History We Take for Granted: The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo (Please excuse large white space–Typepad is being eccentric tonight, and we still seem to be in the Land of Giant Images.)

Every place has history, and we tend to take it for granted.  Here in Maryland, Defenders Day is a state holiday that commemorates the 1814 Battle of North Point.  Toward the end of the War of 1812, it was one of the battles in which the Maryland militia fought off the British who had just burned Washington and were looking to capture Baltimore, a strategically valuable port and home to a “nest of privateers.”  (True.  It was a nest of privateers.)

Fort McHenry The Brits were defeated at North Point, and that fight segued into the Battle of Baltimore—the bombardment of Fort McHenry that inspired the writing of The Star Spangled Banner.  (The bombardment is cheerfully reenacted every September with a Coast Guard cutter shooting blanks, plus lots of fireworks being set off. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Baltimore  )

This history is well known to most school kids, but still, there are lots of local people who have never visited Fort McHenry, now a national shrine and really quite a cool place to wander around in.  Just like tons of New Yorkers have never been to the Statue of Liberty and not all Texans have visited the Alamo, etc.  Some history is just too familiar to be exciting.  We take it for granted.

For me, the Lewis and Clark expedition was in that category: boring fourth grade history.  In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson bought the rights to a huge chunk of North America from the French who weren’t doing much with the territory since Napoleon was busy trying to conquer Europe.  Yawn.  Jefferson got the rights for a bargain price, thereby keeping the French from building an empire at the U. S.’s back door.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Purchase  Many Americans thought the whole thing was a bad idea. 

Map

Wanting to check out just what the nation had bought (even the French weren’t exactly sure what they were selling), Jefferson organized the Lewis and Clark Expedition to cross the continent and see what was there.  They wanted to find the legendary “Northwest Passage,” a water route to the Pacific, but didn’t because there isn’t one unless you go up to the Arctic, where the ice tends to get in the way.  But even if L&C didn’t find a Northwest Passage, they made it to the Oregon coast and back.  Yawn.

Except that fourth grade history doesn’t begin to do justice to what was really an amazing feat.  The Mayhem Consultant (MC for short <g>) saw a National Geographic/Lindblad Expeditions catalog listing a cruise called “In the Wake of Lewis and Clark” and thought it would be fun.  I’d’ve preferred a cruise to the Greek Isles and Dalmatian coast, but I’m easy, and I love water and the Pacific Northwest.  In particular, I wanted to see the desert interiors of Washington and Oregon. 

So we booked tickets on the cruise, which would start in Portland, Oregon, head north on the Willamette River to the Columbia River, east on the Columbia and Snake Rivers as far as Idaho, then working back down the Columbia to the mouth before ending back in Portland.  The staff would include historians and naturalists—people who really know stuff. 

We prepared for the trip by watching the Ken Burns Lewis and Clark documentary.  (http://tinyurl.com/6jwrkl ) Done in typically fine Ken Burns fashion, it was a great overview of the reasons for the expedition, the people, the route, and the hauntingly lovely scenery the Corps of Discovery saw along the way.  I began to develop consider respect for the expedition and its people.

Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 096 Our boat, the Sea Lion, was small and could carry only about 60 passengers, a far cry from the big ocean cruisers.  And did I mention that it was SMALL?!  We had one of the four largest cabins, meaning there was a queen sized bed, but it was still so small that we had to take turns using the floor. 

The bathroom was roughly the size of a phone booth, with a toilet and shower sharing the space so closely that if you took a shower, you needed to remove the toilet paper so it wouldn't get saturated. <g>  I was amazed at the size of the small cabins!  There was major culture shock since we’d spent the night before the cruise at a gorgeous, spacious, and very Pacific Northwestern hotel overlooking the Willamette.  I think the bathroom there would have held our whole Sea Lion cabin.  <g>
 
Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 066 But the Spartan conditions are part of traveling on a boat small enough to go interesting places, and that we did.  The high point was the zodiac rides on the Palouse River, gliding through huge stone canyons on mirror-like water, admiring the birds and bighorn sheep and whispering cattails.  Lovely.  Noisier but equally fun was the jet boat ride up Hell's Canyon on the Snake River. <g>
 Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 034
The tour included groups from both the Smithsonian and Johns Hopkins University, and the educational level of the group was through the ROOF!  I'd say half the people on the boat had PhDs or MDs, if not both.  I was downright uneducated by contrast. 

It was a pretty mature crowd, and a very well traveled one.  People were comparing their trips to Antarctica, for example.  There was one retired professor of 83, and while she needed a cane for balance, she was sharp as a blade mentally and interested in everything.  I've never been on any kind of trip where there were as many really interesting, enjoyable people. 

For me, the cruise could have been called “More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Lewis and Clark,” <g> but I still learned lots of good stuff even though my interest was only moderate and I didn’t go to all the lectures. 

Meriwether_Lewis For example, the expedition is considered a rare successful example of shared leadership.  Meriwether Lewis, well-educated, moody, introverted and scientifically inclined, was the official leader (he was an aide to Jefferson when he was chosen for the expedition, but he always treated William Clark as an equal even though Clark was technically of a lower rank.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meriwether_Lewis )

The men had very complimentary skills, with Clark, Lewis’s one time commanding officer, being calm, extroverted and pragmatic.  Not much at spelling, but a great WilliamClark co-leader.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Clark_(explorer)

As the MC likes to point out, the Corps of Discovery crossed two thousand miles of unknown territory by dead reckoning and arrived within 4 miles of their target destination.  The party consisted of 33 individuals.  Amazingly, only one died and that was apparently of appendicitis and not related to the expedition. 

The members were mostly young males with an adventurous spirit and military experience, but also included the young Shoshone woman, Sacagawea, Clark’s slave, York, and a dog.  Everybody got geographical features named after them.  Including the dog. 

225px-Sakakawea-statue-bismarck-nd-2004 While Sacagawea was sometimes useful as a guide and translator, she was even more valuable because of her gender, and the baby son she had not long after she and her French trapper husband, Toussaint Charbonneau, joined the expedition.  War parties never traveled with women and children, so her presence reassured the Native American tribes they encountered. 

Elk The Corps'r second winter was spent in the cold, wet, hastily built Fort Clatsop in what is now Astoria, Oregon.  Since they had run out of “ardent spirits,” they had to subsist on elk and water.  They were not happy campers.  In honor of their situation, the MC bought a packet of elk jerky along to distribute to our fellow passengers.  It tastes about as you’d expect.  <g>

The Corps of Discovery returned to their starting place in Missouri in September 1806, having spent about two and a half years on the road.  Besides making maps of the territory, they had accumulated all kinds of scientific information on flora and fauna, and had even sent specimens back during the journey.  One such specimen 783px-Prairie_Dog_Washington_DC_1 that was delivered to Jefferson was a live prairie dog in a box. <g>

I suppose one reason I used to take this particular piece of history for granted was because the Corps did such a great, efficient job.  The Alamo is memorable because so many people died.  Quiet competence and survival are less dramatic.

Have you had times when history you dismissed turned out to be fascinating?  Are there incidents or places you’re yearning to explore?  Or ones you have explored and been enchanted by?  Once in Colchester, England, the MC and I stayed in a B&B, and we mentioned to the proprietor that we wanted to see the old Roman wall from the days when Colchester was founded as legionnaire camp.  He said, “There’s a bit in the back garden.”  So we went out and looked, and sure enough, there was a nice sized chunk of Roman wall in his back garden.

He might have taken it for granted.  But we didn’t!

Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 076 Mary Jo, who thinks history it's great to visit real history

 

100 thoughts on “History We Take for Granted: The Lewis and Clark Expedition”

  1. I live in eastern Massachusetts, and there are tons of Revolutionary War history around. Every town center has a Minuteman statue and roadside posts commemorating some event. Only a mile from my house, on the corner of RT. 9 and Edgell Road near the Framingham green, is a stone monument telling us that General Howe passed this way as he transported cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston for the Americans to use against the British.
    I was also really surprised when I first saw the Old North Bridge in Concord, MA, where the Battle of Concord was fought. The bridge, now reconstructed, is very small. The original must have been even smaller. The Americans and the British faced each other over this little bridge to fight the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

    Reply
  2. I live in eastern Massachusetts, and there are tons of Revolutionary War history around. Every town center has a Minuteman statue and roadside posts commemorating some event. Only a mile from my house, on the corner of RT. 9 and Edgell Road near the Framingham green, is a stone monument telling us that General Howe passed this way as he transported cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston for the Americans to use against the British.
    I was also really surprised when I first saw the Old North Bridge in Concord, MA, where the Battle of Concord was fought. The bridge, now reconstructed, is very small. The original must have been even smaller. The Americans and the British faced each other over this little bridge to fight the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

    Reply
  3. I live in eastern Massachusetts, and there are tons of Revolutionary War history around. Every town center has a Minuteman statue and roadside posts commemorating some event. Only a mile from my house, on the corner of RT. 9 and Edgell Road near the Framingham green, is a stone monument telling us that General Howe passed this way as he transported cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston for the Americans to use against the British.
    I was also really surprised when I first saw the Old North Bridge in Concord, MA, where the Battle of Concord was fought. The bridge, now reconstructed, is very small. The original must have been even smaller. The Americans and the British faced each other over this little bridge to fight the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

