Home, sweet home. But where?

Billyjungle
I'm off to England for a month in March (don't worry, I'll be blogging from there), which is a first step toward possibly moving back to England this year. On the left is Billy, ready to explore.

As you can imagine that's both exciting and, literally, unsettling. There are so many little details to attend to, but they aren't a huge hurdle. The majority of people never emigrate from their home country. Most never seriously consider it. Some of us take it in our stride. I call it the nomadic gene.

British people seem to have that gene quite strongly, and Americans not much at all. At first glance the explanation could be that in a nation of mostly immigrants, like America, Canada, Australia etc once people are settled, they're happy to stay that way. Do you think that's true? It might be logical to think of it the other way around — that people who left a homeland already had a bit of the nomad in them.

I'm not sure it works the other way around. The people of most European countries don't seem to feel the same drive to head around the world just because. Mind you, I found this caricature on Allposters.com.

Immigrant
It's called "Place! Place!, Caricature of the Returning Emigrants, 1815." Clearly a different kind of immigrant — the pre-revolution exiled aristocracy returning to France after the fall of Napoleon and the restoration of the Bourbons.

Many people through history have been forced to leave their native lands, of course.

Have you ever thought about emigration? If you think you'd like to try it, where would you go? Are you an emigrant? What are your feelings about it?

On writing, I have long realized that one of my themes in my books is the need for a home. In some books it's explicit, but it's there in all of them. My happy ending requires a really good home. I remember reading a friend's book, and it was wonderful until the end, where they basically wandered off to find a place. I wailed at her, "That's so sad!" She was bemused. "But they have each other. They'll be fine."

"No, no, no," I complained. "I need to see it. I need it fixed and believable. Each other, AND the right home for their happy future. Preferably with the right community around them as well. And if possible, that it's very likely they'll stay there."

Do you share this need for a home for the "happy ending" or are you okay with the happy together couples sailing away, or heading west on a wagon train, or taking a spaceship to the stars?

Recognizing my focus on homes showed that being a nomad can leave dislocations, and that a bit of me was not entirely at home, which was the beginning on this idea of "going home." And after all, if home isn't there, we can come back to Canada, or go elsewhere.

I have a couple of writing things to clear away before we go for our try-out month. One was the proposal for my next book, tentatively titled The Secret Duke, sent off a few days ago. I'll be talking more about that, and the title, in time.
Faerym

The other is finishing a grail novella for A Chalice of Roses, the next project by the "Faery Four" — me, Mary Jo, Karen Harbaugh and Barbara Samuels. Did I mention that Barbara has a new book out under the writing name Barbara O'Neal? The Lost Recipe for Happiness (recipes included) is flying off shelves. Check out her web site. 

Dragonsm

My story is medieval, and can be summed up as "a nun discovers she must find and marry a mystical knight to manifest the Grail and bring peace to England. She's not happy about it."

Once that's done, I can head of for a month on the Devon coast with nothing hanging over my head but the final decision. I will be working there, though, because we want to act as if we're living there, not just on holiday.

Shell_Cove
Here's where we'll be staying
which is more or less in the picture, with the small town of Dawlish in the distance. Amusingly, the best pictures of this area come from train buffs, because a railway line runs along the coast, as seen here. It's a regular working train line, but also a very scenic one.
(Picture source Geoff Sheppard, Creative Commons.)

Oh, and I'm beginning promo for The Secret Wedding, of course. As always with books, most of it is out of my hands, but I like to keep my readers informed. I've come up with a one-liner for it. "Getting married is just the beginning of their problems."

Happy February! Spring is getting closer all the time. I saw snowdrops here yesterday.

Snowdrops

Jo 🙂

130 thoughts on “Home, sweet home. But where?”

  1. I live just along the coast from there – westward. (Which means I just have to come out of lurkdom. And it’s freezing here right now, despite us not having any snow.)
    As for emigration, I always used to want to move to New Zealand, right from when I was about 7. Apart from the fact that we have a lot of family already moved out there, I think it’s because there seem to be a lot of similarites with my part of the world – except on a much larger, wilder scale, and that certainly appeals. Not sure I’d fancy the bigger insects though 🙂 These days I’m more sanguine about it, but I wouldn’t say no if the chance arose.
    With a happy ending, I agree it is nice for them to have a base from which to build their future. But only if staying still and settling down fits the characters. I’d rather they continued to wander around in search of something after the end of the book, than have an adventurous type settling down for simulated domestic bliss, when it’s obvious in a few years they’ll want to be off somewhere again, perhaps wrecking that simulated bliss in the process.
    As long as the characters are true to their own notions of happiness, I’m pretty happy too.

    Reply
  2. I live just along the coast from there – westward. (Which means I just have to come out of lurkdom. And it’s freezing here right now, despite us not having any snow.)
    As for emigration, I always used to want to move to New Zealand, right from when I was about 7. Apart from the fact that we have a lot of family already moved out there, I think it’s because there seem to be a lot of similarites with my part of the world – except on a much larger, wilder scale, and that certainly appeals. Not sure I’d fancy the bigger insects though 🙂 These days I’m more sanguine about it, but I wouldn’t say no if the chance arose.
    With a happy ending, I agree it is nice for them to have a base from which to build their future. But only if staying still and settling down fits the characters. I’d rather they continued to wander around in search of something after the end of the book, than have an adventurous type settling down for simulated domestic bliss, when it’s obvious in a few years they’ll want to be off somewhere again, perhaps wrecking that simulated bliss in the process.
    As long as the characters are true to their own notions of happiness, I’m pretty happy too.

    Reply
  3. I live just along the coast from there – westward. (Which means I just have to come out of lurkdom. And it’s freezing here right now, despite us not having any snow.)
    As for emigration, I always used to want to move to New Zealand, right from when I was about 7. Apart from the fact that we have a lot of family already moved out there, I think it’s because there seem to be a lot of similarites with my part of the world – except on a much larger, wilder scale, and that certainly appeals. Not sure I’d fancy the bigger insects though 🙂 These days I’m more sanguine about it, but I wouldn’t say no if the chance arose.
    With a happy ending, I agree it is nice for them to have a base from which to build their future. But only if staying still and settling down fits the characters. I’d rather they continued to wander around in search of something after the end of the book, than have an adventurous type settling down for simulated domestic bliss, when it’s obvious in a few years they’ll want to be off somewhere again, perhaps wrecking that simulated bliss in the process.
    As long as the characters are true to their own notions of happiness, I’m pretty happy too.

    Reply
  4. I live just along the coast from there – westward. (Which means I just have to come out of lurkdom. And it’s freezing here right now, despite us not having any snow.)
    As for emigration, I always used to want to move to New Zealand, right from when I was about 7. Apart from the fact that we have a lot of family already moved out there, I think it’s because there seem to be a lot of similarites with my part of the world – except on a much larger, wilder scale, and that certainly appeals. Not sure I’d fancy the bigger insects though 🙂 These days I’m more sanguine about it, but I wouldn’t say no if the chance arose.
    With a happy ending, I agree it is nice for them to have a base from which to build their future. But only if staying still and settling down fits the characters. I’d rather they continued to wander around in search of something after the end of the book, than have an adventurous type settling down for simulated domestic bliss, when it’s obvious in a few years they’ll want to be off somewhere again, perhaps wrecking that simulated bliss in the process.
    As long as the characters are true to their own notions of happiness, I’m pretty happy too.

    Reply
  5. I live just along the coast from there – westward. (Which means I just have to come out of lurkdom. And it’s freezing here right now, despite us not having any snow.)
    As for emigration, I always used to want to move to New Zealand, right from when I was about 7. Apart from the fact that we have a lot of family already moved out there, I think it’s because there seem to be a lot of similarites with my part of the world – except on a much larger, wilder scale, and that certainly appeals. Not sure I’d fancy the bigger insects though 🙂 These days I’m more sanguine about it, but I wouldn’t say no if the chance arose.
    With a happy ending, I agree it is nice for them to have a base from which to build their future. But only if staying still and settling down fits the characters. I’d rather they continued to wander around in search of something after the end of the book, than have an adventurous type settling down for simulated domestic bliss, when it’s obvious in a few years they’ll want to be off somewhere again, perhaps wrecking that simulated bliss in the process.
    As long as the characters are true to their own notions of happiness, I’m pretty happy too.

