I do however have the Kindle app for my laptop, but since I work on it every day and do beta-reading on it, I prefer reading actual books when I read for entertainment 🙂
    I read now and then ebooks on my laptop, but mostly only when I can´t get them in paper format.

    Reply
  11. I prefer to read books on my iPad. My eyes are bad, and I can see the print more clearly on the e-device. And I can adjust the size of the type. Happily, my public library carries a fairly decent collection of e-books.

    Reply
  12. I prefer to read books on my iPad. My eyes are bad, and I can see the print more clearly on the e-device. And I can adjust the size of the type. Happily, my public library carries a fairly decent collection of e-books.

    Reply
  13. I prefer to read books on my iPad. My eyes are bad, and I can see the print more clearly on the e-device. And I can adjust the size of the type. Happily, my public library carries a fairly decent collection of e-books.

    Reply
  14. I prefer to read books on my iPad. My eyes are bad, and I can see the print more clearly on the e-device. And I can adjust the size of the type. Happily, my public library carries a fairly decent collection of e-books.

    Reply
  15. I prefer to read books on my iPad. My eyes are bad, and I can see the print more clearly on the e-device. And I can adjust the size of the type. Happily, my public library carries a fairly decent collection of e-books.

    Reply
  16. Print for me. I have Kindle for PC and have downloaded many (free) books that I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. Dee

    Reply
  17. Print for me. I have Kindle for PC and have downloaded many (free) books that I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. Dee

    Reply
  18. Print for me. I have Kindle for PC and have downloaded many (free) books that I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. Dee

    Reply
  19. Print for me. I have Kindle for PC and have downloaded many (free) books that I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. Dee

    Reply
  20. Print for me. I have Kindle for PC and have downloaded many (free) books that I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. Dee

    Reply
  21. I read using every format. I love audiobooks, especially when I’m driving or doing something which isn’t interesting enough on its own like cooking or knitting. I read a lot on my Kindle and like you have discovered that one can take things like clothes on holiday as well as books!
    I don’t like reading books on my computer (partly because I spend too much time on it already), and I’ve only ever read on my phone when I was desperate.
    My first and last love is books in print. I too am moving home to make room for more bookshelves, and I find it very difficult to dispose of books and don’t see why I should! But ebooks are very useful for helping to keep the numbers under some semblance of control.

    Reply
  22. I read using every format. I love audiobooks, especially when I’m driving or doing something which isn’t interesting enough on its own like cooking or knitting. I read a lot on my Kindle and like you have discovered that one can take things like clothes on holiday as well as books!
    I don’t like reading books on my computer (partly because I spend too much time on it already), and I’ve only ever read on my phone when I was desperate.
    My first and last love is books in print. I too am moving home to make room for more bookshelves, and I find it very difficult to dispose of books and don’t see why I should! But ebooks are very useful for helping to keep the numbers under some semblance of control.

    Reply
  23. I read using every format. I love audiobooks, especially when I’m driving or doing something which isn’t interesting enough on its own like cooking or knitting. I read a lot on my Kindle and like you have discovered that one can take things like clothes on holiday as well as books!
    I don’t like reading books on my computer (partly because I spend too much time on it already), and I’ve only ever read on my phone when I was desperate.
    My first and last love is books in print. I too am moving home to make room for more bookshelves, and I find it very difficult to dispose of books and don’t see why I should! But ebooks are very useful for helping to keep the numbers under some semblance of control.

    Reply
  24. I read using every format. I love audiobooks, especially when I’m driving or doing something which isn’t interesting enough on its own like cooking or knitting. I read a lot on my Kindle and like you have discovered that one can take things like clothes on holiday as well as books!
    I don’t like reading books on my computer (partly because I spend too much time on it already), and I’ve only ever read on my phone when I was desperate.
    My first and last love is books in print. I too am moving home to make room for more bookshelves, and I find it very difficult to dispose of books and don’t see why I should! But ebooks are very useful for helping to keep the numbers under some semblance of control.

    Reply
  25. I read using every format. I love audiobooks, especially when I’m driving or doing something which isn’t interesting enough on its own like cooking or knitting. I read a lot on my Kindle and like you have discovered that one can take things like clothes on holiday as well as books!
    I don’t like reading books on my computer (partly because I spend too much time on it already), and I’ve only ever read on my phone when I was desperate.
    My first and last love is books in print. I too am moving home to make room for more bookshelves, and I find it very difficult to dispose of books and don’t see why I should! But ebooks are very useful for helping to keep the numbers under some semblance of control.

    Reply
  26. Definitely print. I am an inveterate page flipper–How much further to the end of the chapter? Wait, what did you say about this before? etc. Plus I just find a book more comfortable to hold.
    That said, I have a whole pile of books on my kindle, most of them free or very cheap, as a sort of emergency stash. Just in case I somehow end up with nothing to read. I was once stuck at a train station in the middle of nowhere for four hours without even a newspaper. Talk about traumatized!
    As for audiobooks, they’re good for long car trips, but even then there’s the problem that one or the other, the trip or the book, ends too soon. Aside from that, I read so much faster than someone can talk that I find them frustration.

    Reply
  27. Definitely print. I am an inveterate page flipper–How much further to the end of the chapter? Wait, what did you say about this before? etc. Plus I just find a book more comfortable to hold.
    That said, I have a whole pile of books on my kindle, most of them free or very cheap, as a sort of emergency stash. Just in case I somehow end up with nothing to read. I was once stuck at a train station in the middle of nowhere for four hours without even a newspaper. Talk about traumatized!
    As for audiobooks, they’re good for long car trips, but even then there’s the problem that one or the other, the trip or the book, ends too soon. Aside from that, I read so much faster than someone can talk that I find them frustration.

    Reply
  28. Definitely print. I am an inveterate page flipper–How much further to the end of the chapter? Wait, what did you say about this before? etc. Plus I just find a book more comfortable to hold.
    That said, I have a whole pile of books on my kindle, most of them free or very cheap, as a sort of emergency stash. Just in case I somehow end up with nothing to read. I was once stuck at a train station in the middle of nowhere for four hours without even a newspaper. Talk about traumatized!
    As for audiobooks, they’re good for long car trips, but even then there’s the problem that one or the other, the trip or the book, ends too soon. Aside from that, I read so much faster than someone can talk that I find them frustration.

    Reply
  29. Definitely print. I am an inveterate page flipper–How much further to the end of the chapter? Wait, what did you say about this before? etc. Plus I just find a book more comfortable to hold.
    That said, I have a whole pile of books on my kindle, most of them free or very cheap, as a sort of emergency stash. Just in case I somehow end up with nothing to read. I was once stuck at a train station in the middle of nowhere for four hours without even a newspaper. Talk about traumatized!
    As for audiobooks, they’re good for long car trips, but even then there’s the problem that one or the other, the trip or the book, ends too soon. Aside from that, I read so much faster than someone can talk that I find them frustration.

    Reply
  30. Definitely print. I am an inveterate page flipper–How much further to the end of the chapter? Wait, what did you say about this before? etc. Plus I just find a book more comfortable to hold.
    That said, I have a whole pile of books on my kindle, most of them free or very cheap, as a sort of emergency stash. Just in case I somehow end up with nothing to read. I was once stuck at a train station in the middle of nowhere for four hours without even a newspaper. Talk about traumatized!
    As for audiobooks, they’re good for long car trips, but even then there’s the problem that one or the other, the trip or the book, ends too soon. Aside from that, I read so much faster than someone can talk that I find them frustration.

    Reply
  31. Janice–
    My Nook HD tablet is an excellent reading device. IF it breaks, I’d get another. Even so, when I have a choice, I go for paper every time. I keep thinking I should load a Kindle app on my iPhone so I can put a few emergency books there, but I’m so sure I’d hate reading on a tiny phone screen that I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m grateful we have multiple formats available!

    Reply
  32. Janice–
    My Nook HD tablet is an excellent reading device. IF it breaks, I’d get another. Even so, when I have a choice, I go for paper every time. I keep thinking I should load a Kindle app on my iPhone so I can put a few emergency books there, but I’m so sure I’d hate reading on a tiny phone screen that I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m grateful we have multiple formats available!

    Reply
  33. Janice–
    My Nook HD tablet is an excellent reading device. IF it breaks, I’d get another. Even so, when I have a choice, I go for paper every time. I keep thinking I should load a Kindle app on my iPhone so I can put a few emergency books there, but I’m so sure I’d hate reading on a tiny phone screen that I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m grateful we have multiple formats available!

    Reply
  34. Janice–
    My Nook HD tablet is an excellent reading device. IF it breaks, I’d get another. Even so, when I have a choice, I go for paper every time. I keep thinking I should load a Kindle app on my iPhone so I can put a few emergency books there, but I’m so sure I’d hate reading on a tiny phone screen that I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m grateful we have multiple formats available!

    Reply
  35. Janice–
    My Nook HD tablet is an excellent reading device. IF it breaks, I’d get another. Even so, when I have a choice, I go for paper every time. I keep thinking I should load a Kindle app on my iPhone so I can put a few emergency books there, but I’m so sure I’d hate reading on a tiny phone screen that I still haven’t gotten around to it. I’m grateful we have multiple formats available!

    Reply
  36. Sarah Meral–
    I’m another who spends so much time looking at a screen (basically, every day, long days) that I really don’t want another screen to read for entertainment!

    Reply
  37. Sarah Meral–
    I’m another who spends so much time looking at a screen (basically, every day, long days) that I really don’t want another screen to read for entertainment!

