Horsing Around With Research


CE-avatar Cara/Andrea here. I’m currently immersed in a new WIP that includes creating some senior military officers within the inner sanctum of Whitehall in 1812. Luckily I love research, for much as I enjoy giving my imagination free rein, it’s probably not a Good Idea to indulge in flights of fancy here. It’s artistic license to insert a make-believe duke into the ranks of the nobility . . . It’s asking for trouble from the High Sticklers to insert a mythical regiment into the British Army.

HorseGuards1 And why go to all the trouble when the actual facts make such great history! When I was in London last fall, I did some boots-on-the-ground poking around at the impressive building that served as a military command center during the Napoleonic Wars. Situated at right angles to the Admiralty, overlooking a massive parade ground that used to be a jousting field, the Horse Guards building still houses the top brass and, well, horses—which shouldn’t come as any surprise.

Curious about the perfectly polished soldiers who mount guard there everyday, I decided I needed to know a little bit about the history of the Horse Guards. So saddle up and let’s take a quick gallop through the illustrious history of the Household Cavalry . . .

Royal_Horse_Guards_uniform Traditionally, the term “Household” refers to a country’s most elite units, as they were one ones used to guard a monarch and his household. The British Household Cavalry is made up of two units—the Blues and Royals (The Royal Horse Guards, known as the Blues, and the Royal Dragoons, known as the Royals were joined together in 1969) and the Life Guards.

The Royal Horse Guards were founded in 1650 on the orders of Oliver Cromwell. The regiment was commanded by the Earl of Oxford during the reign of King Charles II and as the color of its uniform was blue at the time, it was nicknamed "the Oxford Blues", later shortened to the "Blues." In 1750 the regiment became the Royal Horse Guards Blue. The Colonel-In-Chief is the Queen, and both Prince William and Prince Harry joined as cornets.

LifeGuard2 The Life Guards is made up of four different troops of horse guards raised by Charles II around the time of his restoration. In 1788, they were streamlined into two regiments called  1st Life Guards and 2nd Life Guards, and in 1815 they were part of The Household Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo.

Today, the Life Guards, which can be recognized by their red coats and white plumes,  work in tandem with the Blues and Royals to form the Household Cavalry. One half is a modern armoured reconnaissance unit and the other half performs the ceremonial duties. Though they serve together, the Life Guards and the Blues and Royals maintain their regimental identity, with distinct uniforms and traditions, and their own colonel.

Weaons There is a wonderful little museum on the Horse Guards located in the back of the main building, which include the original stables where one can watch the horses being saddled for the daily guard duties on their home turf. The exhibits feature vintage weapons, uniforms and memorabilia from the various campaigns throughout the regiment’s storied history, including battle flags and sabers from Waterloo. It’s well worth a visit if you are strolling down Whitehall Street.

Uniforms I love learning the background and lore of people and places. Perhaps I’m a little odd, but it gives me great pleasure now to see a picture of some ceremonial event in London and be able to say, “Oh, that’s the Blues and Royals on parade—they fought at Waterloo.” How about you? Do you like knowing the history of something, be it a car design or a Coke bottle?

80 thoughts on “Horsing Around With Research”

  1. Thanks, Cara, for the history! I enjoy a historical romance more if I understand the culture behind the British pomp and circumstance!
    I have been watching The Tudors on Showtime (just finished). The show is historically inaccurate, but it spurs my curiosity so I look up the facts after the show.
    As far as making up history, I’m sure some of what we consider historical facts may have been made up along the way. I give you a very abstract example. Five years ago, my husband worked for NATO. The commanding officer was a knighted British Army general. I knew his wife through the charity committee. At one of the formal dinners, I chatted with the General and commented on his plaid pants. He noted they represented the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry. He proceeded to tell me what each color represented, for example, the thin white stripe represented the china clay found in Somerset; the red thick line represented the sunset over Cornwall, etc. It sounded plausible. But then his wife later told me it was all rubbish.

