History of Jury Duty

Courtroom-898931_640I’m on call for jury duty, and while I wouldn’t mind sitting through a trial, this kind of thing never comes at a convenient time. We ought to be able to pick our jury weeks!

Anyway, I thought I’d see how long we’ve been plugged into a jury system. Basically, we know the Athenians around 507 BCE, with their democratic system, did everything by the people. Juries of 500 men (of course) were selected every day to rule on criminal and civil accusations and crimes. Sounds like they had complaining neighbors and teen hoodlums aplenty even back then.

A more modern form of this was developed by Germanic tribes where they chose men of good character to investigate crimes (the beginning of the idea of a grand jury) and judge the accused (petit jury).

The Saxons adopted a similar system by 978 AD. One of Alfred the Great’s Dooms (laws) required that 12 men from every 100 were to accuse perpetrators of crimes and pass judgment on them. So without a police force, juries acted as the law—the perfect occupation for the busybody sorts.

In England, with the Dooms laws to lay the base, the Assize courts were developed. Henry II (1154-1189) demanded Henry_II_of_England_-_Illustration_from_Cassell's_History_of_England_-_Century_Edition_-_published_circa_1902twelve "good and lawful men" in each village to assemble and reveal the names of those suspected of crimes. At this point, petit juries divided into two types we have today, civil and criminal.

In 1215 the Magna Carta, building on the prior years of jury development, expressly included the right of every free man to protection from punishment without "the lawful judgment of his peers." (And 700 years later, the Ku Klux Klan still didn’t grasp that concept.)

John _Magna_CartaAt the same time, the Catholic Church removed its sanction from all forms of ordeal. Previously, instead of using a petit jury, people accused of crimes could be tested for guilt. We’ve all heard of dunking witches to see if they drowned, at which point they were concluded innocent, not to mention quite dead. But suspected thieves could have molten metal poured into their hand under the assumption that if the wound healed rapidly and well, God found the suspect innocent. Without a trial by ordeal, they had to come up with a better way of establishing guilt. They already had juries that would indict criminals. Now they needed jurors to decide if the accused were guilty as charged—I’m sure dunking was a lot more entertaining than sitting around deciding if Old Bob or Young Mary was the liar. Witches_apprehended1613_Wellcome_M0016701

Henry III’s reign regularized the basic trial by petit jury with which we’re familiar—with witnesses and others with knowledge of the case. But it wasn’t until Henry VI’s reign that evidence was introduced into trials.

By the 1700s, the framers of the United States Constitution believed that a trial by an impartial jury was among the principle rights of any free society. The two components of the U.S. jury system — randomness and compulsory service — were developed to ensure that a jury is a representative sample of the community regardless of race, gender, political affiliation or ability to weasel out of jury duty.

Which means I have to call in every night this week and pray I won’t get stuck with a trial that will run over into the vacation to the Grand Canyon that we’ve been planning for the last year!

120 thoughts on “History of Jury Duty”

  1. Well good luck. I hope you make it to your vacation without any problems.
    I’ve had jury duty many times over the years. I’ve been on three juries that actually went to trial. A couple that were settled before we even got to the jury box. They were settled while we waited out in the hallway for hours (ugh!). For most of them though, I just sat around (on uncomfortable metal chairs) waiting to see if I would be chosen (no calling in from home).
    However, on one of my first times, while sitting around in the big waiting room, I picked up a book from their reading rack titled THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiweiss. It started my love affair with romance novels (smile).

    Reply
  2. Well good luck. I hope you make it to your vacation without any problems.
    I’ve had jury duty many times over the years. I’ve been on three juries that actually went to trial. A couple that were settled before we even got to the jury box. They were settled while we waited out in the hallway for hours (ugh!). For most of them though, I just sat around (on uncomfortable metal chairs) waiting to see if I would be chosen (no calling in from home).
    However, on one of my first times, while sitting around in the big waiting room, I picked up a book from their reading rack titled THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiweiss. It started my love affair with romance novels (smile).

    Reply
  3. Well good luck. I hope you make it to your vacation without any problems.
    I’ve had jury duty many times over the years. I’ve been on three juries that actually went to trial. A couple that were settled before we even got to the jury box. They were settled while we waited out in the hallway for hours (ugh!). For most of them though, I just sat around (on uncomfortable metal chairs) waiting to see if I would be chosen (no calling in from home).
    However, on one of my first times, while sitting around in the big waiting room, I picked up a book from their reading rack titled THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiweiss. It started my love affair with romance novels (smile).

    Reply
  4. Well good luck. I hope you make it to your vacation without any problems.
    I’ve had jury duty many times over the years. I’ve been on three juries that actually went to trial. A couple that were settled before we even got to the jury box. They were settled while we waited out in the hallway for hours (ugh!). For most of them though, I just sat around (on uncomfortable metal chairs) waiting to see if I would be chosen (no calling in from home).
    However, on one of my first times, while sitting around in the big waiting room, I picked up a book from their reading rack titled THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiweiss. It started my love affair with romance novels (smile).