    Reply
  38. Sarah Meral–
    I’m another who spends so much time looking at a screen (basically, every day, long days) that I really don’t want another screen to read for entertainment!

    Reply
  39. Sarah Meral–
    I’m another who spends so much time looking at a screen (basically, every day, long days) that I really don’t want another screen to read for entertainment!

    Reply
  40. Sarah Meral–
    I’m another who spends so much time looking at a screen (basically, every day, long days) that I really don’t want another screen to read for entertainment!

    Reply
  41. ***I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. ***
    So very true, Dee! As part of that, one can sit in more positions when reading a hard copy book.

    Reply
  42. ***I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. ***
    So very true, Dee! As part of that, one can sit in more positions when reading a hard copy book.

    Reply
  43. ***I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. ***
    So very true, Dee! As part of that, one can sit in more positions when reading a hard copy book.

    Reply
  44. ***I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. ***
    So very true, Dee! As part of that, one can sit in more positions when reading a hard copy book.

    Reply
  45. ***I do not read because I spend enough time on the computer all day and prefer a book in my hands. ***
    So very true, Dee! As part of that, one can sit in more positions when reading a hard copy book.

    Reply
  46. ** read using every format. **
    I think a lot of us are moving to this, HJ. Different formats for different situations. But no question that print is still preferred by most Word Wench readers!

    Reply
  47. ** read using every format. **
    I think a lot of us are moving to this, HJ. Different formats for different situations. But no question that print is still preferred by most Word Wench readers!

    Reply
  48. ** read using every format. **
    I think a lot of us are moving to this, HJ. Different formats for different situations. But no question that print is still preferred by most Word Wench readers!

    Reply
  49. ** read using every format. **
    I think a lot of us are moving to this, HJ. Different formats for different situations. But no question that print is still preferred by most Word Wench readers!

    Reply
  50. ** read using every format. **
    I think a lot of us are moving to this, HJ. Different formats for different situations. But no question that print is still preferred by most Word Wench readers!

    Reply
  51. “How are you reading these days?”….
    Faster than ever! I’ve had a Kindle now for two years, and while I’ve never been a slow reader, for some reason I have speeded up on the Kindle. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I’m in the “both” category. I initially got the Kindle – under protest – due to space constraints in a two bedroom condo. But I ended up loving it, and now have over 500 books on my Kindle. And I’ve still been buying hard copies as well – research, reference, and authors whom I have collected already in paper, etc. Sometimes it’s a matter of price too – older books are dirt cheap used on Amazon while still fairly expensive in Kindle.
    But your comment about software or distribution platforms changing has been on my mind a lot lately. So I’m beginning to order some of my very favorites, ones I know I’ll re-read, in hard copy. Back to the space problem…
    Just clicked to buy The Sound and The Furry. Great cause!

    Reply
  52. “How are you reading these days?”….
    Faster than ever! I’ve had a Kindle now for two years, and while I’ve never been a slow reader, for some reason I have speeded up on the Kindle. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I’m in the “both” category. I initially got the Kindle – under protest – due to space constraints in a two bedroom condo. But I ended up loving it, and now have over 500 books on my Kindle. And I’ve still been buying hard copies as well – research, reference, and authors whom I have collected already in paper, etc. Sometimes it’s a matter of price too – older books are dirt cheap used on Amazon while still fairly expensive in Kindle.
    But your comment about software or distribution platforms changing has been on my mind a lot lately. So I’m beginning to order some of my very favorites, ones I know I’ll re-read, in hard copy. Back to the space problem…
    Just clicked to buy The Sound and The Furry. Great cause!

    Reply
  53. “How are you reading these days?”….
    Faster than ever! I’ve had a Kindle now for two years, and while I’ve never been a slow reader, for some reason I have speeded up on the Kindle. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I’m in the “both” category. I initially got the Kindle – under protest – due to space constraints in a two bedroom condo. But I ended up loving it, and now have over 500 books on my Kindle. And I’ve still been buying hard copies as well – research, reference, and authors whom I have collected already in paper, etc. Sometimes it’s a matter of price too – older books are dirt cheap used on Amazon while still fairly expensive in Kindle.
    But your comment about software or distribution platforms changing has been on my mind a lot lately. So I’m beginning to order some of my very favorites, ones I know I’ll re-read, in hard copy. Back to the space problem…
    Just clicked to buy The Sound and The Furry. Great cause!

    Reply
  54. “How are you reading these days?”….
    Faster than ever! I’ve had a Kindle now for two years, and while I’ve never been a slow reader, for some reason I have speeded up on the Kindle. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I’m in the “both” category. I initially got the Kindle – under protest – due to space constraints in a two bedroom condo. But I ended up loving it, and now have over 500 books on my Kindle. And I’ve still been buying hard copies as well – research, reference, and authors whom I have collected already in paper, etc. Sometimes it’s a matter of price too – older books are dirt cheap used on Amazon while still fairly expensive in Kindle.
    But your comment about software or distribution platforms changing has been on my mind a lot lately. So I’m beginning to order some of my very favorites, ones I know I’ll re-read, in hard copy. Back to the space problem…
    Just clicked to buy The Sound and The Furry. Great cause!

    Reply
  55. “How are you reading these days?”….
    Faster than ever! I’ve had a Kindle now for two years, and while I’ve never been a slow reader, for some reason I have speeded up on the Kindle. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I’m in the “both” category. I initially got the Kindle – under protest – due to space constraints in a two bedroom condo. But I ended up loving it, and now have over 500 books on my Kindle. And I’ve still been buying hard copies as well – research, reference, and authors whom I have collected already in paper, etc. Sometimes it’s a matter of price too – older books are dirt cheap used on Amazon while still fairly expensive in Kindle.
    But your comment about software or distribution platforms changing has been on my mind a lot lately. So I’m beginning to order some of my very favorites, ones I know I’ll re-read, in hard copy. Back to the space problem…
    Just clicked to buy The Sound and The Furry. Great cause!

    Reply
  56. I am finding myself reading more and more on the Kindle, partly because my eyes have become weaker and I love the adjustable font size. When I had to spend some weeks in rehab last fall, I would have had to take an extra bag just for books, but the kindle did just fine, and I downloaded plenty more over that time. Also, when I use public transport, the Kindle is just so light and convenient. The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space. I do still read my paper books at times.
    I hate reading books on the PC screen, my eyes get too tired. I already spend so much time working on the computer and writing myself, I don’t want to do my reading there, too.

    Reply
  57. I am finding myself reading more and more on the Kindle, partly because my eyes have become weaker and I love the adjustable font size. When I had to spend some weeks in rehab last fall, I would have had to take an extra bag just for books, but the kindle did just fine, and I downloaded plenty more over that time. Also, when I use public transport, the Kindle is just so light and convenient. The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space. I do still read my paper books at times.
    I hate reading books on the PC screen, my eyes get too tired. I already spend so much time working on the computer and writing myself, I don’t want to do my reading there, too.

    Reply
  58. I am finding myself reading more and more on the Kindle, partly because my eyes have become weaker and I love the adjustable font size. When I had to spend some weeks in rehab last fall, I would have had to take an extra bag just for books, but the kindle did just fine, and I downloaded plenty more over that time. Also, when I use public transport, the Kindle is just so light and convenient. The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space. I do still read my paper books at times.
    I hate reading books on the PC screen, my eyes get too tired. I already spend so much time working on the computer and writing myself, I don’t want to do my reading there, too.

    Reply
  59. I am finding myself reading more and more on the Kindle, partly because my eyes have become weaker and I love the adjustable font size. When I had to spend some weeks in rehab last fall, I would have had to take an extra bag just for books, but the kindle did just fine, and I downloaded plenty more over that time. Also, when I use public transport, the Kindle is just so light and convenient. The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space. I do still read my paper books at times.
    I hate reading books on the PC screen, my eyes get too tired. I already spend so much time working on the computer and writing myself, I don’t want to do my reading there, too.

    Reply
  60. I am finding myself reading more and more on the Kindle, partly because my eyes have become weaker and I love the adjustable font size. When I had to spend some weeks in rehab last fall, I would have had to take an extra bag just for books, but the kindle did just fine, and I downloaded plenty more over that time. Also, when I use public transport, the Kindle is just so light and convenient. The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space. I do still read my paper books at times.
    I hate reading books on the PC screen, my eyes get too tired. I already spend so much time working on the computer and writing myself, I don’t want to do my reading there, too.