    Reply
  2. Thanks, Cara, for the history! I enjoy a historical romance more if I understand the culture behind the British pomp and circumstance!
    I have been watching The Tudors on Showtime (just finished). The show is historically inaccurate, but it spurs my curiosity so I look up the facts after the show.
    As far as making up history, I’m sure some of what we consider historical facts may have been made up along the way. I give you a very abstract example. Five years ago, my husband worked for NATO. The commanding officer was a knighted British Army general. I knew his wife through the charity committee. At one of the formal dinners, I chatted with the General and commented on his plaid pants. He noted they represented the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry. He proceeded to tell me what each color represented, for example, the thin white stripe represented the china clay found in Somerset; the red thick line represented the sunset over Cornwall, etc. It sounded plausible. But then his wife later told me it was all rubbish.

    Reply
  3. Thanks, Cara, for the history! I enjoy a historical romance more if I understand the culture behind the British pomp and circumstance!
    I have been watching The Tudors on Showtime (just finished). The show is historically inaccurate, but it spurs my curiosity so I look up the facts after the show.
    As far as making up history, I’m sure some of what we consider historical facts may have been made up along the way. I give you a very abstract example. Five years ago, my husband worked for NATO. The commanding officer was a knighted British Army general. I knew his wife through the charity committee. At one of the formal dinners, I chatted with the General and commented on his plaid pants. He noted they represented the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry. He proceeded to tell me what each color represented, for example, the thin white stripe represented the china clay found in Somerset; the red thick line represented the sunset over Cornwall, etc. It sounded plausible. But then his wife later told me it was all rubbish.

    Reply
  4. Thanks, Cara, for the history! I enjoy a historical romance more if I understand the culture behind the British pomp and circumstance!
    I have been watching The Tudors on Showtime (just finished). The show is historically inaccurate, but it spurs my curiosity so I look up the facts after the show.
    As far as making up history, I’m sure some of what we consider historical facts may have been made up along the way. I give you a very abstract example. Five years ago, my husband worked for NATO. The commanding officer was a knighted British Army general. I knew his wife through the charity committee. At one of the formal dinners, I chatted with the General and commented on his plaid pants. He noted they represented the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry. He proceeded to tell me what each color represented, for example, the thin white stripe represented the china clay found in Somerset; the red thick line represented the sunset over Cornwall, etc. It sounded plausible. But then his wife later told me it was all rubbish.

    Reply
  5. Thanks, Cara, for the history! I enjoy a historical romance more if I understand the culture behind the British pomp and circumstance!
    I have been watching The Tudors on Showtime (just finished). The show is historically inaccurate, but it spurs my curiosity so I look up the facts after the show.
    As far as making up history, I’m sure some of what we consider historical facts may have been made up along the way. I give you a very abstract example. Five years ago, my husband worked for NATO. The commanding officer was a knighted British Army general. I knew his wife through the charity committee. At one of the formal dinners, I chatted with the General and commented on his plaid pants. He noted they represented the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry. He proceeded to tell me what each color represented, for example, the thin white stripe represented the china clay found in Somerset; the red thick line represented the sunset over Cornwall, etc. It sounded plausible. But then his wife later told me it was all rubbish.

    Reply
  6. Thank you for a wonderful history lesson, Cara. I’ve oft been called a history junkie by friends and family, so yes, I love to know the history behind the story whenever possible.
    Case in point: The cover of my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, featured a lovely picture of an Irish castle, taken “somewhere in Galway.” I sent a copy of the book to an Irish friend of mine, who immediately recognized it as Dunguaire Castle, in Kinvara, Galway. I immediately put on my researcher’s cap to find out everything I could about the castle, and last July 15, I walked into the castle. It was almost erie, because I almost felt I was walking in the footsteps of my characters.
    I’ll do so again this summer when I visit Grosse Ile, a former quarrantine station near Quebec. Thousands of Irish immigrants died of typhus on that island, and as the heroes of my next WIPs are Irish immigrants who fled famished Ireland in 1847, it will give me a good idea as to their experience when they first arrived in the new world.
    I do love history!

