Holiday Amusement

Pat present:

Easterbunny_3
No one warned me that the Easter Bunny came with horns and fangs.

Ahem. Forgive me, I’m still practicing opening hooks and high concept.  Vampire bunnies probably aren’t my style though.

I’m writing this on St Patrick’s Day because I’ll be leaving to visit family for Easter later this week.  Did you know that the last time St Pat’s Day and Easter fell in the same week was in 1940, when they were on the same day, and won’t happen again until 2160?  Really, the church ought to make some dispensation for postponing early Easters!  Here in Missouri, it’s not even thinking about spring yet.  Surely it’s a sin to wear winter black on Easter? Unless you’re a Stpatclover
vampire bunny, I guess.

Since I had to fit writing this column in between finishing proposals due after I return from this week’s family outing, next week’s conference, and planning a blog ad campaign for the summer book, I thought I’d just Google 18th century Church of England to see what turned up about Easter. Ugly, very ugly.  I don’t recommend the result for easy reading—vampire bunnies don’t even come close when confronted with true human suffering.  The 18th century church was a political instrument, not necessarily a source of     Winchestercathedral
comfort for the soul much less the poor.  The division between rich and poor in 18th century England was cataclysmic, and the church helped it to stay that way since it was essentially run by the same families as ran the government.  As much as I’d like to take on a political diatribe, this probably isn’t the place.  Although, if I turned politicians into the evil demons…  Okay, stepping back now, hands up. 

So then I Googled Easter to see why rabbits bring eggs for Easter, which was a much more amusing Eastereggs
venture.  It seems rabbits make hollow nests in spring, and a type of bird often uses those hollows for its eggs, so some poor misled creature decided rabbits laid eggs.  Or so the story goes.  (Did you know that rabbits can be pregnant with one litter and then become pregnant with a second litter before the first is born?  The phrase “breeds like bunnies” is at least accurate!)  The reason for coloring eggs at Easter is much less clear but goes back to Greek times. Most cultures use eggs as a symbol of rebirth, which connects them with spring. And the Catholic religion forbade eating eggs during Lent, so giving Easter eggs became a tradition in later periods.  They even had gold leaf added to the paint in medieval times.  (has anyone included that nifty bit of information in a medieval romance that anyone remembers?)

All right, just for holiday fun—can anyone name any historical romances that mention Easter or Saint Patrick’s Day?  Since I have no intention of checking every entry to see if they’re right, I’ll have Sherrie  Jeweledcrown
pull the name of a commenter from today’s replies, and post the winner as Wench Queen (or King) of the Day tomorrow, where the winner will be showered with many virtual gifts and prizes.  All our subjects—er, readers—can join in the royal fun by sending me links to their favorite gifts so I can post a grand display of prizes fitting for a queen or king on Thursday. Just a bit of spring madness to brighten the last gloomy days of winter!

80 thoughts on “Holiday Amusement”

  1. What fun Wench Pat!!
    Easter Historicals….
    AN EASTER DISQUISE by Emily Maxwell
    AN EASTER COURTSHIP by Sara Blayne
    Unfortunately, both are out of print.

    Reply
  2. What fun Wench Pat!!
    Easter Historicals….
    AN EASTER DISQUISE by Emily Maxwell
    AN EASTER COURTSHIP by Sara Blayne
    Unfortunately, both are out of print.

    Reply
  3. What fun Wench Pat!!
    Easter Historicals….
    AN EASTER DISQUISE by Emily Maxwell
    AN EASTER COURTSHIP by Sara Blayne
    Unfortunately, both are out of print.

    Reply
  4. What fun Wench Pat!!
    Easter Historicals….
    AN EASTER DISQUISE by Emily Maxwell
    AN EASTER COURTSHIP by Sara Blayne
    Unfortunately, both are out of print.

    Reply
  5. What fun Wench Pat!!
    Easter Historicals….
    AN EASTER DISQUISE by Emily Maxwell
    AN EASTER COURTSHIP by Sara Blayne
    Unfortunately, both are out of print.