    Reply
  61. I can’t imagine that I’ll ever not read print books, but I do love my Kindle and do more reading on it now than in print. My reasons are many. I live in a small town, and the books I want to read are not always available. But I can preorder them and they are on my Kindle the morning of release day. I love getting e-copies of older, often OOP books to replace tattered paper copies or to add books that I have been unable to afford at the prices for used copies in good condition. I also love having a wide choice of reading material at my fingertips when I travel or when I get stuck at the doctor’s office or in a checkout line. I appreciate being able to adjust font size, and I find the Kindle easier on my arthritic fingers than many print books, especially hardcovers. I usually end up with both electronic and print copies of books that I know will be ones I reach for to reread again and again.
    I’m not a big fan of audio books unless Richard Armitage is reading. 🙂

    Reply
  62. I can’t imagine that I’ll ever not read print books, but I do love my Kindle and do more reading on it now than in print. My reasons are many. I live in a small town, and the books I want to read are not always available. But I can preorder them and they are on my Kindle the morning of release day. I love getting e-copies of older, often OOP books to replace tattered paper copies or to add books that I have been unable to afford at the prices for used copies in good condition. I also love having a wide choice of reading material at my fingertips when I travel or when I get stuck at the doctor’s office or in a checkout line. I appreciate being able to adjust font size, and I find the Kindle easier on my arthritic fingers than many print books, especially hardcovers. I usually end up with both electronic and print copies of books that I know will be ones I reach for to reread again and again.
    I’m not a big fan of audio books unless Richard Armitage is reading. 🙂

    Reply
  63. I can’t imagine that I’ll ever not read print books, but I do love my Kindle and do more reading on it now than in print. My reasons are many. I live in a small town, and the books I want to read are not always available. But I can preorder them and they are on my Kindle the morning of release day. I love getting e-copies of older, often OOP books to replace tattered paper copies or to add books that I have been unable to afford at the prices for used copies in good condition. I also love having a wide choice of reading material at my fingertips when I travel or when I get stuck at the doctor’s office or in a checkout line. I appreciate being able to adjust font size, and I find the Kindle easier on my arthritic fingers than many print books, especially hardcovers. I usually end up with both electronic and print copies of books that I know will be ones I reach for to reread again and again.
    I’m not a big fan of audio books unless Richard Armitage is reading. 🙂

    Reply
  64. I can’t imagine that I’ll ever not read print books, but I do love my Kindle and do more reading on it now than in print. My reasons are many. I live in a small town, and the books I want to read are not always available. But I can preorder them and they are on my Kindle the morning of release day. I love getting e-copies of older, often OOP books to replace tattered paper copies or to add books that I have been unable to afford at the prices for used copies in good condition. I also love having a wide choice of reading material at my fingertips when I travel or when I get stuck at the doctor’s office or in a checkout line. I appreciate being able to adjust font size, and I find the Kindle easier on my arthritic fingers than many print books, especially hardcovers. I usually end up with both electronic and print copies of books that I know will be ones I reach for to reread again and again.
    I’m not a big fan of audio books unless Richard Armitage is reading. 🙂

    Reply
  65. I can’t imagine that I’ll ever not read print books, but I do love my Kindle and do more reading on it now than in print. My reasons are many. I live in a small town, and the books I want to read are not always available. But I can preorder them and they are on my Kindle the morning of release day. I love getting e-copies of older, often OOP books to replace tattered paper copies or to add books that I have been unable to afford at the prices for used copies in good condition. I also love having a wide choice of reading material at my fingertips when I travel or when I get stuck at the doctor’s office or in a checkout line. I appreciate being able to adjust font size, and I find the Kindle easier on my arthritic fingers than many print books, especially hardcovers. I usually end up with both electronic and print copies of books that I know will be ones I reach for to reread again and again.
    I’m not a big fan of audio books unless Richard Armitage is reading. 🙂

    Reply
  66. I love a book I think it is a sort of tactile thing nothing feels or smells quite like a new book and also I am another page flipper especially if you have several characters with similar names and I am constantly flipping back to work out who is who until the penny eventually drops.
    I think I would use a kindle especially for when I am away I had to take a bag for my books when we went to France earlier this year (my French isn’t good enough to pick up a book over there !)But I definitely couldn’t manage an app on my phone I can never read the thing outof doors now ! I was discovered once by a friend with my head in a bush trying to read a text whilst out in the middle of nowhere with the dog!Needless to say she hasn’t forgotten that!

    Reply
  67. I love a book I think it is a sort of tactile thing nothing feels or smells quite like a new book and also I am another page flipper especially if you have several characters with similar names and I am constantly flipping back to work out who is who until the penny eventually drops.
    I think I would use a kindle especially for when I am away I had to take a bag for my books when we went to France earlier this year (my French isn’t good enough to pick up a book over there !)But I definitely couldn’t manage an app on my phone I can never read the thing outof doors now ! I was discovered once by a friend with my head in a bush trying to read a text whilst out in the middle of nowhere with the dog!Needless to say she hasn’t forgotten that!

    Reply
  68. I love a book I think it is a sort of tactile thing nothing feels or smells quite like a new book and also I am another page flipper especially if you have several characters with similar names and I am constantly flipping back to work out who is who until the penny eventually drops.
    I think I would use a kindle especially for when I am away I had to take a bag for my books when we went to France earlier this year (my French isn’t good enough to pick up a book over there !)But I definitely couldn’t manage an app on my phone I can never read the thing outof doors now ! I was discovered once by a friend with my head in a bush trying to read a text whilst out in the middle of nowhere with the dog!Needless to say she hasn’t forgotten that!

    Reply
  69. I love a book I think it is a sort of tactile thing nothing feels or smells quite like a new book and also I am another page flipper especially if you have several characters with similar names and I am constantly flipping back to work out who is who until the penny eventually drops.
    I think I would use a kindle especially for when I am away I had to take a bag for my books when we went to France earlier this year (my French isn’t good enough to pick up a book over there !)But I definitely couldn’t manage an app on my phone I can never read the thing outof doors now ! I was discovered once by a friend with my head in a bush trying to read a text whilst out in the middle of nowhere with the dog!Needless to say she hasn’t forgotten that!

    Reply
  70. I love a book I think it is a sort of tactile thing nothing feels or smells quite like a new book and also I am another page flipper especially if you have several characters with similar names and I am constantly flipping back to work out who is who until the penny eventually drops.
    I think I would use a kindle especially for when I am away I had to take a bag for my books when we went to France earlier this year (my French isn’t good enough to pick up a book over there !)But I definitely couldn’t manage an app on my phone I can never read the thing outof doors now ! I was discovered once by a friend with my head in a bush trying to read a text whilst out in the middle of nowhere with the dog!Needless to say she hasn’t forgotten that!

    Reply
  71. Been reading “real” books for a long time.
    There is a smell to books that the Kindle doesn’t have.
    I do have a Kindle loaded with a lot of freebie books from new writers that I would not otherwise have access to. That I like about the Kindle. Have even purchased more from some of the writers that caught my interest.

    Reply
  72. Been reading “real” books for a long time.
    There is a smell to books that the Kindle doesn’t have.
    I do have a Kindle loaded with a lot of freebie books from new writers that I would not otherwise have access to. That I like about the Kindle. Have even purchased more from some of the writers that caught my interest.

    Reply
  73. Been reading “real” books for a long time.
    There is a smell to books that the Kindle doesn’t have.
    I do have a Kindle loaded with a lot of freebie books from new writers that I would not otherwise have access to. That I like about the Kindle. Have even purchased more from some of the writers that caught my interest.

    Reply
  74. Been reading “real” books for a long time.
    There is a smell to books that the Kindle doesn’t have.
    I do have a Kindle loaded with a lot of freebie books from new writers that I would not otherwise have access to. That I like about the Kindle. Have even purchased more from some of the writers that caught my interest.

    Reply
  75. Been reading “real” books for a long time.
    There is a smell to books that the Kindle doesn’t have.
    I do have a Kindle loaded with a lot of freebie books from new writers that I would not otherwise have access to. That I like about the Kindle. Have even purchased more from some of the writers that caught my interest.

    Reply
  76. Donna–
    I’ve heard others who have adapted to Kindles like ducks on a Junebug *G*, and they also find themselves buying and reading more. The format issue is not insignificant, though. There are early e-readers that have completely disappeared. I don’t think that’s going to happen to Kindle any time soon, but there is much to be said for having print editions of books we really, really love.
    I and the other Sound and the Furry authors thank you, and so do the animals!

    Reply
  77. Donna–
    I’ve heard others who have adapted to Kindles like ducks on a Junebug *G*, and they also find themselves buying and reading more. The format issue is not insignificant, though. There are early e-readers that have completely disappeared. I don’t think that’s going to happen to Kindle any time soon, but there is much to be said for having print editions of books we really, really love.
    I and the other Sound and the Furry authors thank you, and so do the animals!

    Reply
  78. Donna–
    I’ve heard others who have adapted to Kindles like ducks on a Junebug *G*, and they also find themselves buying and reading more. The format issue is not insignificant, though. There are early e-readers that have completely disappeared. I don’t think that’s going to happen to Kindle any time soon, but there is much to be said for having print editions of books we really, really love.
    I and the other Sound and the Furry authors thank you, and so do the animals!

    Reply
  79. Donna–
    I’ve heard others who have adapted to Kindles like ducks on a Junebug *G*, and they also find themselves buying and reading more. The format issue is not insignificant, though. There are early e-readers that have completely disappeared. I don’t think that’s going to happen to Kindle any time soon, but there is much to be said for having print editions of books we really, really love.
    I and the other Sound and the Furry authors thank you, and so do the animals!

    Reply
  80. Donna–
    I’ve heard others who have adapted to Kindles like ducks on a Junebug *G*, and they also find themselves buying and reading more. The format issue is not insignificant, though. There are early e-readers that have completely disappeared. I don’t think that’s going to happen to Kindle any time soon, but there is much to be said for having print editions of books we really, really love.
    I and the other Sound and the Furry authors thank you, and so do the animals!

    Reply
  81. Janga–
    All your reasons for valuing your Kindle are good,and living in a small town with few places to buy books is a big one. But there’s something very nice about print–and about Richard Armitage, too. *G*

    Reply
  82. Janga–
    All your reasons for valuing your Kindle are good,and living in a small town with few places to buy books is a big one. But there’s something very nice about print–and about Richard Armitage, too. *G*

    Reply
  83. Janga–
    All your reasons for valuing your Kindle are good,and living in a small town with few places to buy books is a big one. But there’s something very nice about print–and about Richard Armitage, too. *G*

    Reply
  84. Janga–
    All your reasons for valuing your Kindle are good,and living in a small town with few places to buy books is a big one. But there’s something very nice about print–and about Richard Armitage, too. *G*

    Reply
  85. Janga–
    All your reasons for valuing your Kindle are good,and living in a small town with few places to buy books is a big one. But there’s something very nice about print–and about Richard Armitage, too. *G*

    Reply
  86. **The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space.**
    Okay,I’m impressed. *G* The space savinga advantages of e-readers are HUGE!