    Reply
  7. Thank you for a wonderful history lesson, Cara. I’ve oft been called a history junkie by friends and family, so yes, I love to know the history behind the story whenever possible.
    Case in point: The cover of my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, featured a lovely picture of an Irish castle, taken “somewhere in Galway.” I sent a copy of the book to an Irish friend of mine, who immediately recognized it as Dunguaire Castle, in Kinvara, Galway. I immediately put on my researcher’s cap to find out everything I could about the castle, and last July 15, I walked into the castle. It was almost erie, because I almost felt I was walking in the footsteps of my characters.
    I’ll do so again this summer when I visit Grosse Ile, a former quarrantine station near Quebec. Thousands of Irish immigrants died of typhus on that island, and as the heroes of my next WIPs are Irish immigrants who fled famished Ireland in 1847, it will give me a good idea as to their experience when they first arrived in the new world.
    I do love history!

    Reply
  8. Thank you for a wonderful history lesson, Cara. I’ve oft been called a history junkie by friends and family, so yes, I love to know the history behind the story whenever possible.
    Case in point: The cover of my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, featured a lovely picture of an Irish castle, taken “somewhere in Galway.” I sent a copy of the book to an Irish friend of mine, who immediately recognized it as Dunguaire Castle, in Kinvara, Galway. I immediately put on my researcher’s cap to find out everything I could about the castle, and last July 15, I walked into the castle. It was almost erie, because I almost felt I was walking in the footsteps of my characters.
    I’ll do so again this summer when I visit Grosse Ile, a former quarrantine station near Quebec. Thousands of Irish immigrants died of typhus on that island, and as the heroes of my next WIPs are Irish immigrants who fled famished Ireland in 1847, it will give me a good idea as to their experience when they first arrived in the new world.
    I do love history!

    Reply
  9. Thank you for a wonderful history lesson, Cara. I’ve oft been called a history junkie by friends and family, so yes, I love to know the history behind the story whenever possible.
    Case in point: The cover of my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, featured a lovely picture of an Irish castle, taken “somewhere in Galway.” I sent a copy of the book to an Irish friend of mine, who immediately recognized it as Dunguaire Castle, in Kinvara, Galway. I immediately put on my researcher’s cap to find out everything I could about the castle, and last July 15, I walked into the castle. It was almost erie, because I almost felt I was walking in the footsteps of my characters.
    I’ll do so again this summer when I visit Grosse Ile, a former quarrantine station near Quebec. Thousands of Irish immigrants died of typhus on that island, and as the heroes of my next WIPs are Irish immigrants who fled famished Ireland in 1847, it will give me a good idea as to their experience when they first arrived in the new world.
    I do love history!

    Reply
  10. Thank you for a wonderful history lesson, Cara. I’ve oft been called a history junkie by friends and family, so yes, I love to know the history behind the story whenever possible.
    Case in point: The cover of my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, featured a lovely picture of an Irish castle, taken “somewhere in Galway.” I sent a copy of the book to an Irish friend of mine, who immediately recognized it as Dunguaire Castle, in Kinvara, Galway. I immediately put on my researcher’s cap to find out everything I could about the castle, and last July 15, I walked into the castle. It was almost erie, because I almost felt I was walking in the footsteps of my characters.
    I’ll do so again this summer when I visit Grosse Ile, a former quarrantine station near Quebec. Thousands of Irish immigrants died of typhus on that island, and as the heroes of my next WIPs are Irish immigrants who fled famished Ireland in 1847, it will give me a good idea as to their experience when they first arrived in the new world.
    I do love history!

    Reply
  11. Oh, Kim, thanking for sharing your story! I give the general high marks for imagination, and love his choice of what the colors meant. But he should have fessed up to the prank—it wasn’t very nice to pull your leg about his trousers. (Perhaps he had imbibed a wee too much of a certain Scottish libation!)
    I’m like you—I really feel I appreciate history more when I understand the details that make it come alive. And you discover such fascinating tidbits when you take the time to do a little research. At least they are fascinating to me!

