Historic San Francisco

Curlygirl
Pat here:

Just back from San Francisco RWA and sitting in for Loretta, so I’m completely out of synch, which means you’re subject to whatever is at the tip of my fingers today.

For all the people I met last week—hi, how are you?  Hope I see you in DC next year! And wear your name tags, please.  I could say my memory isn’t what it used to be, but that would be a lie. I never had a memory for names.  I barely have one for faces.  (Did you know there’s such a thing as “face-blindness”?  Here’s a site where you can test your ability to remember faces: http://www.faceblind.org/facetests/ . I managed 50% because I seem to be able to remember noses!)

Andrea_mjp_me_crabWhile I had a lovely time seeing old friends and meeting new ones, (crab photo from pier 39, Andrea Pickens, Mary Jo, and me, incognito) giving away books and autographing them, dining in exotic restaurants (I don’t think San Franciscans eat normal meals—even hamburgers Hamburger
come with soy sprouts or something else weird), and otherwise enjoying the conference, I loved sightseeing even more.

How can anyone who appreciates history not enjoy San Francisco?  We strolled on rock solid ground covered up in gorgeous architecture—that was once a harbor full of
wrecked ship hulls. Sailing_ship
We craned our necks looking up hills so steep even horses couldn’t climb them—which is why they still have cable cars today.  Since the earthquake destroyed some of the earlier grand architecture, such as the Palace Hotel which once entertained royalty, many of the buildings (including Chinatown) Chinatown
have only been there since after 1906 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_San_Francisco_earthquake) . But the people who rebuilt were determined to have the most gorgeous city in the world, and what they Rotunda
produced, given the location and the time period, was truly awesome.  We spent one evening in the Neiman-Marcus Rotunda, which was originally a showroom for the City of Paris department store where shipments straight from Europe could be exhibited to their wealthy customers.  Anywhere else, the stained glass dome would have been in a church!

I can’t begin to cover all the wonderful historical elements I saw, but I’m longing for the days of  Alcatraz_3
American historicals where I can set my characters against a truly challenging backdrop! (the photo is of Alcatraz from Pier 39) One of the rumors I heard at the conference was that the early twentieth century might be the next wave of historical romance.

Maybe I could throw a face-blind wench into an earthquake and let her save a tot from a  cable car or go surfing with the seals. Seals2
Maybe we could all come up with western plots and bombard NYC so they have to listen.  What do you think?

Have you been to San Francisco? What impressed, or didn’t impress, you?

55 thoughts on “Historic San Francisco”

  1. OK, I lived in S.F. for three years — 1969 to 1972. Oh dear! For a while I froze, but I got used to that. Even then there was a wide array of exotic food.
    The first thing I noticed when I arrived on April 15, 1969, was that it hadn’t fallen into the ocean.
    Next I noticed how clean everything looked. All those pastel-painted houses on 19th St. Children having a swordfight using cala lillies as swords! I’d never seen a cala lily before except in church on Easter Sunday.
    Though I continued to live in California until 4 years ago, I hadn’t been into San Francisco for about five years before I left. Everything seems different after the earthquake of ’89; a huge piece of highway came down and they decided they liked the view without it! The wharfs that were there for shipping purposes when I first arrived have become more tourist-oriented, and of course there’s baseball RIGHT IN TOWN now.
    Everything changes. I think I’d enjoy a story set in post-1906, pre-WWI S.F., so how about it, ladies? If you EACH did one, you could undoubtedly start a trend.

    Reply
  2. OK, I lived in S.F. for three years — 1969 to 1972. Oh dear! For a while I froze, but I got used to that. Even then there was a wide array of exotic food.
    The first thing I noticed when I arrived on April 15, 1969, was that it hadn’t fallen into the ocean.
    Next I noticed how clean everything looked. All those pastel-painted houses on 19th St. Children having a swordfight using cala lillies as swords! I’d never seen a cala lily before except in church on Easter Sunday.
    Though I continued to live in California until 4 years ago, I hadn’t been into San Francisco for about five years before I left. Everything seems different after the earthquake of ’89; a huge piece of highway came down and they decided they liked the view without it! The wharfs that were there for shipping purposes when I first arrived have become more tourist-oriented, and of course there’s baseball RIGHT IN TOWN now.
    Everything changes. I think I’d enjoy a story set in post-1906, pre-WWI S.F., so how about it, ladies? If you EACH did one, you could undoubtedly start a trend.