    Reply
  87. **The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space.**
    Okay,I’m impressed. *G* The space savinga advantages of e-readers are HUGE!

    Reply
  88. **The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space.**
    Okay,I’m impressed. *G* The space savinga advantages of e-readers are HUGE!

    Reply
  89. **The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space.**
    Okay,I’m impressed. *G* The space savinga advantages of e-readers are HUGE!

    Reply
  90. **The advantages are undeniable, especially as my bookshelves are bulging with an estimated 8000 books and this way I avoid needing additional space.**
    Okay,I’m impressed. *G* The space savinga advantages of e-readers are HUGE!

    Reply
  91. I never thought I would like ereaders as much as I do, despite the fact that I’m something of a computer person. LCD screens always give me headaches if I spend too long reading on them. But then there was e-ink. So now, while I still get print books from the library, most of the books I read and buy are ebooks. I definitely like the fact that I can fit a couple hundred books in my purse. Before I always tried to take at least a couple books with me wherever I went, and that was a bit bulky, to say the least. And the search function is something I love.
    Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying.

    Reply
  92. I never thought I would like ereaders as much as I do, despite the fact that I’m something of a computer person. LCD screens always give me headaches if I spend too long reading on them. But then there was e-ink. So now, while I still get print books from the library, most of the books I read and buy are ebooks. I definitely like the fact that I can fit a couple hundred books in my purse. Before I always tried to take at least a couple books with me wherever I went, and that was a bit bulky, to say the least. And the search function is something I love.
    Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying.

    Reply
  93. I never thought I would like ereaders as much as I do, despite the fact that I’m something of a computer person. LCD screens always give me headaches if I spend too long reading on them. But then there was e-ink. So now, while I still get print books from the library, most of the books I read and buy are ebooks. I definitely like the fact that I can fit a couple hundred books in my purse. Before I always tried to take at least a couple books with me wherever I went, and that was a bit bulky, to say the least. And the search function is something I love.
    Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying.

    Reply
  94. I never thought I would like ereaders as much as I do, despite the fact that I’m something of a computer person. LCD screens always give me headaches if I spend too long reading on them. But then there was e-ink. So now, while I still get print books from the library, most of the books I read and buy are ebooks. I definitely like the fact that I can fit a couple hundred books in my purse. Before I always tried to take at least a couple books with me wherever I went, and that was a bit bulky, to say the least. And the search function is something I love.
    Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying.

    Reply
  95. I never thought I would like ereaders as much as I do, despite the fact that I’m something of a computer person. LCD screens always give me headaches if I spend too long reading on them. But then there was e-ink. So now, while I still get print books from the library, most of the books I read and buy are ebooks. I definitely like the fact that I can fit a couple hundred books in my purse. Before I always tried to take at least a couple books with me wherever I went, and that was a bit bulky, to say the least. And the search function is something I love.
    Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying.

    Reply
  96. ***Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying**
    Margot, voices are SO important. With the auditions I’ve listened to, without exception the narrators have been capable and professional. But none have blown me away.
    I’m more likely to listen to non-fiction, actually. I’ve been listening to A HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 OBJECTS, a production of the British Museum and narrated by the guy who runs the place. Fascinating material, and the director has a great voice.

    Reply
  97. ***Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying**
    Margot, voices are SO important. With the auditions I’ve listened to, without exception the narrators have been capable and professional. But none have blown me away.
    I’m more likely to listen to non-fiction, actually. I’ve been listening to A HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 OBJECTS, a production of the British Museum and narrated by the guy who runs the place. Fascinating material, and the director has a great voice.

    Reply
  98. ***Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying**
    Margot, voices are SO important. With the auditions I’ve listened to, without exception the narrators have been capable and professional. But none have blown me away.
    I’m more likely to listen to non-fiction, actually. I’ve been listening to A HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 OBJECTS, a production of the British Museum and narrated by the guy who runs the place. Fascinating material, and the director has a great voice.

    Reply
  99. ***Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying**
    Margot, voices are SO important. With the auditions I’ve listened to, without exception the narrators have been capable and professional. But none have blown me away.
    I’m more likely to listen to non-fiction, actually. I’ve been listening to A HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 OBJECTS, a production of the British Museum and narrated by the guy who runs the place. Fascinating material, and the director has a great voice.

    Reply
  100. ***Audiobooks I’ve tried to like, but I am very picky about the narrators’ voices, and easily annoyed by ones I don’t particularly care for. And they’re so slow! But I have a one hour commute every day, so I kind of want to keep trying**
    Margot, voices are SO important. With the auditions I’ve listened to, without exception the narrators have been capable and professional. But none have blown me away.
    I’m more likely to listen to non-fiction, actually. I’ve been listening to A HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 OBJECTS, a production of the British Museum and narrated by the guy who runs the place. Fascinating material, and the director has a great voice.

    Reply
  101. I must say I really like the print edition the best. However I sucumbed last year and bought a kindle and have been happy being able to get older books, and some clasics. I remember I wrote a couple of years ago that I didn’t think I would like the feel of the e-reader, but I was wrong. So my reading consists of paper, e-reader, and some audio, although not much because it is hard to get

    Reply
  102. I must say I really like the print edition the best. However I sucumbed last year and bought a kindle and have been happy being able to get older books, and some clasics. I remember I wrote a couple of years ago that I didn’t think I would like the feel of the e-reader, but I was wrong. So my reading consists of paper, e-reader, and some audio, although not much because it is hard to get

    Reply
  103. I must say I really like the print edition the best. However I sucumbed last year and bought a kindle and have been happy being able to get older books, and some clasics. I remember I wrote a couple of years ago that I didn’t think I would like the feel of the e-reader, but I was wrong. So my reading consists of paper, e-reader, and some audio, although not much because it is hard to get

    Reply
  104. I must say I really like the print edition the best. However I sucumbed last year and bought a kindle and have been happy being able to get older books, and some clasics. I remember I wrote a couple of years ago that I didn’t think I would like the feel of the e-reader, but I was wrong. So my reading consists of paper, e-reader, and some audio, although not much because it is hard to get

    Reply
  105. I must say I really like the print edition the best. However I sucumbed last year and bought a kindle and have been happy being able to get older books, and some clasics. I remember I wrote a couple of years ago that I didn’t think I would like the feel of the e-reader, but I was wrong. So my reading consists of paper, e-reader, and some audio, although not much because it is hard to get

    Reply
  106. I prefer print books. I get frustrated trying to highlight or bookmark things on e-books and it irks me trying to find a passage that I want to refer back to whereas with a print book, I usually know about how far into the book I was. E-books tend to also slow me down since I can’t seem to get the pages to switch over quickly enough. Unfortunately, about 1/3 of the review books I receive are in e-book format but I tend to give the print books priority.

    Reply
  107. I prefer print books. I get frustrated trying to highlight or bookmark things on e-books and it irks me trying to find a passage that I want to refer back to whereas with a print book, I usually know about how far into the book I was. E-books tend to also slow me down since I can’t seem to get the pages to switch over quickly enough. Unfortunately, about 1/3 of the review books I receive are in e-book format but I tend to give the print books priority.

    Reply
  108. I prefer print books. I get frustrated trying to highlight or bookmark things on e-books and it irks me trying to find a passage that I want to refer back to whereas with a print book, I usually know about how far into the book I was. E-books tend to also slow me down since I can’t seem to get the pages to switch over quickly enough. Unfortunately, about 1/3 of the review books I receive are in e-book format but I tend to give the print books priority.

    Reply
  109. I prefer print books. I get frustrated trying to highlight or bookmark things on e-books and it irks me trying to find a passage that I want to refer back to whereas with a print book, I usually know about how far into the book I was. E-books tend to also slow me down since I can’t seem to get the pages to switch over quickly enough. Unfortunately, about 1/3 of the review books I receive are in e-book format but I tend to give the print books priority.

    Reply
  110. I prefer print books. I get frustrated trying to highlight or bookmark things on e-books and it irks me trying to find a passage that I want to refer back to whereas with a print book, I usually know about how far into the book I was. E-books tend to also slow me down since I can’t seem to get the pages to switch over quickly enough. Unfortunately, about 1/3 of the review books I receive are in e-book format but I tend to give the print books priority.

    Reply
  111. Sherrie, here. I used to prefer print books until I started listening to audiobooks. I was spoiled by listening to a series of excellently narrated Georgette Heyers and it was all downhill from there! Now, I listen to audiobooks almost every day, and have found that I can easily listen to one book a day, and often 2 books per day, while doing housework, laundry, gardening, hobbies, etc. One unexpected side benefit: I live alone, and have found that besides liking audiobooks for their literary and time-saving value, they also provide a sort of companionship! Just having a voice in the background, reading to me as I putter around the house, is like having a friend conversing with me!
    No way could I spend 8 hours or more every day reading books–my housework would suffer, not to mention other chores. But with an audiobook, I can listen for 8 hours but accomplish other duties. Being a multi-tasker, that makes me happy!
    I’m one of those people you mentioned who have eye problems, and per doctor’s orders I am cutting my computer time in half, (Suddenly, I have a life!) I think Kindles and e-readers are wonderful for folks who prefer them, but I’m afraid my poor abused eyes will have to forsake them for my beloved audiobooks.