    Reply
  6. I’ve been very nomadic in my adult life, and actually am planning my fourth cross-country move (and hopefully my last — this is getting a tad old) next year.
    My mom is an immigrant (from Denmark), and my grandmother and great-grandfather, and maybe another generation back, before her. They all came over here, and with the exception of my mother, ended up going back. My grandmother married in Denmark and told my grandfather on their first date she wanted to come back to the States *grin*.
    So for me, moving around is in the blood, though everyone eventually settled. I think once I go back to California, I’ll settle too.
    Here’s hoping the state government gets its act together before I move :).
    Good luck with the try-out month in Devon. It’s always a bit strange moving to a new place, even if it’s an old one.

    Reply
  7. I’ve been very nomadic in my adult life, and actually am planning my fourth cross-country move (and hopefully my last — this is getting a tad old) next year.
    My mom is an immigrant (from Denmark), and my grandmother and great-grandfather, and maybe another generation back, before her. They all came over here, and with the exception of my mother, ended up going back. My grandmother married in Denmark and told my grandfather on their first date she wanted to come back to the States *grin*.
    So for me, moving around is in the blood, though everyone eventually settled. I think once I go back to California, I’ll settle too.
    Here’s hoping the state government gets its act together before I move :).
    Good luck with the try-out month in Devon. It’s always a bit strange moving to a new place, even if it’s an old one.

    Reply
  8. I’ve been very nomadic in my adult life, and actually am planning my fourth cross-country move (and hopefully my last — this is getting a tad old) next year.
    My mom is an immigrant (from Denmark), and my grandmother and great-grandfather, and maybe another generation back, before her. They all came over here, and with the exception of my mother, ended up going back. My grandmother married in Denmark and told my grandfather on their first date she wanted to come back to the States *grin*.
    So for me, moving around is in the blood, though everyone eventually settled. I think once I go back to California, I’ll settle too.
    Here’s hoping the state government gets its act together before I move :).
    Good luck with the try-out month in Devon. It’s always a bit strange moving to a new place, even if it’s an old one.

    Reply
  9. I’ve been very nomadic in my adult life, and actually am planning my fourth cross-country move (and hopefully my last — this is getting a tad old) next year.
    My mom is an immigrant (from Denmark), and my grandmother and great-grandfather, and maybe another generation back, before her. They all came over here, and with the exception of my mother, ended up going back. My grandmother married in Denmark and told my grandfather on their first date she wanted to come back to the States *grin*.
    So for me, moving around is in the blood, though everyone eventually settled. I think once I go back to California, I’ll settle too.
    Here’s hoping the state government gets its act together before I move :).
    Good luck with the try-out month in Devon. It’s always a bit strange moving to a new place, even if it’s an old one.

    Reply
  10. I’ve been very nomadic in my adult life, and actually am planning my fourth cross-country move (and hopefully my last — this is getting a tad old) next year.
    My mom is an immigrant (from Denmark), and my grandmother and great-grandfather, and maybe another generation back, before her. They all came over here, and with the exception of my mother, ended up going back. My grandmother married in Denmark and told my grandfather on their first date she wanted to come back to the States *grin*.
    So for me, moving around is in the blood, though everyone eventually settled. I think once I go back to California, I’ll settle too.
    Here’s hoping the state government gets its act together before I move :).
    Good luck with the try-out month in Devon. It’s always a bit strange moving to a new place, even if it’s an old one.

    Reply
  11. I’ve lived in seven states so far and wouldn’t mind moving again if the situation was right. My mom was a war bride from Vienna, who managed to fit in eventually (even living with her mother-in-law). I don’t think I appreciated the difficulty she must have had until I was grown up and she was gone, which saddens me.
    Jo, good luck with whatever you decide! Can’t wait for the new book.

    Reply
  12. I’ve lived in seven states so far and wouldn’t mind moving again if the situation was right. My mom was a war bride from Vienna, who managed to fit in eventually (even living with her mother-in-law). I don’t think I appreciated the difficulty she must have had until I was grown up and she was gone, which saddens me.
    Jo, good luck with whatever you decide! Can’t wait for the new book.

    Reply
  13. I’ve lived in seven states so far and wouldn’t mind moving again if the situation was right. My mom was a war bride from Vienna, who managed to fit in eventually (even living with her mother-in-law). I don’t think I appreciated the difficulty she must have had until I was grown up and she was gone, which saddens me.
    Jo, good luck with whatever you decide! Can’t wait for the new book.

    Reply
  14. I’ve lived in seven states so far and wouldn’t mind moving again if the situation was right. My mom was a war bride from Vienna, who managed to fit in eventually (even living with her mother-in-law). I don’t think I appreciated the difficulty she must have had until I was grown up and she was gone, which saddens me.
    Jo, good luck with whatever you decide! Can’t wait for the new book.

    Reply
  15. I’ve lived in seven states so far and wouldn’t mind moving again if the situation was right. My mom was a war bride from Vienna, who managed to fit in eventually (even living with her mother-in-law). I don’t think I appreciated the difficulty she must have had until I was grown up and she was gone, which saddens me.
    Jo, good luck with whatever you decide! Can’t wait for the new book.

    Reply
  16. You and your husband do like moving! Didn’t you move into ‘the baronial hall’ with the panelled walls only few months ago? Well maybe a year ago, time flies.
    I’ve travelled in that train, going to Cornwall. The views are indeed spectacular.
    I always had the impression you and your husband were northerners, so moving to the West Country would not really be going home, but moving to a new place.
    I’m one of those people who likes to stay put. I live in the town where I grew up, and I have lived in the same flat for 22 years. I dread moving, but that’s a lot to do with all the work involved. I’m lazy. My sister got all the travelling genes in my generation. She now lives in Australia.

    Reply
  17. You and your husband do like moving! Didn’t you move into ‘the baronial hall’ with the panelled walls only few months ago? Well maybe a year ago, time flies.
    I’ve travelled in that train, going to Cornwall. The views are indeed spectacular.
    I always had the impression you and your husband were northerners, so moving to the West Country would not really be going home, but moving to a new place.
    I’m one of those people who likes to stay put. I live in the town where I grew up, and I have lived in the same flat for 22 years. I dread moving, but that’s a lot to do with all the work involved. I’m lazy. My sister got all the travelling genes in my generation. She now lives in Australia.

    Reply
  18. You and your husband do like moving! Didn’t you move into ‘the baronial hall’ with the panelled walls only few months ago? Well maybe a year ago, time flies.
    I’ve travelled in that train, going to Cornwall. The views are indeed spectacular.
    I always had the impression you and your husband were northerners, so moving to the West Country would not really be going home, but moving to a new place.
    I’m one of those people who likes to stay put. I live in the town where I grew up, and I have lived in the same flat for 22 years. I dread moving, but that’s a lot to do with all the work involved. I’m lazy. My sister got all the travelling genes in my generation. She now lives in Australia.

    Reply
  19. You and your husband do like moving! Didn’t you move into ‘the baronial hall’ with the panelled walls only few months ago? Well maybe a year ago, time flies.
    I’ve travelled in that train, going to Cornwall. The views are indeed spectacular.
    I always had the impression you and your husband were northerners, so moving to the West Country would not really be going home, but moving to a new place.
    I’m one of those people who likes to stay put. I live in the town where I grew up, and I have lived in the same flat for 22 years. I dread moving, but that’s a lot to do with all the work involved. I’m lazy. My sister got all the travelling genes in my generation. She now lives in Australia.

    Reply
  20. You and your husband do like moving! Didn’t you move into ‘the baronial hall’ with the panelled walls only few months ago? Well maybe a year ago, time flies.
    I’ve travelled in that train, going to Cornwall. The views are indeed spectacular.
    I always had the impression you and your husband were northerners, so moving to the West Country would not really be going home, but moving to a new place.
    I’m one of those people who likes to stay put. I live in the town where I grew up, and I have lived in the same flat for 22 years. I dread moving, but that’s a lot to do with all the work involved. I’m lazy. My sister got all the travelling genes in my generation. She now lives in Australia.

    Reply
  21. Possibly it’s because Americans don’t really have to emigrate elsewhere to get their doses of ethnic diversity. There was a potluck not too long ago for International Day at the community center — people were supposed to bring dishes to represent their ethnic heritage.
    One young woman — she was in school with my daughter — looked at the instructions doubtfully and commented, “My husband’s from Peru. My father’s from Hungary. Mom was born here, but her father was Norwegian and her mother’s Austrian. Maybe I’ll just bring macaroni and cheese.”
    Other people were dealing with the dilemma of finding something to represent ancestral combinations such as French Canadian/Swedish (my husband), Nigerian/German, Turkish/Latvian, and Italian/Polish.