    Reply
  4. I live in eastern Massachusetts, and there are tons of Revolutionary War history around. Every town center has a Minuteman statue and roadside posts commemorating some event. Only a mile from my house, on the corner of RT. 9 and Edgell Road near the Framingham green, is a stone monument telling us that General Howe passed this way as he transported cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston for the Americans to use against the British.
    I was also really surprised when I first saw the Old North Bridge in Concord, MA, where the Battle of Concord was fought. The bridge, now reconstructed, is very small. The original must have been even smaller. The Americans and the British faced each other over this little bridge to fight the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

    Reply
  5. I live in eastern Massachusetts, and there are tons of Revolutionary War history around. Every town center has a Minuteman statue and roadside posts commemorating some event. Only a mile from my house, on the corner of RT. 9 and Edgell Road near the Framingham green, is a stone monument telling us that General Howe passed this way as he transported cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston for the Americans to use against the British.
    I was also really surprised when I first saw the Old North Bridge in Concord, MA, where the Battle of Concord was fought. The bridge, now reconstructed, is very small. The original must have been even smaller. The Americans and the British faced each other over this little bridge to fight the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

    Reply
  6. One summer we stayed in Long Beach, WA, just north of the Columbia River, and went to the Lewis & Clark Museum, which is nearby. As you note, every American child learns about the expedition, but it’s usually one of those in-one-ear-and-out-the-other pedagogical exercises. However, when you can go to a place and say “They were actually here, and this view, this ocean, those trees are the same ones they saw” — well, it just about takes your breath away. Even the children were impressed (although, being children, they were equally impressed with the literal mountain of shells outside the door of the restaurant that was part of a farm-raised shellfish operation).

    Reply
  7. One summer we stayed in Long Beach, WA, just north of the Columbia River, and went to the Lewis & Clark Museum, which is nearby. As you note, every American child learns about the expedition, but it’s usually one of those in-one-ear-and-out-the-other pedagogical exercises. However, when you can go to a place and say “They were actually here, and this view, this ocean, those trees are the same ones they saw” — well, it just about takes your breath away. Even the children were impressed (although, being children, they were equally impressed with the literal mountain of shells outside the door of the restaurant that was part of a farm-raised shellfish operation).

    Reply
  8. One summer we stayed in Long Beach, WA, just north of the Columbia River, and went to the Lewis & Clark Museum, which is nearby. As you note, every American child learns about the expedition, but it’s usually one of those in-one-ear-and-out-the-other pedagogical exercises. However, when you can go to a place and say “They were actually here, and this view, this ocean, those trees are the same ones they saw” — well, it just about takes your breath away. Even the children were impressed (although, being children, they were equally impressed with the literal mountain of shells outside the door of the restaurant that was part of a farm-raised shellfish operation).

    Reply
  9. One summer we stayed in Long Beach, WA, just north of the Columbia River, and went to the Lewis & Clark Museum, which is nearby. As you note, every American child learns about the expedition, but it’s usually one of those in-one-ear-and-out-the-other pedagogical exercises. However, when you can go to a place and say “They were actually here, and this view, this ocean, those trees are the same ones they saw” — well, it just about takes your breath away. Even the children were impressed (although, being children, they were equally impressed with the literal mountain of shells outside the door of the restaurant that was part of a farm-raised shellfish operation).

    Reply
  10. One summer we stayed in Long Beach, WA, just north of the Columbia River, and went to the Lewis & Clark Museum, which is nearby. As you note, every American child learns about the expedition, but it’s usually one of those in-one-ear-and-out-the-other pedagogical exercises. However, when you can go to a place and say “They were actually here, and this view, this ocean, those trees are the same ones they saw” — well, it just about takes your breath away. Even the children were impressed (although, being children, they were equally impressed with the literal mountain of shells outside the door of the restaurant that was part of a farm-raised shellfish operation).

    Reply
  11. I feel fortunate to live in Portland and have easy access to major portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail , including visits to Fort Clatsop (both the old one, and the recently rebuilt one.) If you drive along either side of the Columbia River it’s covered with signs denoting sites that they spent the night at. It gets down right boring after visiting the 5th site in a couple of hours, yet humbling when we realize that it took them a week to get that far.

    Reply
  12. I feel fortunate to live in Portland and have easy access to major portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail , including visits to Fort Clatsop (both the old one, and the recently rebuilt one.) If you drive along either side of the Columbia River it’s covered with signs denoting sites that they spent the night at. It gets down right boring after visiting the 5th site in a couple of hours, yet humbling when we realize that it took them a week to get that far.

    Reply
  13. I feel fortunate to live in Portland and have easy access to major portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail , including visits to Fort Clatsop (both the old one, and the recently rebuilt one.) If you drive along either side of the Columbia River it’s covered with signs denoting sites that they spent the night at. It gets down right boring after visiting the 5th site in a couple of hours, yet humbling when we realize that it took them a week to get that far.

    Reply
  14. I feel fortunate to live in Portland and have easy access to major portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail , including visits to Fort Clatsop (both the old one, and the recently rebuilt one.) If you drive along either side of the Columbia River it’s covered with signs denoting sites that they spent the night at. It gets down right boring after visiting the 5th site in a couple of hours, yet humbling when we realize that it took them a week to get that far.

    Reply
  15. I feel fortunate to live in Portland and have easy access to major portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail , including visits to Fort Clatsop (both the old one, and the recently rebuilt one.) If you drive along either side of the Columbia River it’s covered with signs denoting sites that they spent the night at. It gets down right boring after visiting the 5th site in a couple of hours, yet humbling when we realize that it took them a week to get that far.

    Reply
  16. ***Some history is just too familiar to be exciting. We take it for granted.***
    Great post, and I couldn’t agree more about the joy of visiting history or about how sometimes local stuff gets set to one side (Bay Area brat that I am, I’ve never been to Alcatraz). I do love Fort Point though (“From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period.”)

    Reply
  17. ***Some history is just too familiar to be exciting. We take it for granted.***
    Great post, and I couldn’t agree more about the joy of visiting history or about how sometimes local stuff gets set to one side (Bay Area brat that I am, I’ve never been to Alcatraz). I do love Fort Point though (“From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period.”)

    Reply
  18. ***Some history is just too familiar to be exciting. We take it for granted.***
    Great post, and I couldn’t agree more about the joy of visiting history or about how sometimes local stuff gets set to one side (Bay Area brat that I am, I’ve never been to Alcatraz). I do love Fort Point though (“From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period.”)

    Reply
  19. ***Some history is just too familiar to be exciting. We take it for granted.***
    Great post, and I couldn’t agree more about the joy of visiting history or about how sometimes local stuff gets set to one side (Bay Area brat that I am, I’ve never been to Alcatraz). I do love Fort Point though (“From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period.”)

    Reply
  20. ***Some history is just too familiar to be exciting. We take it for granted.***
    Great post, and I couldn’t agree more about the joy of visiting history or about how sometimes local stuff gets set to one side (Bay Area brat that I am, I’ve never been to Alcatraz). I do love Fort Point though (“From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period.”)

    Reply
  21. Fascinating blog, Mary Jo. I especially liked the detail that the dog got his due. 🙂
    Since I live in a region where almost every town has some sort of battlefield marker, I have always found local history most interesting. I am fondest of the story of the volunteer women’s auxiliary who met and negotiated a surrender with Federal troops, led by a colonel bearing the same name as the town. According to local records, one of the militia hosted a dinner for the colonel to celebrate his having spared homes in the city. Some local men among the Confederate prisoners were freed to attend the dinner, although the next morning they were again among the prisoners being marched northward. Isn’t that a great story?

    Reply
  22. Fascinating blog, Mary Jo. I especially liked the detail that the dog got his due. 🙂
    Since I live in a region where almost every town has some sort of battlefield marker, I have always found local history most interesting. I am fondest of the story of the volunteer women’s auxiliary who met and negotiated a surrender with Federal troops, led by a colonel bearing the same name as the town. According to local records, one of the militia hosted a dinner for the colonel to celebrate his having spared homes in the city. Some local men among the Confederate prisoners were freed to attend the dinner, although the next morning they were again among the prisoners being marched northward. Isn’t that a great story?

    Reply
  23. Fascinating blog, Mary Jo. I especially liked the detail that the dog got his due. 🙂
    Since I live in a region where almost every town has some sort of battlefield marker, I have always found local history most interesting. I am fondest of the story of the volunteer women’s auxiliary who met and negotiated a surrender with Federal troops, led by a colonel bearing the same name as the town. According to local records, one of the militia hosted a dinner for the colonel to celebrate his having spared homes in the city. Some local men among the Confederate prisoners were freed to attend the dinner, although the next morning they were again among the prisoners being marched northward. Isn’t that a great story?

    Reply
  24. Fascinating blog, Mary Jo. I especially liked the detail that the dog got his due. 🙂
    Since I live in a region where almost every town has some sort of battlefield marker, I have always found local history most interesting. I am fondest of the story of the volunteer women’s auxiliary who met and negotiated a surrender with Federal troops, led by a colonel bearing the same name as the town. According to local records, one of the militia hosted a dinner for the colonel to celebrate his having spared homes in the city. Some local men among the Confederate prisoners were freed to attend the dinner, although the next morning they were again among the prisoners being marched northward. Isn’t that a great story?