    Reply
  12. Oh, Kim, thanking for sharing your story! I give the general high marks for imagination, and love his choice of what the colors meant. But he should have fessed up to the prank—it wasn’t very nice to pull your leg about his trousers. (Perhaps he had imbibed a wee too much of a certain Scottish libation!)
    I’m like you—I really feel I appreciate history more when I understand the details that make it come alive. And you discover such fascinating tidbits when you take the time to do a little research. At least they are fascinating to me!

    Reply
  13. Oh, Kim, thanking for sharing your story! I give the general high marks for imagination, and love his choice of what the colors meant. But he should have fessed up to the prank—it wasn’t very nice to pull your leg about his trousers. (Perhaps he had imbibed a wee too much of a certain Scottish libation!)
    I’m like you—I really feel I appreciate history more when I understand the details that make it come alive. And you discover such fascinating tidbits when you take the time to do a little research. At least they are fascinating to me!

    Reply
  14. Oh, Kim, thanking for sharing your story! I give the general high marks for imagination, and love his choice of what the colors meant. But he should have fessed up to the prank—it wasn’t very nice to pull your leg about his trousers. (Perhaps he had imbibed a wee too much of a certain Scottish libation!)
    I’m like you—I really feel I appreciate history more when I understand the details that make it come alive. And you discover such fascinating tidbits when you take the time to do a little research. At least they are fascinating to me!

    Reply
  15. Oh, Kim, thanking for sharing your story! I give the general high marks for imagination, and love his choice of what the colors meant. But he should have fessed up to the prank—it wasn’t very nice to pull your leg about his trousers. (Perhaps he had imbibed a wee too much of a certain Scottish libation!)
    I’m like you—I really feel I appreciate history more when I understand the details that make it come alive. And you discover such fascinating tidbits when you take the time to do a little research. At least they are fascinating to me!

    Reply
  16. Cynthia,
    That’s such a wonderful story about visiting the castle. I get goosebumps too when I walk through a place that I’ve read about or used as a setting in my stories. I remeber a while ago stumbling upon St. george’s in hanover Square, which is featured in so many regency romances as THE place for weddings. I was so excited, I must have started emitting tiny little shrieks of delight because the friends I was with thought I had lost my marbles. When I explained, they just sort of shook their heads, and didn’t quite get it. That’s one reason I love visiting museums with fellow history geeks. We can gush together!
    I’m sure your visit to the quarantine station will be very moving, and add extra inspiration to your WIP.

    Reply
  17. Cynthia,
    That’s such a wonderful story about visiting the castle. I get goosebumps too when I walk through a place that I’ve read about or used as a setting in my stories. I remeber a while ago stumbling upon St. george’s in hanover Square, which is featured in so many regency romances as THE place for weddings. I was so excited, I must have started emitting tiny little shrieks of delight because the friends I was with thought I had lost my marbles. When I explained, they just sort of shook their heads, and didn’t quite get it. That’s one reason I love visiting museums with fellow history geeks. We can gush together!
    I’m sure your visit to the quarantine station will be very moving, and add extra inspiration to your WIP.

    Reply
  18. Cynthia,
    That’s such a wonderful story about visiting the castle. I get goosebumps too when I walk through a place that I’ve read about or used as a setting in my stories. I remeber a while ago stumbling upon St. george’s in hanover Square, which is featured in so many regency romances as THE place for weddings. I was so excited, I must have started emitting tiny little shrieks of delight because the friends I was with thought I had lost my marbles. When I explained, they just sort of shook their heads, and didn’t quite get it. That’s one reason I love visiting museums with fellow history geeks. We can gush together!
    I’m sure your visit to the quarantine station will be very moving, and add extra inspiration to your WIP.

    Reply
  19. Cynthia,
    That’s such a wonderful story about visiting the castle. I get goosebumps too when I walk through a place that I’ve read about or used as a setting in my stories. I remeber a while ago stumbling upon St. george’s in hanover Square, which is featured in so many regency romances as THE place for weddings. I was so excited, I must have started emitting tiny little shrieks of delight because the friends I was with thought I had lost my marbles. When I explained, they just sort of shook their heads, and didn’t quite get it. That’s one reason I love visiting museums with fellow history geeks. We can gush together!
    I’m sure your visit to the quarantine station will be very moving, and add extra inspiration to your WIP.