    Reply
  22. Possibly it’s because Americans don’t really have to emigrate elsewhere to get their doses of ethnic diversity. There was a potluck not too long ago for International Day at the community center — people were supposed to bring dishes to represent their ethnic heritage.
    One young woman — she was in school with my daughter — looked at the instructions doubtfully and commented, “My husband’s from Peru. My father’s from Hungary. Mom was born here, but her father was Norwegian and her mother’s Austrian. Maybe I’ll just bring macaroni and cheese.”
    Other people were dealing with the dilemma of finding something to represent ancestral combinations such as French Canadian/Swedish (my husband), Nigerian/German, Turkish/Latvian, and Italian/Polish.

    Reply
  23. Possibly it’s because Americans don’t really have to emigrate elsewhere to get their doses of ethnic diversity. There was a potluck not too long ago for International Day at the community center — people were supposed to bring dishes to represent their ethnic heritage.
    One young woman — she was in school with my daughter — looked at the instructions doubtfully and commented, “My husband’s from Peru. My father’s from Hungary. Mom was born here, but her father was Norwegian and her mother’s Austrian. Maybe I’ll just bring macaroni and cheese.”
    Other people were dealing with the dilemma of finding something to represent ancestral combinations such as French Canadian/Swedish (my husband), Nigerian/German, Turkish/Latvian, and Italian/Polish.

    Reply
  24. Possibly it’s because Americans don’t really have to emigrate elsewhere to get their doses of ethnic diversity. There was a potluck not too long ago for International Day at the community center — people were supposed to bring dishes to represent their ethnic heritage.
    One young woman — she was in school with my daughter — looked at the instructions doubtfully and commented, “My husband’s from Peru. My father’s from Hungary. Mom was born here, but her father was Norwegian and her mother’s Austrian. Maybe I’ll just bring macaroni and cheese.”
    Other people were dealing with the dilemma of finding something to represent ancestral combinations such as French Canadian/Swedish (my husband), Nigerian/German, Turkish/Latvian, and Italian/Polish.

    Reply
  25. Possibly it’s because Americans don’t really have to emigrate elsewhere to get their doses of ethnic diversity. There was a potluck not too long ago for International Day at the community center — people were supposed to bring dishes to represent their ethnic heritage.
    One young woman — she was in school with my daughter — looked at the instructions doubtfully and commented, “My husband’s from Peru. My father’s from Hungary. Mom was born here, but her father was Norwegian and her mother’s Austrian. Maybe I’ll just bring macaroni and cheese.”
    Other people were dealing with the dilemma of finding something to represent ancestral combinations such as French Canadian/Swedish (my husband), Nigerian/German, Turkish/Latvian, and Italian/Polish.

    Reply
  26. Ingrid, yes, I’m a northerner but my husband’s from Surrey. Neither of us from the west country, though, so it will be another change. We really love it there, but it is possible our roots won’t transplant there.
    Becca, thanks for delurking! I love how world-wide the cyberworld is. 🙂
    Yes, the snow in England is amazing, but we had a blast of unusual winter here in British Columbia. Weather chaos everywhere. I see the webcam of Dawlish is showing snow and a temp of -9 degrees C!
    If anyone wants to peep.
    http://www.dawlishweather.co.uk
    To compare the pic above the webcam is up in the higher part of town looking out to sea.
    Here’s one from Dartmoor.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/webcams/dartmoor_webcam.shtml
    or (http://tinyurl.com/cs7yvl)
    Or there’s a whole page of them from Guernsey. That’s a Channel Island. It’s supposed to be balmy!
    http://tinyurl.com/c4d2cp
    Amazing.
    Jo

    Reply
  27. Ingrid, yes, I’m a northerner but my husband’s from Surrey. Neither of us from the west country, though, so it will be another change. We really love it there, but it is possible our roots won’t transplant there.
    Becca, thanks for delurking! I love how world-wide the cyberworld is. 🙂
    Yes, the snow in England is amazing, but we had a blast of unusual winter here in British Columbia. Weather chaos everywhere. I see the webcam of Dawlish is showing snow and a temp of -9 degrees C!
    If anyone wants to peep.
    http://www.dawlishweather.co.uk
    To compare the pic above the webcam is up in the higher part of town looking out to sea.
    Here’s one from Dartmoor.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/webcams/dartmoor_webcam.shtml
    or (http://tinyurl.com/cs7yvl)
    Or there’s a whole page of them from Guernsey. That’s a Channel Island. It’s supposed to be balmy!
    http://tinyurl.com/c4d2cp
    Amazing.
    Jo

    Reply
  28. Ingrid, yes, I’m a northerner but my husband’s from Surrey. Neither of us from the west country, though, so it will be another change. We really love it there, but it is possible our roots won’t transplant there.
    Becca, thanks for delurking! I love how world-wide the cyberworld is. 🙂
    Yes, the snow in England is amazing, but we had a blast of unusual winter here in British Columbia. Weather chaos everywhere. I see the webcam of Dawlish is showing snow and a temp of -9 degrees C!
    If anyone wants to peep.
    http://www.dawlishweather.co.uk
    To compare the pic above the webcam is up in the higher part of town looking out to sea.
    Here’s one from Dartmoor.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/webcams/dartmoor_webcam.shtml
    or (http://tinyurl.com/cs7yvl)
    Or there’s a whole page of them from Guernsey. That’s a Channel Island. It’s supposed to be balmy!
    http://tinyurl.com/c4d2cp
    Amazing.
    Jo

    Reply
  29. Ingrid, yes, I’m a northerner but my husband’s from Surrey. Neither of us from the west country, though, so it will be another change. We really love it there, but it is possible our roots won’t transplant there.
    Becca, thanks for delurking! I love how world-wide the cyberworld is. 🙂
    Yes, the snow in England is amazing, but we had a blast of unusual winter here in British Columbia. Weather chaos everywhere. I see the webcam of Dawlish is showing snow and a temp of -9 degrees C!
    If anyone wants to peep.
    http://www.dawlishweather.co.uk
    To compare the pic above the webcam is up in the higher part of town looking out to sea.
    Here’s one from Dartmoor.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/webcams/dartmoor_webcam.shtml
    or (http://tinyurl.com/cs7yvl)
    Or there’s a whole page of them from Guernsey. That’s a Channel Island. It’s supposed to be balmy!
    http://tinyurl.com/c4d2cp
    Amazing.
    Jo

    Reply
  30. Ingrid, yes, I’m a northerner but my husband’s from Surrey. Neither of us from the west country, though, so it will be another change. We really love it there, but it is possible our roots won’t transplant there.
    Becca, thanks for delurking! I love how world-wide the cyberworld is. 🙂
    Yes, the snow in England is amazing, but we had a blast of unusual winter here in British Columbia. Weather chaos everywhere. I see the webcam of Dawlish is showing snow and a temp of -9 degrees C!
    If anyone wants to peep.
    http://www.dawlishweather.co.uk
    To compare the pic above the webcam is up in the higher part of town looking out to sea.
    Here’s one from Dartmoor.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/content/webcams/dartmoor_webcam.shtml
    or (http://tinyurl.com/cs7yvl)
    Or there’s a whole page of them from Guernsey. That’s a Channel Island. It’s supposed to be balmy!
    http://tinyurl.com/c4d2cp
    Amazing.
    Jo

    Reply
  31. Well, I moved mainly for jobs. I’m from New England, went to New York for college, to Texas for a job, back to New York (a different part) for a job, and now I’m back in NE, but not where I started from, where we’ll stay. If I moved anywhere, it would be back to upstate New York.
    Did I like the moving? At the time, it was OK. I doubt I will do it again. Moving is very expensive, and I’m sick to death of the day job. I’d rather stay put and save my money and not have to put up with employment garbage anymore.
    If moving works for you, go for it.

    Reply
  32. Well, I moved mainly for jobs. I’m from New England, went to New York for college, to Texas for a job, back to New York (a different part) for a job, and now I’m back in NE, but not where I started from, where we’ll stay. If I moved anywhere, it would be back to upstate New York.
    Did I like the moving? At the time, it was OK. I doubt I will do it again. Moving is very expensive, and I’m sick to death of the day job. I’d rather stay put and save my money and not have to put up with employment garbage anymore.
    If moving works for you, go for it.