    Reply
  25. Fascinating blog, Mary Jo. I especially liked the detail that the dog got his due. 🙂
    Since I live in a region where almost every town has some sort of battlefield marker, I have always found local history most interesting. I am fondest of the story of the volunteer women’s auxiliary who met and negotiated a surrender with Federal troops, led by a colonel bearing the same name as the town. According to local records, one of the militia hosted a dinner for the colonel to celebrate his having spared homes in the city. Some local men among the Confederate prisoners were freed to attend the dinner, although the next morning they were again among the prisoners being marched northward. Isn’t that a great story?

    Reply
  26. I just got back from a visit to New Harmony, Indiana,where you can still see some of the buildings preserved from the Utopian “Harmonist” movement, later sold to Robert Owen, a 19th century Scotsman who envisioned a colony based on equality and learning. He imported scientists and scholars from Great Britain and other parts of Europe,and established a community in this tiny town on the Wabash River. Prince Maximillian of Germany and his artist, Karl Bodmer, stopped here in the 1820’s as they retraced the route of- you guessed it- Lewis and Clark! Some of the paintings made as part of that trip recorded Indian tribes later wiped out completely by smallpox- and the illustrations were published in a folio print edition that showed Europeans , for the first time, the granduer of the American West….BTW, I live in Indianapolis and I’ve only been to the 500 once in my life…

    Reply
  27. I just got back from a visit to New Harmony, Indiana,where you can still see some of the buildings preserved from the Utopian “Harmonist” movement, later sold to Robert Owen, a 19th century Scotsman who envisioned a colony based on equality and learning. He imported scientists and scholars from Great Britain and other parts of Europe,and established a community in this tiny town on the Wabash River. Prince Maximillian of Germany and his artist, Karl Bodmer, stopped here in the 1820’s as they retraced the route of- you guessed it- Lewis and Clark! Some of the paintings made as part of that trip recorded Indian tribes later wiped out completely by smallpox- and the illustrations were published in a folio print edition that showed Europeans , for the first time, the granduer of the American West….BTW, I live in Indianapolis and I’ve only been to the 500 once in my life…

    Reply
  28. I just got back from a visit to New Harmony, Indiana,where you can still see some of the buildings preserved from the Utopian “Harmonist” movement, later sold to Robert Owen, a 19th century Scotsman who envisioned a colony based on equality and learning. He imported scientists and scholars from Great Britain and other parts of Europe,and established a community in this tiny town on the Wabash River. Prince Maximillian of Germany and his artist, Karl Bodmer, stopped here in the 1820’s as they retraced the route of- you guessed it- Lewis and Clark! Some of the paintings made as part of that trip recorded Indian tribes later wiped out completely by smallpox- and the illustrations were published in a folio print edition that showed Europeans , for the first time, the granduer of the American West….BTW, I live in Indianapolis and I’ve only been to the 500 once in my life…

    Reply
  29. I just got back from a visit to New Harmony, Indiana,where you can still see some of the buildings preserved from the Utopian “Harmonist” movement, later sold to Robert Owen, a 19th century Scotsman who envisioned a colony based on equality and learning. He imported scientists and scholars from Great Britain and other parts of Europe,and established a community in this tiny town on the Wabash River. Prince Maximillian of Germany and his artist, Karl Bodmer, stopped here in the 1820’s as they retraced the route of- you guessed it- Lewis and Clark! Some of the paintings made as part of that trip recorded Indian tribes later wiped out completely by smallpox- and the illustrations were published in a folio print edition that showed Europeans , for the first time, the granduer of the American West….BTW, I live in Indianapolis and I’ve only been to the 500 once in my life…

    Reply
  30. I just got back from a visit to New Harmony, Indiana,where you can still see some of the buildings preserved from the Utopian “Harmonist” movement, later sold to Robert Owen, a 19th century Scotsman who envisioned a colony based on equality and learning. He imported scientists and scholars from Great Britain and other parts of Europe,and established a community in this tiny town on the Wabash River. Prince Maximillian of Germany and his artist, Karl Bodmer, stopped here in the 1820’s as they retraced the route of- you guessed it- Lewis and Clark! Some of the paintings made as part of that trip recorded Indian tribes later wiped out completely by smallpox- and the illustrations were published in a folio print edition that showed Europeans , for the first time, the granduer of the American West….BTW, I live in Indianapolis and I’ve only been to the 500 once in my life…

    Reply
  31. Gretchen…
    I haven’t seen the “live” 500…but have been in Indanapolis. Took a tour of the track…and rode around the track in a tour car.
    I’ve read the printed report the L & C turned in to Jefferson. Very Interesting.

    Reply
  32. Gretchen…
    I haven’t seen the “live” 500…but have been in Indanapolis. Took a tour of the track…and rode around the track in a tour car.
    I’ve read the printed report the L & C turned in to Jefferson. Very Interesting.

    Reply
  33. Gretchen…
    I haven’t seen the “live” 500…but have been in Indanapolis. Took a tour of the track…and rode around the track in a tour car.
    I’ve read the printed report the L & C turned in to Jefferson. Very Interesting.

    Reply
  34. Gretchen…
    I haven’t seen the “live” 500…but have been in Indanapolis. Took a tour of the track…and rode around the track in a tour car.
    I’ve read the printed report the L & C turned in to Jefferson. Very Interesting.

    Reply
  35. Gretchen…
    I haven’t seen the “live” 500…but have been in Indanapolis. Took a tour of the track…and rode around the track in a tour car.
    I’ve read the printed report the L & C turned in to Jefferson. Very Interesting.

    Reply
  36. I have a degree in history, so I love it. I told my dh that any vacations we go on, have to include history (if it’s American Colonial or Revolution, even better) because otherwise, I get bored.
    This past summer we did just that. We started in Boston and ended in Richmond with a day spent in Baltimore at Fort McHenry and the Mary Pickersgill Museum (she made Old Glory), which is an absolute must see stop for anyone interested in history. Don’t waste your time or money at the Besty Ross house in Philadelphia. Our children 8 and then 4 absolutely enjoyed themselves, more than I think they would have had we gone to Walt Disney World and learned so much in the process.
    Back to Lewis and Clark, I grew up in MT about 100 miles away from Pompey’s Pillar, where William Clark carved his name into the sandstone in 1805. I was in my 20s when I finally visited.
    Linda, I believe you mean Henry Knox as William Howe was the British general in charge of the troops in Boston.

    Reply
  37. I have a degree in history, so I love it. I told my dh that any vacations we go on, have to include history (if it’s American Colonial or Revolution, even better) because otherwise, I get bored.
    This past summer we did just that. We started in Boston and ended in Richmond with a day spent in Baltimore at Fort McHenry and the Mary Pickersgill Museum (she made Old Glory), which is an absolute must see stop for anyone interested in history. Don’t waste your time or money at the Besty Ross house in Philadelphia. Our children 8 and then 4 absolutely enjoyed themselves, more than I think they would have had we gone to Walt Disney World and learned so much in the process.
    Back to Lewis and Clark, I grew up in MT about 100 miles away from Pompey’s Pillar, where William Clark carved his name into the sandstone in 1805. I was in my 20s when I finally visited.
    Linda, I believe you mean Henry Knox as William Howe was the British general in charge of the troops in Boston.

    Reply
  38. I have a degree in history, so I love it. I told my dh that any vacations we go on, have to include history (if it’s American Colonial or Revolution, even better) because otherwise, I get bored.
    This past summer we did just that. We started in Boston and ended in Richmond with a day spent in Baltimore at Fort McHenry and the Mary Pickersgill Museum (she made Old Glory), which is an absolute must see stop for anyone interested in history. Don’t waste your time or money at the Besty Ross house in Philadelphia. Our children 8 and then 4 absolutely enjoyed themselves, more than I think they would have had we gone to Walt Disney World and learned so much in the process.
    Back to Lewis and Clark, I grew up in MT about 100 miles away from Pompey’s Pillar, where William Clark carved his name into the sandstone in 1805. I was in my 20s when I finally visited.
    Linda, I believe you mean Henry Knox as William Howe was the British general in charge of the troops in Boston.

    Reply
  39. I have a degree in history, so I love it. I told my dh that any vacations we go on, have to include history (if it’s American Colonial or Revolution, even better) because otherwise, I get bored.
    This past summer we did just that. We started in Boston and ended in Richmond with a day spent in Baltimore at Fort McHenry and the Mary Pickersgill Museum (she made Old Glory), which is an absolute must see stop for anyone interested in history. Don’t waste your time or money at the Besty Ross house in Philadelphia. Our children 8 and then 4 absolutely enjoyed themselves, more than I think they would have had we gone to Walt Disney World and learned so much in the process.
    Back to Lewis and Clark, I grew up in MT about 100 miles away from Pompey’s Pillar, where William Clark carved his name into the sandstone in 1805. I was in my 20s when I finally visited.
    Linda, I believe you mean Henry Knox as William Howe was the British general in charge of the troops in Boston.