    Reply
  6. OK, I’m sorry to do this, but Easter and St. Patrick’s Day can’t possibly fall on the same day, as St. Patrick’s day ALWAYS comes before the equinox and Easter ALWAYS comes after. In 1940 Easter fell on March 24.
    Don’t you just hate nit-pickers?

    Reply
  7. OK, I’m sorry to do this, but Easter and St. Patrick’s Day can’t possibly fall on the same day, as St. Patrick’s day ALWAYS comes before the equinox and Easter ALWAYS comes after. In 1940 Easter fell on March 24.
    Don’t you just hate nit-pickers?

    Reply
  8. OK, I’m sorry to do this, but Easter and St. Patrick’s Day can’t possibly fall on the same day, as St. Patrick’s day ALWAYS comes before the equinox and Easter ALWAYS comes after. In 1940 Easter fell on March 24.
    Don’t you just hate nit-pickers?

    Reply
  9. OK, I’m sorry to do this, but Easter and St. Patrick’s Day can’t possibly fall on the same day, as St. Patrick’s day ALWAYS comes before the equinox and Easter ALWAYS comes after. In 1940 Easter fell on March 24.
    Don’t you just hate nit-pickers?

    Reply
  10. OK, I’m sorry to do this, but Easter and St. Patrick’s Day can’t possibly fall on the same day, as St. Patrick’s day ALWAYS comes before the equinox and Easter ALWAYS comes after. In 1940 Easter fell on March 24.
    Don’t you just hate nit-pickers?

    Reply
  11. Easter coming on a different day, sometimes a different month, from year to year is something I’ve always found confusing. I don’t see why they can’t just pick a day, like they did for Christmas, and be done with it. ;o)
    The interesting fact about rabbits being double preggers just blows my mind!

    Reply
  12. Easter coming on a different day, sometimes a different month, from year to year is something I’ve always found confusing. I don’t see why they can’t just pick a day, like they did for Christmas, and be done with it. ;o)
    The interesting fact about rabbits being double preggers just blows my mind!

    Reply
  13. Easter coming on a different day, sometimes a different month, from year to year is something I’ve always found confusing. I don’t see why they can’t just pick a day, like they did for Christmas, and be done with it. ;o)
    The interesting fact about rabbits being double preggers just blows my mind!

    Reply
  14. Easter coming on a different day, sometimes a different month, from year to year is something I’ve always found confusing. I don’t see why they can’t just pick a day, like they did for Christmas, and be done with it. ;o)
    The interesting fact about rabbits being double preggers just blows my mind!

    Reply
  15. Easter coming on a different day, sometimes a different month, from year to year is something I’ve always found confusing. I don’t see why they can’t just pick a day, like they did for Christmas, and be done with it. ;o)
    The interesting fact about rabbits being double preggers just blows my mind!

    Reply
  16. I guess we have Constantine and the Council of Nicaea to blame. I checked it out and found it all very confusing, but somehow it’s all based on the vernal equinox and the first Sunday after a full moon. But, then it also depends on whether one is Christian or Eastern Orthodox and which calculation one uses…And I got a headache reading about it.
    The Gregorian calculation for Easter this year was March 23.
    The Julian was/is April 27

    Reply
  17. I guess we have Constantine and the Council of Nicaea to blame. I checked it out and found it all very confusing, but somehow it’s all based on the vernal equinox and the first Sunday after a full moon. But, then it also depends on whether one is Christian or Eastern Orthodox and which calculation one uses…And I got a headache reading about it.
    The Gregorian calculation for Easter this year was March 23.
    The Julian was/is April 27

    Reply
  18. I guess we have Constantine and the Council of Nicaea to blame. I checked it out and found it all very confusing, but somehow it’s all based on the vernal equinox and the first Sunday after a full moon. But, then it also depends on whether one is Christian or Eastern Orthodox and which calculation one uses…And I got a headache reading about it.
    The Gregorian calculation for Easter this year was March 23.
    The Julian was/is April 27