    Reply
  5. Well good luck. I hope you make it to your vacation without any problems.
    I’ve had jury duty many times over the years. I’ve been on three juries that actually went to trial. A couple that were settled before we even got to the jury box. They were settled while we waited out in the hallway for hours (ugh!). For most of them though, I just sat around (on uncomfortable metal chairs) waiting to see if I would be chosen (no calling in from home).
    However, on one of my first times, while sitting around in the big waiting room, I picked up a book from their reading rack titled THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiweiss. It started my love affair with romance novels (smile).

    Reply
  6. Very interesting, Pat. I knew the general outlines of this, but not the detailed timeline. I’ve always thought it would be interesting to serve on a jury, but was never called even though I was ready, willing, able, and easy to find. Of course, if I had been called, it would have invariably been at a time that was terrible for me!

    Reply
  7. Very interesting, Pat. I knew the general outlines of this, but not the detailed timeline. I’ve always thought it would be interesting to serve on a jury, but was never called even though I was ready, willing, able, and easy to find. Of course, if I had been called, it would have invariably been at a time that was terrible for me!

    Reply
  8. Very interesting, Pat. I knew the general outlines of this, but not the detailed timeline. I’ve always thought it would be interesting to serve on a jury, but was never called even though I was ready, willing, able, and easy to find. Of course, if I had been called, it would have invariably been at a time that was terrible for me!

    Reply
  9. Very interesting, Pat. I knew the general outlines of this, but not the detailed timeline. I’ve always thought it would be interesting to serve on a jury, but was never called even though I was ready, willing, able, and easy to find. Of course, if I had been called, it would have invariably been at a time that was terrible for me!

    Reply
  10. Very interesting, Pat. I knew the general outlines of this, but not the detailed timeline. I’ve always thought it would be interesting to serve on a jury, but was never called even though I was ready, willing, able, and easy to find. Of course, if I had been called, it would have invariably been at a time that was terrible for me!

    Reply
  11. Once I was called for a jury on a case that was a civil suit following an auto accident. There were about four times as many potential jurors there as would be needed. There were also four attorneys. The first went over the acknowledged facts of the accident, and asked about the jurors’ experiences. The second went over the same material. Then the third did exactly the same. ( don’t know why. I guess they were trying to justify their existences.) The fourth stood up and asked the jury pool, “Do any of you not drive a car?” No one answered, so he say down.
    Then the first twelve people in the seats were assigned to the jury and the rest of us where sent home. While we were waiting to get our dismissal cards, Lawyer #4 came in and we burst into spontaneous applause.
    I wasn’t around for the end of the case, but I bet he won.

    Reply
  12. Once I was called for a jury on a case that was a civil suit following an auto accident. There were about four times as many potential jurors there as would be needed. There were also four attorneys. The first went over the acknowledged facts of the accident, and asked about the jurors’ experiences. The second went over the same material. Then the third did exactly the same. ( don’t know why. I guess they were trying to justify their existences.) The fourth stood up and asked the jury pool, “Do any of you not drive a car?” No one answered, so he say down.
    Then the first twelve people in the seats were assigned to the jury and the rest of us where sent home. While we were waiting to get our dismissal cards, Lawyer #4 came in and we burst into spontaneous applause.
    I wasn’t around for the end of the case, but I bet he won.

    Reply
  13. Once I was called for a jury on a case that was a civil suit following an auto accident. There were about four times as many potential jurors there as would be needed. There were also four attorneys. The first went over the acknowledged facts of the accident, and asked about the jurors’ experiences. The second went over the same material. Then the third did exactly the same. ( don’t know why. I guess they were trying to justify their existences.) The fourth stood up and asked the jury pool, “Do any of you not drive a car?” No one answered, so he say down.
    Then the first twelve people in the seats were assigned to the jury and the rest of us where sent home. While we were waiting to get our dismissal cards, Lawyer #4 came in and we burst into spontaneous applause.
    I wasn’t around for the end of the case, but I bet he won.

    Reply
  14. Once I was called for a jury on a case that was a civil suit following an auto accident. There were about four times as many potential jurors there as would be needed. There were also four attorneys. The first went over the acknowledged facts of the accident, and asked about the jurors’ experiences. The second went over the same material. Then the third did exactly the same. ( don’t know why. I guess they were trying to justify their existences.) The fourth stood up and asked the jury pool, “Do any of you not drive a car?” No one answered, so he say down.
    Then the first twelve people in the seats were assigned to the jury and the rest of us where sent home. While we were waiting to get our dismissal cards, Lawyer #4 came in and we burst into spontaneous applause.
    I wasn’t around for the end of the case, but I bet he won.