    Reply
  3. OK, I lived in S.F. for three years — 1969 to 1972. Oh dear! For a while I froze, but I got used to that. Even then there was a wide array of exotic food.
    The first thing I noticed when I arrived on April 15, 1969, was that it hadn’t fallen into the ocean.
    Next I noticed how clean everything looked. All those pastel-painted houses on 19th St. Children having a swordfight using cala lillies as swords! I’d never seen a cala lily before except in church on Easter Sunday.
    Though I continued to live in California until 4 years ago, I hadn’t been into San Francisco for about five years before I left. Everything seems different after the earthquake of ’89; a huge piece of highway came down and they decided they liked the view without it! The wharfs that were there for shipping purposes when I first arrived have become more tourist-oriented, and of course there’s baseball RIGHT IN TOWN now.
    Everything changes. I think I’d enjoy a story set in post-1906, pre-WWI S.F., so how about it, ladies? If you EACH did one, you could undoubtedly start a trend.

    Reply
  4. OK, I lived in S.F. for three years — 1969 to 1972. Oh dear! For a while I froze, but I got used to that. Even then there was a wide array of exotic food.
    The first thing I noticed when I arrived on April 15, 1969, was that it hadn’t fallen into the ocean.
    Next I noticed how clean everything looked. All those pastel-painted houses on 19th St. Children having a swordfight using cala lillies as swords! I’d never seen a cala lily before except in church on Easter Sunday.
    Though I continued to live in California until 4 years ago, I hadn’t been into San Francisco for about five years before I left. Everything seems different after the earthquake of ’89; a huge piece of highway came down and they decided they liked the view without it! The wharfs that were there for shipping purposes when I first arrived have become more tourist-oriented, and of course there’s baseball RIGHT IN TOWN now.
    Everything changes. I think I’d enjoy a story set in post-1906, pre-WWI S.F., so how about it, ladies? If you EACH did one, you could undoubtedly start a trend.

    Reply
  5. OK, I lived in S.F. for three years — 1969 to 1972. Oh dear! For a while I froze, but I got used to that. Even then there was a wide array of exotic food.
    The first thing I noticed when I arrived on April 15, 1969, was that it hadn’t fallen into the ocean.
    Next I noticed how clean everything looked. All those pastel-painted houses on 19th St. Children having a swordfight using cala lillies as swords! I’d never seen a cala lily before except in church on Easter Sunday.
    Though I continued to live in California until 4 years ago, I hadn’t been into San Francisco for about five years before I left. Everything seems different after the earthquake of ’89; a huge piece of highway came down and they decided they liked the view without it! The wharfs that were there for shipping purposes when I first arrived have become more tourist-oriented, and of course there’s baseball RIGHT IN TOWN now.
    Everything changes. I think I’d enjoy a story set in post-1906, pre-WWI S.F., so how about it, ladies? If you EACH did one, you could undoubtedly start a trend.