    Reply
  19. I guess we have Constantine and the Council of Nicaea to blame. I checked it out and found it all very confusing, but somehow it’s all based on the vernal equinox and the first Sunday after a full moon. But, then it also depends on whether one is Christian or Eastern Orthodox and which calculation one uses…And I got a headache reading about it.
    The Gregorian calculation for Easter this year was March 23.
    The Julian was/is April 27

    Reply
  20. I guess we have Constantine and the Council of Nicaea to blame. I checked it out and found it all very confusing, but somehow it’s all based on the vernal equinox and the first Sunday after a full moon. But, then it also depends on whether one is Christian or Eastern Orthodox and which calculation one uses…And I got a headache reading about it.
    The Gregorian calculation for Easter this year was March 23.
    The Julian was/is April 27

    Reply
  21. Mona Gedney had two:
    Easter Regency and The Easter Charade. And a bit of a cheat, lol, Madeline Hunter’s next book is The Sins of Lord Easterbrook.
    I never knew that about bunnies and breeding, no wonder there are so many hopping around. Happy Easter, Pat.

    Reply
  22. Mona Gedney had two:
    Easter Regency and The Easter Charade. And a bit of a cheat, lol, Madeline Hunter’s next book is The Sins of Lord Easterbrook.
    I never knew that about bunnies and breeding, no wonder there are so many hopping around. Happy Easter, Pat.

    Reply
  23. Mona Gedney had two:
    Easter Regency and The Easter Charade. And a bit of a cheat, lol, Madeline Hunter’s next book is The Sins of Lord Easterbrook.
    I never knew that about bunnies and breeding, no wonder there are so many hopping around. Happy Easter, Pat.

    Reply
  24. Mona Gedney had two:
    Easter Regency and The Easter Charade. And a bit of a cheat, lol, Madeline Hunter’s next book is The Sins of Lord Easterbrook.
    I never knew that about bunnies and breeding, no wonder there are so many hopping around. Happy Easter, Pat.

    Reply
  25. Mona Gedney had two:
    Easter Regency and The Easter Charade. And a bit of a cheat, lol, Madeline Hunter’s next book is The Sins of Lord Easterbrook.
    I never knew that about bunnies and breeding, no wonder there are so many hopping around. Happy Easter, Pat.

    Reply
  26. Elaine, you’ve got to be one of the fun people who sat down and figured out when the next time St Pat and Easter fell the same week! That fact alone amazed me. I just took the newspaper’s word for it that they fell on the same day last time. You get double points. “G”
    Oh, and there really are Easter books out there, cool! Although I’m not entirely certain “easterbrook” counts. “G”
    Hmm, wonder if I ought to adopt the Julian calendar.
    I’m gonna have Sherrie pull names tonight for tomorrow’s Queen Wench for a Day, so be preparing appropriate gifts to bestow on the winner!

    Reply
  27. Elaine, you’ve got to be one of the fun people who sat down and figured out when the next time St Pat and Easter fell the same week! That fact alone amazed me. I just took the newspaper’s word for it that they fell on the same day last time. You get double points. “G”
    Oh, and there really are Easter books out there, cool! Although I’m not entirely certain “easterbrook” counts. “G”
    Hmm, wonder if I ought to adopt the Julian calendar.
    I’m gonna have Sherrie pull names tonight for tomorrow’s Queen Wench for a Day, so be preparing appropriate gifts to bestow on the winner!

    Reply
  28. Elaine, you’ve got to be one of the fun people who sat down and figured out when the next time St Pat and Easter fell the same week! That fact alone amazed me. I just took the newspaper’s word for it that they fell on the same day last time. You get double points. “G”
    Oh, and there really are Easter books out there, cool! Although I’m not entirely certain “easterbrook” counts. “G”
    Hmm, wonder if I ought to adopt the Julian calendar.
    I’m gonna have Sherrie pull names tonight for tomorrow’s Queen Wench for a Day, so be preparing appropriate gifts to bestow on the winner!

