Historically Hot: Part Two

Kingsfavorite From Susan Scott:

As the summer winds down, I’m keeping my promise to post another selection of portraits of historical gentlemen that might deserve a heroic place on some future cover. 

Many writers (and probably more than a few readers as well) keep pictures of actors, musicians, athletes, and other assorted handsome fellows to serve as inspiration as they create their male characters. Personally, I’ve never been able to link to Hollywood or BBC faces –– no matter how gorgeous they may be, or skilled as actors, they always strike me somehow as too “modern”, too much a part of our time and not the past.

I remember seeing an interview with the director of the Master and Commander, (the movie based on the glorious Patrick O’Brian novels), and how he sent his casting director all over the world to find the right faces to fill Jack Aubrey’s crew of sailors.  He believed that most modern Americans and English have an acquired sense of how to present themselves to a camera, including that infamous fixed smile that we all learn from infancy onward.  He wanted men who’d never learned that kind of awareness, men with the same kind of media-innocence that an early 19th century English sailor would have had, and to find it, he’d proudly drawn most of his extras from remote villages in central Europe.  Of course I wondered what happened once he put his untutored innocents on a movie set with Russell Crowe as their captain, but hey, I appreciate what he was trying to do.

For me, paintings from the era of my story can set all kinds of cogs and wheels spinning in my imagination.  Portraits in particular can inspire me: truly, as the old saying goes, one pictures can be worth a thousand words.

So here’s the second half of my summer “gallery” –– plus a special bonus at the end.

Sir_thomas_pagant Vice-Admiral the Honorable Sir Charles Paget (1778-1839, painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence), left

Charles Paget was one of those famous younger sons of an earl who “made good”, beginning a career in the Royal Navy at twelve, making captain of a sloop-of-war before his twentieth birthday, and after a celebrated career, finally becoming a vice-admiral and serving as a member of Parliament.  He also seems to have worn those golden epaulets with stylish aplomb.

Lords John Stuart (1621-1644) and his brother Lord Bernard364pxsiranthonyvandycklordjohnstuar Stuart (1622-1645), painted about 1638 by Anthony Van Dyck, right

Reader Virginia mentioned this double-portrait in response to my last blog, and my lament about how few blonde men were to be found in portraits of the past.  I’d already planned to use this one, but Virginia, you get credit, too! J  Blonde these two brothers certainly were, and obviously proud of their flowing golden locks.  Younger sons of the Duke of Lennox, they sat for this picture shortly before going to Europe for a three-year finish to their education as young gentlemen.  They seem destined for long lives of happy privilege, but alas, Oliver Cromwell and the English Civil Wars had other plans.  Both brothers served in Charles I’s royalist army, and both were killed in action in their early twenties.

Durer_in_hat_jpg Self-portrait of Albrecht Durer (1471-1528), painted in 1498, left

Wench Susan King (far more knowledgable in Northern European art history than I!) suggested this self-portrait of the German artist as another example of a fair-haired man.  Durer had just returned from his first, dazzling trip to Italy, and the influence of the gaudy south is clear not only in the pose he chose for himself, but in his elegant, stylish dress –– and check out the jaunty black-and-white cap!  I know his side-long glance resulted from studying his own reflection, but I still like the way it gives his expression a certain cynical watchfulness.  Legend has it that this portrait was considered such an excellent likeness that Durer’s dog barked in recognition when he saw it.  Whether that’s true or not, it’s a striking picture of a striking man.


William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (1779-1848) painted in 1805 by Sir Thomas Lawrence, rightWilliamlamb2ndviscountmelbourne_2

Later in his life, William Lamb would rise to become Prime Minister, but in this portrait he’s shown as romantically windswept. There’s a certain fashionable, haunted  melancholy in his eyes, and he has good reason for it, too: around the time Lamb sat for Lawrence, he wed the famously unstable poet Lady Caroline Lamb, marking one of the most doomed marriages in English history.  The main reason for this marital disaster, of course, is the gentleman below, Lord Byron, Lady Caroline’s notorious lover.


Byron_to_use George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron
(1788-1824) painted in 1813 by Richard Westall, left

Ahh, who doesn’t know Lord Byron. the quintessential romantic bad-boy hero, so perfectly described by Lady Caroline Lamb as  being “mad, bad, and dangerous to know”? He was always on my list, but thanks to both Tal and Wench Loretta for suggesting him as well.  Byron was a celebrity before there were celebrities, as famous for his wild living, extravagant debts, international exploits, and love affairs as he was for his writing. No wonder he was nearly irresistible to women and men alike: that profiles says it all.


Michael Phelps (b. 1985), rightMichaelphelps_speedo_2

Okay, so this isn’t exactly fine art, but surely Michael Phelps deserves a place in this list for making history as well as living it?  Beyond all those record-setting Olympic gold medals, he’s already demonstrated a fierce determination to strive for his personal best coupled with a humble charm in the middle of the media circus.  He’s devoted to his mom, his sisters, and his bulldog, and he’s not afraid to cry during the National Anthem.  Not bad for only twenty-three!

So do any of these gentlemen inspire you?  Or do you “see” a more contemporary face (Clark Gable, Johnny Depp, James McAvoy, Javier Bardem) while you read or write?

And ‘fess up, along with me: did you put aside books this week in favor of watching the Olympics?

125 thoughts on “Historically Hot: Part Two”

  1. Regarding the Olympics question, I managed to read Johnanna Lindsey’s NO CHOICE BUT SEDUCTION during the week, which is about 3 books fewer than what I’d normally read. I went to camp this weekend (Thursday-Sunday), and I only got through 2 of the 4 books I brought because we spent each night watching Michael Phelps and gymnastics.
    The Olympics are really cutting into my summer reading!

    Reply
  2. Regarding the Olympics question, I managed to read Johnanna Lindsey’s NO CHOICE BUT SEDUCTION during the week, which is about 3 books fewer than what I’d normally read. I went to camp this weekend (Thursday-Sunday), and I only got through 2 of the 4 books I brought because we spent each night watching Michael Phelps and gymnastics.
    The Olympics are really cutting into my summer reading!

    Reply
  3. Regarding the Olympics question, I managed to read Johnanna Lindsey’s NO CHOICE BUT SEDUCTION during the week, which is about 3 books fewer than what I’d normally read. I went to camp this weekend (Thursday-Sunday), and I only got through 2 of the 4 books I brought because we spent each night watching Michael Phelps and gymnastics.
    The Olympics are really cutting into my summer reading!

    Reply
  4. Regarding the Olympics question, I managed to read Johnanna Lindsey’s NO CHOICE BUT SEDUCTION during the week, which is about 3 books fewer than what I’d normally read. I went to camp this weekend (Thursday-Sunday), and I only got through 2 of the 4 books I brought because we spent each night watching Michael Phelps and gymnastics.
    The Olympics are really cutting into my summer reading!

    Reply
  5. Regarding the Olympics question, I managed to read Johnanna Lindsey’s NO CHOICE BUT SEDUCTION during the week, which is about 3 books fewer than what I’d normally read. I went to camp this weekend (Thursday-Sunday), and I only got through 2 of the 4 books I brought because we spent each night watching Michael Phelps and gymnastics.
    The Olympics are really cutting into my summer reading!

    Reply
  6. I’ve long been a fan of Durer, both his other works and his self-portrait. 😉 And Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, has always resided in my mind as an historical hottie. This portrait of him rather defines “dashing,” doesn’t it? http://astro.temple.edu/~gurwin/oliver_hazard_perry.jpg
    But there are admittedly some modern fellas who provide plenty of inspiration, too. Images of Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 Pride and Prejudice frequently come to mind, as does Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. *phew!*

    Reply
  7. I’ve long been a fan of Durer, both his other works and his self-portrait. 😉 And Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, has always resided in my mind as an historical hottie. This portrait of him rather defines “dashing,” doesn’t it? http://astro.temple.edu/~gurwin/oliver_hazard_perry.jpg
    But there are admittedly some modern fellas who provide plenty of inspiration, too. Images of Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 Pride and Prejudice frequently come to mind, as does Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. *phew!*

    Reply
  8. I’ve long been a fan of Durer, both his other works and his self-portrait. 😉 And Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, has always resided in my mind as an historical hottie. This portrait of him rather defines “dashing,” doesn’t it? http://astro.temple.edu/~gurwin/oliver_hazard_perry.jpg
    But there are admittedly some modern fellas who provide plenty of inspiration, too. Images of Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 Pride and Prejudice frequently come to mind, as does Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. *phew!*

    Reply
  9. I’ve long been a fan of Durer, both his other works and his self-portrait. 😉 And Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, has always resided in my mind as an historical hottie. This portrait of him rather defines “dashing,” doesn’t it? http://astro.temple.edu/~gurwin/oliver_hazard_perry.jpg
    But there are admittedly some modern fellas who provide plenty of inspiration, too. Images of Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 Pride and Prejudice frequently come to mind, as does Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. *phew!*

