History—and Heroes!

Lieutenant-general-sir-john-moore-allied-commanders-of-the-napoleonic-war-by-john-romneyAndrea here. As I’ve mentioned here before, along with my Wrexford & Sloane historical mystery series, I’m working on a new book project in a new-to-me genre within historical fiction— a biography “reimagining” the life of Lady Hester Stanhope, an extraordinary real-life woman from the Regency era.

I Engraving of Mooren other words, it’s a book that meant to stay accurate to her real life and personality, but requires an author’s imagination to create the story and dialogue that will make her come alive for readers. It’s been a fascinating challenge. I’ve done a lot of research, which I love, and am lucky that Lady Hester was a member of a very prominent family, so many of her letters have been saved, which give special window into her thoughts and feelings.

But I’m digressing from the main topic of this blog, which is how these deep-dive research forays, where one reads as much as possible about a person’s life can become “personal” in very unexpected ways. I have a confession to make! In looking at the three men who were Lady Hester’s love interests, I have come to have a “crush” on one of them— Lieutenant-General Sir John Moore


Sir John Moore-Lawrence-c 1800-1804For me, Moore is a storybook hero—an author might think twice about creating him, as readers might roll their eyes and think he was too good to be true. Something about him captivated me the first time I looked at the famous portrait of him done by the famous Regency-era painter, Sir Thomas Lawrence. First of all, he has very kind eyes, and a wonderful half smile. Secondly, his military tunic is simple—no medals, no extra flourishes of elaborate gold braid that marks most of the military portraits painted during the era. (I later read that Moore thought Admiral Horatio Nelson, who was known for his love of “bling,” looked like a buffoon out of an opera production. Shown below is one of the many medals—this from the Egyptian Campaign— Moore won, but rarely wore.)

Moore-Grand TourAnd the more I read about Moore, the more I admired him. Born in in 1761, he had an interesting life. His father was a well-respected physician in Scotland and served the family of the Duke of Hamilton. When the duke died, his widow asked Moore’s father to take her sixteen-year-old son, now the 8th duke, on the Grand Tour of the continent that was de rigueur for all young gentlemen of the era. Moore agreed, but only on the condition that John, his eldest son, who was twelve, could come along. (That's John in a military coat, the duke in the middle and John's father to the left.)

While John was already interested in a military career, his travels polished his education—he was exposed to art, music, and culture, and read a great deal about philosophy, as well as military history. In the course of their travels, they visited Berlin, and were invited to observe the military maneuvers of Frederick the Great’s army. Frederick was so impressed with John’s military knowledge—he and the boy had lengthy discussions on the subject—that he gifted John with a pair of exquisite Prussian pistols (which he kept to the end of his life) and offered him an officer’s commission in the Austro-Hungarian army. John politely declined. His loyalty lay with Britain. When they returned home, the Duke of Hamilton used his influence to get John an officer’s commission in the 51st regiment—though he had to wait until his fifteenth birthday to join.

Moore in battleAnd thus began an illustrious career as a courageous soldier and brilliant tactician. Moore fought in America, Holland, Egypt, the Mediterranean, Scandinavia and, finally, Portugal and Spain, earning accolades for his bravery. His men adored him. Unlike most commanders, he didn’t believe in flogging or corporal punishment, but believed discipline came from earning his men’s respect. He treated them well, and battled bureaucrats to ensure that his army had the proper equipment and food.

Moore-Eygptian Military MedalWhen the Napoleonic Wars broke out in the early 1800’s, Moore was put in charge of of a training camp in Kent, to teach his innovative tactics of using light infantry—quick-moving battalions and rifle brigades—to give the British Army an edge in fighting. It’s at this time that he first met Lady Hester. Her uncle, the former prime minister William Pitt the Younger, was in charge of the coastal defenses, and Moore was a frequent visitor their residence, Walmer Castle. (Lady Hester, who was living with her uncle, was a superb rider, as was Moore, and in my book I have them bonding over the love of a good gallop over the rolling countryside.