    Reply
  6. I wish I could’ve been there with you, Pat!
    My mother’s family lived in the San Francisco area for many, many years. They settled both in the city, and in Marin County in the 1850s. The “country folk” ran the first Western Union office in the area, not far from Point Reyes, plus a stage stop-hotel that became a resort for San Francisco city-folks. Now it’s been renovated/restored into a bed-and-breakfast called the Olema Inn (I think.)
    My grandmother (b. 1899) clearly remembered the 1906 earthquake, not only the quake itself, but the smoke from the fires that went on for days afterwards. She also remembers all the refugees coming out from the city, with only their clothes and whatever they’d grabbed as their homes had tumbled down.
    My mother still has a special shelf in her dining room with three glass bowls, a vase, and some plates that aren’t valuable as antiques, but because they all “survived” the earthquake — the only pieces that did in my great-aunt’s house.
    When I was younger, we went to SF every summer to stay with my grandparents. (Anyone who saw our “Name that Wench” contest with our childhood pictures earlier this summer will recall how poorly I fit in with my various beach-browned CA cousins, the hopeless pale kid with saddle shoes from NJ!) I remember going to the City of Paris dept. store that’s in your photos, too, trying to find suitable back-to-school clothes for a school on the other side of the country. Because it was usually so cool in SF, the store (this was the early ’60s) had no air conditioning, and we were there on a rare hot summer day. Ugh! I haven’t been back to the west coast since I was sixteen, though I hope to someday again.
    As for writing a book set in early CA — because I have so much family “stuff”, lots of letters and photos, I’ve tried to pitch the setting/idea to numerous editors and agents over the years, and gotten nowhere. If this is now suddenly The Next Big Historical Thing, maybe I should be trying again. 🙂
    Thanks for the report and the pictures….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  7. I wish I could’ve been there with you, Pat!
    My mother’s family lived in the San Francisco area for many, many years. They settled both in the city, and in Marin County in the 1850s. The “country folk” ran the first Western Union office in the area, not far from Point Reyes, plus a stage stop-hotel that became a resort for San Francisco city-folks. Now it’s been renovated/restored into a bed-and-breakfast called the Olema Inn (I think.)
    My grandmother (b. 1899) clearly remembered the 1906 earthquake, not only the quake itself, but the smoke from the fires that went on for days afterwards. She also remembers all the refugees coming out from the city, with only their clothes and whatever they’d grabbed as their homes had tumbled down.
    My mother still has a special shelf in her dining room with three glass bowls, a vase, and some plates that aren’t valuable as antiques, but because they all “survived” the earthquake — the only pieces that did in my great-aunt’s house.
    When I was younger, we went to SF every summer to stay with my grandparents. (Anyone who saw our “Name that Wench” contest with our childhood pictures earlier this summer will recall how poorly I fit in with my various beach-browned CA cousins, the hopeless pale kid with saddle shoes from NJ!) I remember going to the City of Paris dept. store that’s in your photos, too, trying to find suitable back-to-school clothes for a school on the other side of the country. Because it was usually so cool in SF, the store (this was the early ’60s) had no air conditioning, and we were there on a rare hot summer day. Ugh! I haven’t been back to the west coast since I was sixteen, though I hope to someday again.
    As for writing a book set in early CA — because I have so much family “stuff”, lots of letters and photos, I’ve tried to pitch the setting/idea to numerous editors and agents over the years, and gotten nowhere. If this is now suddenly The Next Big Historical Thing, maybe I should be trying again. 🙂
    Thanks for the report and the pictures….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  8. I wish I could’ve been there with you, Pat!
    My mother’s family lived in the San Francisco area for many, many years. They settled both in the city, and in Marin County in the 1850s. The “country folk” ran the first Western Union office in the area, not far from Point Reyes, plus a stage stop-hotel that became a resort for San Francisco city-folks. Now it’s been renovated/restored into a bed-and-breakfast called the Olema Inn (I think.)
    My grandmother (b. 1899) clearly remembered the 1906 earthquake, not only the quake itself, but the smoke from the fires that went on for days afterwards. She also remembers all the refugees coming out from the city, with only their clothes and whatever they’d grabbed as their homes had tumbled down.
    My mother still has a special shelf in her dining room with three glass bowls, a vase, and some plates that aren’t valuable as antiques, but because they all “survived” the earthquake — the only pieces that did in my great-aunt’s house.