    Reply
  10. I’ve long been a fan of Durer, both his other works and his self-portrait. 😉 And Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the Battle of Lake Erie, has always resided in my mind as an historical hottie. This portrait of him rather defines “dashing,” doesn’t it? http://astro.temple.edu/~gurwin/oliver_hazard_perry.jpg
    But there are admittedly some modern fellas who provide plenty of inspiration, too. Images of Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 Pride and Prejudice frequently come to mind, as does Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. *phew!*

    Reply
  11. Re the search for “authentic” faces for the movie “Master & Commander” reminds me of a recent film (or maybe it was a TV series about the American Civil War) where they got most of the extras locally. They turned out to more authentic than contemporary American actors would be because they didn’t have the perfect teeth that are so common these days for most middle class and above Americans. I think that’s another reason our smiles have changed; unlike Josephine, we don’t have to hide crooked teeth.
    I love the portraits. The one of Byron was here in Washington at our National Portrait Gallery as part of a temporary exhibit of paintings from the British NPG. Quite frankly I stopped and stared. All I could think of was that I’d have been one of his followers myself — those looks accompanied by his poetic genius were have been wellnight irresistible.
    And the portrait of the Lords Stuart is a tragic tale told just by the dates: each of them dead at 23. One can only imagine how their mother’s heart must have broken (assuming she herself was still alive). I think I’ll need to Google more information

    Reply
  12. Re the search for “authentic” faces for the movie “Master & Commander” reminds me of a recent film (or maybe it was a TV series about the American Civil War) where they got most of the extras locally. They turned out to more authentic than contemporary American actors would be because they didn’t have the perfect teeth that are so common these days for most middle class and above Americans. I think that’s another reason our smiles have changed; unlike Josephine, we don’t have to hide crooked teeth.
    I love the portraits. The one of Byron was here in Washington at our National Portrait Gallery as part of a temporary exhibit of paintings from the British NPG. Quite frankly I stopped and stared. All I could think of was that I’d have been one of his followers myself — those looks accompanied by his poetic genius were have been wellnight irresistible.
    And the portrait of the Lords Stuart is a tragic tale told just by the dates: each of them dead at 23. One can only imagine how their mother’s heart must have broken (assuming she herself was still alive). I think I’ll need to Google more information

    Reply
  13. Re the search for “authentic” faces for the movie “Master & Commander” reminds me of a recent film (or maybe it was a TV series about the American Civil War) where they got most of the extras locally. They turned out to more authentic than contemporary American actors would be because they didn’t have the perfect teeth that are so common these days for most middle class and above Americans. I think that’s another reason our smiles have changed; unlike Josephine, we don’t have to hide crooked teeth.
    I love the portraits. The one of Byron was here in Washington at our National Portrait Gallery as part of a temporary exhibit of paintings from the British NPG. Quite frankly I stopped and stared. All I could think of was that I’d have been one of his followers myself — those looks accompanied by his poetic genius were have been wellnight irresistible.
    And the portrait of the Lords Stuart is a tragic tale told just by the dates: each of them dead at 23. One can only imagine how their mother’s heart must have broken (assuming she herself was still alive). I think I’ll need to Google more information

    Reply
  14. Re the search for “authentic” faces for the movie “Master & Commander” reminds me of a recent film (or maybe it was a TV series about the American Civil War) where they got most of the extras locally. They turned out to more authentic than contemporary American actors would be because they didn’t have the perfect teeth that are so common these days for most middle class and above Americans. I think that’s another reason our smiles have changed; unlike Josephine, we don’t have to hide crooked teeth.
    I love the portraits. The one of Byron was here in Washington at our National Portrait Gallery as part of a temporary exhibit of paintings from the British NPG. Quite frankly I stopped and stared. All I could think of was that I’d have been one of his followers myself — those looks accompanied by his poetic genius were have been wellnight irresistible.
    And the portrait of the Lords Stuart is a tragic tale told just by the dates: each of them dead at 23. One can only imagine how their mother’s heart must have broken (assuming she herself was still alive). I think I’ll need to Google more information

    Reply
  15. Re the search for “authentic” faces for the movie “Master & Commander” reminds me of a recent film (or maybe it was a TV series about the American Civil War) where they got most of the extras locally. They turned out to more authentic than contemporary American actors would be because they didn’t have the perfect teeth that are so common these days for most middle class and above Americans. I think that’s another reason our smiles have changed; unlike Josephine, we don’t have to hide crooked teeth.
    I love the portraits. The one of Byron was here in Washington at our National Portrait Gallery as part of a temporary exhibit of paintings from the British NPG. Quite frankly I stopped and stared. All I could think of was that I’d have been one of his followers myself — those looks accompanied by his poetic genius were have been wellnight irresistible.
    And the portrait of the Lords Stuart is a tragic tale told just by the dates: each of them dead at 23. One can only imagine how their mother’s heart must have broken (assuming she herself was still alive). I think I’ll need to Google more information

    Reply
  16. Some fine looking fellows, there, Susan S. I think contemporary & historical men sort of blend in my mind, whether I’m writing or reading. Or maybe I mean the inspiration comes from two sources: a portrait encountered in research & images of an actor or model. But blonds are definitely harder to find. Thank you for the excellent selections!

    Reply
  17. Some fine looking fellows, there, Susan S. I think contemporary & historical men sort of blend in my mind, whether I’m writing or reading. Or maybe I mean the inspiration comes from two sources: a portrait encountered in research & images of an actor or model. But blonds are definitely harder to find. Thank you for the excellent selections!

    Reply
  18. Some fine looking fellows, there, Susan S. I think contemporary & historical men sort of blend in my mind, whether I’m writing or reading. Or maybe I mean the inspiration comes from two sources: a portrait encountered in research & images of an actor or model. But blonds are definitely harder to find. Thank you for the excellent selections!

    Reply
  19. Some fine looking fellows, there, Susan S. I think contemporary & historical men sort of blend in my mind, whether I’m writing or reading. Or maybe I mean the inspiration comes from two sources: a portrait encountered in research & images of an actor or model. But blonds are definitely harder to find. Thank you for the excellent selections!

    Reply
  20. Some fine looking fellows, there, Susan S. I think contemporary & historical men sort of blend in my mind, whether I’m writing or reading. Or maybe I mean the inspiration comes from two sources: a portrait encountered in research & images of an actor or model. But blonds are definitely harder to find. Thank you for the excellent selections!

    Reply
  21. Oh, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for William Lamb. And my heart does go pitter-patter for GG, Lord Byron. In my own writing, I confess that James Purefoy, and Sean Bean inspire me, as well as Clive Owen, and Richard Armitage. Although after seeing Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Javier Bardem has joined the list.
    As for the Olympics, I read during the commercial breaks!

    Reply
  22. Oh, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for William Lamb. And my heart does go pitter-patter for GG, Lord Byron. In my own writing, I confess that James Purefoy, and Sean Bean inspire me, as well as Clive Owen, and Richard Armitage. Although after seeing Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Javier Bardem has joined the list.
    As for the Olympics, I read during the commercial breaks!

    Reply
  23. Oh, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for William Lamb. And my heart does go pitter-patter for GG, Lord Byron. In my own writing, I confess that James Purefoy, and Sean Bean inspire me, as well as Clive Owen, and Richard Armitage. Although after seeing Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Javier Bardem has joined the list.
    As for the Olympics, I read during the commercial breaks!

    Reply
  24. Oh, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for William Lamb. And my heart does go pitter-patter for GG, Lord Byron. In my own writing, I confess that James Purefoy, and Sean Bean inspire me, as well as Clive Owen, and Richard Armitage. Although after seeing Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Javier Bardem has joined the list.
    As for the Olympics, I read during the commercial breaks!

    Reply
  25. Oh, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for William Lamb. And my heart does go pitter-patter for GG, Lord Byron. In my own writing, I confess that James Purefoy, and Sean Bean inspire me, as well as Clive Owen, and Richard Armitage. Although after seeing Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Javier Bardem has joined the list.
    As for the Olympics, I read during the commercial breaks!