As the fighting between France and Britain engulfed much of Europe, Moore was posted to various hotspots. And while he won accolades on the battlefield, he did not endear himself to Britain’s political leaders, as he was outspoken when he thought their war policies were flawed, and only led to the slaughter of British soldiers. He was sidelines for a time in London, where he reconnected with Lady Hester, and they began a friends-to-(possible) lovers romance. Moore’s criticism of the war on the Peninsula earned him the enmity of leading politicians Canning and Castlereagh. (Lady Hester later accused them of deliberately sending Moore into a dangerous campaign in hopes that he would be killed in battle.)

The government ended up sending Moore to take charge of the army in Portugal, and like a good soldier he went, even though he believed his assignment was going to be a fiasco. History isn’t clear on the subject, but it’s thought that he and Lady Hester became engaged, with the understanding that they would marry when he returned.

Death if Sir John Moore
Moore turned out to be right, as the Spanish forces, who were supposed to reinforce his men, crumbled when Napoleon march in to reinforce the French army under Soult. Seeing that the only way to save his men was to retreat through the mountain to the coast, where the British Navy could evacuate the army, he fought his way through terrible weather and hardships to bring his men to the the o town of Corunna. The French were hot on their heels, so in order to give his men time to board the ships, he took personal command of a small rearguard force and fought to hold the French at bay. During the battle, he was hit by a cannon ball and mortally wounded. But he refused to let his staff —who were distraught over his injury—carry him off the field until he was sure they had beaten back the French. He died several hours later, and his words, said to Lady Hester’s brother, who was on his staff, “Stanhope, remember me to your sister.”

The_Burial_of_Sir_John_Moore_after_Corunna_by_Geo_Jones
His body was wrapped in a military cloak and buried on the battlefield, as it was his wish to lie where he had fallen.

One doesn’t often find a true hero in history, but for me, General Sir John Moore is one of those rare men who seem to deserve to be called one. In all my research I have yet to read one bad thing about him . . . so I stand by my historical “crush” on him!

What about you. Have you ever discovered a figure in history that made your heart go pitty-pat? Please share!

115 thoughts on “History—and Heroes!”

  1. Wow, he does sound amazing! A true Regency hero and I can quite see why Lady Hester would fall for him.
    Personally, I like bad boy heroes so my favourite is Harald Hardraada, the Viking king who fell at the battle of Stamford Bridge. He’d led a very exciting life, being part of the Varangian Guard in Byzantium, escaping from there under a cloud, marrying a Slav princess, and later becoming a king in Norway. He was said to be handsome and charismatic, and he was obviously a fighter and great leader of men. Definitely my kind of guy

    Reply
  2. Wow, he does sound amazing! A true Regency hero and I can quite see why Lady Hester would fall for him.
    Personally, I like bad boy heroes so my favourite is Harald Hardraada, the Viking king who fell at the battle of Stamford Bridge. He’d led a very exciting life, being part of the Varangian Guard in Byzantium, escaping from there under a cloud, marrying a Slav princess, and later becoming a king in Norway. He was said to be handsome and charismatic, and he was obviously a fighter and great leader of men. Definitely my kind of guy

    Reply
  3. Wow, he does sound amazing! A true Regency hero and I can quite see why Lady Hester would fall for him.
    Personally, I like bad boy heroes so my favourite is Harald Hardraada, the Viking king who fell at the battle of Stamford Bridge. He’d led a very exciting life, being part of the Varangian Guard in Byzantium, escaping from there under a cloud, marrying a Slav princess, and later becoming a king in Norway. He was said to be handsome and charismatic, and he was obviously a fighter and great leader of men. Definitely my kind of guy

    Reply
  4. Wow, he does sound amazing! A true Regency hero and I can quite see why Lady Hester would fall for him.
    Personally, I like bad boy heroes so my favourite is Harald Hardraada, the Viking king who fell at the battle of Stamford Bridge. He’d led a very exciting life, being part of the Varangian Guard in Byzantium, escaping from there under a cloud, marrying a Slav princess, and later becoming a king in Norway. He was said to be handsome and charismatic, and he was obviously a fighter and great leader of men. Definitely my kind of guy

    Reply
  5. Wow, he does sound amazing! A true Regency hero and I can quite see why Lady Hester would fall for him.
    Personally, I like bad boy heroes so my favourite is Harald Hardraada, the Viking king who fell at the battle of Stamford Bridge. He’d led a very exciting life, being part of the Varangian Guard in Byzantium, escaping from there under a cloud, marrying a Slav princess, and later becoming a king in Norway. He was said to be handsome and charismatic, and he was obviously a fighter and great leader of men. Definitely my kind of guy

    Reply
  6. I loved reading the story of Sir John Moore. I agree he would be a perfect romance hero. The only bad part is that he died too young 😢 For a romance he would have to marry his lady and live happily together to very old age.