    Reply
  112. Sherrie, here. I used to prefer print books until I started listening to audiobooks. I was spoiled by listening to a series of excellently narrated Georgette Heyers and it was all downhill from there! Now, I listen to audiobooks almost every day, and have found that I can easily listen to one book a day, and often 2 books per day, while doing housework, laundry, gardening, hobbies, etc. One unexpected side benefit: I live alone, and have found that besides liking audiobooks for their literary and time-saving value, they also provide a sort of companionship! Just having a voice in the background, reading to me as I putter around the house, is like having a friend conversing with me!
    No way could I spend 8 hours or more every day reading books–my housework would suffer, not to mention other chores. But with an audiobook, I can listen for 8 hours but accomplish other duties. Being a multi-tasker, that makes me happy!
    I’m one of those people you mentioned who have eye problems, and per doctor’s orders I am cutting my computer time in half, (Suddenly, I have a life!) I think Kindles and e-readers are wonderful for folks who prefer them, but I’m afraid my poor abused eyes will have to forsake them for my beloved audiobooks.

    Reply
  113. Sherrie, here. I used to prefer print books until I started listening to audiobooks. I was spoiled by listening to a series of excellently narrated Georgette Heyers and it was all downhill from there! Now, I listen to audiobooks almost every day, and have found that I can easily listen to one book a day, and often 2 books per day, while doing housework, laundry, gardening, hobbies, etc. One unexpected side benefit: I live alone, and have found that besides liking audiobooks for their literary and time-saving value, they also provide a sort of companionship! Just having a voice in the background, reading to me as I putter around the house, is like having a friend conversing with me!
    No way could I spend 8 hours or more every day reading books–my housework would suffer, not to mention other chores. But with an audiobook, I can listen for 8 hours but accomplish other duties. Being a multi-tasker, that makes me happy!
    I’m one of those people you mentioned who have eye problems, and per doctor’s orders I am cutting my computer time in half, (Suddenly, I have a life!) I think Kindles and e-readers are wonderful for folks who prefer them, but I’m afraid my poor abused eyes will have to forsake them for my beloved audiobooks.

    Reply
  114. Sherrie, here. I used to prefer print books until I started listening to audiobooks. I was spoiled by listening to a series of excellently narrated Georgette Heyers and it was all downhill from there! Now, I listen to audiobooks almost every day, and have found that I can easily listen to one book a day, and often 2 books per day, while doing housework, laundry, gardening, hobbies, etc. One unexpected side benefit: I live alone, and have found that besides liking audiobooks for their literary and time-saving value, they also provide a sort of companionship! Just having a voice in the background, reading to me as I putter around the house, is like having a friend conversing with me!
    No way could I spend 8 hours or more every day reading books–my housework would suffer, not to mention other chores. But with an audiobook, I can listen for 8 hours but accomplish other duties. Being a multi-tasker, that makes me happy!
    I’m one of those people you mentioned who have eye problems, and per doctor’s orders I am cutting my computer time in half, (Suddenly, I have a life!) I think Kindles and e-readers are wonderful for folks who prefer them, but I’m afraid my poor abused eyes will have to forsake them for my beloved audiobooks.

    Reply
  115. Sherrie, here. I used to prefer print books until I started listening to audiobooks. I was spoiled by listening to a series of excellently narrated Georgette Heyers and it was all downhill from there! Now, I listen to audiobooks almost every day, and have found that I can easily listen to one book a day, and often 2 books per day, while doing housework, laundry, gardening, hobbies, etc. One unexpected side benefit: I live alone, and have found that besides liking audiobooks for their literary and time-saving value, they also provide a sort of companionship! Just having a voice in the background, reading to me as I putter around the house, is like having a friend conversing with me!
    No way could I spend 8 hours or more every day reading books–my housework would suffer, not to mention other chores. But with an audiobook, I can listen for 8 hours but accomplish other duties. Being a multi-tasker, that makes me happy!
    I’m one of those people you mentioned who have eye problems, and per doctor’s orders I am cutting my computer time in half, (Suddenly, I have a life!) I think Kindles and e-readers are wonderful for folks who prefer them, but I’m afraid my poor abused eyes will have to forsake them for my beloved audiobooks.

    Reply
  116. ELF, it makes perfect sense to review the books that are easiest to read when you’re swamped with requests. Print makes it SO much easier to skip around, highlight, et al.

    Reply
  117. ELF, it makes perfect sense to review the books that are easiest to read when you’re swamped with requests. Print makes it SO much easier to skip around, highlight, et al.

    Reply
  118. ELF, it makes perfect sense to review the books that are easiest to read when you’re swamped with requests. Print makes it SO much easier to skip around, highlight, et al.

    Reply
  119. ELF, it makes perfect sense to review the books that are easiest to read when you’re swamped with requests. Print makes it SO much easier to skip around, highlight, et al.

    Reply
  120. ELF, it makes perfect sense to review the books that are easiest to read when you’re swamped with requests. Print makes it SO much easier to skip around, highlight, et al.

    Reply
  121. Sherrie–
    Audio to relieve strained eyes is a biggie for sure, but the fact that you can multitask and listen while doing other things highlights the really fundamental difference between print and audio: with print, you -have- to give the words your full attention. With audio, the mind can wander and you’ll miss things, and maybe not be as deeply engaged with the story. Different modes. Luckily, we get to choose which we prefer.

    Reply
  122. Sherrie–
    Audio to relieve strained eyes is a biggie for sure, but the fact that you can multitask and listen while doing other things highlights the really fundamental difference between print and audio: with print, you -have- to give the words your full attention. With audio, the mind can wander and you’ll miss things, and maybe not be as deeply engaged with the story. Different modes. Luckily, we get to choose which we prefer.

    Reply
  123. Sherrie–
    Audio to relieve strained eyes is a biggie for sure, but the fact that you can multitask and listen while doing other things highlights the really fundamental difference between print and audio: with print, you -have- to give the words your full attention. With audio, the mind can wander and you’ll miss things, and maybe not be as deeply engaged with the story. Different modes. Luckily, we get to choose which we prefer.

    Reply
  124. Sherrie–
    Audio to relieve strained eyes is a biggie for sure, but the fact that you can multitask and listen while doing other things highlights the really fundamental difference between print and audio: with print, you -have- to give the words your full attention. With audio, the mind can wander and you’ll miss things, and maybe not be as deeply engaged with the story. Different modes. Luckily, we get to choose which we prefer.

    Reply
  125. Sherrie–
    Audio to relieve strained eyes is a biggie for sure, but the fact that you can multitask and listen while doing other things highlights the really fundamental difference between print and audio: with print, you -have- to give the words your full attention. With audio, the mind can wander and you’ll miss things, and maybe not be as deeply engaged with the story. Different modes. Luckily, we get to choose which we prefer.

    Reply
  126. Sherrie, I too love a good audiobook – it’s like listening to favorite music – better, because it has (for me) more of that sense of contact and companionship that you mention. I always have one in the cd player next to my bed and frequently have one in the car as well.
    On the other hand, there’s nothing worse than a bad audiobook. Abridgements make me mad and awful readers make me grit my teeth. I have Persuasion in the bedside player now, and when the reader does Captain Wentworth, “it’s all wrong!!” 🙂
    My kindle has a voice reader function, but it’s very mechanical. Also my kindle has no speaker, so I have to use earbuds and I hate them.
    First world problems 🙂
    Mary Jo, I too have found my attention drifting. I often find myself punching the back button to get back to the last thing I recognize 🙂
    I want to have it like Cmdr Sinclair on Babylon 5 – he came back to his quarters after a hard day of trying to understand Vorlons and keep Londo and G’Kar from wiping each other out, poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did.

    Reply
  127. Sherrie, I too love a good audiobook – it’s like listening to favorite music – better, because it has (for me) more of that sense of contact and companionship that you mention. I always have one in the cd player next to my bed and frequently have one in the car as well.
    On the other hand, there’s nothing worse than a bad audiobook. Abridgements make me mad and awful readers make me grit my teeth. I have Persuasion in the bedside player now, and when the reader does Captain Wentworth, “it’s all wrong!!” 🙂
    My kindle has a voice reader function, but it’s very mechanical. Also my kindle has no speaker, so I have to use earbuds and I hate them.
    First world problems 🙂
    Mary Jo, I too have found my attention drifting. I often find myself punching the back button to get back to the last thing I recognize 🙂
    I want to have it like Cmdr Sinclair on Babylon 5 – he came back to his quarters after a hard day of trying to understand Vorlons and keep Londo and G’Kar from wiping each other out, poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did.

    Reply
  128. Sherrie, I too love a good audiobook – it’s like listening to favorite music – better, because it has (for me) more of that sense of contact and companionship that you mention. I always have one in the cd player next to my bed and frequently have one in the car as well.
    On the other hand, there’s nothing worse than a bad audiobook. Abridgements make me mad and awful readers make me grit my teeth. I have Persuasion in the bedside player now, and when the reader does Captain Wentworth, “it’s all wrong!!” 🙂
    My kindle has a voice reader function, but it’s very mechanical. Also my kindle has no speaker, so I have to use earbuds and I hate them.
    First world problems 🙂
    Mary Jo, I too have found my attention drifting. I often find myself punching the back button to get back to the last thing I recognize 🙂
    I want to have it like Cmdr Sinclair on Babylon 5 – he came back to his quarters after a hard day of trying to understand Vorlons and keep Londo and G’Kar from wiping each other out, poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did.