    Reply
  26. You know, I keep looking at those pictures and they’re all just a tad too…effeminate looking for me. I like my men big, brawny and bad. And my heroes in my stories reflect that I think.
    It’s very hard to find the right pictures when I’m writing too. I have an idea of what my hero looks like before I find the picture, which it probably the wrong way to do that but…
    Maybe I’m just totally bass-ackward. Wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of that! 😉

    Reply
  27. You know, I keep looking at those pictures and they’re all just a tad too…effeminate looking for me. I like my men big, brawny and bad. And my heroes in my stories reflect that I think.
    It’s very hard to find the right pictures when I’m writing too. I have an idea of what my hero looks like before I find the picture, which it probably the wrong way to do that but…
    Maybe I’m just totally bass-ackward. Wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of that! 😉

    Reply
  28. You know, I keep looking at those pictures and they’re all just a tad too…effeminate looking for me. I like my men big, brawny and bad. And my heroes in my stories reflect that I think.
    It’s very hard to find the right pictures when I’m writing too. I have an idea of what my hero looks like before I find the picture, which it probably the wrong way to do that but…
    Maybe I’m just totally bass-ackward. Wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of that! 😉

    Reply
  29. You know, I keep looking at those pictures and they’re all just a tad too…effeminate looking for me. I like my men big, brawny and bad. And my heroes in my stories reflect that I think.
    It’s very hard to find the right pictures when I’m writing too. I have an idea of what my hero looks like before I find the picture, which it probably the wrong way to do that but…
    Maybe I’m just totally bass-ackward. Wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of that! 😉

    Reply
  30. You know, I keep looking at those pictures and they’re all just a tad too…effeminate looking for me. I like my men big, brawny and bad. And my heroes in my stories reflect that I think.
    It’s very hard to find the right pictures when I’m writing too. I have an idea of what my hero looks like before I find the picture, which it probably the wrong way to do that but…
    Maybe I’m just totally bass-ackward. Wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of that! 😉

    Reply
  31. Theo, I don’t think you’re bass-ackward. Or if you are, so am I. The people are conjured in my brain, and then maybe I’ll see someone who fits the bill, but usually, the person in my mind is a blend of several people. But, ya know, that swimmer guy looks brawny enough to me. I’ve always liked swimmer’s muscles. Strong but not bulky.

    Reply
  32. Theo, I don’t think you’re bass-ackward. Or if you are, so am I. The people are conjured in my brain, and then maybe I’ll see someone who fits the bill, but usually, the person in my mind is a blend of several people. But, ya know, that swimmer guy looks brawny enough to me. I’ve always liked swimmer’s muscles. Strong but not bulky.

    Reply
  33. Theo, I don’t think you’re bass-ackward. Or if you are, so am I. The people are conjured in my brain, and then maybe I’ll see someone who fits the bill, but usually, the person in my mind is a blend of several people. But, ya know, that swimmer guy looks brawny enough to me. I’ve always liked swimmer’s muscles. Strong but not bulky.

    Reply
  34. Theo, I don’t think you’re bass-ackward. Or if you are, so am I. The people are conjured in my brain, and then maybe I’ll see someone who fits the bill, but usually, the person in my mind is a blend of several people. But, ya know, that swimmer guy looks brawny enough to me. I’ve always liked swimmer’s muscles. Strong but not bulky.

    Reply
  35. Theo, I don’t think you’re bass-ackward. Or if you are, so am I. The people are conjured in my brain, and then maybe I’ll see someone who fits the bill, but usually, the person in my mind is a blend of several people. But, ya know, that swimmer guy looks brawny enough to me. I’ve always liked swimmer’s muscles. Strong but not bulky.

    Reply
  36. And how about this aristocratic scientist, remembered for his appearance in a famous clerihew:
    Sir Humphry Davy
    Abominated gravy.
    He lived in the odium
    Of having discovered sodium.
    http://tinyurl.com/5dwyy2
    And the Cavalier poet Sir John Suckling, as painted by Van Dyck:
    http://tinyurl.com/5bs94t
    WHY so pale and wan, fond lover?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Will, when looking well can’t move her,
    Looking ill prevail?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
    Saying nothing do ‘t?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Quit, quit for shame! This will not move;
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!
    (He also invented cribbage, so they say.)

    Reply
  37. And how about this aristocratic scientist, remembered for his appearance in a famous clerihew:
    Sir Humphry Davy
    Abominated gravy.
    He lived in the odium
    Of having discovered sodium.
    http://tinyurl.com/5dwyy2
    And the Cavalier poet Sir John Suckling, as painted by Van Dyck:
    http://tinyurl.com/5bs94t
    WHY so pale and wan, fond lover?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Will, when looking well can’t move her,
    Looking ill prevail?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
    Saying nothing do ‘t?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Quit, quit for shame! This will not move;
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!
    (He also invented cribbage, so they say.)

    Reply
  38. And how about this aristocratic scientist, remembered for his appearance in a famous clerihew:
    Sir Humphry Davy
    Abominated gravy.
    He lived in the odium
    Of having discovered sodium.
    http://tinyurl.com/5dwyy2
    And the Cavalier poet Sir John Suckling, as painted by Van Dyck:
    http://tinyurl.com/5bs94t
    WHY so pale and wan, fond lover?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Will, when looking well can’t move her,
    Looking ill prevail?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
    Saying nothing do ‘t?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Quit, quit for shame! This will not move;
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!
    (He also invented cribbage, so they say.)

    Reply
  39. And how about this aristocratic scientist, remembered for his appearance in a famous clerihew:
    Sir Humphry Davy
    Abominated gravy.
    He lived in the odium
    Of having discovered sodium.
    http://tinyurl.com/5dwyy2
    And the Cavalier poet Sir John Suckling, as painted by Van Dyck:
    http://tinyurl.com/5bs94t
    WHY so pale and wan, fond lover?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Will, when looking well can’t move her,
    Looking ill prevail?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
    Saying nothing do ‘t?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Quit, quit for shame! This will not move;
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!
    (He also invented cribbage, so they say.)

    Reply
  40. And how about this aristocratic scientist, remembered for his appearance in a famous clerihew:
    Sir Humphry Davy
    Abominated gravy.
    He lived in the odium
    Of having discovered sodium.
    http://tinyurl.com/5dwyy2
    And the Cavalier poet Sir John Suckling, as painted by Van Dyck:
    http://tinyurl.com/5bs94t
    WHY so pale and wan, fond lover?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Will, when looking well can’t move her,
    Looking ill prevail?
    Prithee, why so pale?
    Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
    Saying nothing do ‘t?
    Prithee, why so mute?
    Quit, quit for shame! This will not move;
    This cannot take her.
    If of herself she will not love,
    Nothing can make her:
    The devil take her!
    (He also invented cribbage, so they say.)

    Reply
  41. Note: The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?

    Reply
  42. Note: The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?

    Reply
  43. Note: The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?

    Reply
  44. Note: The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?

    Reply
  45. Note: The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?

    Reply
  46. Loretta,
    Swimmers (most anyway) are too lean for me. I don’t know. I’m more…my DH is 6’5″, 290+ pounds of crush-your-hand-inadvertently-when-I-shake-it strong, almost black hair, obsidian eyes…and he used to bench press almost twice his weight. (alas, now that we’ve both hi–passed the half century mark he doesn’t do that anymore) But he was all raw muscle when we married and I realized even then, that’s the type I was always drawn to.
    I think one of the things I have a problem with in all of the posted pictures (yours too, tal!) is the coiffured hair. If a guy’s gonna have long hair, this is more my idea of what it looks like:
    http://tiny.cc/GjUzs
    Of course, I’d take that man any day… *sigh*
    But it’s natural looking, not neatly styled so each tiny curl goes a certain way.
    I think maybe I’d better shut up now…

    Reply
  47. Loretta,
    Swimmers (most anyway) are too lean for me. I don’t know. I’m more…my DH is 6’5″, 290+ pounds of crush-your-hand-inadvertently-when-I-shake-it strong, almost black hair, obsidian eyes…and he used to bench press almost twice his weight. (alas, now that we’ve both hi–passed the half century mark he doesn’t do that anymore) But he was all raw muscle when we married and I realized even then, that’s the type I was always drawn to.
    I think one of the things I have a problem with in all of the posted pictures (yours too, tal!) is the coiffured hair. If a guy’s gonna have long hair, this is more my idea of what it looks like:
    http://tiny.cc/GjUzs
    Of course, I’d take that man any day… *sigh*
    But it’s natural looking, not neatly styled so each tiny curl goes a certain way.
    I think maybe I’d better shut up now…

    Reply
  48. Loretta,
    Swimmers (most anyway) are too lean for me. I don’t know. I’m more…my DH is 6’5″, 290+ pounds of crush-your-hand-inadvertently-when-I-shake-it strong, almost black hair, obsidian eyes…and he used to bench press almost twice his weight. (alas, now that we’ve both hi–passed the half century mark he doesn’t do that anymore) But he was all raw muscle when we married and I realized even then, that’s the type I was always drawn to.
    I think one of the things I have a problem with in all of the posted pictures (yours too, tal!) is the coiffured hair. If a guy’s gonna have long hair, this is more my idea of what it looks like:
    http://tiny.cc/GjUzs
    Of course, I’d take that man any day… *sigh*
    But it’s natural looking, not neatly styled so each tiny curl goes a certain way.
    I think maybe I’d better shut up now…