    Reply
  33. Well, I moved mainly for jobs. I’m from New England, went to New York for college, to Texas for a job, back to New York (a different part) for a job, and now I’m back in NE, but not where I started from, where we’ll stay. If I moved anywhere, it would be back to upstate New York.
    Did I like the moving? At the time, it was OK. I doubt I will do it again. Moving is very expensive, and I’m sick to death of the day job. I’d rather stay put and save my money and not have to put up with employment garbage anymore.
    If moving works for you, go for it.

    Reply
  34. Well, I moved mainly for jobs. I’m from New England, went to New York for college, to Texas for a job, back to New York (a different part) for a job, and now I’m back in NE, but not where I started from, where we’ll stay. If I moved anywhere, it would be back to upstate New York.
    Did I like the moving? At the time, it was OK. I doubt I will do it again. Moving is very expensive, and I’m sick to death of the day job. I’d rather stay put and save my money and not have to put up with employment garbage anymore.
    If moving works for you, go for it.

    Reply
  35. Well, I moved mainly for jobs. I’m from New England, went to New York for college, to Texas for a job, back to New York (a different part) for a job, and now I’m back in NE, but not where I started from, where we’ll stay. If I moved anywhere, it would be back to upstate New York.
    Did I like the moving? At the time, it was OK. I doubt I will do it again. Moving is very expensive, and I’m sick to death of the day job. I’d rather stay put and save my money and not have to put up with employment garbage anymore.
    If moving works for you, go for it.

    Reply
  36. Heck, yes I think about emigrating! Every time we get one of these horrible winter storms and I have to dig out my driveway and slog, slide, or skate into work,I think wonderful thoughts about Florida or another warm climate. But then I remember- I lived in Cuba for 2 years as a Navy wife, and I missed the change of seasons… If I was younger I think I would like to try living in another country. New Zealand and Australia appeal to me , but so does Scotland. And maybe Italy although I don’t know one word of Italian. I doubt I’ll ever visit another country but it is fun to dream…

    Reply
  37. Heck, yes I think about emigrating! Every time we get one of these horrible winter storms and I have to dig out my driveway and slog, slide, or skate into work,I think wonderful thoughts about Florida or another warm climate. But then I remember- I lived in Cuba for 2 years as a Navy wife, and I missed the change of seasons… If I was younger I think I would like to try living in another country. New Zealand and Australia appeal to me , but so does Scotland. And maybe Italy although I don’t know one word of Italian. I doubt I’ll ever visit another country but it is fun to dream…

    Reply
  38. Heck, yes I think about emigrating! Every time we get one of these horrible winter storms and I have to dig out my driveway and slog, slide, or skate into work,I think wonderful thoughts about Florida or another warm climate. But then I remember- I lived in Cuba for 2 years as a Navy wife, and I missed the change of seasons… If I was younger I think I would like to try living in another country. New Zealand and Australia appeal to me , but so does Scotland. And maybe Italy although I don’t know one word of Italian. I doubt I’ll ever visit another country but it is fun to dream…

    Reply
  39. Heck, yes I think about emigrating! Every time we get one of these horrible winter storms and I have to dig out my driveway and slog, slide, or skate into work,I think wonderful thoughts about Florida or another warm climate. But then I remember- I lived in Cuba for 2 years as a Navy wife, and I missed the change of seasons… If I was younger I think I would like to try living in another country. New Zealand and Australia appeal to me , but so does Scotland. And maybe Italy although I don’t know one word of Italian. I doubt I’ll ever visit another country but it is fun to dream…

    Reply
  40. Heck, yes I think about emigrating! Every time we get one of these horrible winter storms and I have to dig out my driveway and slog, slide, or skate into work,I think wonderful thoughts about Florida or another warm climate. But then I remember- I lived in Cuba for 2 years as a Navy wife, and I missed the change of seasons… If I was younger I think I would like to try living in another country. New Zealand and Australia appeal to me , but so does Scotland. And maybe Italy although I don’t know one word of Italian. I doubt I’ll ever visit another country but it is fun to dream…

    Reply
  41. I am very settled I have only ever been on a cruise so haven’t even travelled very much at all only in the books that I have read that take me to wonderful places.
    I live in Australia and am happy to stay put although some holidays overseas would be great I would love to visit some of the places I have read about.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  42. I am very settled I have only ever been on a cruise so haven’t even travelled very much at all only in the books that I have read that take me to wonderful places.
    I live in Australia and am happy to stay put although some holidays overseas would be great I would love to visit some of the places I have read about.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  43. I am very settled I have only ever been on a cruise so haven’t even travelled very much at all only in the books that I have read that take me to wonderful places.
    I live in Australia and am happy to stay put although some holidays overseas would be great I would love to visit some of the places I have read about.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  44. I am very settled I have only ever been on a cruise so haven’t even travelled very much at all only in the books that I have read that take me to wonderful places.
    I live in Australia and am happy to stay put although some holidays overseas would be great I would love to visit some of the places I have read about.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  45. I am very settled I have only ever been on a cruise so haven’t even travelled very much at all only in the books that I have read that take me to wonderful places.
    I live in Australia and am happy to stay put although some holidays overseas would be great I would love to visit some of the places I have read about.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  46. My husband and I were both in the Navy. He had retired after 20 years and I was almost at 10 years when we married. It was a second marriage for both of us. He had done lots of traveling, including 8 different trips to Antarctica, so when we married, we were both ready to put down roots. Neither one of us had traveled at all as children growing up. We returned to my home state; to my home city, in fact! My children have attended school in the same school district I was in growing up.
    I have to admit, however, that I am beginning to feel the itch to travel now that our children are growing up. I will be glad to always have a permanent home to return to, though.

    Reply
  47. My husband and I were both in the Navy. He had retired after 20 years and I was almost at 10 years when we married. It was a second marriage for both of us. He had done lots of traveling, including 8 different trips to Antarctica, so when we married, we were both ready to put down roots. Neither one of us had traveled at all as children growing up. We returned to my home state; to my home city, in fact! My children have attended school in the same school district I was in growing up.
    I have to admit, however, that I am beginning to feel the itch to travel now that our children are growing up. I will be glad to always have a permanent home to return to, though.

    Reply
  48. My husband and I were both in the Navy. He had retired after 20 years and I was almost at 10 years when we married. It was a second marriage for both of us. He had done lots of traveling, including 8 different trips to Antarctica, so when we married, we were both ready to put down roots. Neither one of us had traveled at all as children growing up. We returned to my home state; to my home city, in fact! My children have attended school in the same school district I was in growing up.
    I have to admit, however, that I am beginning to feel the itch to travel now that our children are growing up. I will be glad to always have a permanent home to return to, though.

    Reply
  49. My husband and I were both in the Navy. He had retired after 20 years and I was almost at 10 years when we married. It was a second marriage for both of us. He had done lots of traveling, including 8 different trips to Antarctica, so when we married, we were both ready to put down roots. Neither one of us had traveled at all as children growing up. We returned to my home state; to my home city, in fact! My children have attended school in the same school district I was in growing up.
    I have to admit, however, that I am beginning to feel the itch to travel now that our children are growing up. I will be glad to always have a permanent home to return to, though.

    Reply
  50. My husband and I were both in the Navy. He had retired after 20 years and I was almost at 10 years when we married. It was a second marriage for both of us. He had done lots of traveling, including 8 different trips to Antarctica, so when we married, we were both ready to put down roots. Neither one of us had traveled at all as children growing up. We returned to my home state; to my home city, in fact! My children have attended school in the same school district I was in growing up.
    I have to admit, however, that I am beginning to feel the itch to travel now that our children are growing up. I will be glad to always have a permanent home to return to, though.

    Reply
  51. Ever since I was a young teenager I thought if I’d move out of USA I’d want to move to Cornwall England as I always saw such incredible pictures and descriptions!
    BUT–my close “sister” I met via e-mail is from Cornwall area–Newquay and she’s counting the days to move to SPAIN as the taxes and cost of every day living is too high in England.
    SO–home it is–I had asked my hubby several times to look for jobs some other place then E Pa. but we never got to move–I’m from Harrisburg PA and he’s from Pittsbugh and we live in Allentown so we cover the whole state (and it’s a fairly big one).
    We now have an old house (by USA standards) and we put in out own fireplace ourself (our own hands) the year we moved in and burn wood from our land (never cut down a tree for it)So we’re here for the duration even with grown children!