    Reply
  40. I have a degree in history, so I love it. I told my dh that any vacations we go on, have to include history (if it’s American Colonial or Revolution, even better) because otherwise, I get bored.
    This past summer we did just that. We started in Boston and ended in Richmond with a day spent in Baltimore at Fort McHenry and the Mary Pickersgill Museum (she made Old Glory), which is an absolute must see stop for anyone interested in history. Don’t waste your time or money at the Besty Ross house in Philadelphia. Our children 8 and then 4 absolutely enjoyed themselves, more than I think they would have had we gone to Walt Disney World and learned so much in the process.
    Back to Lewis and Clark, I grew up in MT about 100 miles away from Pompey’s Pillar, where William Clark carved his name into the sandstone in 1805. I was in my 20s when I finally visited.
    Linda, I believe you mean Henry Knox as William Howe was the British general in charge of the troops in Boston.

    Reply
  41. From MJP:
    What fun history is in other people’s neighborhoods!
    Linda, I love visiting the revolutionary history in Massachusetts. So much more interesting than the Civil War to me, though my father, a history buff, took us to Fort Ticonderoga as well as Gettysburg. He was good for just about any history we came near. 🙂
    Susan, I’m sure the piles of shells will help your kids remember the cool Lewis and Clark history. 🙂 (One of William Clark’s many older brothers was George Rogers Clark, a revolutionary hero and general.)
    Rick, it’s definitely sobering to think how long it took L&C and other pioneers to travel the distances we whiz through. WE could fly to Portland from Baltimore in about 7 hours. On the Oregon Trail, it was more like 7 months, and that from Missouri, not the Eastern Seaboard.
    Janga, what great local history you have!
    Gretchen, I never heard about New Harmony. Those utopian communities fascinate me. As for the Indy 500–well, I’ve lived in Maryland for more than 30 years and have yet to make it to Pimlico for the big horse race. With any luck, I never will since it seems to be mostly about the beer and drinking in the infield.
    Janae, how great that you’re taking your kids to real history. My parents did the same (surely not easy with three of us wiggling in the back seat!), and it really did lay the groundwork for my life long interest in history. Who knew it would turn into a career for me? 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  42. From MJP:
    What fun history is in other people’s neighborhoods!
    Linda, I love visiting the revolutionary history in Massachusetts. So much more interesting than the Civil War to me, though my father, a history buff, took us to Fort Ticonderoga as well as Gettysburg. He was good for just about any history we came near. 🙂
    Susan, I’m sure the piles of shells will help your kids remember the cool Lewis and Clark history. 🙂 (One of William Clark’s many older brothers was George Rogers Clark, a revolutionary hero and general.)
    Rick, it’s definitely sobering to think how long it took L&C and other pioneers to travel the distances we whiz through. WE could fly to Portland from Baltimore in about 7 hours. On the Oregon Trail, it was more like 7 months, and that from Missouri, not the Eastern Seaboard.
    Janga, what great local history you have!
    Gretchen, I never heard about New Harmony. Those utopian communities fascinate me. As for the Indy 500–well, I’ve lived in Maryland for more than 30 years and have yet to make it to Pimlico for the big horse race. With any luck, I never will since it seems to be mostly about the beer and drinking in the infield.
    Janae, how great that you’re taking your kids to real history. My parents did the same (surely not easy with three of us wiggling in the back seat!), and it really did lay the groundwork for my life long interest in history. Who knew it would turn into a career for me? 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  43. From MJP:
    What fun history is in other people’s neighborhoods!
    Linda, I love visiting the revolutionary history in Massachusetts. So much more interesting than the Civil War to me, though my father, a history buff, took us to Fort Ticonderoga as well as Gettysburg. He was good for just about any history we came near. 🙂
    Susan, I’m sure the piles of shells will help your kids remember the cool Lewis and Clark history. 🙂 (One of William Clark’s many older brothers was George Rogers Clark, a revolutionary hero and general.)
    Rick, it’s definitely sobering to think how long it took L&C and other pioneers to travel the distances we whiz through. WE could fly to Portland from Baltimore in about 7 hours. On the Oregon Trail, it was more like 7 months, and that from Missouri, not the Eastern Seaboard.
    Janga, what great local history you have!
    Gretchen, I never heard about New Harmony. Those utopian communities fascinate me. As for the Indy 500–well, I’ve lived in Maryland for more than 30 years and have yet to make it to Pimlico for the big horse race. With any luck, I never will since it seems to be mostly about the beer and drinking in the infield.
    Janae, how great that you’re taking your kids to real history. My parents did the same (surely not easy with three of us wiggling in the back seat!), and it really did lay the groundwork for my life long interest in history. Who knew it would turn into a career for me? 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  44. From MJP:
    What fun history is in other people’s neighborhoods!
    Linda, I love visiting the revolutionary history in Massachusetts. So much more interesting than the Civil War to me, though my father, a history buff, took us to Fort Ticonderoga as well as Gettysburg. He was good for just about any history we came near. 🙂
    Susan, I’m sure the piles of shells will help your kids remember the cool Lewis and Clark history. 🙂 (One of William Clark’s many older brothers was George Rogers Clark, a revolutionary hero and general.)
    Rick, it’s definitely sobering to think how long it took L&C and other pioneers to travel the distances we whiz through. WE could fly to Portland from Baltimore in about 7 hours. On the Oregon Trail, it was more like 7 months, and that from Missouri, not the Eastern Seaboard.
    Janga, what great local history you have!
    Gretchen, I never heard about New Harmony. Those utopian communities fascinate me. As for the Indy 500–well, I’ve lived in Maryland for more than 30 years and have yet to make it to Pimlico for the big horse race. With any luck, I never will since it seems to be mostly about the beer and drinking in the infield.
    Janae, how great that you’re taking your kids to real history. My parents did the same (surely not easy with three of us wiggling in the back seat!), and it really did lay the groundwork for my life long interest in history. Who knew it would turn into a career for me? 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  45. From MJP:
    What fun history is in other people’s neighborhoods!
    Linda, I love visiting the revolutionary history in Massachusetts. So much more interesting than the Civil War to me, though my father, a history buff, took us to Fort Ticonderoga as well as Gettysburg. He was good for just about any history we came near. 🙂
    Susan, I’m sure the piles of shells will help your kids remember the cool Lewis and Clark history. 🙂 (One of William Clark’s many older brothers was George Rogers Clark, a revolutionary hero and general.)
    Rick, it’s definitely sobering to think how long it took L&C and other pioneers to travel the distances we whiz through. WE could fly to Portland from Baltimore in about 7 hours. On the Oregon Trail, it was more like 7 months, and that from Missouri, not the Eastern Seaboard.
    Janga, what great local history you have!
    Gretchen, I never heard about New Harmony. Those utopian communities fascinate me. As for the Indy 500–well, I’ve lived in Maryland for more than 30 years and have yet to make it to Pimlico for the big horse race. With any luck, I never will since it seems to be mostly about the beer and drinking in the infield.
    Janae, how great that you’re taking your kids to real history. My parents did the same (surely not easy with three of us wiggling in the back seat!), and it really did lay the groundwork for my life long interest in history. Who knew it would turn into a career for me? 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  46. I think that kids should be encouraged to play “Lewis & Clark” instead of “Cowboys & Indians”–instead of fighting, they’d learn to negotiate and make alliances.
    When the Smithsonian sent out a touring exhibition some years ago, one of the places it stopped was Scottsdale. I got to see William Clark’s compass, as well as George Washington’s sword, Lincoln’s top hat, Dorothy’s ruby slippers, one of the Wright Brothers’ planes, and the Mercury 7 capsule.
    Fort McHenry looks very much like Fort Monroe, Virginia, where I used to live–at the time, there was still water in the moat. Some of the fortifications were built under the supervision of a young lieutenant called Robert E. Lee; the parade ground held what was at the time the largest cast cannon in the world; Jefferson Davis was imprisoned there; and Edgar Allan Poe served there when he ran away from the University of Virginia and enlisted in the Army under an assumed name.

    Reply
  47. I think that kids should be encouraged to play “Lewis & Clark” instead of “Cowboys & Indians”–instead of fighting, they’d learn to negotiate and make alliances.
    When the Smithsonian sent out a touring exhibition some years ago, one of the places it stopped was Scottsdale. I got to see William Clark’s compass, as well as George Washington’s sword, Lincoln’s top hat, Dorothy’s ruby slippers, one of the Wright Brothers’ planes, and the Mercury 7 capsule.
    Fort McHenry looks very much like Fort Monroe, Virginia, where I used to live–at the time, there was still water in the moat. Some of the fortifications were built under the supervision of a young lieutenant called Robert E. Lee; the parade ground held what was at the time the largest cast cannon in the world; Jefferson Davis was imprisoned there; and Edgar Allan Poe served there when he ran away from the University of Virginia and enlisted in the Army under an assumed name.

    Reply
  48. I think that kids should be encouraged to play “Lewis & Clark” instead of “Cowboys & Indians”–instead of fighting, they’d learn to negotiate and make alliances.
    When the Smithsonian sent out a touring exhibition some years ago, one of the places it stopped was Scottsdale. I got to see William Clark’s compass, as well as George Washington’s sword, Lincoln’s top hat, Dorothy’s ruby slippers, one of the Wright Brothers’ planes, and the Mercury 7 capsule.
    Fort McHenry looks very much like Fort Monroe, Virginia, where I used to live–at the time, there was still water in the moat. Some of the fortifications were built under the supervision of a young lieutenant called Robert E. Lee; the parade ground held what was at the time the largest cast cannon in the world; Jefferson Davis was imprisoned there; and Edgar Allan Poe served there when he ran away from the University of Virginia and enlisted in the Army under an assumed name.