    Reply
  7. I loved reading the story of Sir John Moore. I agree he would be a perfect romance hero. The only bad part is that he died too young 😢 For a romance he would have to marry his lady and live happily together to very old age.

    Reply
  8. I loved reading the story of Sir John Moore. I agree he would be a perfect romance hero. The only bad part is that he died too young 😢 For a romance he would have to marry his lady and live happily together to very old age.

    Reply
  9. I loved reading the story of Sir John Moore. I agree he would be a perfect romance hero. The only bad part is that he died too young 😢 For a romance he would have to marry his lady and live happily together to very old age.

    Reply
  10. I loved reading the story of Sir John Moore. I agree he would be a perfect romance hero. The only bad part is that he died too young 😢 For a romance he would have to marry his lady and live happily together to very old age.

    Reply
  11. Yes! Everything I’ve come across about Moore only increases my admiration for him—and I rarely end up with much admiration for military officers.

    Reply
  12. Yes! Everything I’ve come across about Moore only increases my admiration for him—and I rarely end up with much admiration for military officers.

    Reply
  13. Yes! Everything I’ve come across about Moore only increases my admiration for him—and I rarely end up with much admiration for military officers.

    Reply
  14. Yes! Everything I’ve come across about Moore only increases my admiration for him—and I rarely end up with much admiration for military officers.

    Reply
  15. Yes! Everything I’ve come across about Moore only increases my admiration for him—and I rarely end up with much admiration for military officers.

    Reply
  16. One of my favorite books is Fortune’s Bride by Roberta Gellis. I’ve learned more about history from her books than I ever did at school! Lol. That book took place in Portugal and Spain during the Napoleonic war. Sir John Moore is dealt with there as he is the hero’s hero and the hero is an aide de camp so fairly close.
    One of the things I loved about Roberta’s books when I first started reading them was her accuracy in her historical events. She had a degree in history and medieval history especially. This series diverged by starting during the French Revolution and going forward through the Napoleonic wars. Roberta always took the historical events seriously and made them very clear to her readers.
    I liked how she showed Sir John Moore as larger than life and human at the same time. Very interesting book and well read! I think I need a new copy as I’ve almost read it to death! Lol I’ve done that a few times with her books. 😀

    Reply
  17. One of my favorite books is Fortune’s Bride by Roberta Gellis. I’ve learned more about history from her books than I ever did at school! Lol. That book took place in Portugal and Spain during the Napoleonic war. Sir John Moore is dealt with there as he is the hero’s hero and the hero is an aide de camp so fairly close.
    One of the things I loved about Roberta’s books when I first started reading them was her accuracy in her historical events. She had a degree in history and medieval history especially. This series diverged by starting during the French Revolution and going forward through the Napoleonic wars. Roberta always took the historical events seriously and made them very clear to her readers.
    I liked how she showed Sir John Moore as larger than life and human at the same time. Very interesting book and well read! I think I need a new copy as I’ve almost read it to death! Lol I’ve done that a few times with her books. 😀

    Reply
  18. One of my favorite books is Fortune’s Bride by Roberta Gellis. I’ve learned more about history from her books than I ever did at school! Lol. That book took place in Portugal and Spain during the Napoleonic war. Sir John Moore is dealt with there as he is the hero’s hero and the hero is an aide de camp so fairly close.
    One of the things I loved about Roberta’s books when I first started reading them was her accuracy in her historical events. She had a degree in history and medieval history especially. This series diverged by starting during the French Revolution and going forward through the Napoleonic wars. Roberta always took the historical events seriously and made them very clear to her readers.
    I liked how she showed Sir John Moore as larger than life and human at the same time. Very interesting book and well read! I think I need a new copy as I’ve almost read it to death! Lol I’ve done that a few times with her books. 😀