    Reply
  52. Ever since I was a young teenager I thought if I’d move out of USA I’d want to move to Cornwall England as I always saw such incredible pictures and descriptions!
    BUT–my close “sister” I met via e-mail is from Cornwall area–Newquay and she’s counting the days to move to SPAIN as the taxes and cost of every day living is too high in England.
    SO–home it is–I had asked my hubby several times to look for jobs some other place then E Pa. but we never got to move–I’m from Harrisburg PA and he’s from Pittsbugh and we live in Allentown so we cover the whole state (and it’s a fairly big one).
    We now have an old house (by USA standards) and we put in out own fireplace ourself (our own hands) the year we moved in and burn wood from our land (never cut down a tree for it)So we’re here for the duration even with grown children!

    Reply
  53. Ever since I was a young teenager I thought if I’d move out of USA I’d want to move to Cornwall England as I always saw such incredible pictures and descriptions!
    BUT–my close “sister” I met via e-mail is from Cornwall area–Newquay and she’s counting the days to move to SPAIN as the taxes and cost of every day living is too high in England.
    SO–home it is–I had asked my hubby several times to look for jobs some other place then E Pa. but we never got to move–I’m from Harrisburg PA and he’s from Pittsbugh and we live in Allentown so we cover the whole state (and it’s a fairly big one).
    We now have an old house (by USA standards) and we put in out own fireplace ourself (our own hands) the year we moved in and burn wood from our land (never cut down a tree for it)So we’re here for the duration even with grown children!

    Reply
  54. Ever since I was a young teenager I thought if I’d move out of USA I’d want to move to Cornwall England as I always saw such incredible pictures and descriptions!
    BUT–my close “sister” I met via e-mail is from Cornwall area–Newquay and she’s counting the days to move to SPAIN as the taxes and cost of every day living is too high in England.
    SO–home it is–I had asked my hubby several times to look for jobs some other place then E Pa. but we never got to move–I’m from Harrisburg PA and he’s from Pittsbugh and we live in Allentown so we cover the whole state (and it’s a fairly big one).
    We now have an old house (by USA standards) and we put in out own fireplace ourself (our own hands) the year we moved in and burn wood from our land (never cut down a tree for it)So we’re here for the duration even with grown children!

    Reply
  55. Ever since I was a young teenager I thought if I’d move out of USA I’d want to move to Cornwall England as I always saw such incredible pictures and descriptions!
    BUT–my close “sister” I met via e-mail is from Cornwall area–Newquay and she’s counting the days to move to SPAIN as the taxes and cost of every day living is too high in England.
    SO–home it is–I had asked my hubby several times to look for jobs some other place then E Pa. but we never got to move–I’m from Harrisburg PA and he’s from Pittsbugh and we live in Allentown so we cover the whole state (and it’s a fairly big one).
    We now have an old house (by USA standards) and we put in out own fireplace ourself (our own hands) the year we moved in and burn wood from our land (never cut down a tree for it)So we’re here for the duration even with grown children!

    Reply
  56. One of my closest friends is Greek. She’s returning home this summer after many years in the U.S. I hate to see her leave, but I understand her longing for home. I have lived all my life within a hundred miles of the town where I was born. Some of my grandparents’ grandparents lived here, and the Grands are growing up here now. I’d love to travel more, but I can’t imagine calling another place home.

    Reply
  57. One of my closest friends is Greek. She’s returning home this summer after many years in the U.S. I hate to see her leave, but I understand her longing for home. I have lived all my life within a hundred miles of the town where I was born. Some of my grandparents’ grandparents lived here, and the Grands are growing up here now. I’d love to travel more, but I can’t imagine calling another place home.

    Reply
  58. One of my closest friends is Greek. She’s returning home this summer after many years in the U.S. I hate to see her leave, but I understand her longing for home. I have lived all my life within a hundred miles of the town where I was born. Some of my grandparents’ grandparents lived here, and the Grands are growing up here now. I’d love to travel more, but I can’t imagine calling another place home.

    Reply
  59. One of my closest friends is Greek. She’s returning home this summer after many years in the U.S. I hate to see her leave, but I understand her longing for home. I have lived all my life within a hundred miles of the town where I was born. Some of my grandparents’ grandparents lived here, and the Grands are growing up here now. I’d love to travel more, but I can’t imagine calling another place home.

    Reply
  60. One of my closest friends is Greek. She’s returning home this summer after many years in the U.S. I hate to see her leave, but I understand her longing for home. I have lived all my life within a hundred miles of the town where I was born. Some of my grandparents’ grandparents lived here, and the Grands are growing up here now. I’d love to travel more, but I can’t imagine calling another place home.

    Reply
  61. I moved, but never far from home and after my father passed, tore down the 12 X 12 house I grew up in and built a new (bigger) house so I live where I grew up.
    My mother’s parents came here in the early 1900’s from Forfar, Scotland. My dad’s parents came here around the same time from Cornwall.
    *made for interesting family dinners*
    I want to go ‘home’, but for me, home is Scotland because I spent so much time with my maternal grandparents I still carry a bit of the accent when I get really, really angry. 😀
    I envy your chance to do this. Wish I could, so enjoy it and keep us posted 😀

    Reply
  62. I moved, but never far from home and after my father passed, tore down the 12 X 12 house I grew up in and built a new (bigger) house so I live where I grew up.
    My mother’s parents came here in the early 1900’s from Forfar, Scotland. My dad’s parents came here around the same time from Cornwall.
    *made for interesting family dinners*
    I want to go ‘home’, but for me, home is Scotland because I spent so much time with my maternal grandparents I still carry a bit of the accent when I get really, really angry. 😀
    I envy your chance to do this. Wish I could, so enjoy it and keep us posted 😀

    Reply
  63. I moved, but never far from home and after my father passed, tore down the 12 X 12 house I grew up in and built a new (bigger) house so I live where I grew up.
    My mother’s parents came here in the early 1900’s from Forfar, Scotland. My dad’s parents came here around the same time from Cornwall.
    *made for interesting family dinners*
    I want to go ‘home’, but for me, home is Scotland because I spent so much time with my maternal grandparents I still carry a bit of the accent when I get really, really angry. 😀
    I envy your chance to do this. Wish I could, so enjoy it and keep us posted 😀

    Reply
  64. I moved, but never far from home and after my father passed, tore down the 12 X 12 house I grew up in and built a new (bigger) house so I live where I grew up.
    My mother’s parents came here in the early 1900’s from Forfar, Scotland. My dad’s parents came here around the same time from Cornwall.
    *made for interesting family dinners*
    I want to go ‘home’, but for me, home is Scotland because I spent so much time with my maternal grandparents I still carry a bit of the accent when I get really, really angry. 😀
    I envy your chance to do this. Wish I could, so enjoy it and keep us posted 😀

    Reply
  65. I moved, but never far from home and after my father passed, tore down the 12 X 12 house I grew up in and built a new (bigger) house so I live where I grew up.
    My mother’s parents came here in the early 1900’s from Forfar, Scotland. My dad’s parents came here around the same time from Cornwall.
    *made for interesting family dinners*
    I want to go ‘home’, but for me, home is Scotland because I spent so much time with my maternal grandparents I still carry a bit of the accent when I get really, really angry. 😀
    I envy your chance to do this. Wish I could, so enjoy it and keep us posted 😀

    Reply
  66. I think it’s true some people are born with the travel gene. I made sure my children traveled when they were little because I wanted them to feel that they were part of a larger world. In that sense it worked, but now that they are adults my oldest is very much a homebody while my middle son has already lived in Argentina and Vietnam at the ripe old age of 23. We’ll see about the youngest; at 19 it’s a little too soon to tell.
    As for my husband and me, I think we will stay in Washington DC. I grew up in Arizona and Washington state and lived in Massachusetts for several years, but DC is where our roots are now. While there are lovely people everywhere, here is where I don’t have to explain who and what I am to people because they have lived through the events of the past 25 years with me so these things are part of their lives too — and the converse is, of course, true as well. I do still love to travel, however, and periodically fall in love with other places. My hope is that when I retire we’ll be able to do some longer term home exchanges. We’ve done several short-term exchanges in the past and they’ve worked well; it’s a way of feeling as if one is part of a community without having to commit.

    Reply
  67. I think it’s true some people are born with the travel gene. I made sure my children traveled when they were little because I wanted them to feel that they were part of a larger world. In that sense it worked, but now that they are adults my oldest is very much a homebody while my middle son has already lived in Argentina and Vietnam at the ripe old age of 23. We’ll see about the youngest; at 19 it’s a little too soon to tell.
    As for my husband and me, I think we will stay in Washington DC. I grew up in Arizona and Washington state and lived in Massachusetts for several years, but DC is where our roots are now. While there are lovely people everywhere, here is where I don’t have to explain who and what I am to people because they have lived through the events of the past 25 years with me so these things are part of their lives too — and the converse is, of course, true as well. I do still love to travel, however, and periodically fall in love with other places. My hope is that when I retire we’ll be able to do some longer term home exchanges. We’ve done several short-term exchanges in the past and they’ve worked well; it’s a way of feeling as if one is part of a community without having to commit.