    Reply
  129. Sherrie, I too love a good audiobook – it’s like listening to favorite music – better, because it has (for me) more of that sense of contact and companionship that you mention. I always have one in the cd player next to my bed and frequently have one in the car as well.
    On the other hand, there’s nothing worse than a bad audiobook. Abridgements make me mad and awful readers make me grit my teeth. I have Persuasion in the bedside player now, and when the reader does Captain Wentworth, “it’s all wrong!!” 🙂
    My kindle has a voice reader function, but it’s very mechanical. Also my kindle has no speaker, so I have to use earbuds and I hate them.
    First world problems 🙂
    Mary Jo, I too have found my attention drifting. I often find myself punching the back button to get back to the last thing I recognize 🙂
    I want to have it like Cmdr Sinclair on Babylon 5 – he came back to his quarters after a hard day of trying to understand Vorlons and keep Londo and G’Kar from wiping each other out, poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did.

    Reply
  130. Sherrie, I too love a good audiobook – it’s like listening to favorite music – better, because it has (for me) more of that sense of contact and companionship that you mention. I always have one in the cd player next to my bed and frequently have one in the car as well.
    On the other hand, there’s nothing worse than a bad audiobook. Abridgements make me mad and awful readers make me grit my teeth. I have Persuasion in the bedside player now, and when the reader does Captain Wentworth, “it’s all wrong!!” 🙂
    My kindle has a voice reader function, but it’s very mechanical. Also my kindle has no speaker, so I have to use earbuds and I hate them.
    First world problems 🙂
    Mary Jo, I too have found my attention drifting. I often find myself punching the back button to get back to the last thing I recognize 🙂
    I want to have it like Cmdr Sinclair on Babylon 5 – he came back to his quarters after a hard day of trying to understand Vorlons and keep Londo and G’Kar from wiping each other out, poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did.

    Reply
  131. ** poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did. **
    I loved Sinclair. *G* And like you, I hate ear buds. Nasty, uncomfortable things. In a print book, we can conjure up the voices and intonations we want!

    Reply
  132. ** poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did. **
    I loved Sinclair. *G* And like you, I hate ear buds. Nasty, uncomfortable things. In a print book, we can conjure up the voices and intonations we want!

    Reply
  133. ** poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did. **
    I loved Sinclair. *G* And like you, I hate ear buds. Nasty, uncomfortable things. In a print book, we can conjure up the voices and intonations we want!

    Reply
  134. ** poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did. **
    I loved Sinclair. *G* And like you, I hate ear buds. Nasty, uncomfortable things. In a print book, we can conjure up the voices and intonations we want!

    Reply
  135. ** poured himself a drink, sank back into his favorite (well, only) chair and said computer, read me some poetry. And the computer did. **
    I loved Sinclair. *G* And like you, I hate ear buds. Nasty, uncomfortable things. In a print book, we can conjure up the voices and intonations we want!

    Reply
  136. Ah, another Babylon 5 fan! I was so sad to learn that Michael O’Hare had died. Such a lovely actor. You would never have guessed from his performances that he had such awful problems. God rest his soul. Not that there’s anything wrong with that Silver Fox, Bruce Boxleitner 🙂

    Reply
  137. Ah, another Babylon 5 fan! I was so sad to learn that Michael O’Hare had died. Such a lovely actor. You would never have guessed from his performances that he had such awful problems. God rest his soul. Not that there’s anything wrong with that Silver Fox, Bruce Boxleitner 🙂

    Reply
  138. Ah, another Babylon 5 fan! I was so sad to learn that Michael O’Hare had died. Such a lovely actor. You would never have guessed from his performances that he had such awful problems. God rest his soul. Not that there’s anything wrong with that Silver Fox, Bruce Boxleitner 🙂

    Reply
  139. Ah, another Babylon 5 fan! I was so sad to learn that Michael O’Hare had died. Such a lovely actor. You would never have guessed from his performances that he had such awful problems. God rest his soul. Not that there’s anything wrong with that Silver Fox, Bruce Boxleitner 🙂

    Reply
  140. Ah, another Babylon 5 fan! I was so sad to learn that Michael O’Hare had died. Such a lovely actor. You would never have guessed from his performances that he had such awful problems. God rest his soul. Not that there’s anything wrong with that Silver Fox, Bruce Boxleitner 🙂

    Reply
  141. Janice,
    I hadn’t realized that Michael O’Hare had died. Very sad–he was an appealilng and talented actor. I just looked him up on Wikipedia, and agree that he did a really good job of keeping his physical problems private. Rest in peace.

    Reply
  142. Janice,
    I hadn’t realized that Michael O’Hare had died. Very sad–he was an appealilng and talented actor. I just looked him up on Wikipedia, and agree that he did a really good job of keeping his physical problems private. Rest in peace.

    Reply
  143. Janice,
    I hadn’t realized that Michael O’Hare had died. Very sad–he was an appealilng and talented actor. I just looked him up on Wikipedia, and agree that he did a really good job of keeping his physical problems private. Rest in peace.

    Reply
  144. Janice,
    I hadn’t realized that Michael O’Hare had died. Very sad–he was an appealilng and talented actor. I just looked him up on Wikipedia, and agree that he did a really good job of keeping his physical problems private. Rest in peace.

    Reply
  145. Janice,
    I hadn’t realized that Michael O’Hare had died. Very sad–he was an appealilng and talented actor. I just looked him up on Wikipedia, and agree that he did a really good job of keeping his physical problems private. Rest in peace.

    Reply
  146. Mary Jo – it’s sad that so many have gone in the 20 years since B5 aired – Michael O’Hare, Tim Choate (Zathras), Richard Biggs (Dr. Franklin), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan), Andreas Katsulas (G’Kar), many others. I am a huge B5 fan – some of the best roles for women ever! – and I miss all of them. There was a terrific romance between Sinclair and Sakai; I was glad it got finished in an authorized novel.

    Reply
  147. Mary Jo – it’s sad that so many have gone in the 20 years since B5 aired – Michael O’Hare, Tim Choate (Zathras), Richard Biggs (Dr. Franklin), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan), Andreas Katsulas (G’Kar), many others. I am a huge B5 fan – some of the best roles for women ever! – and I miss all of them. There was a terrific romance between Sinclair and Sakai; I was glad it got finished in an authorized novel.

    Reply
  148. Mary Jo – it’s sad that so many have gone in the 20 years since B5 aired – Michael O’Hare, Tim Choate (Zathras), Richard Biggs (Dr. Franklin), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan), Andreas Katsulas (G’Kar), many others. I am a huge B5 fan – some of the best roles for women ever! – and I miss all of them. There was a terrific romance between Sinclair and Sakai; I was glad it got finished in an authorized novel.

    Reply
  149. Mary Jo – it’s sad that so many have gone in the 20 years since B5 aired – Michael O’Hare, Tim Choate (Zathras), Richard Biggs (Dr. Franklin), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan), Andreas Katsulas (G’Kar), many others. I am a huge B5 fan – some of the best roles for women ever! – and I miss all of them. There was a terrific romance between Sinclair and Sakai; I was glad it got finished in an authorized novel.

    Reply
  150. Mary Jo – it’s sad that so many have gone in the 20 years since B5 aired – Michael O’Hare, Tim Choate (Zathras), Richard Biggs (Dr. Franklin), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan), Andreas Katsulas (G’Kar), many others. I am a huge B5 fan – some of the best roles for women ever! – and I miss all of them. There was a terrific romance between Sinclair and Sakai; I was glad it got finished in an authorized novel.

    Reply
  151. Janice, I knew about some of those deaths, not all. When I looked it up on Wikipedia, I was surprised to see that it had been 20 years since the series was launched. Long enough to lose people, alas. I hadn’t realized that Sinclair and Catherine Sakai finall got a resolution–a happy one, I hope! I need to look up that book. *G*

    Reply
  152. Janice, I knew about some of those deaths, not all. When I looked it up on Wikipedia, I was surprised to see that it had been 20 years since the series was launched. Long enough to lose people, alas. I hadn’t realized that Sinclair and Catherine Sakai finall got a resolution–a happy one, I hope! I need to look up that book. *G*

    Reply
  153. Janice, I knew about some of those deaths, not all. When I looked it up on Wikipedia, I was surprised to see that it had been 20 years since the series was launched. Long enough to lose people, alas. I hadn’t realized that Sinclair and Catherine Sakai finall got a resolution–a happy one, I hope! I need to look up that book. *G*

    Reply
  154. Janice, I knew about some of those deaths, not all. When I looked it up on Wikipedia, I was surprised to see that it had been 20 years since the series was launched. Long enough to lose people, alas. I hadn’t realized that Sinclair and Catherine Sakai finall got a resolution–a happy one, I hope! I need to look up that book. *G*

    Reply
  155. Janice, I knew about some of those deaths, not all. When I looked it up on Wikipedia, I was surprised to see that it had been 20 years since the series was launched. Long enough to lose people, alas. I hadn’t realized that Sinclair and Catherine Sakai finall got a resolution–a happy one, I hope! I need to look up that book. *G*

    Reply
  156. It’s To Dream in the City of Sorrows by Kathryn Drennan. She was married to Straczynski at the time, and all the novels were done under his supervision – so they were all pretty coherent and filled in things not shown in the series. Easy to find used. Happy hunting.

    Reply
  157. It’s To Dream in the City of Sorrows by Kathryn Drennan. She was married to Straczynski at the time, and all the novels were done under his supervision – so they were all pretty coherent and filled in things not shown in the series. Easy to find used. Happy hunting.