    Reply
  49. Loretta,
    Swimmers (most anyway) are too lean for me. I don’t know. I’m more…my DH is 6’5″, 290+ pounds of crush-your-hand-inadvertently-when-I-shake-it strong, almost black hair, obsidian eyes…and he used to bench press almost twice his weight. (alas, now that we’ve both hi–passed the half century mark he doesn’t do that anymore) But he was all raw muscle when we married and I realized even then, that’s the type I was always drawn to.
    I think one of the things I have a problem with in all of the posted pictures (yours too, tal!) is the coiffured hair. If a guy’s gonna have long hair, this is more my idea of what it looks like:
    http://tiny.cc/GjUzs
    Of course, I’d take that man any day… *sigh*
    But it’s natural looking, not neatly styled so each tiny curl goes a certain way.
    I think maybe I’d better shut up now…

    Reply
  50. Loretta,
    Swimmers (most anyway) are too lean for me. I don’t know. I’m more…my DH is 6’5″, 290+ pounds of crush-your-hand-inadvertently-when-I-shake-it strong, almost black hair, obsidian eyes…and he used to bench press almost twice his weight. (alas, now that we’ve both hi–passed the half century mark he doesn’t do that anymore) But he was all raw muscle when we married and I realized even then, that’s the type I was always drawn to.
    I think one of the things I have a problem with in all of the posted pictures (yours too, tal!) is the coiffured hair. If a guy’s gonna have long hair, this is more my idea of what it looks like:
    http://tiny.cc/GjUzs
    Of course, I’d take that man any day… *sigh*
    But it’s natural looking, not neatly styled so each tiny curl goes a certain way.
    I think maybe I’d better shut up now…

    Reply
  51. Susan here (finally), still on the road and wrestling as a “guest” on a pc that’s not her own – oh, please, please return me to Apple-land soon!
    Lindsey – The Olympics can be a powerful draw. I’ve been at the beach, and though we spent the days outside, after dinner that televised-torch seemed always to be beckoning….good thing it’s only every four years, right? *g*
    Susan – I hadn’t seen the Paget brother before. Whoa! Obviously this family was born to wear uniforms.
    Rachel – I know all about Oliver Hazard Perry! Earlier in my long & winding (or perhaps that’s long-winded? *g*) writing career, I wrote a series of books about a fictitious seafaring family from Newport. In that context, OHP is pretty hard to overlook, and the dashing portrait in your link makes him hard to overlook in other ways, too.
    Susan/DC – You’re right about the teeth. Modern Americans are so accustomed to having things “fixed” that we’d probably be shocked by a group of average folk of the past, just as they in turn would likely be dazzled by a pack of modern, middle-class teenagers who’ve had the benefit of good diets, dentistry, orthodontists, dermatologists, and other health care. Though the historical-moms would probably look at all those flawless complexions and worry because none would have the scars to prove they’d already had smallpox.
    I agree with you about the sad fates of the Stuart brothers. Civil wars have to be the cruelest, both to countries and to the families who suffer the losses.

    Reply
  52. Susan here (finally), still on the road and wrestling as a “guest” on a pc that’s not her own – oh, please, please return me to Apple-land soon!
    Lindsey – The Olympics can be a powerful draw. I’ve been at the beach, and though we spent the days outside, after dinner that televised-torch seemed always to be beckoning….good thing it’s only every four years, right? *g*
    Susan – I hadn’t seen the Paget brother before. Whoa! Obviously this family was born to wear uniforms.
    Rachel – I know all about Oliver Hazard Perry! Earlier in my long & winding (or perhaps that’s long-winded? *g*) writing career, I wrote a series of books about a fictitious seafaring family from Newport. In that context, OHP is pretty hard to overlook, and the dashing portrait in your link makes him hard to overlook in other ways, too.
    Susan/DC – You’re right about the teeth. Modern Americans are so accustomed to having things “fixed” that we’d probably be shocked by a group of average folk of the past, just as they in turn would likely be dazzled by a pack of modern, middle-class teenagers who’ve had the benefit of good diets, dentistry, orthodontists, dermatologists, and other health care. Though the historical-moms would probably look at all those flawless complexions and worry because none would have the scars to prove they’d already had smallpox.
    I agree with you about the sad fates of the Stuart brothers. Civil wars have to be the cruelest, both to countries and to the families who suffer the losses.

    Reply
  53. Susan here (finally), still on the road and wrestling as a “guest” on a pc that’s not her own – oh, please, please return me to Apple-land soon!
    Lindsey – The Olympics can be a powerful draw. I’ve been at the beach, and though we spent the days outside, after dinner that televised-torch seemed always to be beckoning….good thing it’s only every four years, right? *g*
    Susan – I hadn’t seen the Paget brother before. Whoa! Obviously this family was born to wear uniforms.
    Rachel – I know all about Oliver Hazard Perry! Earlier in my long & winding (or perhaps that’s long-winded? *g*) writing career, I wrote a series of books about a fictitious seafaring family from Newport. In that context, OHP is pretty hard to overlook, and the dashing portrait in your link makes him hard to overlook in other ways, too.
    Susan/DC – You’re right about the teeth. Modern Americans are so accustomed to having things “fixed” that we’d probably be shocked by a group of average folk of the past, just as they in turn would likely be dazzled by a pack of modern, middle-class teenagers who’ve had the benefit of good diets, dentistry, orthodontists, dermatologists, and other health care. Though the historical-moms would probably look at all those flawless complexions and worry because none would have the scars to prove they’d already had smallpox.
    I agree with you about the sad fates of the Stuart brothers. Civil wars have to be the cruelest, both to countries and to the families who suffer the losses.

    Reply
  54. Susan here (finally), still on the road and wrestling as a “guest” on a pc that’s not her own – oh, please, please return me to Apple-land soon!
    Lindsey – The Olympics can be a powerful draw. I’ve been at the beach, and though we spent the days outside, after dinner that televised-torch seemed always to be beckoning….good thing it’s only every four years, right? *g*
    Susan – I hadn’t seen the Paget brother before. Whoa! Obviously this family was born to wear uniforms.
    Rachel – I know all about Oliver Hazard Perry! Earlier in my long & winding (or perhaps that’s long-winded? *g*) writing career, I wrote a series of books about a fictitious seafaring family from Newport. In that context, OHP is pretty hard to overlook, and the dashing portrait in your link makes him hard to overlook in other ways, too.
    Susan/DC – You’re right about the teeth. Modern Americans are so accustomed to having things “fixed” that we’d probably be shocked by a group of average folk of the past, just as they in turn would likely be dazzled by a pack of modern, middle-class teenagers who’ve had the benefit of good diets, dentistry, orthodontists, dermatologists, and other health care. Though the historical-moms would probably look at all those flawless complexions and worry because none would have the scars to prove they’d already had smallpox.
    I agree with you about the sad fates of the Stuart brothers. Civil wars have to be the cruelest, both to countries and to the families who suffer the losses.

    Reply
  55. Susan here (finally), still on the road and wrestling as a “guest” on a pc that’s not her own – oh, please, please return me to Apple-land soon!
    Lindsey – The Olympics can be a powerful draw. I’ve been at the beach, and though we spent the days outside, after dinner that televised-torch seemed always to be beckoning….good thing it’s only every four years, right? *g*
    Susan – I hadn’t seen the Paget brother before. Whoa! Obviously this family was born to wear uniforms.
    Rachel – I know all about Oliver Hazard Perry! Earlier in my long & winding (or perhaps that’s long-winded? *g*) writing career, I wrote a series of books about a fictitious seafaring family from Newport. In that context, OHP is pretty hard to overlook, and the dashing portrait in your link makes him hard to overlook in other ways, too.
    Susan/DC – You’re right about the teeth. Modern Americans are so accustomed to having things “fixed” that we’d probably be shocked by a group of average folk of the past, just as they in turn would likely be dazzled by a pack of modern, middle-class teenagers who’ve had the benefit of good diets, dentistry, orthodontists, dermatologists, and other health care. Though the historical-moms would probably look at all those flawless complexions and worry because none would have the scars to prove they’d already had smallpox.
    I agree with you about the sad fates of the Stuart brothers. Civil wars have to be the cruelest, both to countries and to the families who suffer the losses.