    Reply
  29. Elaine, you’ve got to be one of the fun people who sat down and figured out when the next time St Pat and Easter fell the same week! That fact alone amazed me. I just took the newspaper’s word for it that they fell on the same day last time. You get double points. “G”
    Oh, and there really are Easter books out there, cool! Although I’m not entirely certain “easterbrook” counts. “G”
    Hmm, wonder if I ought to adopt the Julian calendar.
    I’m gonna have Sherrie pull names tonight for tomorrow’s Queen Wench for a Day, so be preparing appropriate gifts to bestow on the winner!

    Reply
  30. Elaine, you’ve got to be one of the fun people who sat down and figured out when the next time St Pat and Easter fell the same week! That fact alone amazed me. I just took the newspaper’s word for it that they fell on the same day last time. You get double points. “G”
    Oh, and there really are Easter books out there, cool! Although I’m not entirely certain “easterbrook” counts. “G”
    Hmm, wonder if I ought to adopt the Julian calendar.
    I’m gonna have Sherrie pull names tonight for tomorrow’s Queen Wench for a Day, so be preparing appropriate gifts to bestow on the winner!

    Reply
  31. If I remember correctly, Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” has a reference to Easter and the rebirth/resurrection brought by spring. I’ll have to wait until I get home from work to give you chapter and verse. . .

    Reply
  32. If I remember correctly, Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” has a reference to Easter and the rebirth/resurrection brought by spring. I’ll have to wait until I get home from work to give you chapter and verse. . .

    Reply
  33. If I remember correctly, Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” has a reference to Easter and the rebirth/resurrection brought by spring. I’ll have to wait until I get home from work to give you chapter and verse. . .

    Reply
  34. If I remember correctly, Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” has a reference to Easter and the rebirth/resurrection brought by spring. I’ll have to wait until I get home from work to give you chapter and verse. . .

    Reply
  35. If I remember correctly, Mary Balogh’s “Simply Dangerous” has a reference to Easter and the rebirth/resurrection brought by spring. I’ll have to wait until I get home from work to give you chapter and verse. . .

    Reply
  36. My eleven year old daughter asked me a couple days ago why the Easter bunny gives out eggs. (She’s getting to the smart-aleck age.)
    I answered that it was because a bunny would never hand out its own kids, so it doles out somebody else’s.
    I celebrate Eostara, which is today.
    Happy Eostara everybody!

    Reply
  37. My eleven year old daughter asked me a couple days ago why the Easter bunny gives out eggs. (She’s getting to the smart-aleck age.)
    I answered that it was because a bunny would never hand out its own kids, so it doles out somebody else’s.
    I celebrate Eostara, which is today.
    Happy Eostara everybody!

    Reply
  38. My eleven year old daughter asked me a couple days ago why the Easter bunny gives out eggs. (She’s getting to the smart-aleck age.)
    I answered that it was because a bunny would never hand out its own kids, so it doles out somebody else’s.
    I celebrate Eostara, which is today.
    Happy Eostara everybody!

    Reply
  39. My eleven year old daughter asked me a couple days ago why the Easter bunny gives out eggs. (She’s getting to the smart-aleck age.)
    I answered that it was because a bunny would never hand out its own kids, so it doles out somebody else’s.
    I celebrate Eostara, which is today.
    Happy Eostara everybody!

    Reply
  40. My eleven year old daughter asked me a couple days ago why the Easter bunny gives out eggs. (She’s getting to the smart-aleck age.)
    I answered that it was because a bunny would never hand out its own kids, so it doles out somebody else’s.
    I celebrate Eostara, which is today.
    Happy Eostara everybody!

    Reply
  41. I’m utterly amazed that you remember titles much less which one contains the Easter references! I really need a microchip implanted in my brain.
    I love your answer, Jane. Wonder where she gets that smart aleck gene? “G”
    Sure, Bunny books might as well qualify if Lord Easterbrooks are! The more, the merrier.