    Reply
  15. Once I was called for a jury on a case that was a civil suit following an auto accident. There were about four times as many potential jurors there as would be needed. There were also four attorneys. The first went over the acknowledged facts of the accident, and asked about the jurors’ experiences. The second went over the same material. Then the third did exactly the same. ( don’t know why. I guess they were trying to justify their existences.) The fourth stood up and asked the jury pool, “Do any of you not drive a car?” No one answered, so he say down.
    Then the first twelve people in the seats were assigned to the jury and the rest of us where sent home. While we were waiting to get our dismissal cards, Lawyer #4 came in and we burst into spontaneous applause.
    I wasn’t around for the end of the case, but I bet he won.

    Reply
  16. then it wasn’t all bad! We have a very comfortable jury assembly room, but I decided to reschedule when they said trials could last for weeks. I have a trip coming up next week I didn’t want to miss! And they said that even if the case was settled before we got called up, our presence is valued. They recognize the tedium at least.

    Reply
  17. then it wasn’t all bad! We have a very comfortable jury assembly room, but I decided to reschedule when they said trials could last for weeks. I have a trip coming up next week I didn’t want to miss! And they said that even if the case was settled before we got called up, our presence is valued. They recognize the tedium at least.

    Reply
  18. then it wasn’t all bad! We have a very comfortable jury assembly room, but I decided to reschedule when they said trials could last for weeks. I have a trip coming up next week I didn’t want to miss! And they said that even if the case was settled before we got called up, our presence is valued. They recognize the tedium at least.

    Reply
  19. then it wasn’t all bad! We have a very comfortable jury assembly room, but I decided to reschedule when they said trials could last for weeks. I have a trip coming up next week I didn’t want to miss! And they said that even if the case was settled before we got called up, our presence is valued. They recognize the tedium at least.

    Reply
  20. then it wasn’t all bad! We have a very comfortable jury assembly room, but I decided to reschedule when they said trials could last for weeks. I have a trip coming up next week I didn’t want to miss! And they said that even if the case was settled before we got called up, our presence is valued. They recognize the tedium at least.

    Reply
  21. oh, now that’s interesting, thank you! We have different levels of judiciary here. If the basic jury I would be on rules and one of the parties disagrees, they bump the case up another level. The higher courts have only judges. I think we’re a more litigious society and we don’t have enough judges to handle it your way! So the basic jury settles the basic cases.

    Reply
  22. oh, now that’s interesting, thank you! We have different levels of judiciary here. If the basic jury I would be on rules and one of the parties disagrees, they bump the case up another level. The higher courts have only judges. I think we’re a more litigious society and we don’t have enough judges to handle it your way! So the basic jury settles the basic cases.

    Reply
  23. oh, now that’s interesting, thank you! We have different levels of judiciary here. If the basic jury I would be on rules and one of the parties disagrees, they bump the case up another level. The higher courts have only judges. I think we’re a more litigious society and we don’t have enough judges to handle it your way! So the basic jury settles the basic cases.

    Reply
  24. oh, now that’s interesting, thank you! We have different levels of judiciary here. If the basic jury I would be on rules and one of the parties disagrees, they bump the case up another level. The higher courts have only judges. I think we’re a more litigious society and we don’t have enough judges to handle it your way! So the basic jury settles the basic cases.

    Reply
  25. oh, now that’s interesting, thank you! We have different levels of judiciary here. If the basic jury I would be on rules and one of the parties disagrees, they bump the case up another level. The higher courts have only judges. I think we’re a more litigious society and we don’t have enough judges to handle it your way! So the basic jury settles the basic cases.

    Reply
  26. I have served on juries several times. Once the case was adjourned and once I was excused from the jury because I knew someone else in the group from which the jury was chosen (I was GLAD of that because I was wondering how to be excused. I had had a strong prejudicial reaction to one of the lawyers and I DID NOT belong on that jury. (Later I asked a local judge. He said you ask to talk to the judge privately and he will excuse you.)
    The last case I was considered for was in a reasonably small chamber but I couldn’t hear one of the lawyers. So I asked the judge to be excused because of my deafness.Later, I received a call for a grand jury, but I cited my deafness and was never called again.
    I’m rather sorry that I had gotten so deaf. I found the process interesting.
    Of course they would no longer consider me — there is some sort of age cut-off and I’m sure my 91 years are beyond that mark.

    Reply
  27. I have served on juries several times. Once the case was adjourned and once I was excused from the jury because I knew someone else in the group from which the jury was chosen (I was GLAD of that because I was wondering how to be excused. I had had a strong prejudicial reaction to one of the lawyers and I DID NOT belong on that jury. (Later I asked a local judge. He said you ask to talk to the judge privately and he will excuse you.)
    The last case I was considered for was in a reasonably small chamber but I couldn’t hear one of the lawyers. So I asked the judge to be excused because of my deafness.Later, I received a call for a grand jury, but I cited my deafness and was never called again.
    I’m rather sorry that I had gotten so deaf. I found the process interesting.
    Of course they would no longer consider me — there is some sort of age cut-off and I’m sure my 91 years are beyond that mark.