    Reply
  56. Susan again:
    Loretta – I knew as long as I included Lord Byron, you’d be happy!
    Elizabeth – How could you not have a soft spot for William Lamb? Great lovers are always romantic; the ones they leave suffering in their wake aren’t as fortunate.
    As for what to do during all those endless Coke commercials – I knit whenever I watch the tube, so at least my hands are gainfully employed. I’m about half-way through a sky-blue cable-pattern cardigan, begun about the time of the opening ceremony, so it hasn’t been a complete waste. ☺
    Theo – No one’s bass-ackwards here at the Wenches! As the old saying goes, there’s someone for everyone, and that’s especially true in fantasy-land. Truly you’re blessed if your husband’s your dream-man made real!
    I will offer a defense for the portrait-guys, though. Portraits were painted for posterity, and because they were expensive, they’re almost always of gentlemen. Until very recently, even the buffest of gentlemen would consider being seen in public without his shirt, let alone be painted that way. I’m willing to bet that the military men in particular probably looked just fine in less formal situations!
    Also – that same caveat about the teeth and smiles would have to hold true in regard to muscles. Even the brawniest of Renaissance Hercules looks puny beside most of today’s college linebackers. Diet, trainers, weights and fitness machines have let men, uh, blossom.
    Women, too. I recently read an interview with the head of a legendary wedding-dress company. She said that few of today’s brides who wish to wear their mother’s or grandmother’s dresses can do so, at least not without heavy alterations. It’s not that girls today are necessarily taller or heavier, but because so many girls today work out, they’re broader in the shoulders and generally more muscular than even a generation or so ago. If that Renaissance Hercules couldn’t compete in a World’s Strongest Man competition, then the lusciously endowed Venuses of the past wouldn’t pass muster in the SI swimsuit issue, either. All those female nudes of the past, and nary a single six-pack in the lot….*g*

    Reply
  57. Susan again:
    Loretta – I knew as long as I included Lord Byron, you’d be happy!
    Elizabeth – How could you not have a soft spot for William Lamb? Great lovers are always romantic; the ones they leave suffering in their wake aren’t as fortunate.
    As for what to do during all those endless Coke commercials – I knit whenever I watch the tube, so at least my hands are gainfully employed. I’m about half-way through a sky-blue cable-pattern cardigan, begun about the time of the opening ceremony, so it hasn’t been a complete waste. ☺
    Theo – No one’s bass-ackwards here at the Wenches! As the old saying goes, there’s someone for everyone, and that’s especially true in fantasy-land. Truly you’re blessed if your husband’s your dream-man made real!
    I will offer a defense for the portrait-guys, though. Portraits were painted for posterity, and because they were expensive, they’re almost always of gentlemen. Until very recently, even the buffest of gentlemen would consider being seen in public without his shirt, let alone be painted that way. I’m willing to bet that the military men in particular probably looked just fine in less formal situations!
    Also – that same caveat about the teeth and smiles would have to hold true in regard to muscles. Even the brawniest of Renaissance Hercules looks puny beside most of today’s college linebackers. Diet, trainers, weights and fitness machines have let men, uh, blossom.
    Women, too. I recently read an interview with the head of a legendary wedding-dress company. She said that few of today’s brides who wish to wear their mother’s or grandmother’s dresses can do so, at least not without heavy alterations. It’s not that girls today are necessarily taller or heavier, but because so many girls today work out, they’re broader in the shoulders and generally more muscular than even a generation or so ago. If that Renaissance Hercules couldn’t compete in a World’s Strongest Man competition, then the lusciously endowed Venuses of the past wouldn’t pass muster in the SI swimsuit issue, either. All those female nudes of the past, and nary a single six-pack in the lot….*g*

    Reply
  58. Susan again:
    Loretta – I knew as long as I included Lord Byron, you’d be happy!
    Elizabeth – How could you not have a soft spot for William Lamb? Great lovers are always romantic; the ones they leave suffering in their wake aren’t as fortunate.
    As for what to do during all those endless Coke commercials – I knit whenever I watch the tube, so at least my hands are gainfully employed. I’m about half-way through a sky-blue cable-pattern cardigan, begun about the time of the opening ceremony, so it hasn’t been a complete waste. ☺
    Theo – No one’s bass-ackwards here at the Wenches! As the old saying goes, there’s someone for everyone, and that’s especially true in fantasy-land. Truly you’re blessed if your husband’s your dream-man made real!
    I will offer a defense for the portrait-guys, though. Portraits were painted for posterity, and because they were expensive, they’re almost always of gentlemen. Until very recently, even the buffest of gentlemen would consider being seen in public without his shirt, let alone be painted that way. I’m willing to bet that the military men in particular probably looked just fine in less formal situations!
    Also – that same caveat about the teeth and smiles would have to hold true in regard to muscles. Even the brawniest of Renaissance Hercules looks puny beside most of today’s college linebackers. Diet, trainers, weights and fitness machines have let men, uh, blossom.
    Women, too. I recently read an interview with the head of a legendary wedding-dress company. She said that few of today’s brides who wish to wear their mother’s or grandmother’s dresses can do so, at least not without heavy alterations. It’s not that girls today are necessarily taller or heavier, but because so many girls today work out, they’re broader in the shoulders and generally more muscular than even a generation or so ago. If that Renaissance Hercules couldn’t compete in a World’s Strongest Man competition, then the lusciously endowed Venuses of the past wouldn’t pass muster in the SI swimsuit issue, either. All those female nudes of the past, and nary a single six-pack in the lot….*g*

    Reply
  59. Susan again:
    Loretta – I knew as long as I included Lord Byron, you’d be happy!
    Elizabeth – How could you not have a soft spot for William Lamb? Great lovers are always romantic; the ones they leave suffering in their wake aren’t as fortunate.
    As for what to do during all those endless Coke commercials – I knit whenever I watch the tube, so at least my hands are gainfully employed. I’m about half-way through a sky-blue cable-pattern cardigan, begun about the time of the opening ceremony, so it hasn’t been a complete waste. ☺
    Theo – No one’s bass-ackwards here at the Wenches! As the old saying goes, there’s someone for everyone, and that’s especially true in fantasy-land. Truly you’re blessed if your husband’s your dream-man made real!
    I will offer a defense for the portrait-guys, though. Portraits were painted for posterity, and because they were expensive, they’re almost always of gentlemen. Until very recently, even the buffest of gentlemen would consider being seen in public without his shirt, let alone be painted that way. I’m willing to bet that the military men in particular probably looked just fine in less formal situations!
    Also – that same caveat about the teeth and smiles would have to hold true in regard to muscles. Even the brawniest of Renaissance Hercules looks puny beside most of today’s college linebackers. Diet, trainers, weights and fitness machines have let men, uh, blossom.
    Women, too. I recently read an interview with the head of a legendary wedding-dress company. She said that few of today’s brides who wish to wear their mother’s or grandmother’s dresses can do so, at least not without heavy alterations. It’s not that girls today are necessarily taller or heavier, but because so many girls today work out, they’re broader in the shoulders and generally more muscular than even a generation or so ago. If that Renaissance Hercules couldn’t compete in a World’s Strongest Man competition, then the lusciously endowed Venuses of the past wouldn’t pass muster in the SI swimsuit issue, either. All those female nudes of the past, and nary a single six-pack in the lot….*g*

    Reply
  60. Susan again:
    Loretta – I knew as long as I included Lord Byron, you’d be happy!
    Elizabeth – How could you not have a soft spot for William Lamb? Great lovers are always romantic; the ones they leave suffering in their wake aren’t as fortunate.
    As for what to do during all those endless Coke commercials – I knit whenever I watch the tube, so at least my hands are gainfully employed. I’m about half-way through a sky-blue cable-pattern cardigan, begun about the time of the opening ceremony, so it hasn’t been a complete waste. ☺
    Theo – No one’s bass-ackwards here at the Wenches! As the old saying goes, there’s someone for everyone, and that’s especially true in fantasy-land. Truly you’re blessed if your husband’s your dream-man made real!
    I will offer a defense for the portrait-guys, though. Portraits were painted for posterity, and because they were expensive, they’re almost always of gentlemen. Until very recently, even the buffest of gentlemen would consider being seen in public without his shirt, let alone be painted that way. I’m willing to bet that the military men in particular probably looked just fine in less formal situations!
    Also – that same caveat about the teeth and smiles would have to hold true in regard to muscles. Even the brawniest of Renaissance Hercules looks puny beside most of today’s college linebackers. Diet, trainers, weights and fitness machines have let men, uh, blossom.
    Women, too. I recently read an interview with the head of a legendary wedding-dress company. She said that few of today’s brides who wish to wear their mother’s or grandmother’s dresses can do so, at least not without heavy alterations. It’s not that girls today are necessarily taller or heavier, but because so many girls today work out, they’re broader in the shoulders and generally more muscular than even a generation or so ago. If that Renaissance Hercules couldn’t compete in a World’s Strongest Man competition, then the lusciously endowed Venuses of the past wouldn’t pass muster in the SI swimsuit issue, either. All those female nudes of the past, and nary a single six-pack in the lot….*g*