    Reply
  49. I think that kids should be encouraged to play “Lewis & Clark” instead of “Cowboys & Indians”–instead of fighting, they’d learn to negotiate and make alliances.
    When the Smithsonian sent out a touring exhibition some years ago, one of the places it stopped was Scottsdale. I got to see William Clark’s compass, as well as George Washington’s sword, Lincoln’s top hat, Dorothy’s ruby slippers, one of the Wright Brothers’ planes, and the Mercury 7 capsule.
    Fort McHenry looks very much like Fort Monroe, Virginia, where I used to live–at the time, there was still water in the moat. Some of the fortifications were built under the supervision of a young lieutenant called Robert E. Lee; the parade ground held what was at the time the largest cast cannon in the world; Jefferson Davis was imprisoned there; and Edgar Allan Poe served there when he ran away from the University of Virginia and enlisted in the Army under an assumed name.

    Reply
  50. I think that kids should be encouraged to play “Lewis & Clark” instead of “Cowboys & Indians”–instead of fighting, they’d learn to negotiate and make alliances.
    When the Smithsonian sent out a touring exhibition some years ago, one of the places it stopped was Scottsdale. I got to see William Clark’s compass, as well as George Washington’s sword, Lincoln’s top hat, Dorothy’s ruby slippers, one of the Wright Brothers’ planes, and the Mercury 7 capsule.
    Fort McHenry looks very much like Fort Monroe, Virginia, where I used to live–at the time, there was still water in the moat. Some of the fortifications were built under the supervision of a young lieutenant called Robert E. Lee; the parade ground held what was at the time the largest cast cannon in the world; Jefferson Davis was imprisoned there; and Edgar Allan Poe served there when he ran away from the University of Virginia and enlisted in the Army under an assumed name.

    Reply
  51. Mary Jo, I also love how in Europe there are all sorts of historical remnants incorporated into more modern buildings. I remember being very taken by the sight of a tiny house built into the formidable walls of Caernarfon Castle in Nth Wales. Never let a good castle go to waste, I suppose…

    Reply
  52. Mary Jo, I also love how in Europe there are all sorts of historical remnants incorporated into more modern buildings. I remember being very taken by the sight of a tiny house built into the formidable walls of Caernarfon Castle in Nth Wales. Never let a good castle go to waste, I suppose…

    Reply
  53. Mary Jo, I also love how in Europe there are all sorts of historical remnants incorporated into more modern buildings. I remember being very taken by the sight of a tiny house built into the formidable walls of Caernarfon Castle in Nth Wales. Never let a good castle go to waste, I suppose…

    Reply
  54. Mary Jo, I also love how in Europe there are all sorts of historical remnants incorporated into more modern buildings. I remember being very taken by the sight of a tiny house built into the formidable walls of Caernarfon Castle in Nth Wales. Never let a good castle go to waste, I suppose…

    Reply
  55. Mary Jo, I also love how in Europe there are all sorts of historical remnants incorporated into more modern buildings. I remember being very taken by the sight of a tiny house built into the formidable walls of Caernarfon Castle in Nth Wales. Never let a good castle go to waste, I suppose…

    Reply
  56. I live in Michigan and we have a long involved history here. Detroit (which started as a fort) played a huge part in not only the Revolutionary War but was a landing place for the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The building of the Mackinac Bridge is fascinating, and the equipment surveyors use today was standardized because of the mapping of the UP, which took almost 30 years.
    And yet, I really never give it another thought most of the time. Until I go to Greenfield Village and walk down the street at night, lit by Thomas Edison’s original light bulbs, past the boarding house where Henry Ford’s first small handful of employees lived. Or I walk through the Wright house, or Webster’s house and see his hand written dictionary in his den…no, not everything there originated in Michigan, but what an amazing place to go!
    Great post MJ 🙂

    Reply
  57. I live in Michigan and we have a long involved history here. Detroit (which started as a fort) played a huge part in not only the Revolutionary War but was a landing place for the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The building of the Mackinac Bridge is fascinating, and the equipment surveyors use today was standardized because of the mapping of the UP, which took almost 30 years.
    And yet, I really never give it another thought most of the time. Until I go to Greenfield Village and walk down the street at night, lit by Thomas Edison’s original light bulbs, past the boarding house where Henry Ford’s first small handful of employees lived. Or I walk through the Wright house, or Webster’s house and see his hand written dictionary in his den…no, not everything there originated in Michigan, but what an amazing place to go!
    Great post MJ 🙂

    Reply
  58. I live in Michigan and we have a long involved history here. Detroit (which started as a fort) played a huge part in not only the Revolutionary War but was a landing place for the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The building of the Mackinac Bridge is fascinating, and the equipment surveyors use today was standardized because of the mapping of the UP, which took almost 30 years.
    And yet, I really never give it another thought most of the time. Until I go to Greenfield Village and walk down the street at night, lit by Thomas Edison’s original light bulbs, past the boarding house where Henry Ford’s first small handful of employees lived. Or I walk through the Wright house, or Webster’s house and see his hand written dictionary in his den…no, not everything there originated in Michigan, but what an amazing place to go!
    Great post MJ 🙂

    Reply
  59. I live in Michigan and we have a long involved history here. Detroit (which started as a fort) played a huge part in not only the Revolutionary War but was a landing place for the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The building of the Mackinac Bridge is fascinating, and the equipment surveyors use today was standardized because of the mapping of the UP, which took almost 30 years.
    And yet, I really never give it another thought most of the time. Until I go to Greenfield Village and walk down the street at night, lit by Thomas Edison’s original light bulbs, past the boarding house where Henry Ford’s first small handful of employees lived. Or I walk through the Wright house, or Webster’s house and see his hand written dictionary in his den…no, not everything there originated in Michigan, but what an amazing place to go!
    Great post MJ 🙂

    Reply
  60. I live in Michigan and we have a long involved history here. Detroit (which started as a fort) played a huge part in not only the Revolutionary War but was a landing place for the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The building of the Mackinac Bridge is fascinating, and the equipment surveyors use today was standardized because of the mapping of the UP, which took almost 30 years.
    And yet, I really never give it another thought most of the time. Until I go to Greenfield Village and walk down the street at night, lit by Thomas Edison’s original light bulbs, past the boarding house where Henry Ford’s first small handful of employees lived. Or I walk through the Wright house, or Webster’s house and see his hand written dictionary in his den…no, not everything there originated in Michigan, but what an amazing place to go!
    Great post MJ 🙂

    Reply
  61. One of the things I treasure most is the oral history one’s relatives pass on to their kin. My grandmother was born in 1900, and stories she could tell! It was like hearing a fascinating novel unfold. She talked about WWI, about presidents dead before I was born, life in a rural community without electricity and whose only transportation was a horse, and being able to talk to men who fought in the Civil War.
    These personal stories often never make it into written history. Thankfully, as a young woman I realized that if Grandma didn’t write down these experiences, they would be lost, so during our 40 year correspondence by letter, she wrote down many of her stories, which I still have.

    Reply
  62. One of the things I treasure most is the oral history one’s relatives pass on to their kin. My grandmother was born in 1900, and stories she could tell! It was like hearing a fascinating novel unfold. She talked about WWI, about presidents dead before I was born, life in a rural community without electricity and whose only transportation was a horse, and being able to talk to men who fought in the Civil War.
    These personal stories often never make it into written history. Thankfully, as a young woman I realized that if Grandma didn’t write down these experiences, they would be lost, so during our 40 year correspondence by letter, she wrote down many of her stories, which I still have.

    Reply
  63. One of the things I treasure most is the oral history one’s relatives pass on to their kin. My grandmother was born in 1900, and stories she could tell! It was like hearing a fascinating novel unfold. She talked about WWI, about presidents dead before I was born, life in a rural community without electricity and whose only transportation was a horse, and being able to talk to men who fought in the Civil War.
    These personal stories often never make it into written history. Thankfully, as a young woman I realized that if Grandma didn’t write down these experiences, they would be lost, so during our 40 year correspondence by letter, she wrote down many of her stories, which I still have.

    Reply
  64. One of the things I treasure most is the oral history one’s relatives pass on to their kin. My grandmother was born in 1900, and stories she could tell! It was like hearing a fascinating novel unfold. She talked about WWI, about presidents dead before I was born, life in a rural community without electricity and whose only transportation was a horse, and being able to talk to men who fought in the Civil War.
    These personal stories often never make it into written history. Thankfully, as a young woman I realized that if Grandma didn’t write down these experiences, they would be lost, so during our 40 year correspondence by letter, she wrote down many of her stories, which I still have.

    Reply
  65. One of the things I treasure most is the oral history one’s relatives pass on to their kin. My grandmother was born in 1900, and stories she could tell! It was like hearing a fascinating novel unfold. She talked about WWI, about presidents dead before I was born, life in a rural community without electricity and whose only transportation was a horse, and being able to talk to men who fought in the Civil War.
    These personal stories often never make it into written history. Thankfully, as a young woman I realized that if Grandma didn’t write down these experiences, they would be lost, so during our 40 year correspondence by letter, she wrote down many of her stories, which I still have.