    Reply
  42. I’m utterly amazed that you remember titles much less which one contains the Easter references! I really need a microchip implanted in my brain.
    I love your answer, Jane. Wonder where she gets that smart aleck gene? “G”
    Sure, Bunny books might as well qualify if Lord Easterbrooks are! The more, the merrier.

    Reply
  43. I’m utterly amazed that you remember titles much less which one contains the Easter references! I really need a microchip implanted in my brain.
    I love your answer, Jane. Wonder where she gets that smart aleck gene? “G”
    Sure, Bunny books might as well qualify if Lord Easterbrooks are! The more, the merrier.

    Reply
  44. I’m utterly amazed that you remember titles much less which one contains the Easter references! I really need a microchip implanted in my brain.
    I love your answer, Jane. Wonder where she gets that smart aleck gene? “G”
    Sure, Bunny books might as well qualify if Lord Easterbrooks are! The more, the merrier.

    Reply
  45. I’m utterly amazed that you remember titles much less which one contains the Easter references! I really need a microchip implanted in my brain.
    I love your answer, Jane. Wonder where she gets that smart aleck gene? “G”
    Sure, Bunny books might as well qualify if Lord Easterbrooks are! The more, the merrier.

    Reply
  46. Yes, yes, yes, the book I’m thinking of is “Slightly Dangerous” by Mary Balogh–the last third of the book is set at an Easter-holiday house party. There is actually mention of Good Friday and Easter church services, and in Chapter 17 there’s this:
    . . .”I love winter landscapes too,” she said. “They have all the appearance of death but all the potential for resurrection. One understands the full power and mystery and glory of life during winter. . .”
    . . .”I believe, Mrs. Derrick,” the duke said, “you are an eternal optimist. You find hope even in death.”
    “The whole of life would be a tragedy if one did not understand that it is, in fact, indestructible,” she said.
    . . .it was true what she had just said. Easter began with mourning for a death and was gloomy for a while. But then came the glory of resurrection. . .
    (end quote)
    It’s a very appropriate metaphor for the journeys undertaken by both Wulfric and Christine on the way to their happy ending–his journey out of emotional remoteness and her journey out of sorrow and disgrace, as they reveal their mutual love and embrace a joyful future together..
    Sigh.

    Reply
  47. Yes, yes, yes, the book I’m thinking of is “Slightly Dangerous” by Mary Balogh–the last third of the book is set at an Easter-holiday house party. There is actually mention of Good Friday and Easter church services, and in Chapter 17 there’s this:
    . . .”I love winter landscapes too,” she said. “They have all the appearance of death but all the potential for resurrection. One understands the full power and mystery and glory of life during winter. . .”
    . . .”I believe, Mrs. Derrick,” the duke said, “you are an eternal optimist. You find hope even in death.”
    “The whole of life would be a tragedy if one did not understand that it is, in fact, indestructible,” she said.
    . . .it was true what she had just said. Easter began with mourning for a death and was gloomy for a while. But then came the glory of resurrection. . .
    (end quote)
    It’s a very appropriate metaphor for the journeys undertaken by both Wulfric and Christine on the way to their happy ending–his journey out of emotional remoteness and her journey out of sorrow and disgrace, as they reveal their mutual love and embrace a joyful future together..
    Sigh.

    Reply
  48. Yes, yes, yes, the book I’m thinking of is “Slightly Dangerous” by Mary Balogh–the last third of the book is set at an Easter-holiday house party. There is actually mention of Good Friday and Easter church services, and in Chapter 17 there’s this:
    . . .”I love winter landscapes too,” she said. “They have all the appearance of death but all the potential for resurrection. One understands the full power and mystery and glory of life during winter. . .”
    . . .”I believe, Mrs. Derrick,” the duke said, “you are an eternal optimist. You find hope even in death.”
    “The whole of life would be a tragedy if one did not understand that it is, in fact, indestructible,” she said.
    . . .it was true what she had just said. Easter began with mourning for a death and was gloomy for a while. But then came the glory of resurrection. . .
    (end quote)
    It’s a very appropriate metaphor for the journeys undertaken by both Wulfric and Christine on the way to their happy ending–his journey out of emotional remoteness and her journey out of sorrow and disgrace, as they reveal their mutual love and embrace a joyful future together..
    Sigh.