    Reply
  61. Susan, you can blog about historical hunks anytime you feel in the mood! I hadn’t seen that picture of Oliver Hazard Perry, so he’s definitely in the club, too. Uniforms do tend to suit most men. 🙂
    Interesting thought about modern folk being used to cameras and presenting themselves in certan ways. I tend to think a lot of the differences between portraits and modern folk is the painting conventions of the period, which had that tendency to soften features that is slightly feminizing, as Theo pointed out.
    Period styles do tend to make people like rather alike–just as fashion models and actors now often look too much alike. What is considered beautiful tends to favor those who have those looks, and styles (hair, make-up, plastic surgery) tend to make most people look more like the current ideal. If that makes sense.
    Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.
    My characters tend to be rather vague visually, though they’re sharp in my mind psychologically. I never use pictures for inspiration.
    I haven’t watched any of the Olympics, either, even though Michael Phelps is a local boy who grew up and trained within five miles of my house. I’m just not a television watcher. Which is good for my WIP….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  62. Susan, you can blog about historical hunks anytime you feel in the mood! I hadn’t seen that picture of Oliver Hazard Perry, so he’s definitely in the club, too. Uniforms do tend to suit most men. 🙂
    Interesting thought about modern folk being used to cameras and presenting themselves in certan ways. I tend to think a lot of the differences between portraits and modern folk is the painting conventions of the period, which had that tendency to soften features that is slightly feminizing, as Theo pointed out.
    Period styles do tend to make people like rather alike–just as fashion models and actors now often look too much alike. What is considered beautiful tends to favor those who have those looks, and styles (hair, make-up, plastic surgery) tend to make most people look more like the current ideal. If that makes sense.
    Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.
    My characters tend to be rather vague visually, though they’re sharp in my mind psychologically. I never use pictures for inspiration.
    I haven’t watched any of the Olympics, either, even though Michael Phelps is a local boy who grew up and trained within five miles of my house. I’m just not a television watcher. Which is good for my WIP….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  63. Susan, you can blog about historical hunks anytime you feel in the mood! I hadn’t seen that picture of Oliver Hazard Perry, so he’s definitely in the club, too. Uniforms do tend to suit most men. 🙂
    Interesting thought about modern folk being used to cameras and presenting themselves in certan ways. I tend to think a lot of the differences between portraits and modern folk is the painting conventions of the period, which had that tendency to soften features that is slightly feminizing, as Theo pointed out.
    Period styles do tend to make people like rather alike–just as fashion models and actors now often look too much alike. What is considered beautiful tends to favor those who have those looks, and styles (hair, make-up, plastic surgery) tend to make most people look more like the current ideal. If that makes sense.
    Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.
    My characters tend to be rather vague visually, though they’re sharp in my mind psychologically. I never use pictures for inspiration.
    I haven’t watched any of the Olympics, either, even though Michael Phelps is a local boy who grew up and trained within five miles of my house. I’m just not a television watcher. Which is good for my WIP….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  64. Susan, you can blog about historical hunks anytime you feel in the mood! I hadn’t seen that picture of Oliver Hazard Perry, so he’s definitely in the club, too. Uniforms do tend to suit most men. 🙂
    Interesting thought about modern folk being used to cameras and presenting themselves in certan ways. I tend to think a lot of the differences between portraits and modern folk is the painting conventions of the period, which had that tendency to soften features that is slightly feminizing, as Theo pointed out.
    Period styles do tend to make people like rather alike–just as fashion models and actors now often look too much alike. What is considered beautiful tends to favor those who have those looks, and styles (hair, make-up, plastic surgery) tend to make most people look more like the current ideal. If that makes sense.
    Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.
    My characters tend to be rather vague visually, though they’re sharp in my mind psychologically. I never use pictures for inspiration.
    I haven’t watched any of the Olympics, either, even though Michael Phelps is a local boy who grew up and trained within five miles of my house. I’m just not a television watcher. Which is good for my WIP….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  65. Susan, you can blog about historical hunks anytime you feel in the mood! I hadn’t seen that picture of Oliver Hazard Perry, so he’s definitely in the club, too. Uniforms do tend to suit most men. 🙂
    Interesting thought about modern folk being used to cameras and presenting themselves in certan ways. I tend to think a lot of the differences between portraits and modern folk is the painting conventions of the period, which had that tendency to soften features that is slightly feminizing, as Theo pointed out.
    Period styles do tend to make people like rather alike–just as fashion models and actors now often look too much alike. What is considered beautiful tends to favor those who have those looks, and styles (hair, make-up, plastic surgery) tend to make most people look more like the current ideal. If that makes sense.
    Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.
    My characters tend to be rather vague visually, though they’re sharp in my mind psychologically. I never use pictures for inspiration.
    I haven’t watched any of the Olympics, either, even though Michael Phelps is a local boy who grew up and trained within five miles of my house. I’m just not a television watcher. Which is good for my WIP….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  66. Susan,
    I agree with you as far as the paintings for posterity. And many of those painted probably weren’t overly buff, since many who could afford those portraits didn’t do much physical labor for their food.
    Case in point, look at Michaelangelo’s David. That statue dates back to the late 1400’s/early 1500’s. David was a laborer long before he was king and I’m guessing Mikey had other examples to use as a basis for his David. Many of the paintings of men of that era, even of the elite, were represented as physically well-developed. What I do like though is the fact that they appreciated curvy rather than Stick! 😆 I’d have fit right in back then.
    Jump forward 300 years and the men are made to look ‘pretty’. At least to ME! I know most people don’t see it that way. Then again, I can’t stand that whole metrosexual thing that’s going on now. A man needs to be a MAN!
    That said, I think what I’m saying, for me, is that I tend to picture in my head, the laborer’s physique, and then plunk him into the elite echelon.
    And that probably makes even LESS sense!
    I think I really do need to stop before I shoot myself in the foot here….

    Reply
  67. Susan,
    I agree with you as far as the paintings for posterity. And many of those painted probably weren’t overly buff, since many who could afford those portraits didn’t do much physical labor for their food.
    Case in point, look at Michaelangelo’s David. That statue dates back to the late 1400’s/early 1500’s. David was a laborer long before he was king and I’m guessing Mikey had other examples to use as a basis for his David. Many of the paintings of men of that era, even of the elite, were represented as physically well-developed. What I do like though is the fact that they appreciated curvy rather than Stick! 😆 I’d have fit right in back then.
    Jump forward 300 years and the men are made to look ‘pretty’. At least to ME! I know most people don’t see it that way. Then again, I can’t stand that whole metrosexual thing that’s going on now. A man needs to be a MAN!
    That said, I think what I’m saying, for me, is that I tend to picture in my head, the laborer’s physique, and then plunk him into the elite echelon.
    And that probably makes even LESS sense!
    I think I really do need to stop before I shoot myself in the foot here….

    Reply
  68. Susan,
    I agree with you as far as the paintings for posterity. And many of those painted probably weren’t overly buff, since many who could afford those portraits didn’t do much physical labor for their food.
    Case in point, look at Michaelangelo’s David. That statue dates back to the late 1400’s/early 1500’s. David was a laborer long before he was king and I’m guessing Mikey had other examples to use as a basis for his David. Many of the paintings of men of that era, even of the elite, were represented as physically well-developed. What I do like though is the fact that they appreciated curvy rather than Stick! 😆 I’d have fit right in back then.
    Jump forward 300 years and the men are made to look ‘pretty’. At least to ME! I know most people don’t see it that way. Then again, I can’t stand that whole metrosexual thing that’s going on now. A man needs to be a MAN!
    That said, I think what I’m saying, for me, is that I tend to picture in my head, the laborer’s physique, and then plunk him into the elite echelon.
    And that probably makes even LESS sense!
    I think I really do need to stop before I shoot myself in the foot here….

    Reply
  69. Susan,
    I agree with you as far as the paintings for posterity. And many of those painted probably weren’t overly buff, since many who could afford those portraits didn’t do much physical labor for their food.
    Case in point, look at Michaelangelo’s David. That statue dates back to the late 1400’s/early 1500’s. David was a laborer long before he was king and I’m guessing Mikey had other examples to use as a basis for his David. Many of the paintings of men of that era, even of the elite, were represented as physically well-developed. What I do like though is the fact that they appreciated curvy rather than Stick! 😆 I’d have fit right in back then.
    Jump forward 300 years and the men are made to look ‘pretty’. At least to ME! I know most people don’t see it that way. Then again, I can’t stand that whole metrosexual thing that’s going on now. A man needs to be a MAN!
    That said, I think what I’m saying, for me, is that I tend to picture in my head, the laborer’s physique, and then plunk him into the elite echelon.
    And that probably makes even LESS sense!
    I think I really do need to stop before I shoot myself in the foot here….

    Reply
  70. Susan,
    I agree with you as far as the paintings for posterity. And many of those painted probably weren’t overly buff, since many who could afford those portraits didn’t do much physical labor for their food.
    Case in point, look at Michaelangelo’s David. That statue dates back to the late 1400’s/early 1500’s. David was a laborer long before he was king and I’m guessing Mikey had other examples to use as a basis for his David. Many of the paintings of men of that era, even of the elite, were represented as physically well-developed. What I do like though is the fact that they appreciated curvy rather than Stick! 😆 I’d have fit right in back then.
    Jump forward 300 years and the men are made to look ‘pretty’. At least to ME! I know most people don’t see it that way. Then again, I can’t stand that whole metrosexual thing that’s going on now. A man needs to be a MAN!
    That said, I think what I’m saying, for me, is that I tend to picture in my head, the laborer’s physique, and then plunk him into the elite echelon.
    And that probably makes even LESS sense!
    I think I really do need to stop before I shoot myself in the foot here….