    Reply
  28. I have served on juries several times. Once the case was adjourned and once I was excused from the jury because I knew someone else in the group from which the jury was chosen (I was GLAD of that because I was wondering how to be excused. I had had a strong prejudicial reaction to one of the lawyers and I DID NOT belong on that jury. (Later I asked a local judge. He said you ask to talk to the judge privately and he will excuse you.)
    The last case I was considered for was in a reasonably small chamber but I couldn’t hear one of the lawyers. So I asked the judge to be excused because of my deafness.Later, I received a call for a grand jury, but I cited my deafness and was never called again.
    I’m rather sorry that I had gotten so deaf. I found the process interesting.
    Of course they would no longer consider me — there is some sort of age cut-off and I’m sure my 91 years are beyond that mark.

    Reply
  29. I have served on juries several times. Once the case was adjourned and once I was excused from the jury because I knew someone else in the group from which the jury was chosen (I was GLAD of that because I was wondering how to be excused. I had had a strong prejudicial reaction to one of the lawyers and I DID NOT belong on that jury. (Later I asked a local judge. He said you ask to talk to the judge privately and he will excuse you.)
    The last case I was considered for was in a reasonably small chamber but I couldn’t hear one of the lawyers. So I asked the judge to be excused because of my deafness.Later, I received a call for a grand jury, but I cited my deafness and was never called again.
    I’m rather sorry that I had gotten so deaf. I found the process interesting.
    Of course they would no longer consider me — there is some sort of age cut-off and I’m sure my 91 years are beyond that mark.

    Reply
  30. I have served on juries several times. Once the case was adjourned and once I was excused from the jury because I knew someone else in the group from which the jury was chosen (I was GLAD of that because I was wondering how to be excused. I had had a strong prejudicial reaction to one of the lawyers and I DID NOT belong on that jury. (Later I asked a local judge. He said you ask to talk to the judge privately and he will excuse you.)
    The last case I was considered for was in a reasonably small chamber but I couldn’t hear one of the lawyers. So I asked the judge to be excused because of my deafness.Later, I received a call for a grand jury, but I cited my deafness and was never called again.
    I’m rather sorry that I had gotten so deaf. I found the process interesting.
    Of course they would no longer consider me — there is some sort of age cut-off and I’m sure my 91 years are beyond that mark.

    Reply
  31. I have been called for jury duty several times, but never selected. The last time I was called for jury duty, it was for mid to late August. By the time I was due to report, I’d been without power for 8 days,thanks to a hurricane. On the day before I was to report, I opened the front door to check for the mail – and in waltzed (scampered) an adorable chipmunk. Of course, I had to lock the front door and drive to the courthouse. I didn’t bother to call to ask to be excused; I didn’t think “chipmunk invasion” would be any better than “my dog at the homework.” I was not called to serve on the jury. By the time I got home, I no longer thought of my “guest” as cute. He/she had thoughtfully left his mark (don’t ask) all over the house, eaten half a peach, etc. The exterminator brought a huge racoon trap ($80) for a tiny chipmunk. Critter ate the peanut butter but escaped. Eventually, I opened the kitchen window and left a peach there. By the time I came back into the kitchen, the peach and the critter were gone. And that’s my most memorable experience with jury duty.

    Reply
  32. I have been called for jury duty several times, but never selected. The last time I was called for jury duty, it was for mid to late August. By the time I was due to report, I’d been without power for 8 days,thanks to a hurricane. On the day before I was to report, I opened the front door to check for the mail – and in waltzed (scampered) an adorable chipmunk. Of course, I had to lock the front door and drive to the courthouse. I didn’t bother to call to ask to be excused; I didn’t think “chipmunk invasion” would be any better than “my dog at the homework.” I was not called to serve on the jury. By the time I got home, I no longer thought of my “guest” as cute. He/she had thoughtfully left his mark (don’t ask) all over the house, eaten half a peach, etc. The exterminator brought a huge racoon trap ($80) for a tiny chipmunk. Critter ate the peanut butter but escaped. Eventually, I opened the kitchen window and left a peach there. By the time I came back into the kitchen, the peach and the critter were gone. And that’s my most memorable experience with jury duty.

    Reply
  33. I have been called for jury duty several times, but never selected. The last time I was called for jury duty, it was for mid to late August. By the time I was due to report, I’d been without power for 8 days,thanks to a hurricane. On the day before I was to report, I opened the front door to check for the mail – and in waltzed (scampered) an adorable chipmunk. Of course, I had to lock the front door and drive to the courthouse. I didn’t bother to call to ask to be excused; I didn’t think “chipmunk invasion” would be any better than “my dog at the homework.” I was not called to serve on the jury. By the time I got home, I no longer thought of my “guest” as cute. He/she had thoughtfully left his mark (don’t ask) all over the house, eaten half a peach, etc. The exterminator brought a huge racoon trap ($80) for a tiny chipmunk. Critter ate the peanut butter but escaped. Eventually, I opened the kitchen window and left a peach there. By the time I came back into the kitchen, the peach and the critter were gone. And that’s my most memorable experience with jury duty.