    When I was younger, we went to SF every summer to stay with my grandparents. (Anyone who saw our “Name that Wench” contest with our childhood pictures earlier this summer will recall how poorly I fit in with my various beach-browned CA cousins, the hopeless pale kid with saddle shoes from NJ!) I remember going to the City of Paris dept. store that’s in your photos, too, trying to find suitable back-to-school clothes for a school on the other side of the country. Because it was usually so cool in SF, the store (this was the early ’60s) had no air conditioning, and we were there on a rare hot summer day. Ugh! I haven’t been back to the west coast since I was sixteen, though I hope to someday again.
    As for writing a book set in early CA — because I have so much family “stuff”, lots of letters and photos, I’ve tried to pitch the setting/idea to numerous editors and agents over the years, and gotten nowhere. If this is now suddenly The Next Big Historical Thing, maybe I should be trying again. 🙂
    Thanks for the report and the pictures….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  9. I wish I could’ve been there with you, Pat!
    My mother’s family lived in the San Francisco area for many, many years. They settled both in the city, and in Marin County in the 1850s. The “country folk” ran the first Western Union office in the area, not far from Point Reyes, plus a stage stop-hotel that became a resort for San Francisco city-folks. Now it’s been renovated/restored into a bed-and-breakfast called the Olema Inn (I think.)
    My grandmother (b. 1899) clearly remembered the 1906 earthquake, not only the quake itself, but the smoke from the fires that went on for days afterwards. She also remembers all the refugees coming out from the city, with only their clothes and whatever they’d grabbed as their homes had tumbled down.
    My mother still has a special shelf in her dining room with three glass bowls, a vase, and some plates that aren’t valuable as antiques, but because they all “survived” the earthquake — the only pieces that did in my great-aunt’s house.
    When I was younger, we went to SF every summer to stay with my grandparents. (Anyone who saw our “Name that Wench” contest with our childhood pictures earlier this summer will recall how poorly I fit in with my various beach-browned CA cousins, the hopeless pale kid with saddle shoes from NJ!) I remember going to the City of Paris dept. store that’s in your photos, too, trying to find suitable back-to-school clothes for a school on the other side of the country. Because it was usually so cool in SF, the store (this was the early ’60s) had no air conditioning, and we were there on a rare hot summer day. Ugh! I haven’t been back to the west coast since I was sixteen, though I hope to someday again.
    As for writing a book set in early CA — because I have so much family “stuff”, lots of letters and photos, I’ve tried to pitch the setting/idea to numerous editors and agents over the years, and gotten nowhere. If this is now suddenly The Next Big Historical Thing, maybe I should be trying again. 🙂
    Thanks for the report and the pictures….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  10. I wish I could’ve been there with you, Pat!
    My mother’s family lived in the San Francisco area for many, many years. They settled both in the city, and in Marin County in the 1850s. The “country folk” ran the first Western Union office in the area, not far from Point Reyes, plus a stage stop-hotel that became a resort for San Francisco city-folks. Now it’s been renovated/restored into a bed-and-breakfast called the Olema Inn (I think.)
    My grandmother (b. 1899) clearly remembered the 1906 earthquake, not only the quake itself, but the smoke from the fires that went on for days afterwards. She also remembers all the refugees coming out from the city, with only their clothes and whatever they’d grabbed as their homes had tumbled down.
    My mother still has a special shelf in her dining room with three glass bowls, a vase, and some plates that aren’t valuable as antiques, but because they all “survived” the earthquake — the only pieces that did in my great-aunt’s house.
    When I was younger, we went to SF every summer to stay with my grandparents. (Anyone who saw our “Name that Wench” contest with our childhood pictures earlier this summer will recall how poorly I fit in with my various beach-browned CA cousins, the hopeless pale kid with saddle shoes from NJ!) I remember going to the City of Paris dept. store that’s in your photos, too, trying to find suitable back-to-school clothes for a school on the other side of the country. Because it was usually so cool in SF, the store (this was the early ’60s) had no air conditioning, and we were there on a rare hot summer day. Ugh! I haven’t been back to the west coast since I was sixteen, though I hope to someday again.
    As for writing a book set in early CA — because I have so much family “stuff”, lots of letters and photos, I’ve tried to pitch the setting/idea to numerous editors and agents over the years, and gotten nowhere. If this is now suddenly The Next Big Historical Thing, maybe I should be trying again. 🙂
    Thanks for the report and the pictures….
    Susan S.