    Reply
  158. It’s To Dream in the City of Sorrows by Kathryn Drennan. She was married to Straczynski at the time, and all the novels were done under his supervision – so they were all pretty coherent and filled in things not shown in the series. Easy to find used. Happy hunting.

    Reply
  159. It’s To Dream in the City of Sorrows by Kathryn Drennan. She was married to Straczynski at the time, and all the novels were done under his supervision – so they were all pretty coherent and filled in things not shown in the series. Easy to find used. Happy hunting.

    Reply
  160. It’s To Dream in the City of Sorrows by Kathryn Drennan. She was married to Straczynski at the time, and all the novels were done under his supervision – so they were all pretty coherent and filled in things not shown in the series. Easy to find used. Happy hunting.

    Reply
  161. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Putney!
    Oy vie, a conversation I have seen on many a-blog recently! I must say, I have previously stood my ground and stood up for being a traditional reader,…and I know this has come up on Word Wenches as well. Honestly!? I think I summerised it best in this way:
    I personally cannot read anything online for long periods of time, as it affects my eyes, which is one reason I appreciate blogs, as you can read them in your leisure and although its quick reading, its a moment in time that I readily enjoy! My eyes never feel strained or iffy.
    I’ll never totally say that ereaders do not have their place, because for children and adults who learn and process information differently, I do support alternative means of reading. The same way I support audio books, large print books, and books in braille for the hearing and vision challenged readers. Perhaps, ereaders will have their place in our lives, but to say that I’m attracted to holding a screened gadget and could get properly transmorphed into a different setting and place isn’t something that I will yield too.
    Reading for me involves good old fashioned books – hardbacks, softcovers, compact editions, and everything in-between. I like the fact I can turn the book over in my hands, noting the coverart, the flyleaf descriptions, the extra pages that might be included that lay pause before proceeding into the heart of the story, and the very texture of the paper itself fused with the typecast of the words placed on the page. Reading is viscerally stimulating and its co-dependant on a book in hand. At least for me.
    postscript: I used to believe I was the sole Babylon 5 fan because it aired whilst I was a teenager, and it was ‘just another thing’ I was into that my classmates didn’t quite understand! Laughs. Thankfully science fiction is a living pursuit — one never grows old of it and is always museful of watching an old favourite once more! I did grieve the loss of Sinclair, even if I understood why he exited the series; of course, as a fan of Scarecrow & Mrs. King, I didn’t mind his replacement,…yet I did find it a bit of a surprise that Shari Belefonte became a ghost writer and that that was not shared until well into the last of the series! I too, appreciated the strength of the women characters, but it was the pure fact that B5 was unlike most sci-fi series of it’s time. It didn’t follow the traditional formula and it broke new ground. I miss that nowadays! I shudder thinking about how much that particular station has altered itself — it’s always too steeped in violence for me, or just too odd-worldly for me to dig into. What happened to the heart of it? The pursuit of new worlds and forging relationships with people unlike us? What happened to the core foundation of all my favourite sci-fi series!? Sighs.

    Reply
  162. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Putney!
    Oy vie, a conversation I have seen on many a-blog recently! I must say, I have previously stood my ground and stood up for being a traditional reader,…and I know this has come up on Word Wenches as well. Honestly!? I think I summerised it best in this way:
    I personally cannot read anything online for long periods of time, as it affects my eyes, which is one reason I appreciate blogs, as you can read them in your leisure and although its quick reading, its a moment in time that I readily enjoy! My eyes never feel strained or iffy.
    I’ll never totally say that ereaders do not have their place, because for children and adults who learn and process information differently, I do support alternative means of reading. The same way I support audio books, large print books, and books in braille for the hearing and vision challenged readers. Perhaps, ereaders will have their place in our lives, but to say that I’m attracted to holding a screened gadget and could get properly transmorphed into a different setting and place isn’t something that I will yield too.
    Reading for me involves good old fashioned books – hardbacks, softcovers, compact editions, and everything in-between. I like the fact I can turn the book over in my hands, noting the coverart, the flyleaf descriptions, the extra pages that might be included that lay pause before proceeding into the heart of the story, and the very texture of the paper itself fused with the typecast of the words placed on the page. Reading is viscerally stimulating and its co-dependant on a book in hand. At least for me.
    postscript: I used to believe I was the sole Babylon 5 fan because it aired whilst I was a teenager, and it was ‘just another thing’ I was into that my classmates didn’t quite understand! Laughs. Thankfully science fiction is a living pursuit — one never grows old of it and is always museful of watching an old favourite once more! I did grieve the loss of Sinclair, even if I understood why he exited the series; of course, as a fan of Scarecrow & Mrs. King, I didn’t mind his replacement,…yet I did find it a bit of a surprise that Shari Belefonte became a ghost writer and that that was not shared until well into the last of the series! I too, appreciated the strength of the women characters, but it was the pure fact that B5 was unlike most sci-fi series of it’s time. It didn’t follow the traditional formula and it broke new ground. I miss that nowadays! I shudder thinking about how much that particular station has altered itself — it’s always too steeped in violence for me, or just too odd-worldly for me to dig into. What happened to the heart of it? The pursuit of new worlds and forging relationships with people unlike us? What happened to the core foundation of all my favourite sci-fi series!? Sighs.

    Reply
  163. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Putney!
    Oy vie, a conversation I have seen on many a-blog recently! I must say, I have previously stood my ground and stood up for being a traditional reader,…and I know this has come up on Word Wenches as well. Honestly!? I think I summerised it best in this way:
    I personally cannot read anything online for long periods of time, as it affects my eyes, which is one reason I appreciate blogs, as you can read them in your leisure and although its quick reading, its a moment in time that I readily enjoy! My eyes never feel strained or iffy.
    I’ll never totally say that ereaders do not have their place, because for children and adults who learn and process information differently, I do support alternative means of reading. The same way I support audio books, large print books, and books in braille for the hearing and vision challenged readers. Perhaps, ereaders will have their place in our lives, but to say that I’m attracted to holding a screened gadget and could get properly transmorphed into a different setting and place isn’t something that I will yield too.
    Reading for me involves good old fashioned books – hardbacks, softcovers, compact editions, and everything in-between. I like the fact I can turn the book over in my hands, noting the coverart, the flyleaf descriptions, the extra pages that might be included that lay pause before proceeding into the heart of the story, and the very texture of the paper itself fused with the typecast of the words placed on the page. Reading is viscerally stimulating and its co-dependant on a book in hand. At least for me.
    postscript: I used to believe I was the sole Babylon 5 fan because it aired whilst I was a teenager, and it was ‘just another thing’ I was into that my classmates didn’t quite understand! Laughs. Thankfully science fiction is a living pursuit — one never grows old of it and is always museful of watching an old favourite once more! I did grieve the loss of Sinclair, even if I understood why he exited the series; of course, as a fan of Scarecrow & Mrs. King, I didn’t mind his replacement,…yet I did find it a bit of a surprise that Shari Belefonte became a ghost writer and that that was not shared until well into the last of the series! I too, appreciated the strength of the women characters, but it was the pure fact that B5 was unlike most sci-fi series of it’s time. It didn’t follow the traditional formula and it broke new ground. I miss that nowadays! I shudder thinking about how much that particular station has altered itself — it’s always too steeped in violence for me, or just too odd-worldly for me to dig into. What happened to the heart of it? The pursuit of new worlds and forging relationships with people unlike us? What happened to the core foundation of all my favourite sci-fi series!? Sighs.

    Reply
  164. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Putney!
    Oy vie, a conversation I have seen on many a-blog recently! I must say, I have previously stood my ground and stood up for being a traditional reader,…and I know this has come up on Word Wenches as well. Honestly!? I think I summerised it best in this way:
    I personally cannot read anything online for long periods of time, as it affects my eyes, which is one reason I appreciate blogs, as you can read them in your leisure and although its quick reading, its a moment in time that I readily enjoy! My eyes never feel strained or iffy.
    I’ll never totally say that ereaders do not have their place, because for children and adults who learn and process information differently, I do support alternative means of reading. The same way I support audio books, large print books, and books in braille for the hearing and vision challenged readers. Perhaps, ereaders will have their place in our lives, but to say that I’m attracted to holding a screened gadget and could get properly transmorphed into a different setting and place isn’t something that I will yield too.
    Reading for me involves good old fashioned books – hardbacks, softcovers, compact editions, and everything in-between. I like the fact I can turn the book over in my hands, noting the coverart, the flyleaf descriptions, the extra pages that might be included that lay pause before proceeding into the heart of the story, and the very texture of the paper itself fused with the typecast of the words placed on the page. Reading is viscerally stimulating and its co-dependant on a book in hand. At least for me.
    postscript: I used to believe I was the sole Babylon 5 fan because it aired whilst I was a teenager, and it was ‘just another thing’ I was into that my classmates didn’t quite understand! Laughs. Thankfully science fiction is a living pursuit — one never grows old of it and is always museful of watching an old favourite once more! I did grieve the loss of Sinclair, even if I understood why he exited the series; of course, as a fan of Scarecrow & Mrs. King, I didn’t mind his replacement,…yet I did find it a bit of a surprise that Shari Belefonte became a ghost writer and that that was not shared until well into the last of the series! I too, appreciated the strength of the women characters, but it was the pure fact that B5 was unlike most sci-fi series of it’s time. It didn’t follow the traditional formula and it broke new ground. I miss that nowadays! I shudder thinking about how much that particular station has altered itself — it’s always too steeped in violence for me, or just too odd-worldly for me to dig into. What happened to the heart of it? The pursuit of new worlds and forging relationships with people unlike us? What happened to the core foundation of all my favourite sci-fi series!? Sighs.