    Reply
  34. I have been called for jury duty several times, but never selected. The last time I was called for jury duty, it was for mid to late August. By the time I was due to report, I’d been without power for 8 days,thanks to a hurricane. On the day before I was to report, I opened the front door to check for the mail – and in waltzed (scampered) an adorable chipmunk. Of course, I had to lock the front door and drive to the courthouse. I didn’t bother to call to ask to be excused; I didn’t think “chipmunk invasion” would be any better than “my dog at the homework.” I was not called to serve on the jury. By the time I got home, I no longer thought of my “guest” as cute. He/she had thoughtfully left his mark (don’t ask) all over the house, eaten half a peach, etc. The exterminator brought a huge racoon trap ($80) for a tiny chipmunk. Critter ate the peanut butter but escaped. Eventually, I opened the kitchen window and left a peach there. By the time I came back into the kitchen, the peach and the critter were gone. And that’s my most memorable experience with jury duty.

    Reply
  35. I have been called for jury duty several times, but never selected. The last time I was called for jury duty, it was for mid to late August. By the time I was due to report, I’d been without power for 8 days,thanks to a hurricane. On the day before I was to report, I opened the front door to check for the mail – and in waltzed (scampered) an adorable chipmunk. Of course, I had to lock the front door and drive to the courthouse. I didn’t bother to call to ask to be excused; I didn’t think “chipmunk invasion” would be any better than “my dog at the homework.” I was not called to serve on the jury. By the time I got home, I no longer thought of my “guest” as cute. He/she had thoughtfully left his mark (don’t ask) all over the house, eaten half a peach, etc. The exterminator brought a huge racoon trap ($80) for a tiny chipmunk. Critter ate the peanut butter but escaped. Eventually, I opened the kitchen window and left a peach there. By the time I came back into the kitchen, the peach and the critter were gone. And that’s my most memorable experience with jury duty.

    Reply
  36. Binnie, you win! What a great story.
    I was called once for a murder trial in Indiana. I was enthusiastically planning to write a book or magazine article about the experience when the accused pled guilty and the trial was canceled. Have you ever heard of someone who was disappointed not to serve? I was, silly me.
    More recently, I served on a jury here in Arizona hearing a case against a man who was arrested for being an armed guard at a drop house (where the “coyotes” hold and terrorize the illegals they’ve brought across the border while hapless relatives are extorted for large sums of cash to get them released). Several of the inmates of the house testified, telling their stories including the awful slog across the desert on foot. Not a stroll in the park! I gained a new respect for these human beings who really are just trying to survive in a hostile world.
    Now, like Sue, I’ve aged out of the jury system. But I’m glad I was able to do my bit back in the day. Sure, it’s a time killer. But so necessary to the freedom we enjoy every day.

    Reply
  37. Binnie, you win! What a great story.
    I was called once for a murder trial in Indiana. I was enthusiastically planning to write a book or magazine article about the experience when the accused pled guilty and the trial was canceled. Have you ever heard of someone who was disappointed not to serve? I was, silly me.
    More recently, I served on a jury here in Arizona hearing a case against a man who was arrested for being an armed guard at a drop house (where the “coyotes” hold and terrorize the illegals they’ve brought across the border while hapless relatives are extorted for large sums of cash to get them released). Several of the inmates of the house testified, telling their stories including the awful slog across the desert on foot. Not a stroll in the park! I gained a new respect for these human beings who really are just trying to survive in a hostile world.
    Now, like Sue, I’ve aged out of the jury system. But I’m glad I was able to do my bit back in the day. Sure, it’s a time killer. But so necessary to the freedom we enjoy every day.

    Reply
  38. Binnie, you win! What a great story.
    I was called once for a murder trial in Indiana. I was enthusiastically planning to write a book or magazine article about the experience when the accused pled guilty and the trial was canceled. Have you ever heard of someone who was disappointed not to serve? I was, silly me.
    More recently, I served on a jury here in Arizona hearing a case against a man who was arrested for being an armed guard at a drop house (where the “coyotes” hold and terrorize the illegals they’ve brought across the border while hapless relatives are extorted for large sums of cash to get them released). Several of the inmates of the house testified, telling their stories including the awful slog across the desert on foot. Not a stroll in the park! I gained a new respect for these human beings who really are just trying to survive in a hostile world.
    Now, like Sue, I’ve aged out of the jury system. But I’m glad I was able to do my bit back in the day. Sure, it’s a time killer. But so necessary to the freedom we enjoy every day.

    Reply
  39. Binnie, you win! What a great story.
    I was called once for a murder trial in Indiana. I was enthusiastically planning to write a book or magazine article about the experience when the accused pled guilty and the trial was canceled. Have you ever heard of someone who was disappointed not to serve? I was, silly me.
    More recently, I served on a jury here in Arizona hearing a case against a man who was arrested for being an armed guard at a drop house (where the “coyotes” hold and terrorize the illegals they’ve brought across the border while hapless relatives are extorted for large sums of cash to get them released). Several of the inmates of the house testified, telling their stories including the awful slog across the desert on foot. Not a stroll in the park! I gained a new respect for these human beings who really are just trying to survive in a hostile world.
    Now, like Sue, I’ve aged out of the jury system. But I’m glad I was able to do my bit back in the day. Sure, it’s a time killer. But so necessary to the freedom we enjoy every day.