    Reply
  49. Yes, yes, yes, the book I’m thinking of is “Slightly Dangerous” by Mary Balogh–the last third of the book is set at an Easter-holiday house party. There is actually mention of Good Friday and Easter church services, and in Chapter 17 there’s this:
    . . .”I love winter landscapes too,” she said. “They have all the appearance of death but all the potential for resurrection. One understands the full power and mystery and glory of life during winter. . .”
    . . .”I believe, Mrs. Derrick,” the duke said, “you are an eternal optimist. You find hope even in death.”
    “The whole of life would be a tragedy if one did not understand that it is, in fact, indestructible,” she said.
    . . .it was true what she had just said. Easter began with mourning for a death and was gloomy for a while. But then came the glory of resurrection. . .
    (end quote)
    It’s a very appropriate metaphor for the journeys undertaken by both Wulfric and Christine on the way to their happy ending–his journey out of emotional remoteness and her journey out of sorrow and disgrace, as they reveal their mutual love and embrace a joyful future together..
    Sigh.

    Reply
  50. Yes, yes, yes, the book I’m thinking of is “Slightly Dangerous” by Mary Balogh–the last third of the book is set at an Easter-holiday house party. There is actually mention of Good Friday and Easter church services, and in Chapter 17 there’s this:
    . . .”I love winter landscapes too,” she said. “They have all the appearance of death but all the potential for resurrection. One understands the full power and mystery and glory of life during winter. . .”
    . . .”I believe, Mrs. Derrick,” the duke said, “you are an eternal optimist. You find hope even in death.”
    “The whole of life would be a tragedy if one did not understand that it is, in fact, indestructible,” she said.
    . . .it was true what she had just said. Easter began with mourning for a death and was gloomy for a while. But then came the glory of resurrection. . .
    (end quote)
    It’s a very appropriate metaphor for the journeys undertaken by both Wulfric and Christine on the way to their happy ending–his journey out of emotional remoteness and her journey out of sorrow and disgrace, as they reveal their mutual love and embrace a joyful future together..
    Sigh.

    Reply
  51. Oh, RevMelinda… that is so good! I don’t think I’ve ever considered winter in the same breath as resurrection.
    And Jane… your comment is to die for! I wish I’d thought of that when my daughter asked many, many, many years ago. Instead, I went with the intellectual answer. Poor kid.

    Reply
  52. Oh, RevMelinda… that is so good! I don’t think I’ve ever considered winter in the same breath as resurrection.
    And Jane… your comment is to die for! I wish I’d thought of that when my daughter asked many, many, many years ago. Instead, I went with the intellectual answer. Poor kid.

    Reply
  53. Oh, RevMelinda… that is so good! I don’t think I’ve ever considered winter in the same breath as resurrection.
    And Jane… your comment is to die for! I wish I’d thought of that when my daughter asked many, many, many years ago. Instead, I went with the intellectual answer. Poor kid.

    Reply
  54. Oh, RevMelinda… that is so good! I don’t think I’ve ever considered winter in the same breath as resurrection.
    And Jane… your comment is to die for! I wish I’d thought of that when my daughter asked many, many, many years ago. Instead, I went with the intellectual answer. Poor kid.

    Reply
  55. Oh, RevMelinda… that is so good! I don’t think I’ve ever considered winter in the same breath as resurrection.
    And Jane… your comment is to die for! I wish I’d thought of that when my daughter asked many, many, many years ago. Instead, I went with the intellectual answer. Poor kid.