    Reply
  68. I think it’s true some people are born with the travel gene. I made sure my children traveled when they were little because I wanted them to feel that they were part of a larger world. In that sense it worked, but now that they are adults my oldest is very much a homebody while my middle son has already lived in Argentina and Vietnam at the ripe old age of 23. We’ll see about the youngest; at 19 it’s a little too soon to tell.
    As for my husband and me, I think we will stay in Washington DC. I grew up in Arizona and Washington state and lived in Massachusetts for several years, but DC is where our roots are now. While there are lovely people everywhere, here is where I don’t have to explain who and what I am to people because they have lived through the events of the past 25 years with me so these things are part of their lives too — and the converse is, of course, true as well. I do still love to travel, however, and periodically fall in love with other places. My hope is that when I retire we’ll be able to do some longer term home exchanges. We’ve done several short-term exchanges in the past and they’ve worked well; it’s a way of feeling as if one is part of a community without having to commit.

    Reply
  69. I think it’s true some people are born with the travel gene. I made sure my children traveled when they were little because I wanted them to feel that they were part of a larger world. In that sense it worked, but now that they are adults my oldest is very much a homebody while my middle son has already lived in Argentina and Vietnam at the ripe old age of 23. We’ll see about the youngest; at 19 it’s a little too soon to tell.
    As for my husband and me, I think we will stay in Washington DC. I grew up in Arizona and Washington state and lived in Massachusetts for several years, but DC is where our roots are now. While there are lovely people everywhere, here is where I don’t have to explain who and what I am to people because they have lived through the events of the past 25 years with me so these things are part of their lives too — and the converse is, of course, true as well. I do still love to travel, however, and periodically fall in love with other places. My hope is that when I retire we’ll be able to do some longer term home exchanges. We’ve done several short-term exchanges in the past and they’ve worked well; it’s a way of feeling as if one is part of a community without having to commit.

    Reply
  70. I think it’s true some people are born with the travel gene. I made sure my children traveled when they were little because I wanted them to feel that they were part of a larger world. In that sense it worked, but now that they are adults my oldest is very much a homebody while my middle son has already lived in Argentina and Vietnam at the ripe old age of 23. We’ll see about the youngest; at 19 it’s a little too soon to tell.
    As for my husband and me, I think we will stay in Washington DC. I grew up in Arizona and Washington state and lived in Massachusetts for several years, but DC is where our roots are now. While there are lovely people everywhere, here is where I don’t have to explain who and what I am to people because they have lived through the events of the past 25 years with me so these things are part of their lives too — and the converse is, of course, true as well. I do still love to travel, however, and periodically fall in love with other places. My hope is that when I retire we’ll be able to do some longer term home exchanges. We’ve done several short-term exchanges in the past and they’ve worked well; it’s a way of feeling as if one is part of a community without having to commit.

    Reply
  71. I don’t know – I moved around America and came back to the place I was raised. I’ve traveled Europe, but never wanted to move there. My two closest friends from my childhood are both ex-pats, one professionally, the other having retired at 35 and gone backpacking through Asia for the last six -seven years.
    I think part of it is that America is so different – San Francisco is not Wyoming, is not New York is not Chicago. If you want a different culture, you can find it easily without all the bother of changing nations. Heck, you can be like my other childhood pal and just head to Alaska.
    I like my home, I like to travel in doses, but I’m a homebody at heart. I think my people were too because in my research they don’t set out happy in the morning – they are always driven or forced from where they were, head to a new home, and stay there until forced out.
    The only time I considered relocating (seriously) was last summer – for the first time I was doubting or electoral process and the presidential term limits. I realized how fragile they were, and how much we take them for granted. I looked into what it would entail to leave, if for some reason they ended. Paranoid now, probably paranoid then, but so much was happening (Patriot Act, etc) that I realized we can’t assume it’s protected.

    Reply
  72. I don’t know – I moved around America and came back to the place I was raised. I’ve traveled Europe, but never wanted to move there. My two closest friends from my childhood are both ex-pats, one professionally, the other having retired at 35 and gone backpacking through Asia for the last six -seven years.
    I think part of it is that America is so different – San Francisco is not Wyoming, is not New York is not Chicago. If you want a different culture, you can find it easily without all the bother of changing nations. Heck, you can be like my other childhood pal and just head to Alaska.
    I like my home, I like to travel in doses, but I’m a homebody at heart. I think my people were too because in my research they don’t set out happy in the morning – they are always driven or forced from where they were, head to a new home, and stay there until forced out.
    The only time I considered relocating (seriously) was last summer – for the first time I was doubting or electoral process and the presidential term limits. I realized how fragile they were, and how much we take them for granted. I looked into what it would entail to leave, if for some reason they ended. Paranoid now, probably paranoid then, but so much was happening (Patriot Act, etc) that I realized we can’t assume it’s protected.

    Reply
  73. I don’t know – I moved around America and came back to the place I was raised. I’ve traveled Europe, but never wanted to move there. My two closest friends from my childhood are both ex-pats, one professionally, the other having retired at 35 and gone backpacking through Asia for the last six -seven years.
    I think part of it is that America is so different – San Francisco is not Wyoming, is not New York is not Chicago. If you want a different culture, you can find it easily without all the bother of changing nations. Heck, you can be like my other childhood pal and just head to Alaska.
    I like my home, I like to travel in doses, but I’m a homebody at heart. I think my people were too because in my research they don’t set out happy in the morning – they are always driven or forced from where they were, head to a new home, and stay there until forced out.
    The only time I considered relocating (seriously) was last summer – for the first time I was doubting or electoral process and the presidential term limits. I realized how fragile they were, and how much we take them for granted. I looked into what it would entail to leave, if for some reason they ended. Paranoid now, probably paranoid then, but so much was happening (Patriot Act, etc) that I realized we can’t assume it’s protected.

    Reply
  74. I don’t know – I moved around America and came back to the place I was raised. I’ve traveled Europe, but never wanted to move there. My two closest friends from my childhood are both ex-pats, one professionally, the other having retired at 35 and gone backpacking through Asia for the last six -seven years.
    I think part of it is that America is so different – San Francisco is not Wyoming, is not New York is not Chicago. If you want a different culture, you can find it easily without all the bother of changing nations. Heck, you can be like my other childhood pal and just head to Alaska.
    I like my home, I like to travel in doses, but I’m a homebody at heart. I think my people were too because in my research they don’t set out happy in the morning – they are always driven or forced from where they were, head to a new home, and stay there until forced out.
    The only time I considered relocating (seriously) was last summer – for the first time I was doubting or electoral process and the presidential term limits. I realized how fragile they were, and how much we take them for granted. I looked into what it would entail to leave, if for some reason they ended. Paranoid now, probably paranoid then, but so much was happening (Patriot Act, etc) that I realized we can’t assume it’s protected.

    Reply
  75. I don’t know – I moved around America and came back to the place I was raised. I’ve traveled Europe, but never wanted to move there. My two closest friends from my childhood are both ex-pats, one professionally, the other having retired at 35 and gone backpacking through Asia for the last six -seven years.
    I think part of it is that America is so different – San Francisco is not Wyoming, is not New York is not Chicago. If you want a different culture, you can find it easily without all the bother of changing nations. Heck, you can be like my other childhood pal and just head to Alaska.
    I like my home, I like to travel in doses, but I’m a homebody at heart. I think my people were too because in my research they don’t set out happy in the morning – they are always driven or forced from where they were, head to a new home, and stay there until forced out.
    The only time I considered relocating (seriously) was last summer – for the first time I was doubting or electoral process and the presidential term limits. I realized how fragile they were, and how much we take them for granted. I looked into what it would entail to leave, if for some reason they ended. Paranoid now, probably paranoid then, but so much was happening (Patriot Act, etc) that I realized we can’t assume it’s protected.