    Reply
  40. Binnie, you win! What a great story.
    I was called once for a murder trial in Indiana. I was enthusiastically planning to write a book or magazine article about the experience when the accused pled guilty and the trial was canceled. Have you ever heard of someone who was disappointed not to serve? I was, silly me.
    More recently, I served on a jury here in Arizona hearing a case against a man who was arrested for being an armed guard at a drop house (where the “coyotes” hold and terrorize the illegals they’ve brought across the border while hapless relatives are extorted for large sums of cash to get them released). Several of the inmates of the house testified, telling their stories including the awful slog across the desert on foot. Not a stroll in the park! I gained a new respect for these human beings who really are just trying to survive in a hostile world.
    Now, like Sue, I’ve aged out of the jury system. But I’m glad I was able to do my bit back in the day. Sure, it’s a time killer. But so necessary to the freedom we enjoy every day.

    Reply
  41. I’ve only been called twice, and it’s mostly sitting in a room waiting, quite boring. But once I was selected for a rape trial, and it turned out that I knew the suspect and his family so I was excused! We had attended the same schools, and his mother was my school bus driver. It was quite awkward to explain during voir dire why I couldn’t serve on that case. By the way, why do they still use the French term “voir dire” for questioning jurors, when most the other legal terms are Latin?

    Reply
  42. I’ve only been called twice, and it’s mostly sitting in a room waiting, quite boring. But once I was selected for a rape trial, and it turned out that I knew the suspect and his family so I was excused! We had attended the same schools, and his mother was my school bus driver. It was quite awkward to explain during voir dire why I couldn’t serve on that case. By the way, why do they still use the French term “voir dire” for questioning jurors, when most the other legal terms are Latin?

    Reply
  43. I’ve only been called twice, and it’s mostly sitting in a room waiting, quite boring. But once I was selected for a rape trial, and it turned out that I knew the suspect and his family so I was excused! We had attended the same schools, and his mother was my school bus driver. It was quite awkward to explain during voir dire why I couldn’t serve on that case. By the way, why do they still use the French term “voir dire” for questioning jurors, when most the other legal terms are Latin?

    Reply
  44. I’ve only been called twice, and it’s mostly sitting in a room waiting, quite boring. But once I was selected for a rape trial, and it turned out that I knew the suspect and his family so I was excused! We had attended the same schools, and his mother was my school bus driver. It was quite awkward to explain during voir dire why I couldn’t serve on that case. By the way, why do they still use the French term “voir dire” for questioning jurors, when most the other legal terms are Latin?

    Reply
  45. I’ve only been called twice, and it’s mostly sitting in a room waiting, quite boring. But once I was selected for a rape trial, and it turned out that I knew the suspect and his family so I was excused! We had attended the same schools, and his mother was my school bus driver. It was quite awkward to explain during voir dire why I couldn’t serve on that case. By the way, why do they still use the French term “voir dire” for questioning jurors, when most the other legal terms are Latin?

    Reply
  46. Ah, it’s good to know that there is still some leeway once inside a courtroom! But you’re right, it would be interesting to actually see a case through. I’m sorry your disability made that difficult to do. And at 91, you need to just enjoy life and not fret about judicial decisions! The young need the experience more than you.

    Reply
  47. Ah, it’s good to know that there is still some leeway once inside a courtroom! But you’re right, it would be interesting to actually see a case through. I’m sorry your disability made that difficult to do. And at 91, you need to just enjoy life and not fret about judicial decisions! The young need the experience more than you.

    Reply
  48. Ah, it’s good to know that there is still some leeway once inside a courtroom! But you’re right, it would be interesting to actually see a case through. I’m sorry your disability made that difficult to do. And at 91, you need to just enjoy life and not fret about judicial decisions! The young need the experience more than you.

    Reply
  49. Ah, it’s good to know that there is still some leeway once inside a courtroom! But you’re right, it would be interesting to actually see a case through. I’m sorry your disability made that difficult to do. And at 91, you need to just enjoy life and not fret about judicial decisions! The young need the experience more than you.

    Reply
  50. Ah, it’s good to know that there is still some leeway once inside a courtroom! But you’re right, it would be interesting to actually see a case through. I’m sorry your disability made that difficult to do. And at 91, you need to just enjoy life and not fret about judicial decisions! The young need the experience more than you.

    Reply
  51. LOL, typepad needs a big laughing face icon. That would have been a good wild life post on our earlier blog. 😉 It’s interesting how many people have never actually been chosen for a jury!