    Reply
  71. Theo, you like a man who strips to advantage? Check out the lifeguards on the TRU beach-patrol shows.
    Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?

    Reply
  72. Theo, you like a man who strips to advantage? Check out the lifeguards on the TRU beach-patrol shows.
    Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?

    Reply
  73. Theo, you like a man who strips to advantage? Check out the lifeguards on the TRU beach-patrol shows.
    Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?

    Reply
  74. Theo, you like a man who strips to advantage? Check out the lifeguards on the TRU beach-patrol shows.
    Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?

    Reply
  75. Theo, you like a man who strips to advantage? Check out the lifeguards on the TRU beach-patrol shows.
    Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?

    Reply
  76. Susan here again:
    Mary Jo wrote: “Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.”
    Well put, Mary Jo. Sports may seem foolish or frivolous, especially in the international realm of the Olympics, but they sure beat war.
    Theo wrote: “A man needs to be a MAN!”
    Yes, Theo, but who defines what exactly makes a man, just as what makes a woman? Fortunately there’s a whole wide wonderful world between simpering fops and cavemen, and books with every kind of hero. Variety is the spice of life!
    Tal wrote: “Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?”
    Hmmm…that’s an interesting question, Tal. My guess would be that the very notion of walking on the moon would seem inconcievable, even vaguely blasphemous for questioning the divine order of the Heavens.
    But smallpox –– smallpox was a disease that affected all levels of society with such horrifying results. Irradicating smallpox must have been the fervent wish of so many that it would likely seem the more possible –– and certainly the more useful. But that’s just my opinion. Anyone else have one to share?

    Reply
  77. Susan here again:
    Mary Jo wrote: “Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.”
    Well put, Mary Jo. Sports may seem foolish or frivolous, especially in the international realm of the Olympics, but they sure beat war.
    Theo wrote: “A man needs to be a MAN!”
    Yes, Theo, but who defines what exactly makes a man, just as what makes a woman? Fortunately there’s a whole wide wonderful world between simpering fops and cavemen, and books with every kind of hero. Variety is the spice of life!
    Tal wrote: “Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?”
    Hmmm…that’s an interesting question, Tal. My guess would be that the very notion of walking on the moon would seem inconcievable, even vaguely blasphemous for questioning the divine order of the Heavens.
    But smallpox –– smallpox was a disease that affected all levels of society with such horrifying results. Irradicating smallpox must have been the fervent wish of so many that it would likely seem the more possible –– and certainly the more useful. But that’s just my opinion. Anyone else have one to share?

    Reply
  78. Susan here again:
    Mary Jo wrote: “Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.”
    Well put, Mary Jo. Sports may seem foolish or frivolous, especially in the international realm of the Olympics, but they sure beat war.
    Theo wrote: “A man needs to be a MAN!”
    Yes, Theo, but who defines what exactly makes a man, just as what makes a woman? Fortunately there’s a whole wide wonderful world between simpering fops and cavemen, and books with every kind of hero. Variety is the spice of life!
    Tal wrote: “Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?”
    Hmmm…that’s an interesting question, Tal. My guess would be that the very notion of walking on the moon would seem inconcievable, even vaguely blasphemous for questioning the divine order of the Heavens.
    But smallpox –– smallpox was a disease that affected all levels of society with such horrifying results. Irradicating smallpox must have been the fervent wish of so many that it would likely seem the more possible –– and certainly the more useful. But that’s just my opinion. Anyone else have one to share?

    Reply
  79. Susan here again:
    Mary Jo wrote: “Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.”
    Well put, Mary Jo. Sports may seem foolish or frivolous, especially in the international realm of the Olympics, but they sure beat war.
    Theo wrote: “A man needs to be a MAN!”
    Yes, Theo, but who defines what exactly makes a man, just as what makes a woman? Fortunately there’s a whole wide wonderful world between simpering fops and cavemen, and books with every kind of hero. Variety is the spice of life!
    Tal wrote: “Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?”
    Hmmm…that’s an interesting question, Tal. My guess would be that the very notion of walking on the moon would seem inconcievable, even vaguely blasphemous for questioning the divine order of the Heavens.
    But smallpox –– smallpox was a disease that affected all levels of society with such horrifying results. Irradicating smallpox must have been the fervent wish of so many that it would likely seem the more possible –– and certainly the more useful. But that’s just my opinion. Anyone else have one to share?

    Reply
  80. Susan here again:
    Mary Jo wrote: “Tragic to think that at 23, Michael Phelps is possibly the best known man in the world for this week, while the two young Stuart lords were dead. Sports definitely beat war as a way of competing.”
    Well put, Mary Jo. Sports may seem foolish or frivolous, especially in the international realm of the Olympics, but they sure beat war.
    Theo wrote: “A man needs to be a MAN!”
    Yes, Theo, but who defines what exactly makes a man, just as what makes a woman? Fortunately there’s a whole wide wonderful world between simpering fops and cavemen, and books with every kind of hero. Variety is the spice of life!
    Tal wrote: “Susan, I wonder which achievement would most impress one of your historical hunks if he came forward to our time? The fact that men have walked on the moon–or the fact that smallpox has been completely eliminated from the world?”
    Hmmm…that’s an interesting question, Tal. My guess would be that the very notion of walking on the moon would seem inconcievable, even vaguely blasphemous for questioning the divine order of the Heavens.
    But smallpox –– smallpox was a disease that affected all levels of society with such horrifying results. Irradicating smallpox must have been the fervent wish of so many that it would likely seem the more possible –– and certainly the more useful. But that’s just my opinion. Anyone else have one to share?

    Reply
  81. Susan again:
    Tal wrote: “The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?”
    Don’t know if such “puddings” are to be found in any regional American cookbooks (certainly stewed fruit in general is out of fashion these days when fresh is so readily available), but I do remember seeing a similar recipie in an issue of Gourmet magazine a few years back –– so somewhere Americans are likely making it.

    Reply
  82. Susan again:
    Tal wrote: “The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?”
    Don’t know if such “puddings” are to be found in any regional American cookbooks (certainly stewed fruit in general is out of fashion these days when fresh is so readily available), but I do remember seeing a similar recipie in an issue of Gourmet magazine a few years back –– so somewhere Americans are likely making it.

    Reply
  83. Susan again:
    Tal wrote: “The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?”
    Don’t know if such “puddings” are to be found in any regional American cookbooks (certainly stewed fruit in general is out of fashion these days when fresh is so readily available), but I do remember seeing a similar recipie in an issue of Gourmet magazine a few years back –– so somewhere Americans are likely making it.

    Reply
  84. Susan again:
    Tal wrote: “The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?”
    Don’t know if such “puddings” are to be found in any regional American cookbooks (certainly stewed fruit in general is out of fashion these days when fresh is so readily available), but I do remember seeing a similar recipie in an issue of Gourmet magazine a few years back –– so somewhere Americans are likely making it.

    Reply
  85. Susan again:
    Tal wrote: “The Tigress posted her summer pudding recipe on the summer foods thread. She’s sure that we must know it, perhaps by another name; but I’ve never heard of it. Is it just a Brit thing?”
    Don’t know if such “puddings” are to be found in any regional American cookbooks (certainly stewed fruit in general is out of fashion these days when fresh is so readily available), but I do remember seeing a similar recipie in an issue of Gourmet magazine a few years back –– so somewhere Americans are likely making it.

    Reply
  86. I am amazed looking at period film versus modern film recreating that event. I found some great footage of the Carpathia landing in NY with the Titanic survivors including an interview with the crew. I love the little boys jumping and waving behind the crew. Somethings do not change. You can find that video on http://www.britishpathe.com — search for Titanic then look for Titanic Disaster it is film # 1674.16. I wish I was a UK teacher and could get full versions for free. I just use the low grade versions with my classes.
    As for features and dental condition, 1492 seems to be a cut off date. The introduction of sugar to the European diet (similar to canned food to the S. Pacific Islanders) created the tooth crisis. Ah but can you imagine living without chocolate. Now there is a pudding for you. Thanks for the images.

    Reply
  87. I am amazed looking at period film versus modern film recreating that event. I found some great footage of the Carpathia landing in NY with the Titanic survivors including an interview with the crew. I love the little boys jumping and waving behind the crew. Somethings do not change. You can find that video on http://www.britishpathe.com — search for Titanic then look for Titanic Disaster it is film # 1674.16. I wish I was a UK teacher and could get full versions for free. I just use the low grade versions with my classes.
    As for features and dental condition, 1492 seems to be a cut off date. The introduction of sugar to the European diet (similar to canned food to the S. Pacific Islanders) created the tooth crisis. Ah but can you imagine living without chocolate. Now there is a pudding for you. Thanks for the images.