    Reply
  76. Oh I can so relate to you Jo. I moved back to the UK with my Canadian husband after living in Canada for 4 years because my Dad was dying. We had dreamed of being back at “home” and immersing ourselves in the history again. We loved the history but hated the post Thatcher Britain with the big divide between rich and poor. We also found everything so very expensive. After Dad died we came back to Canada, quite happy with the decision and the better lifestyle. Here in Ontario we could afford a big house and garden with only one salary and our children had the freedom to play in the woods around town and walk/ bike everywhere without an adult. We also enjoy never locking doors on the car or house! 20 years later it is still just as it was when we moved here.
    We get our “fix” by visiting England every few years, as all my family still lives there. I have the urge to travel and look forward to retirement when my husband and I can indulge our wanderlust. We do one major trip every year and can’t imagine life without the buzz of getting on a plane to visit an exotic locale.
    Good luck in Devon…it’s my former county. I lived in Barnstaple and Plymouth.

    Reply
  77. Oh I can so relate to you Jo. I moved back to the UK with my Canadian husband after living in Canada for 4 years because my Dad was dying. We had dreamed of being back at “home” and immersing ourselves in the history again. We loved the history but hated the post Thatcher Britain with the big divide between rich and poor. We also found everything so very expensive. After Dad died we came back to Canada, quite happy with the decision and the better lifestyle. Here in Ontario we could afford a big house and garden with only one salary and our children had the freedom to play in the woods around town and walk/ bike everywhere without an adult. We also enjoy never locking doors on the car or house! 20 years later it is still just as it was when we moved here.
    We get our “fix” by visiting England every few years, as all my family still lives there. I have the urge to travel and look forward to retirement when my husband and I can indulge our wanderlust. We do one major trip every year and can’t imagine life without the buzz of getting on a plane to visit an exotic locale.
    Good luck in Devon…it’s my former county. I lived in Barnstaple and Plymouth.

    Reply
  78. Oh I can so relate to you Jo. I moved back to the UK with my Canadian husband after living in Canada for 4 years because my Dad was dying. We had dreamed of being back at “home” and immersing ourselves in the history again. We loved the history but hated the post Thatcher Britain with the big divide between rich and poor. We also found everything so very expensive. After Dad died we came back to Canada, quite happy with the decision and the better lifestyle. Here in Ontario we could afford a big house and garden with only one salary and our children had the freedom to play in the woods around town and walk/ bike everywhere without an adult. We also enjoy never locking doors on the car or house! 20 years later it is still just as it was when we moved here.
    We get our “fix” by visiting England every few years, as all my family still lives there. I have the urge to travel and look forward to retirement when my husband and I can indulge our wanderlust. We do one major trip every year and can’t imagine life without the buzz of getting on a plane to visit an exotic locale.
    Good luck in Devon…it’s my former county. I lived in Barnstaple and Plymouth.

    Reply
  79. Oh I can so relate to you Jo. I moved back to the UK with my Canadian husband after living in Canada for 4 years because my Dad was dying. We had dreamed of being back at “home” and immersing ourselves in the history again. We loved the history but hated the post Thatcher Britain with the big divide between rich and poor. We also found everything so very expensive. After Dad died we came back to Canada, quite happy with the decision and the better lifestyle. Here in Ontario we could afford a big house and garden with only one salary and our children had the freedom to play in the woods around town and walk/ bike everywhere without an adult. We also enjoy never locking doors on the car or house! 20 years later it is still just as it was when we moved here.
    We get our “fix” by visiting England every few years, as all my family still lives there. I have the urge to travel and look forward to retirement when my husband and I can indulge our wanderlust. We do one major trip every year and can’t imagine life without the buzz of getting on a plane to visit an exotic locale.
    Good luck in Devon…it’s my former county. I lived in Barnstaple and Plymouth.

    Reply
  80. Oh I can so relate to you Jo. I moved back to the UK with my Canadian husband after living in Canada for 4 years because my Dad was dying. We had dreamed of being back at “home” and immersing ourselves in the history again. We loved the history but hated the post Thatcher Britain with the big divide between rich and poor. We also found everything so very expensive. After Dad died we came back to Canada, quite happy with the decision and the better lifestyle. Here in Ontario we could afford a big house and garden with only one salary and our children had the freedom to play in the woods around town and walk/ bike everywhere without an adult. We also enjoy never locking doors on the car or house! 20 years later it is still just as it was when we moved here.
    We get our “fix” by visiting England every few years, as all my family still lives there. I have the urge to travel and look forward to retirement when my husband and I can indulge our wanderlust. We do one major trip every year and can’t imagine life without the buzz of getting on a plane to visit an exotic locale.
    Good luck in Devon…it’s my former county. I lived in Barnstaple and Plymouth.

    Reply
  81. As a teenager I moved halfway across the States to California. Have no desire to move again. There is a camera in Cornwall that I check frequently.(among others).
    Locations in books can be checked by looking at a particular camera that proliferate cyberspace.

    Reply
  82. As a teenager I moved halfway across the States to California. Have no desire to move again. There is a camera in Cornwall that I check frequently.(among others).
    Locations in books can be checked by looking at a particular camera that proliferate cyberspace.

    Reply
  83. As a teenager I moved halfway across the States to California. Have no desire to move again. There is a camera in Cornwall that I check frequently.(among others).
    Locations in books can be checked by looking at a particular camera that proliferate cyberspace.

    Reply
  84. As a teenager I moved halfway across the States to California. Have no desire to move again. There is a camera in Cornwall that I check frequently.(among others).
    Locations in books can be checked by looking at a particular camera that proliferate cyberspace.

    Reply
  85. As a teenager I moved halfway across the States to California. Have no desire to move again. There is a camera in Cornwall that I check frequently.(among others).
    Locations in books can be checked by looking at a particular camera that proliferate cyberspace.

    Reply
  86. Jo, when reading a historical, I like to look at a map to get the general idea of the location and its relationship to other countries. In relation to my feelings about home, it doesn’t affect my reaction to the book–it only makes me want to visit the place!
    I’ve never lived farther from my birth city than 15 miles, and the number of times I’ve been on a plane is 6 (3 round trips). I’ve lived in this house for 35 years. In my youth, when I could afford to travel, I didn’t. (Alas!) Now that I’m older and would love to travel, the budget says “no.” After a lifetime of staid security, I want CHANGE in my life! I want to move to a new house, travel to new countries, experience more of the world! If only I had a rich uncle …

    Reply
  87. Jo, when reading a historical, I like to look at a map to get the general idea of the location and its relationship to other countries. In relation to my feelings about home, it doesn’t affect my reaction to the book–it only makes me want to visit the place!
    I’ve never lived farther from my birth city than 15 miles, and the number of times I’ve been on a plane is 6 (3 round trips). I’ve lived in this house for 35 years. In my youth, when I could afford to travel, I didn’t. (Alas!) Now that I’m older and would love to travel, the budget says “no.” After a lifetime of staid security, I want CHANGE in my life! I want to move to a new house, travel to new countries, experience more of the world! If only I had a rich uncle …

    Reply
  88. Jo, when reading a historical, I like to look at a map to get the general idea of the location and its relationship to other countries. In relation to my feelings about home, it doesn’t affect my reaction to the book–it only makes me want to visit the place!
    I’ve never lived farther from my birth city than 15 miles, and the number of times I’ve been on a plane is 6 (3 round trips). I’ve lived in this house for 35 years. In my youth, when I could afford to travel, I didn’t. (Alas!) Now that I’m older and would love to travel, the budget says “no.” After a lifetime of staid security, I want CHANGE in my life! I want to move to a new house, travel to new countries, experience more of the world! If only I had a rich uncle …

    Reply
  89. Jo, when reading a historical, I like to look at a map to get the general idea of the location and its relationship to other countries. In relation to my feelings about home, it doesn’t affect my reaction to the book–it only makes me want to visit the place!
    I’ve never lived farther from my birth city than 15 miles, and the number of times I’ve been on a plane is 6 (3 round trips). I’ve lived in this house for 35 years. In my youth, when I could afford to travel, I didn’t. (Alas!) Now that I’m older and would love to travel, the budget says “no.” After a lifetime of staid security, I want CHANGE in my life! I want to move to a new house, travel to new countries, experience more of the world! If only I had a rich uncle …

    Reply
  90. Jo, when reading a historical, I like to look at a map to get the general idea of the location and its relationship to other countries. In relation to my feelings about home, it doesn’t affect my reaction to the book–it only makes me want to visit the place!
    I’ve never lived farther from my birth city than 15 miles, and the number of times I’ve been on a plane is 6 (3 round trips). I’ve lived in this house for 35 years. In my youth, when I could afford to travel, I didn’t. (Alas!) Now that I’m older and would love to travel, the budget says “no.” After a lifetime of staid security, I want CHANGE in my life! I want to move to a new house, travel to new countries, experience more of the world! If only I had a rich uncle …

    Reply
  91. I certainly cannot comment on emigrating- I live 6 miles from where my great-great-grandfather is buried, he being the one in our family who came here from Ireland in 1847. Clearly we don’t move a lot.
    I hope your experience in England in March is wonderful- and also that it is revealing to you to help you make a difficult decision.