    Reply
  20. Cynthia,
    That’s such a wonderful story about visiting the castle. I get goosebumps too when I walk through a place that I’ve read about or used as a setting in my stories. I remeber a while ago stumbling upon St. george’s in hanover Square, which is featured in so many regency romances as THE place for weddings. I was so excited, I must have started emitting tiny little shrieks of delight because the friends I was with thought I had lost my marbles. When I explained, they just sort of shook their heads, and didn’t quite get it. That’s one reason I love visiting museums with fellow history geeks. We can gush together!
    I’m sure your visit to the quarantine station will be very moving, and add extra inspiration to your WIP.

    Reply
  21. How delicious, Cara! I’ve heard these regiments referred to again and again, but since I’ve never had reason to research them, the details were very hazy in my mind. Now I have a much better sense of them.
    I was amused to learn that Horse Guards still houses horse. *g* But if there are going to be ceremonial guards on horseback, I guess the horses have to be convenient!

    Reply
  22. How delicious, Cara! I’ve heard these regiments referred to again and again, but since I’ve never had reason to research them, the details were very hazy in my mind. Now I have a much better sense of them.
    I was amused to learn that Horse Guards still houses horse. *g* But if there are going to be ceremonial guards on horseback, I guess the horses have to be convenient!

    Reply
  23. How delicious, Cara! I’ve heard these regiments referred to again and again, but since I’ve never had reason to research them, the details were very hazy in my mind. Now I have a much better sense of them.
    I was amused to learn that Horse Guards still houses horse. *g* But if there are going to be ceremonial guards on horseback, I guess the horses have to be convenient!

    Reply
  24. How delicious, Cara! I’ve heard these regiments referred to again and again, but since I’ve never had reason to research them, the details were very hazy in my mind. Now I have a much better sense of them.
    I was amused to learn that Horse Guards still houses horse. *g* But if there are going to be ceremonial guards on horseback, I guess the horses have to be convenient!

    Reply
  25. How delicious, Cara! I’ve heard these regiments referred to again and again, but since I’ve never had reason to research them, the details were very hazy in my mind. Now I have a much better sense of them.
    I was amused to learn that Horse Guards still houses horse. *g* But if there are going to be ceremonial guards on horseback, I guess the horses have to be convenient!

    Reply
  26. LOL, Mary Jo. The main stables are somewhere close by, but they have a few working stalls and a large plate glass window so you can watch the horses being saddled for the ceremonial duties. And the setting is the original stables, with all the old worn wood and cobbles, so very cool to see.

    Reply
  27. LOL, Mary Jo. The main stables are somewhere close by, but they have a few working stalls and a large plate glass window so you can watch the horses being saddled for the ceremonial duties. And the setting is the original stables, with all the old worn wood and cobbles, so very cool to see.

    Reply
  28. LOL, Mary Jo. The main stables are somewhere close by, but they have a few working stalls and a large plate glass window so you can watch the horses being saddled for the ceremonial duties. And the setting is the original stables, with all the old worn wood and cobbles, so very cool to see.

    Reply
  29. LOL, Mary Jo. The main stables are somewhere close by, but they have a few working stalls and a large plate glass window so you can watch the horses being saddled for the ceremonial duties. And the setting is the original stables, with all the old worn wood and cobbles, so very cool to see.

    Reply
  30. LOL, Mary Jo. The main stables are somewhere close by, but they have a few working stalls and a large plate glass window so you can watch the horses being saddled for the ceremonial duties. And the setting is the original stables, with all the old worn wood and cobbles, so very cool to see.

    Reply
  31. Lovely post, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by the various regiments and how they emerged and developed traditions and some mythology. I also find their uniform histories fascinating — how in some cases they were designed to flatter a portly Prince and make him look dashing on the dance floor, and how the poor real life soldiers then had to seat it out , fighting in impossible uniforms.
    I’m always interested to learn the history behind things.