    Reply
  19. One of my favorite books is Fortune’s Bride by Roberta Gellis. I’ve learned more about history from her books than I ever did at school! Lol. That book took place in Portugal and Spain during the Napoleonic war. Sir John Moore is dealt with there as he is the hero’s hero and the hero is an aide de camp so fairly close.
    One of the things I loved about Roberta’s books when I first started reading them was her accuracy in her historical events. She had a degree in history and medieval history especially. This series diverged by starting during the French Revolution and going forward through the Napoleonic wars. Roberta always took the historical events seriously and made them very clear to her readers.
    I liked how she showed Sir John Moore as larger than life and human at the same time. Very interesting book and well read! I think I need a new copy as I’ve almost read it to death! Lol I’ve done that a few times with her books. 😀

    Reply
  20. One of my favorite books is Fortune’s Bride by Roberta Gellis. I’ve learned more about history from her books than I ever did at school! Lol. That book took place in Portugal and Spain during the Napoleonic war. Sir John Moore is dealt with there as he is the hero’s hero and the hero is an aide de camp so fairly close.
    One of the things I loved about Roberta’s books when I first started reading them was her accuracy in her historical events. She had a degree in history and medieval history especially. This series diverged by starting during the French Revolution and going forward through the Napoleonic wars. Roberta always took the historical events seriously and made them very clear to her readers.
    I liked how she showed Sir John Moore as larger than life and human at the same time. Very interesting book and well read! I think I need a new copy as I’ve almost read it to death! Lol I’ve done that a few times with her books. 😀

    Reply
  21. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  22. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  23. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  24. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  25. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  26. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  27. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  28. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  29. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  30. One of my favorite books is similar to what you are talking about. “Dolley: a Novel” by Rita Mae Brown. She built a story around the First Lady’s what she learned from the Madison papers and historical accounts. As for a historical figure I’ve had a “thing” for; I’d say Theodore Roosevelt keeps dragging me back into the book crush.

    Reply
  31. I did a lot of research on the Battle of Corunna, including the grueling march across the mountains in mid-winter that preceded the battle. I actually found a book that is first person account of the march from Spain to Corunna where the British forces were waiting for the ships. Two of my main characters, in opposing armies are on that march, but do not meet. The descriptions are horrifying and brutal.

    Reply
  32. I did a lot of research on the Battle of Corunna, including the grueling march across the mountains in mid-winter that preceded the battle. I actually found a book that is first person account of the march from Spain to Corunna where the British forces were waiting for the ships. Two of my main characters, in opposing armies are on that march, but do not meet. The descriptions are horrifying and brutal.

    Reply
  33. I did a lot of research on the Battle of Corunna, including the grueling march across the mountains in mid-winter that preceded the battle. I actually found a book that is first person account of the march from Spain to Corunna where the British forces were waiting for the ships. Two of my main characters, in opposing armies are on that march, but do not meet. The descriptions are horrifying and brutal.

    Reply
  34. I did a lot of research on the Battle of Corunna, including the grueling march across the mountains in mid-winter that preceded the battle. I actually found a book that is first person account of the march from Spain to Corunna where the British forces were waiting for the ships. Two of my main characters, in opposing armies are on that march, but do not meet. The descriptions are horrifying and brutal.

    Reply
  35. I did a lot of research on the Battle of Corunna, including the grueling march across the mountains in mid-winter that preceded the battle. I actually found a book that is first person account of the march from Spain to Corunna where the British forces were waiting for the ships. Two of my main characters, in opposing armies are on that march, but do not meet. The descriptions are horrifying and brutal.

    Reply
  36. Thank you so much. You have introduced me to a remarkable and heroic man. And he was very handsome. He could run for office today and win hands down….but no one would believe he could be honest and forthright. Historic figures are not always admirable, but I have admired Thomas Jefferson for his intelligence, and Benjamin Franklin for the same reason. I imagine those two would have had wonderful discussions. And, George Washington is a heroic figure. I have read a wonderful biography about Martha and she was amazing. I don’t think she would have chosen George if he were not the man she thought he was. I trust her judgment. Thanks for this post, it is wonderful. And I am pleased to meet such a hero as Sir John Moore. You are right, he is nearly too good to be true.