    Reply
  66. I majored in history in college, so any trip I take absolutely has to have some history in it! I think my favorite “history” stops have been at various Civil War battlefields–Gettysburg, Antietam, Manassas, Cold Harbor, etc. When I stand at the spots where the battles occurred, I close my eyes and imagine the events as they happened–it’s a truly wonderful experience! I’ve had similar things happen on my trips overseas–in Berlin at the site of the Wall, in Sydney, Australia at the Rocks (first European settlement in Australia) and at Culloden Moor in Scotland (we know what happened there in 1746!). History travel is the best!

    Reply
  67. I majored in history in college, so any trip I take absolutely has to have some history in it! I think my favorite “history” stops have been at various Civil War battlefields–Gettysburg, Antietam, Manassas, Cold Harbor, etc. When I stand at the spots where the battles occurred, I close my eyes and imagine the events as they happened–it’s a truly wonderful experience! I’ve had similar things happen on my trips overseas–in Berlin at the site of the Wall, in Sydney, Australia at the Rocks (first European settlement in Australia) and at Culloden Moor in Scotland (we know what happened there in 1746!). History travel is the best!

    Reply
  68. I majored in history in college, so any trip I take absolutely has to have some history in it! I think my favorite “history” stops have been at various Civil War battlefields–Gettysburg, Antietam, Manassas, Cold Harbor, etc. When I stand at the spots where the battles occurred, I close my eyes and imagine the events as they happened–it’s a truly wonderful experience! I’ve had similar things happen on my trips overseas–in Berlin at the site of the Wall, in Sydney, Australia at the Rocks (first European settlement in Australia) and at Culloden Moor in Scotland (we know what happened there in 1746!). History travel is the best!

    Reply
  69. I majored in history in college, so any trip I take absolutely has to have some history in it! I think my favorite “history” stops have been at various Civil War battlefields–Gettysburg, Antietam, Manassas, Cold Harbor, etc. When I stand at the spots where the battles occurred, I close my eyes and imagine the events as they happened–it’s a truly wonderful experience! I’ve had similar things happen on my trips overseas–in Berlin at the site of the Wall, in Sydney, Australia at the Rocks (first European settlement in Australia) and at Culloden Moor in Scotland (we know what happened there in 1746!). History travel is the best!

    Reply
  70. I majored in history in college, so any trip I take absolutely has to have some history in it! I think my favorite “history” stops have been at various Civil War battlefields–Gettysburg, Antietam, Manassas, Cold Harbor, etc. When I stand at the spots where the battles occurred, I close my eyes and imagine the events as they happened–it’s a truly wonderful experience! I’ve had similar things happen on my trips overseas–in Berlin at the site of the Wall, in Sydney, Australia at the Rocks (first European settlement in Australia) and at Culloden Moor in Scotland (we know what happened there in 1746!). History travel is the best!

    Reply
  71. I love obscure local history the mostest, but it is true that what’s in our backyard, we tend to ignore. I had no idea of the role of my local community in WW2 until the last five years or so. And it came up talking to an elderly cousin about a totally different topic.
    I fell into Lewis & Clark by a similar route, reading about my great-great-uncle’s 1882 expedition to map the Columbia River and propose ways to make it habitable to the non-native settler.

    Reply
  72. I love obscure local history the mostest, but it is true that what’s in our backyard, we tend to ignore. I had no idea of the role of my local community in WW2 until the last five years or so. And it came up talking to an elderly cousin about a totally different topic.
    I fell into Lewis & Clark by a similar route, reading about my great-great-uncle’s 1882 expedition to map the Columbia River and propose ways to make it habitable to the non-native settler.

    Reply
  73. I love obscure local history the mostest, but it is true that what’s in our backyard, we tend to ignore. I had no idea of the role of my local community in WW2 until the last five years or so. And it came up talking to an elderly cousin about a totally different topic.
    I fell into Lewis & Clark by a similar route, reading about my great-great-uncle’s 1882 expedition to map the Columbia River and propose ways to make it habitable to the non-native settler.

    Reply
  74. I love obscure local history the mostest, but it is true that what’s in our backyard, we tend to ignore. I had no idea of the role of my local community in WW2 until the last five years or so. And it came up talking to an elderly cousin about a totally different topic.
    I fell into Lewis & Clark by a similar route, reading about my great-great-uncle’s 1882 expedition to map the Columbia River and propose ways to make it habitable to the non-native settler.

    Reply
  75. I love obscure local history the mostest, but it is true that what’s in our backyard, we tend to ignore. I had no idea of the role of my local community in WW2 until the last five years or so. And it came up talking to an elderly cousin about a totally different topic.
    I fell into Lewis & Clark by a similar route, reading about my great-great-uncle’s 1882 expedition to map the Columbia River and propose ways to make it habitable to the non-native settler.

    Reply
  76. From MJP:
    Tal, I agree that it would be great if kids played “Lewis and Clark,” but alas, the little devils tend to prefer conflict to negotiation.
    Indeed, Anne, one mustn’t waste a good castle! And much nicer to build the cottage into the wall than to tear the wall down to reuse as building materials.
    Theo, where I was raised in Upstate New York, there was a large house said to be used by the Underground Railroad to help people escape to Canada. One of my classmates lived in that house. And probably took it for granted. 🙂
    Sherrie, how great that you preserved so many of your grandmother’s stories! I trust you’ve transcribed them and turned a copy over to the local historical society as well as family members???
    Robin, not only is history travel terrific–there’s fascinating history just about everywhere!
    Liz, it wasn’t until this trip that I realized what a dangerous river the Columbia is. Many years ago I crossed the bridge at the mouth and it looked big and smooth and navigible. At the Columbian River museum in Astoria, the guide showed a map of over 200 ships that had sunk trying to cross the Columbia Bar, the treacherous area of shifting shoals at the mouth.
    On the Sea Lion, we saw a movie about how full of rapids the Columbia was until the dams were built. That was treacherous work your great great uncle did.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  77. From MJP:
    Tal, I agree that it would be great if kids played “Lewis and Clark,” but alas, the little devils tend to prefer conflict to negotiation.
    Indeed, Anne, one mustn’t waste a good castle! And much nicer to build the cottage into the wall than to tear the wall down to reuse as building materials.
    Theo, where I was raised in Upstate New York, there was a large house said to be used by the Underground Railroad to help people escape to Canada. One of my classmates lived in that house. And probably took it for granted. 🙂
    Sherrie, how great that you preserved so many of your grandmother’s stories! I trust you’ve transcribed them and turned a copy over to the local historical society as well as family members???
    Robin, not only is history travel terrific–there’s fascinating history just about everywhere!
    Liz, it wasn’t until this trip that I realized what a dangerous river the Columbia is. Many years ago I crossed the bridge at the mouth and it looked big and smooth and navigible. At the Columbian River museum in Astoria, the guide showed a map of over 200 ships that had sunk trying to cross the Columbia Bar, the treacherous area of shifting shoals at the mouth.
    On the Sea Lion, we saw a movie about how full of rapids the Columbia was until the dams were built. That was treacherous work your great great uncle did.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  78. From MJP:
    Tal, I agree that it would be great if kids played “Lewis and Clark,” but alas, the little devils tend to prefer conflict to negotiation.
    Indeed, Anne, one mustn’t waste a good castle! And much nicer to build the cottage into the wall than to tear the wall down to reuse as building materials.
    Theo, where I was raised in Upstate New York, there was a large house said to be used by the Underground Railroad to help people escape to Canada. One of my classmates lived in that house. And probably took it for granted. 🙂
    Sherrie, how great that you preserved so many of your grandmother’s stories! I trust you’ve transcribed them and turned a copy over to the local historical society as well as family members???
    Robin, not only is history travel terrific–there’s fascinating history just about everywhere!
    Liz, it wasn’t until this trip that I realized what a dangerous river the Columbia is. Many years ago I crossed the bridge at the mouth and it looked big and smooth and navigible. At the Columbian River museum in Astoria, the guide showed a map of over 200 ships that had sunk trying to cross the Columbia Bar, the treacherous area of shifting shoals at the mouth.
    On the Sea Lion, we saw a movie about how full of rapids the Columbia was until the dams were built. That was treacherous work your great great uncle did.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  79. From MJP:
    Tal, I agree that it would be great if kids played “Lewis and Clark,” but alas, the little devils tend to prefer conflict to negotiation.
    Indeed, Anne, one mustn’t waste a good castle! And much nicer to build the cottage into the wall than to tear the wall down to reuse as building materials.
    Theo, where I was raised in Upstate New York, there was a large house said to be used by the Underground Railroad to help people escape to Canada. One of my classmates lived in that house. And probably took it for granted. 🙂
    Sherrie, how great that you preserved so many of your grandmother’s stories! I trust you’ve transcribed them and turned a copy over to the local historical society as well as family members???
    Robin, not only is history travel terrific–there’s fascinating history just about everywhere!
    Liz, it wasn’t until this trip that I realized what a dangerous river the Columbia is. Many years ago I crossed the bridge at the mouth and it looked big and smooth and navigible. At the Columbian River museum in Astoria, the guide showed a map of over 200 ships that had sunk trying to cross the Columbia Bar, the treacherous area of shifting shoals at the mouth.
    On the Sea Lion, we saw a movie about how full of rapids the Columbia was until the dams were built. That was treacherous work your great great uncle did.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  80. From MJP:
    Tal, I agree that it would be great if kids played “Lewis and Clark,” but alas, the little devils tend to prefer conflict to negotiation.
    Indeed, Anne, one mustn’t waste a good castle! And much nicer to build the cottage into the wall than to tear the wall down to reuse as building materials.
    Theo, where I was raised in Upstate New York, there was a large house said to be used by the Underground Railroad to help people escape to Canada. One of my classmates lived in that house. And probably took it for granted. 🙂
    Sherrie, how great that you preserved so many of your grandmother’s stories! I trust you’ve transcribed them and turned a copy over to the local historical society as well as family members???
    Robin, not only is history travel terrific–there’s fascinating history just about everywhere!
    Liz, it wasn’t until this trip that I realized what a dangerous river the Columbia is. Many years ago I crossed the bridge at the mouth and it looked big and smooth and navigible. At the Columbian River museum in Astoria, the guide showed a map of over 200 ships that had sunk trying to cross the Columbia Bar, the treacherous area of shifting shoals at the mouth.
    On the Sea Lion, we saw a movie about how full of rapids the Columbia was until the dams were built. That was treacherous work your great great uncle did.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  81. Sherrie, on a side note…your grandmother was born in 1900? My dad was born in 1907!!! My mother in 1917. I really got a first hand taste of history from them. In fact, they met at the Willow Run Airport plant during WWII. My father assembled the RR Merlin engines for the P-51 Mustangs, my mother tested them. One blew up and covered her face and eyes with oil and as they rushed her through my dad’s department, he decided he would marry her.
    And now, my DH works for Jack Roush who is a NASCAR Team owner and runs his P-51 Mustang Rebuild business. How’s that for ‘full circle?