    Reply
  52. LOL, typepad needs a big laughing face icon. That would have been a good wild life post on our earlier blog. 😉 It’s interesting how many people have never actually been chosen for a jury!

    Reply
  53. LOL, typepad needs a big laughing face icon. That would have been a good wild life post on our earlier blog. 😉 It’s interesting how many people have never actually been chosen for a jury!

    Reply
  54. LOL, typepad needs a big laughing face icon. That would have been a good wild life post on our earlier blog. 😉 It’s interesting how many people have never actually been chosen for a jury!

    Reply
  55. LOL, typepad needs a big laughing face icon. That would have been a good wild life post on our earlier blog. 😉 It’s interesting how many people have never actually been chosen for a jury!

    Reply
  56. oh cool, someone who actually had a chance to serve! That’s a great story. And a sad one. We’re all humans on this planet. I wish we could open all borders, but we’re also still animals, I guess, and need our territories.

    Reply
  57. oh cool, someone who actually had a chance to serve! That’s a great story. And a sad one. We’re all humans on this planet. I wish we could open all borders, but we’re also still animals, I guess, and need our territories.

    Reply
  58. oh cool, someone who actually had a chance to serve! That’s a great story. And a sad one. We’re all humans on this planet. I wish we could open all borders, but we’re also still animals, I guess, and need our territories.

    Reply
  59. oh cool, someone who actually had a chance to serve! That’s a great story. And a sad one. We’re all humans on this planet. I wish we could open all borders, but we’re also still animals, I guess, and need our territories.

    Reply
  60. oh cool, someone who actually had a chance to serve! That’s a great story. And a sad one. We’re all humans on this planet. I wish we could open all borders, but we’re also still animals, I guess, and need our territories.

    Reply
  61. Was it a small town? That really would be difficult. I had to look up voir dire because you aroused my curiosity. It’s more of our mangled English than anything, Latin to French to Anglo-Norman and probably written into all the British law texts our laws were founded on. I’m betting law doesn’t rely solely on Latin but those old Brit usages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voir_dire

    Reply
  62. Was it a small town? That really would be difficult. I had to look up voir dire because you aroused my curiosity. It’s more of our mangled English than anything, Latin to French to Anglo-Norman and probably written into all the British law texts our laws were founded on. I’m betting law doesn’t rely solely on Latin but those old Brit usages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voir_dire

    Reply
  63. Was it a small town? That really would be difficult. I had to look up voir dire because you aroused my curiosity. It’s more of our mangled English than anything, Latin to French to Anglo-Norman and probably written into all the British law texts our laws were founded on. I’m betting law doesn’t rely solely on Latin but those old Brit usages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voir_dire

    Reply
  64. Was it a small town? That really would be difficult. I had to look up voir dire because you aroused my curiosity. It’s more of our mangled English than anything, Latin to French to Anglo-Norman and probably written into all the British law texts our laws were founded on. I’m betting law doesn’t rely solely on Latin but those old Brit usages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voir_dire

    Reply
  65. Was it a small town? That really would be difficult. I had to look up voir dire because you aroused my curiosity. It’s more of our mangled English than anything, Latin to French to Anglo-Norman and probably written into all the British law texts our laws were founded on. I’m betting law doesn’t rely solely on Latin but those old Brit usages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voir_dire

    Reply
  66. I live in the US and have been called to serve on jury duty many times; however, I’m not a US citizen so thus have an automatic excuse. Strangely, I’ve been called far more times than my husband who is a citizen.

    Reply
  67. I live in the US and have been called to serve on jury duty many times; however, I’m not a US citizen so thus have an automatic excuse. Strangely, I’ve been called far more times than my husband who is a citizen.

    Reply
  68. I live in the US and have been called to serve on jury duty many times; however, I’m not a US citizen so thus have an automatic excuse. Strangely, I’ve been called far more times than my husband who is a citizen.

    Reply
  69. I live in the US and have been called to serve on jury duty many times; however, I’m not a US citizen so thus have an automatic excuse. Strangely, I’ve been called far more times than my husband who is a citizen.

    Reply
  70. I live in the US and have been called to serve on jury duty many times; however, I’m not a US citizen so thus have an automatic excuse. Strangely, I’ve been called far more times than my husband who is a citizen.

    Reply
  71. I served on a jury that deadlocked. We divided into two camps early and the only thing we could all agree on was that the prosecution probably shouldn’t have brought the case!

    Reply
  72. I served on a jury that deadlocked. We divided into two camps early and the only thing we could all agree on was that the prosecution probably shouldn’t have brought the case!

    Reply
  73. I served on a jury that deadlocked. We divided into two camps early and the only thing we could all agree on was that the prosecution probably shouldn’t have brought the case!

    Reply
  74. I served on a jury that deadlocked. We divided into two camps early and the only thing we could all agree on was that the prosecution probably shouldn’t have brought the case!

    Reply
  75. I served on a jury that deadlocked. We divided into two camps early and the only thing we could all agree on was that the prosecution probably shouldn’t have brought the case!