    Reply
  37. Thank you so much. You have introduced me to a remarkable and heroic man. And he was very handsome. He could run for office today and win hands down….but no one would believe he could be honest and forthright. Historic figures are not always admirable, but I have admired Thomas Jefferson for his intelligence, and Benjamin Franklin for the same reason. I imagine those two would have had wonderful discussions. And, George Washington is a heroic figure. I have read a wonderful biography about Martha and she was amazing. I don’t think she would have chosen George if he were not the man she thought he was. I trust her judgment. Thanks for this post, it is wonderful. And I am pleased to meet such a hero as Sir John Moore. You are right, he is nearly too good to be true.

    Reply
  38. Thank you so much. You have introduced me to a remarkable and heroic man. And he was very handsome. He could run for office today and win hands down….but no one would believe he could be honest and forthright. Historic figures are not always admirable, but I have admired Thomas Jefferson for his intelligence, and Benjamin Franklin for the same reason. I imagine those two would have had wonderful discussions. And, George Washington is a heroic figure. I have read a wonderful biography about Martha and she was amazing. I don’t think she would have chosen George if he were not the man she thought he was. I trust her judgment. Thanks for this post, it is wonderful. And I am pleased to meet such a hero as Sir John Moore. You are right, he is nearly too good to be true.

    Reply
  39. Thank you so much. You have introduced me to a remarkable and heroic man. And he was very handsome. He could run for office today and win hands down….but no one would believe he could be honest and forthright. Historic figures are not always admirable, but I have admired Thomas Jefferson for his intelligence, and Benjamin Franklin for the same reason. I imagine those two would have had wonderful discussions. And, George Washington is a heroic figure. I have read a wonderful biography about Martha and she was amazing. I don’t think she would have chosen George if he were not the man she thought he was. I trust her judgment. Thanks for this post, it is wonderful. And I am pleased to meet such a hero as Sir John Moore. You are right, he is nearly too good to be true.

    Reply
  40. Thank you so much. You have introduced me to a remarkable and heroic man. And he was very handsome. He could run for office today and win hands down….but no one would believe he could be honest and forthright. Historic figures are not always admirable, but I have admired Thomas Jefferson for his intelligence, and Benjamin Franklin for the same reason. I imagine those two would have had wonderful discussions. And, George Washington is a heroic figure. I have read a wonderful biography about Martha and she was amazing. I don’t think she would have chosen George if he were not the man she thought he was. I trust her judgment. Thanks for this post, it is wonderful. And I am pleased to meet such a hero as Sir John Moore. You are right, he is nearly too good to be true.

    Reply
  41. So glad you enjoyed the post, Annette. It’s fun to discover really admirable men (We need more of them!) You mentioned three very special men. Turly admirable too, despite their human flaws.

    Reply
  42. So glad you enjoyed the post, Annette. It’s fun to discover really admirable men (We need more of them!) You mentioned three very special men. Turly admirable too, despite their human flaws.

    Reply
  43. So glad you enjoyed the post, Annette. It’s fun to discover really admirable men (We need more of them!) You mentioned three very special men. Turly admirable too, despite their human flaws.

    Reply
  44. So glad you enjoyed the post, Annette. It’s fun to discover really admirable men (We need more of them!) You mentioned three very special men. Turly admirable too, despite their human flaws.

    Reply
  45. So glad you enjoyed the post, Annette. It’s fun to discover really admirable men (We need more of them!) You mentioned three very special men. Turly admirable too, despite their human flaws.

    Reply
  46. Oop, sorry Lil. I added a comment under your name that was meant to go Lavinia.
    In answer to you, yes, military men can be tought. But Moore had such a humanity to him that really made him stand out. He treated his men better than most.

    Reply
  47. Oop, sorry Lil. I added a comment under your name that was meant to go Lavinia.
    In answer to you, yes, military men can be tought. But Moore had such a humanity to him that really made him stand out. He treated his men better than most.

    Reply
  48. Oop, sorry Lil. I added a comment under your name that was meant to go Lavinia.
    In answer to you, yes, military men can be tought. But Moore had such a humanity to him that really made him stand out. He treated his men better than most.

    Reply
  49. Oop, sorry Lil. I added a comment under your name that was meant to go Lavinia.
    In answer to you, yes, military men can be tought. But Moore had such a humanity to him that really made him stand out. He treated his men better than most.