    Reply
  32. Lovely post, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by the various regiments and how they emerged and developed traditions and some mythology. I also find their uniform histories fascinating — how in some cases they were designed to flatter a portly Prince and make him look dashing on the dance floor, and how the poor real life soldiers then had to seat it out , fighting in impossible uniforms.
    I’m always interested to learn the history behind things.

    Reply
  33. Lovely post, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by the various regiments and how they emerged and developed traditions and some mythology. I also find their uniform histories fascinating — how in some cases they were designed to flatter a portly Prince and make him look dashing on the dance floor, and how the poor real life soldiers then had to seat it out , fighting in impossible uniforms.
    I’m always interested to learn the history behind things.

    Reply
  34. Lovely post, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by the various regiments and how they emerged and developed traditions and some mythology. I also find their uniform histories fascinating — how in some cases they were designed to flatter a portly Prince and make him look dashing on the dance floor, and how the poor real life soldiers then had to seat it out , fighting in impossible uniforms.
    I’m always interested to learn the history behind things.

    Reply
  35. Lovely post, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by the various regiments and how they emerged and developed traditions and some mythology. I also find their uniform histories fascinating — how in some cases they were designed to flatter a portly Prince and make him look dashing on the dance floor, and how the poor real life soldiers then had to seat it out , fighting in impossible uniforms.
    I’m always interested to learn the history behind things.

    Reply
  36. Anne, I love looking at the uniforms too, and learning what all the little geegaws mean—-as you say, the poor foot soldiers who had to polish brass, pipeclay belts and wear towering bearskin hats so that they looked impressive in formation! Can you imagine what heavy wool and fur felt like on a sweltering summer day with smoke and bullets whizzing all around! Regimentals do look dashing on a dance floor.

    Reply
  37. Anne, I love looking at the uniforms too, and learning what all the little geegaws mean—-as you say, the poor foot soldiers who had to polish brass, pipeclay belts and wear towering bearskin hats so that they looked impressive in formation! Can you imagine what heavy wool and fur felt like on a sweltering summer day with smoke and bullets whizzing all around! Regimentals do look dashing on a dance floor.

    Reply
  38. Anne, I love looking at the uniforms too, and learning what all the little geegaws mean—-as you say, the poor foot soldiers who had to polish brass, pipeclay belts and wear towering bearskin hats so that they looked impressive in formation! Can you imagine what heavy wool and fur felt like on a sweltering summer day with smoke and bullets whizzing all around! Regimentals do look dashing on a dance floor.

    Reply
  39. Anne, I love looking at the uniforms too, and learning what all the little geegaws mean—-as you say, the poor foot soldiers who had to polish brass, pipeclay belts and wear towering bearskin hats so that they looked impressive in formation! Can you imagine what heavy wool and fur felt like on a sweltering summer day with smoke and bullets whizzing all around! Regimentals do look dashing on a dance floor.

    Reply
  40. Anne, I love looking at the uniforms too, and learning what all the little geegaws mean—-as you say, the poor foot soldiers who had to polish brass, pipeclay belts and wear towering bearskin hats so that they looked impressive in formation! Can you imagine what heavy wool and fur felt like on a sweltering summer day with smoke and bullets whizzing all around! Regimentals do look dashing on a dance floor.

    Reply
  41. When visiting London, most tourists line up in front of Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard. But I knew that the Guard were “inspected” outside of St. James’ Palace before marching down the broadway to Buckingham Palace with fewer tourists to block the view. But the best “show” is the changing of the Life Guards behind Whitehall – the horses are gorgeous and tourists are few.

    Reply
  42. When visiting London, most tourists line up in front of Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard. But I knew that the Guard were “inspected” outside of St. James’ Palace before marching down the broadway to Buckingham Palace with fewer tourists to block the view. But the best “show” is the changing of the Life Guards behind Whitehall – the horses are gorgeous and tourists are few.