    Reply
  88. I am amazed looking at period film versus modern film recreating that event. I found some great footage of the Carpathia landing in NY with the Titanic survivors including an interview with the crew. I love the little boys jumping and waving behind the crew. Somethings do not change. You can find that video on http://www.britishpathe.com — search for Titanic then look for Titanic Disaster it is film # 1674.16. I wish I was a UK teacher and could get full versions for free. I just use the low grade versions with my classes.
    As for features and dental condition, 1492 seems to be a cut off date. The introduction of sugar to the European diet (similar to canned food to the S. Pacific Islanders) created the tooth crisis. Ah but can you imagine living without chocolate. Now there is a pudding for you. Thanks for the images.

    Reply
  89. I am amazed looking at period film versus modern film recreating that event. I found some great footage of the Carpathia landing in NY with the Titanic survivors including an interview with the crew. I love the little boys jumping and waving behind the crew. Somethings do not change. You can find that video on http://www.britishpathe.com — search for Titanic then look for Titanic Disaster it is film # 1674.16. I wish I was a UK teacher and could get full versions for free. I just use the low grade versions with my classes.
    As for features and dental condition, 1492 seems to be a cut off date. The introduction of sugar to the European diet (similar to canned food to the S. Pacific Islanders) created the tooth crisis. Ah but can you imagine living without chocolate. Now there is a pudding for you. Thanks for the images.

    Reply
  90. I am amazed looking at period film versus modern film recreating that event. I found some great footage of the Carpathia landing in NY with the Titanic survivors including an interview with the crew. I love the little boys jumping and waving behind the crew. Somethings do not change. You can find that video on http://www.britishpathe.com — search for Titanic then look for Titanic Disaster it is film # 1674.16. I wish I was a UK teacher and could get full versions for free. I just use the low grade versions with my classes.
    As for features and dental condition, 1492 seems to be a cut off date. The introduction of sugar to the European diet (similar to canned food to the S. Pacific Islanders) created the tooth crisis. Ah but can you imagine living without chocolate. Now there is a pudding for you. Thanks for the images.

    Reply
  91. Susan here again:
    Fascinating link to the Titanic footage, Lyn –– thanks for sharing!
    As for the “bad teeth” question, I agree, sugar is a likely culprit. Tea-drinking (and the sweetening that accompanied it) also gets blamed. I’m far from a medical historian, but I’m guessing that there would be some other causes as well. Tooth loss can result from advanced scurvy (a lack of vitamin C, common not only in sailors on long voyages, but during times of famine, war-induced food shortages, or long winter without fresh vegetables.) Calcium deficiencies also lead to tooth loss, and that old adage about “a tooth lost for every child” must have been based in experience. Heavy drinking can hurry along tooth decay, as does snuff and smoking tobacco. Hmmm….I sense another blog in the making! *g*

    Reply
  92. Susan here again:
    Fascinating link to the Titanic footage, Lyn –– thanks for sharing!
    As for the “bad teeth” question, I agree, sugar is a likely culprit. Tea-drinking (and the sweetening that accompanied it) also gets blamed. I’m far from a medical historian, but I’m guessing that there would be some other causes as well. Tooth loss can result from advanced scurvy (a lack of vitamin C, common not only in sailors on long voyages, but during times of famine, war-induced food shortages, or long winter without fresh vegetables.) Calcium deficiencies also lead to tooth loss, and that old adage about “a tooth lost for every child” must have been based in experience. Heavy drinking can hurry along tooth decay, as does snuff and smoking tobacco. Hmmm….I sense another blog in the making! *g*

    Reply
  93. Susan here again:
    Fascinating link to the Titanic footage, Lyn –– thanks for sharing!
    As for the “bad teeth” question, I agree, sugar is a likely culprit. Tea-drinking (and the sweetening that accompanied it) also gets blamed. I’m far from a medical historian, but I’m guessing that there would be some other causes as well. Tooth loss can result from advanced scurvy (a lack of vitamin C, common not only in sailors on long voyages, but during times of famine, war-induced food shortages, or long winter without fresh vegetables.) Calcium deficiencies also lead to tooth loss, and that old adage about “a tooth lost for every child” must have been based in experience. Heavy drinking can hurry along tooth decay, as does snuff and smoking tobacco. Hmmm….I sense another blog in the making! *g*

    Reply
  94. Susan here again:
    Fascinating link to the Titanic footage, Lyn –– thanks for sharing!
    As for the “bad teeth” question, I agree, sugar is a likely culprit. Tea-drinking (and the sweetening that accompanied it) also gets blamed. I’m far from a medical historian, but I’m guessing that there would be some other causes as well. Tooth loss can result from advanced scurvy (a lack of vitamin C, common not only in sailors on long voyages, but during times of famine, war-induced food shortages, or long winter without fresh vegetables.) Calcium deficiencies also lead to tooth loss, and that old adage about “a tooth lost for every child” must have been based in experience. Heavy drinking can hurry along tooth decay, as does snuff and smoking tobacco. Hmmm….I sense another blog in the making! *g*

    Reply
  95. Susan here again:
    Fascinating link to the Titanic footage, Lyn –– thanks for sharing!
    As for the “bad teeth” question, I agree, sugar is a likely culprit. Tea-drinking (and the sweetening that accompanied it) also gets blamed. I’m far from a medical historian, but I’m guessing that there would be some other causes as well. Tooth loss can result from advanced scurvy (a lack of vitamin C, common not only in sailors on long voyages, but during times of famine, war-induced food shortages, or long winter without fresh vegetables.) Calcium deficiencies also lead to tooth loss, and that old adage about “a tooth lost for every child” must have been based in experience. Heavy drinking can hurry along tooth decay, as does snuff and smoking tobacco. Hmmm….I sense another blog in the making! *g*

    Reply
  96. Susan, you’re absolutely right, variety is the spice of life. I just lean more toward the caveman I guess 😉 LOL
    I would think also that walking on the moon would label the person trying to explain it to him as a witch, where as the eradication of small pox, that was a tragic reality to people for hundreds of years, as were so many other diseases which are now curable with penicillin or like antibiotics.

    Reply
  97. Susan, you’re absolutely right, variety is the spice of life. I just lean more toward the caveman I guess 😉 LOL
    I would think also that walking on the moon would label the person trying to explain it to him as a witch, where as the eradication of small pox, that was a tragic reality to people for hundreds of years, as were so many other diseases which are now curable with penicillin or like antibiotics.

    Reply
  98. Susan, you’re absolutely right, variety is the spice of life. I just lean more toward the caveman I guess 😉 LOL
    I would think also that walking on the moon would label the person trying to explain it to him as a witch, where as the eradication of small pox, that was a tragic reality to people for hundreds of years, as were so many other diseases which are now curable with penicillin or like antibiotics.

    Reply
  99. Susan, you’re absolutely right, variety is the spice of life. I just lean more toward the caveman I guess 😉 LOL
    I would think also that walking on the moon would label the person trying to explain it to him as a witch, where as the eradication of small pox, that was a tragic reality to people for hundreds of years, as were so many other diseases which are now curable with penicillin or like antibiotics.

    Reply
  100. Susan, you’re absolutely right, variety is the spice of life. I just lean more toward the caveman I guess 😉 LOL
    I would think also that walking on the moon would label the person trying to explain it to him as a witch, where as the eradication of small pox, that was a tragic reality to people for hundreds of years, as were so many other diseases which are now curable with penicillin or like antibiotics.

    Reply
  101. Mmmmm, summer pudding. I think the point is that though you make cook the fruit a bit, it does have to be reasonably fresh to work. Or at least the one I had at the weekend was. A top pudding because it gives the semblance of health.

    Reply
  102. Mmmmm, summer pudding. I think the point is that though you make cook the fruit a bit, it does have to be reasonably fresh to work. Or at least the one I had at the weekend was. A top pudding because it gives the semblance of health.

    Reply
  103. Mmmmm, summer pudding. I think the point is that though you make cook the fruit a bit, it does have to be reasonably fresh to work. Or at least the one I had at the weekend was. A top pudding because it gives the semblance of health.

    Reply
  104. Mmmmm, summer pudding. I think the point is that though you make cook the fruit a bit, it does have to be reasonably fresh to work. Or at least the one I had at the weekend was. A top pudding because it gives the semblance of health.

    Reply
  105. Mmmmm, summer pudding. I think the point is that though you make cook the fruit a bit, it does have to be reasonably fresh to work. Or at least the one I had at the weekend was. A top pudding because it gives the semblance of health.

    Reply

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