    Reply
  11. Lovely memories, thank you! SF really is an astonishingly clean city considering how many people are packed together in so limited a space. And your antiques, SS, ought to be valuable for having survived the earthquake! Antiques with stories are worth a lot to historians.
    I just wish NYC would realize CA exists and has a fabulous history!

    Reply
  12. Lovely memories, thank you! SF really is an astonishingly clean city considering how many people are packed together in so limited a space. And your antiques, SS, ought to be valuable for having survived the earthquake! Antiques with stories are worth a lot to historians.
    I just wish NYC would realize CA exists and has a fabulous history!

    Reply
  13. Lovely memories, thank you! SF really is an astonishingly clean city considering how many people are packed together in so limited a space. And your antiques, SS, ought to be valuable for having survived the earthquake! Antiques with stories are worth a lot to historians.
    I just wish NYC would realize CA exists and has a fabulous history!

    Reply
  14. Lovely memories, thank you! SF really is an astonishingly clean city considering how many people are packed together in so limited a space. And your antiques, SS, ought to be valuable for having survived the earthquake! Antiques with stories are worth a lot to historians.
    I just wish NYC would realize CA exists and has a fabulous history!

    Reply
  15. Lovely memories, thank you! SF really is an astonishingly clean city considering how many people are packed together in so limited a space. And your antiques, SS, ought to be valuable for having survived the earthquake! Antiques with stories are worth a lot to historians.
    I just wish NYC would realize CA exists and has a fabulous history!

    Reply
  16. I only spent a few days there once, for a wedding, but a friend drove me down to see the Golden Gate and there was some kind of sailing Regatta going on. It was neat. Then, at night, the sight of the fog rolling in was positively eerie. I’ve never seen anything like it.

    Reply
  17. I only spent a few days there once, for a wedding, but a friend drove me down to see the Golden Gate and there was some kind of sailing Regatta going on. It was neat. Then, at night, the sight of the fog rolling in was positively eerie. I’ve never seen anything like it.

    Reply
  18. I only spent a few days there once, for a wedding, but a friend drove me down to see the Golden Gate and there was some kind of sailing Regatta going on. It was neat. Then, at night, the sight of the fog rolling in was positively eerie. I’ve never seen anything like it.

    Reply
  19. I only spent a few days there once, for a wedding, but a friend drove me down to see the Golden Gate and there was some kind of sailing Regatta going on. It was neat. Then, at night, the sight of the fog rolling in was positively eerie. I’ve never seen anything like it.

    Reply
  20. I only spent a few days there once, for a wedding, but a friend drove me down to see the Golden Gate and there was some kind of sailing Regatta going on. It was neat. Then, at night, the sight of the fog rolling in was positively eerie. I’ve never seen anything like it.

    Reply
  21. My first visit there was memorable, but not in a good way, as I spent most of it with an IV in my arm, undergoing tests in the hospital at the Presidio.
    I spent a good whack of the 1960s at UC Berkeley, and visited SF fairly often while my aunt and uncle lived there. Great places to eat–especially at Fisherman’s Wharf.

    Reply
  22. My first visit there was memorable, but not in a good way, as I spent most of it with an IV in my arm, undergoing tests in the hospital at the Presidio.
    I spent a good whack of the 1960s at UC Berkeley, and visited SF fairly often while my aunt and uncle lived there. Great places to eat–especially at Fisherman’s Wharf.

    Reply
  23. My first visit there was memorable, but not in a good way, as I spent most of it with an IV in my arm, undergoing tests in the hospital at the Presidio.
    I spent a good whack of the 1960s at UC Berkeley, and visited SF fairly often while my aunt and uncle lived there. Great places to eat–especially at Fisherman’s Wharf.

    Reply
  24. My first visit there was memorable, but not in a good way, as I spent most of it with an IV in my arm, undergoing tests in the hospital at the Presidio.
    I spent a good whack of the 1960s at UC Berkeley, and visited SF fairly often while my aunt and uncle lived there. Great places to eat–especially at Fisherman’s Wharf.

    Reply
  25. My first visit there was memorable, but not in a good way, as I spent most of it with an IV in my arm, undergoing tests in the hospital at the Presidio.
    I spent a good whack of the 1960s at UC Berkeley, and visited SF fairly often while my aunt and uncle lived there. Great places to eat–especially at Fisherman’s Wharf.