    Reply
  43. When visiting London, most tourists line up in front of Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard. But I knew that the Guard were “inspected” outside of St. James’ Palace before marching down the broadway to Buckingham Palace with fewer tourists to block the view. But the best “show” is the changing of the Life Guards behind Whitehall – the horses are gorgeous and tourists are few.

    Reply
  44. When visiting London, most tourists line up in front of Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard. But I knew that the Guard were “inspected” outside of St. James’ Palace before marching down the broadway to Buckingham Palace with fewer tourists to block the view. But the best “show” is the changing of the Life Guards behind Whitehall – the horses are gorgeous and tourists are few.

    Reply
  45. When visiting London, most tourists line up in front of Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard. But I knew that the Guard were “inspected” outside of St. James’ Palace before marching down the broadway to Buckingham Palace with fewer tourists to block the view. But the best “show” is the changing of the Life Guards behind Whitehall – the horses are gorgeous and tourists are few.

    Reply
  46. Yes, that’s very true, Kim! It’s very impressive, and as you say, uncrowded. There’s a great story too about the changing . . . it may be only for the guards at Horse Guards (didn’t get that clarified) But apparently the Guards were 15 minutes late one day when Queen Victoria was waiting for them. Furious with the delay, she decreed that from then on, they were to stand in formation for 15 minutes before taking up their posts, and the tradition continues to this day. So they line up facing each other on the parade ground and must stay there for the requisite time (great photo op) before moving on.

    Reply
  47. Yes, that’s very true, Kim! It’s very impressive, and as you say, uncrowded. There’s a great story too about the changing . . . it may be only for the guards at Horse Guards (didn’t get that clarified) But apparently the Guards were 15 minutes late one day when Queen Victoria was waiting for them. Furious with the delay, she decreed that from then on, they were to stand in formation for 15 minutes before taking up their posts, and the tradition continues to this day. So they line up facing each other on the parade ground and must stay there for the requisite time (great photo op) before moving on.

    Reply
  48. Yes, that’s very true, Kim! It’s very impressive, and as you say, uncrowded. There’s a great story too about the changing . . . it may be only for the guards at Horse Guards (didn’t get that clarified) But apparently the Guards were 15 minutes late one day when Queen Victoria was waiting for them. Furious with the delay, she decreed that from then on, they were to stand in formation for 15 minutes before taking up their posts, and the tradition continues to this day. So they line up facing each other on the parade ground and must stay there for the requisite time (great photo op) before moving on.

    Reply
  49. Yes, that’s very true, Kim! It’s very impressive, and as you say, uncrowded. There’s a great story too about the changing . . . it may be only for the guards at Horse Guards (didn’t get that clarified) But apparently the Guards were 15 minutes late one day when Queen Victoria was waiting for them. Furious with the delay, she decreed that from then on, they were to stand in formation for 15 minutes before taking up their posts, and the tradition continues to this day. So they line up facing each other on the parade ground and must stay there for the requisite time (great photo op) before moving on.

    Reply
  50. Yes, that’s very true, Kim! It’s very impressive, and as you say, uncrowded. There’s a great story too about the changing . . . it may be only for the guards at Horse Guards (didn’t get that clarified) But apparently the Guards were 15 minutes late one day when Queen Victoria was waiting for them. Furious with the delay, she decreed that from then on, they were to stand in formation for 15 minutes before taking up their posts, and the tradition continues to this day. So they line up facing each other on the parade ground and must stay there for the requisite time (great photo op) before moving on.

    Reply
  51. I much prefer the history to the artistic license. *LOL* This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing and doing all the hard work for us!
    And I didn’t know that about the changing of the guard either! *lol* Don’t tick off the queen!

    Reply
  52. I much prefer the history to the artistic license. *LOL* This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing and doing all the hard work for us!
    And I didn’t know that about the changing of the guard either! *lol* Don’t tick off the queen!

    Reply
  53. I much prefer the history to the artistic license. *LOL* This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing and doing all the hard work for us!
    And I didn’t know that about the changing of the guard either! *lol* Don’t tick off the queen!

    Reply
  54. I much prefer the history to the artistic license. *LOL* This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing and doing all the hard work for us!
    And I didn’t know that about the changing of the guard either! *lol* Don’t tick off the queen!