    Reply
  165. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Putney!
    Oy vie, a conversation I have seen on many a-blog recently! I must say, I have previously stood my ground and stood up for being a traditional reader,…and I know this has come up on Word Wenches as well. Honestly!? I think I summerised it best in this way:
    I personally cannot read anything online for long periods of time, as it affects my eyes, which is one reason I appreciate blogs, as you can read them in your leisure and although its quick reading, its a moment in time that I readily enjoy! My eyes never feel strained or iffy.
    I’ll never totally say that ereaders do not have their place, because for children and adults who learn and process information differently, I do support alternative means of reading. The same way I support audio books, large print books, and books in braille for the hearing and vision challenged readers. Perhaps, ereaders will have their place in our lives, but to say that I’m attracted to holding a screened gadget and could get properly transmorphed into a different setting and place isn’t something that I will yield too.
    Reading for me involves good old fashioned books – hardbacks, softcovers, compact editions, and everything in-between. I like the fact I can turn the book over in my hands, noting the coverart, the flyleaf descriptions, the extra pages that might be included that lay pause before proceeding into the heart of the story, and the very texture of the paper itself fused with the typecast of the words placed on the page. Reading is viscerally stimulating and its co-dependant on a book in hand. At least for me.
    postscript: I used to believe I was the sole Babylon 5 fan because it aired whilst I was a teenager, and it was ‘just another thing’ I was into that my classmates didn’t quite understand! Laughs. Thankfully science fiction is a living pursuit — one never grows old of it and is always museful of watching an old favourite once more! I did grieve the loss of Sinclair, even if I understood why he exited the series; of course, as a fan of Scarecrow & Mrs. King, I didn’t mind his replacement,…yet I did find it a bit of a surprise that Shari Belefonte became a ghost writer and that that was not shared until well into the last of the series! I too, appreciated the strength of the women characters, but it was the pure fact that B5 was unlike most sci-fi series of it’s time. It didn’t follow the traditional formula and it broke new ground. I miss that nowadays! I shudder thinking about how much that particular station has altered itself — it’s always too steeped in violence for me, or just too odd-worldly for me to dig into. What happened to the heart of it? The pursuit of new worlds and forging relationships with people unlike us? What happened to the core foundation of all my favourite sci-fi series!? Sighs.

    Reply
  166. Jorie–
    It’s pretty clear from the comments that most Word Wench readers are solidly in your camp! I can read from a good e-reader with no problem, but given a choice, I’ll take print every time.
    I’m also not surprised to find other Babylon 5 fans here. It’s such a wonderfully constructed world, and with such great characters. Better yet, great FEMALE characters. That’s never common, especially not in science fiction. Pretty soon it will be time for the Mayhem Consultant and I to watch the DVDs again. *G*

    Reply
  167. Jorie–
    It’s pretty clear from the comments that most Word Wench readers are solidly in your camp! I can read from a good e-reader with no problem, but given a choice, I’ll take print every time.
    I’m also not surprised to find other Babylon 5 fans here. It’s such a wonderfully constructed world, and with such great characters. Better yet, great FEMALE characters. That’s never common, especially not in science fiction. Pretty soon it will be time for the Mayhem Consultant and I to watch the DVDs again. *G*

    Reply
  168. Jorie–
    It’s pretty clear from the comments that most Word Wench readers are solidly in your camp! I can read from a good e-reader with no problem, but given a choice, I’ll take print every time.
    I’m also not surprised to find other Babylon 5 fans here. It’s such a wonderfully constructed world, and with such great characters. Better yet, great FEMALE characters. That’s never common, especially not in science fiction. Pretty soon it will be time for the Mayhem Consultant and I to watch the DVDs again. *G*

    Reply
  169. Jorie–
    It’s pretty clear from the comments that most Word Wench readers are solidly in your camp! I can read from a good e-reader with no problem, but given a choice, I’ll take print every time.
    I’m also not surprised to find other Babylon 5 fans here. It’s such a wonderfully constructed world, and with such great characters. Better yet, great FEMALE characters. That’s never common, especially not in science fiction. Pretty soon it will be time for the Mayhem Consultant and I to watch the DVDs again. *G*

    Reply
  170. Jorie–
    It’s pretty clear from the comments that most Word Wench readers are solidly in your camp! I can read from a good e-reader with no problem, but given a choice, I’ll take print every time.
    I’m also not surprised to find other Babylon 5 fans here. It’s such a wonderfully constructed world, and with such great characters. Better yet, great FEMALE characters. That’s never common, especially not in science fiction. Pretty soon it will be time for the Mayhem Consultant and I to watch the DVDs again. *G*

    Reply
  171. Ms. Putney,
    I was pleasantly surprised to realise that too, after I had a proper read-through of the comments above mine! I keep forgetting to tell you a bit of good news, as I have been busy at work on a project I’m launching soon, (grins),… I looked up your first POD release *Thunder & Roses*, finding it over on Powells much to my delight! As soon as I’m able too, I am going to order it! After all the talking you’ve down on it’s behalf, I simply became too curious not to want to get a copy! 🙂 I look forward to seeing it in person too, so I know how a POD appears next to a regular trade paperback! I love learning these sorts of differences in bindings and printings! 🙂
    Speaking of Babylon 5,… I couldn’t agree with you more! I just might have to ILL the series so I can partake in re-discovering it all over again!

    Reply
  172. Ms. Putney,
    I was pleasantly surprised to realise that too, after I had a proper read-through of the comments above mine! I keep forgetting to tell you a bit of good news, as I have been busy at work on a project I’m launching soon, (grins),… I looked up your first POD release *Thunder & Roses*, finding it over on Powells much to my delight! As soon as I’m able too, I am going to order it! After all the talking you’ve down on it’s behalf, I simply became too curious not to want to get a copy! 🙂 I look forward to seeing it in person too, so I know how a POD appears next to a regular trade paperback! I love learning these sorts of differences in bindings and printings! 🙂
    Speaking of Babylon 5,… I couldn’t agree with you more! I just might have to ILL the series so I can partake in re-discovering it all over again!

    Reply
  173. Ms. Putney,
    I was pleasantly surprised to realise that too, after I had a proper read-through of the comments above mine! I keep forgetting to tell you a bit of good news, as I have been busy at work on a project I’m launching soon, (grins),… I looked up your first POD release *Thunder & Roses*, finding it over on Powells much to my delight! As soon as I’m able too, I am going to order it! After all the talking you’ve down on it’s behalf, I simply became too curious not to want to get a copy! 🙂 I look forward to seeing it in person too, so I know how a POD appears next to a regular trade paperback! I love learning these sorts of differences in bindings and printings! 🙂
    Speaking of Babylon 5,… I couldn’t agree with you more! I just might have to ILL the series so I can partake in re-discovering it all over again!

    Reply
  174. Ms. Putney,
    I was pleasantly surprised to realise that too, after I had a proper read-through of the comments above mine! I keep forgetting to tell you a bit of good news, as I have been busy at work on a project I’m launching soon, (grins),… I looked up your first POD release *Thunder & Roses*, finding it over on Powells much to my delight! As soon as I’m able too, I am going to order it! After all the talking you’ve down on it’s behalf, I simply became too curious not to want to get a copy! 🙂 I look forward to seeing it in person too, so I know how a POD appears next to a regular trade paperback! I love learning these sorts of differences in bindings and printings! 🙂
    Speaking of Babylon 5,… I couldn’t agree with you more! I just might have to ILL the series so I can partake in re-discovering it all over again!

    Reply
  175. Ms. Putney,
    I was pleasantly surprised to realise that too, after I had a proper read-through of the comments above mine! I keep forgetting to tell you a bit of good news, as I have been busy at work on a project I’m launching soon, (grins),… I looked up your first POD release *Thunder & Roses*, finding it over on Powells much to my delight! As soon as I’m able too, I am going to order it! After all the talking you’ve down on it’s behalf, I simply became too curious not to want to get a copy! 🙂 I look forward to seeing it in person too, so I know how a POD appears next to a regular trade paperback! I love learning these sorts of differences in bindings and printings! 🙂
    Speaking of Babylon 5,… I couldn’t agree with you more! I just might have to ILL the series so I can partake in re-discovering it all over again!

    Reply
  176. Jorie–
    How cool that the POD of Thunder and Roses is at Powell’s! I didn’t know that, but I’ve always heard it’s a great bookstore.
    By all means, watch Bab 5 again–it will be just as good the second time around.

    Reply
  177. Jorie–
    How cool that the POD of Thunder and Roses is at Powell’s! I didn’t know that, but I’ve always heard it’s a great bookstore.
    By all means, watch Bab 5 again–it will be just as good the second time around.

    Reply
  178. Jorie–
    How cool that the POD of Thunder and Roses is at Powell’s! I didn’t know that, but I’ve always heard it’s a great bookstore.
    By all means, watch Bab 5 again–it will be just as good the second time around.

    Reply
  179. Jorie–
    How cool that the POD of Thunder and Roses is at Powell’s! I didn’t know that, but I’ve always heard it’s a great bookstore.
    By all means, watch Bab 5 again–it will be just as good the second time around.

    Reply
  180. Jorie–
    How cool that the POD of Thunder and Roses is at Powell’s! I didn’t know that, but I’ve always heard it’s a great bookstore.
    By all means, watch Bab 5 again–it will be just as good the second time around.

    Reply

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