    Reply
  92. I certainly cannot comment on emigrating- I live 6 miles from where my great-great-grandfather is buried, he being the one in our family who came here from Ireland in 1847. Clearly we don’t move a lot.
    I hope your experience in England in March is wonderful- and also that it is revealing to you to help you make a difficult decision.

    Reply
  93. I certainly cannot comment on emigrating- I live 6 miles from where my great-great-grandfather is buried, he being the one in our family who came here from Ireland in 1847. Clearly we don’t move a lot.
    I hope your experience in England in March is wonderful- and also that it is revealing to you to help you make a difficult decision.

    Reply
  94. I certainly cannot comment on emigrating- I live 6 miles from where my great-great-grandfather is buried, he being the one in our family who came here from Ireland in 1847. Clearly we don’t move a lot.
    I hope your experience in England in March is wonderful- and also that it is revealing to you to help you make a difficult decision.

    Reply
  95. I certainly cannot comment on emigrating- I live 6 miles from where my great-great-grandfather is buried, he being the one in our family who came here from Ireland in 1847. Clearly we don’t move a lot.
    I hope your experience in England in March is wonderful- and also that it is revealing to you to help you make a difficult decision.

    Reply
  96. LOL, Theo!
    A part of me envies people who live in the same area all their lives, but I know it isn’t me.
    After all, my first family home was a hotel, so though I lived there until I was twelve, it wasn’t unchanging. And by the time we moved, I was at boarding school.
    I’ve been rolling ever since!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  97. LOL, Theo!
    A part of me envies people who live in the same area all their lives, but I know it isn’t me.
    After all, my first family home was a hotel, so though I lived there until I was twelve, it wasn’t unchanging. And by the time we moved, I was at boarding school.
    I’ve been rolling ever since!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  98. LOL, Theo!
    A part of me envies people who live in the same area all their lives, but I know it isn’t me.
    After all, my first family home was a hotel, so though I lived there until I was twelve, it wasn’t unchanging. And by the time we moved, I was at boarding school.
    I’ve been rolling ever since!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  99. LOL, Theo!
    A part of me envies people who live in the same area all their lives, but I know it isn’t me.
    After all, my first family home was a hotel, so though I lived there until I was twelve, it wasn’t unchanging. And by the time we moved, I was at boarding school.
    I’ve been rolling ever since!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  100. LOL, Theo!
    A part of me envies people who live in the same area all their lives, but I know it isn’t me.
    After all, my first family home was a hotel, so though I lived there until I was twelve, it wasn’t unchanging. And by the time we moved, I was at boarding school.
    I’ve been rolling ever since!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  101. One of the biggest reasons for emigrating from anywhere to anywhere has been economic disaster and religious persecution. Since America has never (well, except the Great Depression) had serious and long-lasting times of those, there has been less motivation to emigrate.
    My sister transplanted to London a few years ago and really likes it there. I’m an anglophile and love to visit but I don’t know if I’d really like living there (or any other country) long-term.
    BTW, did you change the ending of this post since you first posted or am I going insane?
    Well, enjoy your experiment across the Pond! But wherever you live, please keep writing! 🙂

    Reply
  102. One of the biggest reasons for emigrating from anywhere to anywhere has been economic disaster and religious persecution. Since America has never (well, except the Great Depression) had serious and long-lasting times of those, there has been less motivation to emigrate.
    My sister transplanted to London a few years ago and really likes it there. I’m an anglophile and love to visit but I don’t know if I’d really like living there (or any other country) long-term.
    BTW, did you change the ending of this post since you first posted or am I going insane?
    Well, enjoy your experiment across the Pond! But wherever you live, please keep writing! 🙂

    Reply
  103. One of the biggest reasons for emigrating from anywhere to anywhere has been economic disaster and religious persecution. Since America has never (well, except the Great Depression) had serious and long-lasting times of those, there has been less motivation to emigrate.
    My sister transplanted to London a few years ago and really likes it there. I’m an anglophile and love to visit but I don’t know if I’d really like living there (or any other country) long-term.
    BTW, did you change the ending of this post since you first posted or am I going insane?
    Well, enjoy your experiment across the Pond! But wherever you live, please keep writing! 🙂

    Reply
  104. One of the biggest reasons for emigrating from anywhere to anywhere has been economic disaster and religious persecution. Since America has never (well, except the Great Depression) had serious and long-lasting times of those, there has been less motivation to emigrate.
    My sister transplanted to London a few years ago and really likes it there. I’m an anglophile and love to visit but I don’t know if I’d really like living there (or any other country) long-term.
    BTW, did you change the ending of this post since you first posted or am I going insane?
    Well, enjoy your experiment across the Pond! But wherever you live, please keep writing! 🙂

    Reply
  105. One of the biggest reasons for emigrating from anywhere to anywhere has been economic disaster and religious persecution. Since America has never (well, except the Great Depression) had serious and long-lasting times of those, there has been less motivation to emigrate.
    My sister transplanted to London a few years ago and really likes it there. I’m an anglophile and love to visit but I don’t know if I’d really like living there (or any other country) long-term.
    BTW, did you change the ending of this post since you first posted or am I going insane?
    Well, enjoy your experiment across the Pond! But wherever you live, please keep writing! 🙂

    Reply
  106. I was also going to say that family is as important to me as home in an ending. That’s why family sagas, like the Mallorens, work, and the Rogues work because they have formed their own sense of family whatever their individual biological families may be like. So, I am a demanding reader! I need the romantic relationship, permanent home, and loving family relationships for me to feel that an ending is truly happy. If this is fantasy, why not have it all?! 🙂

    Reply
  107. I was also going to say that family is as important to me as home in an ending. That’s why family sagas, like the Mallorens, work, and the Rogues work because they have formed their own sense of family whatever their individual biological families may be like. So, I am a demanding reader! I need the romantic relationship, permanent home, and loving family relationships for me to feel that an ending is truly happy. If this is fantasy, why not have it all?! 🙂

    Reply
  108. I was also going to say that family is as important to me as home in an ending. That’s why family sagas, like the Mallorens, work, and the Rogues work because they have formed their own sense of family whatever their individual biological families may be like. So, I am a demanding reader! I need the romantic relationship, permanent home, and loving family relationships for me to feel that an ending is truly happy. If this is fantasy, why not have it all?! 🙂

    Reply
  109. I was also going to say that family is as important to me as home in an ending. That’s why family sagas, like the Mallorens, work, and the Rogues work because they have formed their own sense of family whatever their individual biological families may be like. So, I am a demanding reader! I need the romantic relationship, permanent home, and loving family relationships for me to feel that an ending is truly happy. If this is fantasy, why not have it all?! 🙂

    Reply
  110. I was also going to say that family is as important to me as home in an ending. That’s why family sagas, like the Mallorens, work, and the Rogues work because they have formed their own sense of family whatever their individual biological families may be like. So, I am a demanding reader! I need the romantic relationship, permanent home, and loving family relationships for me to feel that an ending is truly happy. If this is fantasy, why not have it all?! 🙂

    Reply
  111. Anne, I don’t think I changed the ending! With Typepad, one can never quite be sure, though.
    I agree about family, yes.
    Liz, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks!(Liz was the winner of the advance reading copy.)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  112. Anne, I don’t think I changed the ending! With Typepad, one can never quite be sure, though.
    I agree about family, yes.
    Liz, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks!(Liz was the winner of the advance reading copy.)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  113. Anne, I don’t think I changed the ending! With Typepad, one can never quite be sure, though.
    I agree about family, yes.
    Liz, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks!(Liz was the winner of the advance reading copy.)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  114. Anne, I don’t think I changed the ending! With Typepad, one can never quite be sure, though.
    I agree about family, yes.
    Liz, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks!(Liz was the winner of the advance reading copy.)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  115. Anne, I don’t think I changed the ending! With Typepad, one can never quite be sure, though.
    I agree about family, yes.
    Liz, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Thanks!(Liz was the winner of the advance reading copy.)
    Jo 🙂

    Reply

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