    Reply
  82. Sherrie, on a side note…your grandmother was born in 1900? My dad was born in 1907!!! My mother in 1917. I really got a first hand taste of history from them. In fact, they met at the Willow Run Airport plant during WWII. My father assembled the RR Merlin engines for the P-51 Mustangs, my mother tested them. One blew up and covered her face and eyes with oil and as they rushed her through my dad’s department, he decided he would marry her.
    And now, my DH works for Jack Roush who is a NASCAR Team owner and runs his P-51 Mustang Rebuild business. How’s that for ‘full circle?

    Reply
  83. Sherrie, on a side note…your grandmother was born in 1900? My dad was born in 1907!!! My mother in 1917. I really got a first hand taste of history from them. In fact, they met at the Willow Run Airport plant during WWII. My father assembled the RR Merlin engines for the P-51 Mustangs, my mother tested them. One blew up and covered her face and eyes with oil and as they rushed her through my dad’s department, he decided he would marry her.
    And now, my DH works for Jack Roush who is a NASCAR Team owner and runs his P-51 Mustang Rebuild business. How’s that for ‘full circle?

    Reply
  84. Sherrie, on a side note…your grandmother was born in 1900? My dad was born in 1907!!! My mother in 1917. I really got a first hand taste of history from them. In fact, they met at the Willow Run Airport plant during WWII. My father assembled the RR Merlin engines for the P-51 Mustangs, my mother tested them. One blew up and covered her face and eyes with oil and as they rushed her through my dad’s department, he decided he would marry her.
    And now, my DH works for Jack Roush who is a NASCAR Team owner and runs his P-51 Mustang Rebuild business. How’s that for ‘full circle?

    Reply
  85. Sherrie, on a side note…your grandmother was born in 1900? My dad was born in 1907!!! My mother in 1917. I really got a first hand taste of history from them. In fact, they met at the Willow Run Airport plant during WWII. My father assembled the RR Merlin engines for the P-51 Mustangs, my mother tested them. One blew up and covered her face and eyes with oil and as they rushed her through my dad’s department, he decided he would marry her.
    And now, my DH works for Jack Roush who is a NASCAR Team owner and runs his P-51 Mustang Rebuild business. How’s that for ‘full circle?

    Reply
  86. I forgot to mention that once when I was in the UC Berkeley library, I got lost trying to find a water fountain and fetched up somehow in the Bancroft Library, where I was able to see some of the original paintings that the artists with Lewis & Clark painted. I never could find it again–I think it just appears every hundred years, like Brigadoon.
    When I lived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN, I spent a night “granny-sitting” for the mother of a general; she had all her faculties, but they didn’t want to leave her alone while they were on a trip in case of sudden illness or accident. We got along swimmingly: I told her of how, at our previous post, Fort Monroe, I’d seen the Parade of Tall Ships that was part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement. Then she proceeded to tell ME of watching Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet set off on its round-the-world trip in 1906! She had also, as a very young girl in the Oklahoma Territory, been taken secretly to see one of the last Ghost Dances.
    I love being connected with history! My mother’s grandfather was Sitting Bull’s interpreter; and my father once met Custer’s widow. (She scared the life out of him–a most formidable lady, Libby Custer!)

    Reply
  87. I forgot to mention that once when I was in the UC Berkeley library, I got lost trying to find a water fountain and fetched up somehow in the Bancroft Library, where I was able to see some of the original paintings that the artists with Lewis & Clark painted. I never could find it again–I think it just appears every hundred years, like Brigadoon.
    When I lived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN, I spent a night “granny-sitting” for the mother of a general; she had all her faculties, but they didn’t want to leave her alone while they were on a trip in case of sudden illness or accident. We got along swimmingly: I told her of how, at our previous post, Fort Monroe, I’d seen the Parade of Tall Ships that was part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement. Then she proceeded to tell ME of watching Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet set off on its round-the-world trip in 1906! She had also, as a very young girl in the Oklahoma Territory, been taken secretly to see one of the last Ghost Dances.
    I love being connected with history! My mother’s grandfather was Sitting Bull’s interpreter; and my father once met Custer’s widow. (She scared the life out of him–a most formidable lady, Libby Custer!)

    Reply
  88. I forgot to mention that once when I was in the UC Berkeley library, I got lost trying to find a water fountain and fetched up somehow in the Bancroft Library, where I was able to see some of the original paintings that the artists with Lewis & Clark painted. I never could find it again–I think it just appears every hundred years, like Brigadoon.
    When I lived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN, I spent a night “granny-sitting” for the mother of a general; she had all her faculties, but they didn’t want to leave her alone while they were on a trip in case of sudden illness or accident. We got along swimmingly: I told her of how, at our previous post, Fort Monroe, I’d seen the Parade of Tall Ships that was part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement. Then she proceeded to tell ME of watching Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet set off on its round-the-world trip in 1906! She had also, as a very young girl in the Oklahoma Territory, been taken secretly to see one of the last Ghost Dances.
    I love being connected with history! My mother’s grandfather was Sitting Bull’s interpreter; and my father once met Custer’s widow. (She scared the life out of him–a most formidable lady, Libby Custer!)

    Reply
  89. I forgot to mention that once when I was in the UC Berkeley library, I got lost trying to find a water fountain and fetched up somehow in the Bancroft Library, where I was able to see some of the original paintings that the artists with Lewis & Clark painted. I never could find it again–I think it just appears every hundred years, like Brigadoon.
    When I lived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN, I spent a night “granny-sitting” for the mother of a general; she had all her faculties, but they didn’t want to leave her alone while they were on a trip in case of sudden illness or accident. We got along swimmingly: I told her of how, at our previous post, Fort Monroe, I’d seen the Parade of Tall Ships that was part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement. Then she proceeded to tell ME of watching Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet set off on its round-the-world trip in 1906! She had also, as a very young girl in the Oklahoma Territory, been taken secretly to see one of the last Ghost Dances.
    I love being connected with history! My mother’s grandfather was Sitting Bull’s interpreter; and my father once met Custer’s widow. (She scared the life out of him–a most formidable lady, Libby Custer!)

    Reply
  90. I forgot to mention that once when I was in the UC Berkeley library, I got lost trying to find a water fountain and fetched up somehow in the Bancroft Library, where I was able to see some of the original paintings that the artists with Lewis & Clark painted. I never could find it again–I think it just appears every hundred years, like Brigadoon.
    When I lived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN, I spent a night “granny-sitting” for the mother of a general; she had all her faculties, but they didn’t want to leave her alone while they were on a trip in case of sudden illness or accident. We got along swimmingly: I told her of how, at our previous post, Fort Monroe, I’d seen the Parade of Tall Ships that was part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Jamestown settlement. Then she proceeded to tell ME of watching Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet set off on its round-the-world trip in 1906! She had also, as a very young girl in the Oklahoma Territory, been taken secretly to see one of the last Ghost Dances.
    I love being connected with history! My mother’s grandfather was Sitting Bull’s interpreter; and my father once met Custer’s widow. (She scared the life out of him–a most formidable lady, Libby Custer!)