    Reply
  55. I much prefer the history to the artistic license. *LOL* This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing and doing all the hard work for us!
    And I didn’t know that about the changing of the guard either! *lol* Don’t tick off the queen!

    Reply
  56. Interesting post. Thank you.
    I love digging around to learn the history of place, people, and things. Our vacations focus on two things, Nature and History. We generally visit every National or State Park and historic site possible on our trips. I generally research the area before we go, so I have some of the history and interesting information on hand. It also helps me make a list of those places we don’t want to miss. Knowing the background makes the trip and what we see more meaningful and better understood.

    Reply
  57. Interesting post. Thank you.
    I love digging around to learn the history of place, people, and things. Our vacations focus on two things, Nature and History. We generally visit every National or State Park and historic site possible on our trips. I generally research the area before we go, so I have some of the history and interesting information on hand. It also helps me make a list of those places we don’t want to miss. Knowing the background makes the trip and what we see more meaningful and better understood.

    Reply
  58. Interesting post. Thank you.
    I love digging around to learn the history of place, people, and things. Our vacations focus on two things, Nature and History. We generally visit every National or State Park and historic site possible on our trips. I generally research the area before we go, so I have some of the history and interesting information on hand. It also helps me make a list of those places we don’t want to miss. Knowing the background makes the trip and what we see more meaningful and better understood.

    Reply
  59. Interesting post. Thank you.
    I love digging around to learn the history of place, people, and things. Our vacations focus on two things, Nature and History. We generally visit every National or State Park and historic site possible on our trips. I generally research the area before we go, so I have some of the history and interesting information on hand. It also helps me make a list of those places we don’t want to miss. Knowing the background makes the trip and what we see more meaningful and better understood.

    Reply
  60. Interesting post. Thank you.
    I love digging around to learn the history of place, people, and things. Our vacations focus on two things, Nature and History. We generally visit every National or State Park and historic site possible on our trips. I generally research the area before we go, so I have some of the history and interesting information on hand. It also helps me make a list of those places we don’t want to miss. Knowing the background makes the trip and what we see more meaningful and better understood.

    Reply
  61. I’ve been lucky enough to see the Blues and Royals band in concert. I also love the history of the Green Rifles. They have a great museum in Winchester that has an authentic scale model of the Waterloo battlefield. We were in London last September 11th and got to see the Rifles band and the Household band play at a memorial service. The service was held in front of the US embassy at the lovely memorial to the fallen in Grosvenor Square.

    Reply
  62. I’ve been lucky enough to see the Blues and Royals band in concert. I also love the history of the Green Rifles. They have a great museum in Winchester that has an authentic scale model of the Waterloo battlefield. We were in London last September 11th and got to see the Rifles band and the Household band play at a memorial service. The service was held in front of the US embassy at the lovely memorial to the fallen in Grosvenor Square.

    Reply
  63. I’ve been lucky enough to see the Blues and Royals band in concert. I also love the history of the Green Rifles. They have a great museum in Winchester that has an authentic scale model of the Waterloo battlefield. We were in London last September 11th and got to see the Rifles band and the Household band play at a memorial service. The service was held in front of the US embassy at the lovely memorial to the fallen in Grosvenor Square.

    Reply
  64. I’ve been lucky enough to see the Blues and Royals band in concert. I also love the history of the Green Rifles. They have a great museum in Winchester that has an authentic scale model of the Waterloo battlefield. We were in London last September 11th and got to see the Rifles band and the Household band play at a memorial service. The service was held in front of the US embassy at the lovely memorial to the fallen in Grosvenor Square.

    Reply
  65. I’ve been lucky enough to see the Blues and Royals band in concert. I also love the history of the Green Rifles. They have a great museum in Winchester that has an authentic scale model of the Waterloo battlefield. We were in London last September 11th and got to see the Rifles band and the Household band play at a memorial service. The service was held in front of the US embassy at the lovely memorial to the fallen in Grosvenor Square.

    Reply

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