    Reply
  76. I don’t like to think of myself as a stereotype, but…
    Once I was called for a jury on something that sounded like an interesting case involving computer fraud.The two US attorneys were women, and my first thought was, “Great! The US attorneys are women.”
    My second thought was, “That’s a great dress she’s wearing. I wonder where she got it?”
    To my regret, I didn’t end up on the jury.

    Reply
  77. I don’t like to think of myself as a stereotype, but…
    Once I was called for a jury on something that sounded like an interesting case involving computer fraud.The two US attorneys were women, and my first thought was, “Great! The US attorneys are women.”
    My second thought was, “That’s a great dress she’s wearing. I wonder where she got it?”
    To my regret, I didn’t end up on the jury.

    Reply
  78. I don’t like to think of myself as a stereotype, but…
    Once I was called for a jury on something that sounded like an interesting case involving computer fraud.The two US attorneys were women, and my first thought was, “Great! The US attorneys are women.”
    My second thought was, “That’s a great dress she’s wearing. I wonder where she got it?”
    To my regret, I didn’t end up on the jury.

    Reply
  79. I don’t like to think of myself as a stereotype, but…
    Once I was called for a jury on something that sounded like an interesting case involving computer fraud.The two US attorneys were women, and my first thought was, “Great! The US attorneys are women.”
    My second thought was, “That’s a great dress she’s wearing. I wonder where she got it?”
    To my regret, I didn’t end up on the jury.

    Reply
  80. I don’t like to think of myself as a stereotype, but…
    Once I was called for a jury on something that sounded like an interesting case involving computer fraud.The two US attorneys were women, and my first thought was, “Great! The US attorneys are women.”
    My second thought was, “That’s a great dress she’s wearing. I wonder where she got it?”
    To my regret, I didn’t end up on the jury.

    Reply
  81. In my nearly deadlocked case we found a way around the deadlock; but we too thought the trial shouldn’t have happened.

    Reply
  82. In my nearly deadlocked case we found a way around the deadlock; but we too thought the trial shouldn’t have happened.

    Reply
  83. In my nearly deadlocked case we found a way around the deadlock; but we too thought the trial shouldn’t have happened.

    Reply
  84. In my nearly deadlocked case we found a way around the deadlock; but we too thought the trial shouldn’t have happened.

    Reply
  85. In my nearly deadlocked case we found a way around the deadlock; but we too thought the trial shouldn’t have happened.

    Reply
  86. Today I had jury duty and coincidently read your blog. I was glad to miss out on this trial although originally it seemed a good opportunity for civic duty. However, it involved multiple counts of child sexual assault and multiple victims. Fortunately I was not selected, as even voire dir was stressful.

    Reply
  87. Today I had jury duty and coincidently read your blog. I was glad to miss out on this trial although originally it seemed a good opportunity for civic duty. However, it involved multiple counts of child sexual assault and multiple victims. Fortunately I was not selected, as even voire dir was stressful.

    Reply
  88. Today I had jury duty and coincidently read your blog. I was glad to miss out on this trial although originally it seemed a good opportunity for civic duty. However, it involved multiple counts of child sexual assault and multiple victims. Fortunately I was not selected, as even voire dir was stressful.

    Reply
  89. Today I had jury duty and coincidently read your blog. I was glad to miss out on this trial although originally it seemed a good opportunity for civic duty. However, it involved multiple counts of child sexual assault and multiple victims. Fortunately I was not selected, as even voire dir was stressful.

    Reply
  90. Today I had jury duty and coincidently read your blog. I was glad to miss out on this trial although originally it seemed a good opportunity for civic duty. However, it involved multiple counts of child sexual assault and multiple victims. Fortunately I was not selected, as even voire dir was stressful.

    Reply
  91. Oh my, that would have been a painful one to listen to. Im glad youre out of it but really sorry that any jury has to listen to such horror.
    I had to reschedule until today. They still havent selected the full jury but Im already prejudiced against the senile defense lawyer. 😉

    Reply
  92. Oh my, that would have been a painful one to listen to. Im glad youre out of it but really sorry that any jury has to listen to such horror.
    I had to reschedule until today. They still havent selected the full jury but Im already prejudiced against the senile defense lawyer. 😉

    Reply
  93. Oh my, that would have been a painful one to listen to. Im glad youre out of it but really sorry that any jury has to listen to such horror.
    I had to reschedule until today. They still havent selected the full jury but Im already prejudiced against the senile defense lawyer. 😉

    Reply
  94. Oh my, that would have been a painful one to listen to. Im glad youre out of it but really sorry that any jury has to listen to such horror.
    I had to reschedule until today. They still havent selected the full jury but Im already prejudiced against the senile defense lawyer. 😉

    Reply
  95. Oh my, that would have been a painful one to listen to. Im glad youre out of it but really sorry that any jury has to listen to such horror.
    I had to reschedule until today. They still havent selected the full jury but Im already prejudiced against the senile defense lawyer. 😉

    Reply

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