    Reply
  91. Wow, all this fabulous history unfolding before our very eyes! This is precisely the kind of oral history I was talking about. I find these family stories utterly fascinating! And now I can claim to be close personal friends *g* with people whose kin saw Sitting Bull, Custer’s widow, etc.
    Theo, how fun! My cousin in Minnesota is working on a P-51 Mustang … in his basement. Don’t ask.
    And your mom was born in 1917? When Grandma was a young bride in 1919, she was riding the family plow horse to a neighbor’s to deliver a jar of homemade jam. The horse was dead gentle and had no bridle or saddle. Gram guided it by touching her feet to its neck. Well, Gram had a baby in one arm, and a jar of jam in the other, when a bear spooked the horse & he took off running. When the horse hit the rain slick wooden bridge he fell, throwing her, before tumbling into the river. Gram said when the horse fell she landed on her feet, running, and didn’t stop running till she reached her neighbor’s. *g* Both the baby and the jam were unhurt.
    That horse was swept over a mile downstream in a raging, rain swollen river and given up for dead, which was a real loss back in those days. A week later, a distant neighbor returned the “stray” horse he’d found. He had recognized it’s blaze and knew who it belonged to.

    Reply
  92. Wow, all this fabulous history unfolding before our very eyes! This is precisely the kind of oral history I was talking about. I find these family stories utterly fascinating! And now I can claim to be close personal friends *g* with people whose kin saw Sitting Bull, Custer’s widow, etc.
    Theo, how fun! My cousin in Minnesota is working on a P-51 Mustang … in his basement. Don’t ask.
    And your mom was born in 1917? When Grandma was a young bride in 1919, she was riding the family plow horse to a neighbor’s to deliver a jar of homemade jam. The horse was dead gentle and had no bridle or saddle. Gram guided it by touching her feet to its neck. Well, Gram had a baby in one arm, and a jar of jam in the other, when a bear spooked the horse & he took off running. When the horse hit the rain slick wooden bridge he fell, throwing her, before tumbling into the river. Gram said when the horse fell she landed on her feet, running, and didn’t stop running till she reached her neighbor’s. *g* Both the baby and the jam were unhurt.
    That horse was swept over a mile downstream in a raging, rain swollen river and given up for dead, which was a real loss back in those days. A week later, a distant neighbor returned the “stray” horse he’d found. He had recognized it’s blaze and knew who it belonged to.

    Reply
  93. Wow, all this fabulous history unfolding before our very eyes! This is precisely the kind of oral history I was talking about. I find these family stories utterly fascinating! And now I can claim to be close personal friends *g* with people whose kin saw Sitting Bull, Custer’s widow, etc.
    Theo, how fun! My cousin in Minnesota is working on a P-51 Mustang … in his basement. Don’t ask.
    And your mom was born in 1917? When Grandma was a young bride in 1919, she was riding the family plow horse to a neighbor’s to deliver a jar of homemade jam. The horse was dead gentle and had no bridle or saddle. Gram guided it by touching her feet to its neck. Well, Gram had a baby in one arm, and a jar of jam in the other, when a bear spooked the horse & he took off running. When the horse hit the rain slick wooden bridge he fell, throwing her, before tumbling into the river. Gram said when the horse fell she landed on her feet, running, and didn’t stop running till she reached her neighbor’s. *g* Both the baby and the jam were unhurt.
    That horse was swept over a mile downstream in a raging, rain swollen river and given up for dead, which was a real loss back in those days. A week later, a distant neighbor returned the “stray” horse he’d found. He had recognized it’s blaze and knew who it belonged to.

    Reply
  94. Wow, all this fabulous history unfolding before our very eyes! This is precisely the kind of oral history I was talking about. I find these family stories utterly fascinating! And now I can claim to be close personal friends *g* with people whose kin saw Sitting Bull, Custer’s widow, etc.
    Theo, how fun! My cousin in Minnesota is working on a P-51 Mustang … in his basement. Don’t ask.
    And your mom was born in 1917? When Grandma was a young bride in 1919, she was riding the family plow horse to a neighbor’s to deliver a jar of homemade jam. The horse was dead gentle and had no bridle or saddle. Gram guided it by touching her feet to its neck. Well, Gram had a baby in one arm, and a jar of jam in the other, when a bear spooked the horse & he took off running. When the horse hit the rain slick wooden bridge he fell, throwing her, before tumbling into the river. Gram said when the horse fell she landed on her feet, running, and didn’t stop running till she reached her neighbor’s. *g* Both the baby and the jam were unhurt.
    That horse was swept over a mile downstream in a raging, rain swollen river and given up for dead, which was a real loss back in those days. A week later, a distant neighbor returned the “stray” horse he’d found. He had recognized it’s blaze and knew who it belonged to.

    Reply
  95. Wow, all this fabulous history unfolding before our very eyes! This is precisely the kind of oral history I was talking about. I find these family stories utterly fascinating! And now I can claim to be close personal friends *g* with people whose kin saw Sitting Bull, Custer’s widow, etc.
    Theo, how fun! My cousin in Minnesota is working on a P-51 Mustang … in his basement. Don’t ask.
    And your mom was born in 1917? When Grandma was a young bride in 1919, she was riding the family plow horse to a neighbor’s to deliver a jar of homemade jam. The horse was dead gentle and had no bridle or saddle. Gram guided it by touching her feet to its neck. Well, Gram had a baby in one arm, and a jar of jam in the other, when a bear spooked the horse & he took off running. When the horse hit the rain slick wooden bridge he fell, throwing her, before tumbling into the river. Gram said when the horse fell she landed on her feet, running, and didn’t stop running till she reached her neighbor’s. *g* Both the baby and the jam were unhurt.
    That horse was swept over a mile downstream in a raging, rain swollen river and given up for dead, which was a real loss back in those days. A week later, a distant neighbor returned the “stray” horse he’d found. He had recognized it’s blaze and knew who it belonged to.

    Reply
  96. Oh, Sherrie! What a story! And I’m so glad the horse survived too! 🙂
    A P-51 in his basement? We had a friend who was building a bi-plane in his. I don’t get it, but okay…
    If he’s interested though, email me. I might be able to answer questions he might have about parts.
    Yes, 1917. Her parents had recently immigrated from Scotland and my grandfather was a tool and die maker at Ford (which has gone the way of the dinosaur). Between them and my dad’s parents, who immigrated from Cornwall in 1904, I learned history from a first hand perspective. When my mom’s mother passed, and we cleaned the house, we found slices of bread wrapped in brown paper and tucked here and there throughout the house. During the depression, it’s what she did to ensure her family always had something to eat because she never turned anyone away…old habits…

    Reply
  97. Oh, Sherrie! What a story! And I’m so glad the horse survived too! 🙂
    A P-51 in his basement? We had a friend who was building a bi-plane in his. I don’t get it, but okay…
    If he’s interested though, email me. I might be able to answer questions he might have about parts.
    Yes, 1917. Her parents had recently immigrated from Scotland and my grandfather was a tool and die maker at Ford (which has gone the way of the dinosaur). Between them and my dad’s parents, who immigrated from Cornwall in 1904, I learned history from a first hand perspective. When my mom’s mother passed, and we cleaned the house, we found slices of bread wrapped in brown paper and tucked here and there throughout the house. During the depression, it’s what she did to ensure her family always had something to eat because she never turned anyone away…old habits…

    Reply
  98. Oh, Sherrie! What a story! And I’m so glad the horse survived too! 🙂
    A P-51 in his basement? We had a friend who was building a bi-plane in his. I don’t get it, but okay…
    If he’s interested though, email me. I might be able to answer questions he might have about parts.
    Yes, 1917. Her parents had recently immigrated from Scotland and my grandfather was a tool and die maker at Ford (which has gone the way of the dinosaur). Between them and my dad’s parents, who immigrated from Cornwall in 1904, I learned history from a first hand perspective. When my mom’s mother passed, and we cleaned the house, we found slices of bread wrapped in brown paper and tucked here and there throughout the house. During the depression, it’s what she did to ensure her family always had something to eat because she never turned anyone away…old habits…

    Reply
  99. Oh, Sherrie! What a story! And I’m so glad the horse survived too! 🙂
    A P-51 in his basement? We had a friend who was building a bi-plane in his. I don’t get it, but okay…
    If he’s interested though, email me. I might be able to answer questions he might have about parts.
    Yes, 1917. Her parents had recently immigrated from Scotland and my grandfather was a tool and die maker at Ford (which has gone the way of the dinosaur). Between them and my dad’s parents, who immigrated from Cornwall in 1904, I learned history from a first hand perspective. When my mom’s mother passed, and we cleaned the house, we found slices of bread wrapped in brown paper and tucked here and there throughout the house. During the depression, it’s what she did to ensure her family always had something to eat because she never turned anyone away…old habits…

    Reply
  100. Oh, Sherrie! What a story! And I’m so glad the horse survived too! 🙂
    A P-51 in his basement? We had a friend who was building a bi-plane in his. I don’t get it, but okay…
    If he’s interested though, email me. I might be able to answer questions he might have about parts.
    Yes, 1917. Her parents had recently immigrated from Scotland and my grandfather was a tool and die maker at Ford (which has gone the way of the dinosaur). Between them and my dad’s parents, who immigrated from Cornwall in 1904, I learned history from a first hand perspective. When my mom’s mother passed, and we cleaned the house, we found slices of bread wrapped in brown paper and tucked here and there throughout the house. During the depression, it’s what she did to ensure her family always had something to eat because she never turned anyone away…old habits…

    Reply

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