    Reply
  56. Elie Halevy, England in 1815 (one of my favorite books for nearly a half century–it stands up well to rereading) has some interesting things to say about how, in spite of the institutional sludginess of the CofE, the rise of Methodism in 18th century England had a significant impact in averting events parallel to the French Revolution.
    Halevy’s book was unusual at the time it was published because it was someone from an “outside” tradition looking at how the English government worked (and how much less “governed” England was than the continent).

    Reply
  57. Elie Halevy, England in 1815 (one of my favorite books for nearly a half century–it stands up well to rereading) has some interesting things to say about how, in spite of the institutional sludginess of the CofE, the rise of Methodism in 18th century England had a significant impact in averting events parallel to the French Revolution.
    Halevy’s book was unusual at the time it was published because it was someone from an “outside” tradition looking at how the English government worked (and how much less “governed” England was than the continent).

    Reply
  58. Elie Halevy, England in 1815 (one of my favorite books for nearly a half century–it stands up well to rereading) has some interesting things to say about how, in spite of the institutional sludginess of the CofE, the rise of Methodism in 18th century England had a significant impact in averting events parallel to the French Revolution.
    Halevy’s book was unusual at the time it was published because it was someone from an “outside” tradition looking at how the English government worked (and how much less “governed” England was than the continent).

    Reply
  59. Elie Halevy, England in 1815 (one of my favorite books for nearly a half century–it stands up well to rereading) has some interesting things to say about how, in spite of the institutional sludginess of the CofE, the rise of Methodism in 18th century England had a significant impact in averting events parallel to the French Revolution.
    Halevy’s book was unusual at the time it was published because it was someone from an “outside” tradition looking at how the English government worked (and how much less “governed” England was than the continent).

    Reply
  60. Elie Halevy, England in 1815 (one of my favorite books for nearly a half century–it stands up well to rereading) has some interesting things to say about how, in spite of the institutional sludginess of the CofE, the rise of Methodism in 18th century England had a significant impact in averting events parallel to the French Revolution.
    Halevy’s book was unusual at the time it was published because it was someone from an “outside” tradition looking at how the English government worked (and how much less “governed” England was than the continent).

    Reply
  61. At least historical to those of us under 50 🙂 “The Lady” by Anne McCaffrey. She is known for her science fiction, but wrote at least 2 lovely “romance” novels in the traditional sense. The Lady is set in Ireland where McCaffrey moved decades ago. She also wrote “In the Year of the Lucy” about a creative women trapped as a housewife in the US.

    Reply
  62. At least historical to those of us under 50 🙂 “The Lady” by Anne McCaffrey. She is known for her science fiction, but wrote at least 2 lovely “romance” novels in the traditional sense. The Lady is set in Ireland where McCaffrey moved decades ago. She also wrote “In the Year of the Lucy” about a creative women trapped as a housewife in the US.

    Reply
  63. At least historical to those of us under 50 🙂 “The Lady” by Anne McCaffrey. She is known for her science fiction, but wrote at least 2 lovely “romance” novels in the traditional sense. The Lady is set in Ireland where McCaffrey moved decades ago. She also wrote “In the Year of the Lucy” about a creative women trapped as a housewife in the US.

    Reply
  64. At least historical to those of us under 50 🙂 “The Lady” by Anne McCaffrey. She is known for her science fiction, but wrote at least 2 lovely “romance” novels in the traditional sense. The Lady is set in Ireland where McCaffrey moved decades ago. She also wrote “In the Year of the Lucy” about a creative women trapped as a housewife in the US.

    Reply
  65. At least historical to those of us under 50 🙂 “The Lady” by Anne McCaffrey. She is known for her science fiction, but wrote at least 2 lovely “romance” novels in the traditional sense. The Lady is set in Ireland where McCaffrey moved decades ago. She also wrote “In the Year of the Lucy” about a creative women trapped as a housewife in the US.

    Reply

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