    Reply
  50. Oop, sorry Lil. I added a comment under your name that was meant to go Lavinia.
    In answer to you, yes, military men can be tought. But Moore had such a humanity to him that really made him stand out. He treated his men better than most.

    Reply
  51. Yesterday I could not see or enter any comments here. But I had to come back and try again, just to say that after reading this I have a bit of a crush on John Moore too.

    Reply
  52. Yesterday I could not see or enter any comments here. But I had to come back and try again, just to say that after reading this I have a bit of a crush on John Moore too.

    Reply
  53. Yesterday I could not see or enter any comments here. But I had to come back and try again, just to say that after reading this I have a bit of a crush on John Moore too.

    Reply
  54. Yesterday I could not see or enter any comments here. But I had to come back and try again, just to say that after reading this I have a bit of a crush on John Moore too.

    Reply
  55. Yesterday I could not see or enter any comments here. But I had to come back and try again, just to say that after reading this I have a bit of a crush on John Moore too.

    Reply
  56. Yesterday, I was unable to post my comments. I wrote beautifully 😉 of Mr Moore as a heroic figure. He was so many things that one would want in a leader. And it is tragic that his life ended before he could complete his plans for the future.
    Thanks for this post and thanks for fixing the site for all of us.

    Reply
  57. Yesterday, I was unable to post my comments. I wrote beautifully 😉 of Mr Moore as a heroic figure. He was so many things that one would want in a leader. And it is tragic that his life ended before he could complete his plans for the future.
    Thanks for this post and thanks for fixing the site for all of us.

    Reply
  58. Yesterday, I was unable to post my comments. I wrote beautifully 😉 of Mr Moore as a heroic figure. He was so many things that one would want in a leader. And it is tragic that his life ended before he could complete his plans for the future.
    Thanks for this post and thanks for fixing the site for all of us.

    Reply
  59. Yesterday, I was unable to post my comments. I wrote beautifully 😉 of Mr Moore as a heroic figure. He was so many things that one would want in a leader. And it is tragic that his life ended before he could complete his plans for the future.
    Thanks for this post and thanks for fixing the site for all of us.

    Reply
  60. Yesterday, I was unable to post my comments. I wrote beautifully 😉 of Mr Moore as a heroic figure. He was so many things that one would want in a leader. And it is tragic that his life ended before he could complete his plans for the future.
    Thanks for this post and thanks for fixing the site for all of us.

    Reply
  61. I have it on good authority by a man named Basil Henning that Moore was a “bloody idiot.” This has tempered my admiration for the General, I’m sorry to say.

    Reply
  62. I have it on good authority by a man named Basil Henning that Moore was a “bloody idiot.” This has tempered my admiration for the General, I’m sorry to say.

    Reply
  63. I have it on good authority by a man named Basil Henning that Moore was a “bloody idiot.” This has tempered my admiration for the General, I’m sorry to say.

    Reply
  64. I have it on good authority by a man named Basil Henning that Moore was a “bloody idiot.” This has tempered my admiration for the General, I’m sorry to say.

    Reply
  65. I have it on good authority by a man named Basil Henning that Moore was a “bloody idiot.” This has tempered my admiration for the General, I’m sorry to say.

    Reply
  66. The Sir John Moore narrative was fascinating to read. He would make the ideal romantic lead, in my opinion. The only negative is that he passed away too soon. He would have to wed her and be faithful to her until they were extremely old to qualify as a romance.

    Reply
  67. The Sir John Moore narrative was fascinating to read. He would make the ideal romantic lead, in my opinion. The only negative is that he passed away too soon. He would have to wed her and be faithful to her until they were extremely old to qualify as a romance.

    Reply
  68. The Sir John Moore narrative was fascinating to read. He would make the ideal romantic lead, in my opinion. The only negative is that he passed away too soon. He would have to wed her and be faithful to her until they were extremely old to qualify as a romance.

    Reply
  69. The Sir John Moore narrative was fascinating to read. He would make the ideal romantic lead, in my opinion. The only negative is that he passed away too soon. He would have to wed her and be faithful to her until they were extremely old to qualify as a romance.

    Reply
  70. The Sir John Moore narrative was fascinating to read. He would make the ideal romantic lead, in my opinion. The only negative is that he passed away too soon. He would have to wed her and be faithful to her until they were extremely old to qualify as a romance.

    Reply

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