    Reply
  26. I remember walking hand-in-hand with my husband across the Golden Gate bridge in the evening in the mist.
    I remeber hiking on a beautiful Blue-sky day on the cliff of Point Reyes. I saw a large grey hawk swooping low over the fields and then higher up. It spies an big reddish hawk and they charge upwards directly at each other. They collide and tumble locked together towards the ground, only separating just in time and flying away. This, my bird book tells me is the mating dance of the Harrier Hawk.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    Reply
  27. I remember walking hand-in-hand with my husband across the Golden Gate bridge in the evening in the mist.
    I remeber hiking on a beautiful Blue-sky day on the cliff of Point Reyes. I saw a large grey hawk swooping low over the fields and then higher up. It spies an big reddish hawk and they charge upwards directly at each other. They collide and tumble locked together towards the ground, only separating just in time and flying away. This, my bird book tells me is the mating dance of the Harrier Hawk.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    Reply
  28. I remember walking hand-in-hand with my husband across the Golden Gate bridge in the evening in the mist.
    I remeber hiking on a beautiful Blue-sky day on the cliff of Point Reyes. I saw a large grey hawk swooping low over the fields and then higher up. It spies an big reddish hawk and they charge upwards directly at each other. They collide and tumble locked together towards the ground, only separating just in time and flying away. This, my bird book tells me is the mating dance of the Harrier Hawk.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    Reply
  29. I remember walking hand-in-hand with my husband across the Golden Gate bridge in the evening in the mist.
    I remeber hiking on a beautiful Blue-sky day on the cliff of Point Reyes. I saw a large grey hawk swooping low over the fields and then higher up. It spies an big reddish hawk and they charge upwards directly at each other. They collide and tumble locked together towards the ground, only separating just in time and flying away. This, my bird book tells me is the mating dance of the Harrier Hawk.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    Reply
  30. I remember walking hand-in-hand with my husband across the Golden Gate bridge in the evening in the mist.
    I remeber hiking on a beautiful Blue-sky day on the cliff of Point Reyes. I saw a large grey hawk swooping low over the fields and then higher up. It spies an big reddish hawk and they charge upwards directly at each other. They collide and tumble locked together towards the ground, only separating just in time and flying away. This, my bird book tells me is the mating dance of the Harrier Hawk.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    Reply
  31. Welcome back, Prof. Pat! I’ve never been to S.F. Sounds beautiful. And I’m with you on American set historical. We could do so much! I vote you as Commander and Chief of the next Great Rebellion. 🙂
    The Face Recognition test was very fun. I got 59/72 which puts me above average. Just don’t ask me to remember the names. Can’t remember names to save my neck. Today, I walked into the pet shop for dog food and had a 20-minute conversation with someone who knew me. I recognized her face but her name… still can’t remember her name. Ah, well…

    Reply
  32. Welcome back, Prof. Pat! I’ve never been to S.F. Sounds beautiful. And I’m with you on American set historical. We could do so much! I vote you as Commander and Chief of the next Great Rebellion. 🙂
    The Face Recognition test was very fun. I got 59/72 which puts me above average. Just don’t ask me to remember the names. Can’t remember names to save my neck. Today, I walked into the pet shop for dog food and had a 20-minute conversation with someone who knew me. I recognized her face but her name… still can’t remember her name. Ah, well…

    Reply
  33. Welcome back, Prof. Pat! I’ve never been to S.F. Sounds beautiful. And I’m with you on American set historical. We could do so much! I vote you as Commander and Chief of the next Great Rebellion. 🙂
    The Face Recognition test was very fun. I got 59/72 which puts me above average. Just don’t ask me to remember the names. Can’t remember names to save my neck. Today, I walked into the pet shop for dog food and had a 20-minute conversation with someone who knew me. I recognized her face but her name… still can’t remember her name. Ah, well…

    Reply
  34. Welcome back, Prof. Pat! I’ve never been to S.F. Sounds beautiful. And I’m with you on American set historical. We could do so much! I vote you as Commander and Chief of the next Great Rebellion. 🙂
    The Face Recognition test was very fun. I got 59/72 which puts me above average. Just don’t ask me to remember the names. Can’t remember names to save my neck. Today, I walked into the pet shop for dog food and had a 20-minute conversation with someone who knew me. I recognized her face but her name… still can’t remember her name. Ah, well…

    Reply
  35. Welcome back, Prof. Pat! I’ve never been to S.F. Sounds beautiful. And I’m with you on American set historical. We could do so much! I vote you as Commander and Chief of the next Great Rebellion. 🙂
    The Face Recognition test was very fun. I got 59/72 which puts me above average. Just don’t ask me to remember the names. Can’t remember names to save my neck. Today, I walked into the pet shop for dog food and had a 20-minute conversation with someone who knew me. I recognized her face but her name… still can’t remember her name. Ah, well…

    Reply
  36. The fog is a character element all of its own! We were fortunate and had lovely sunny days, but I’ve been there in June when I understood what Twain meant when he said the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco. That cold and damp will eat into your bones, especially if you’re wearing summer weight clothing! But the fog moves so swiftly across the ocean, and seen from above, it is quite eerie.
    I fear I am losing the battle so far in the Great Rebellion. Bermuda has been shot down, so I don’t hold out many hopes of reaching the American shore!
    And Nina, I learned that accessing the brain’s name database is affected by hormones, so women are fighting a losing battle there, too!

    Reply
  37. The fog is a character element all of its own! We were fortunate and had lovely sunny days, but I’ve been there in June when I understood what Twain meant when he said the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco. That cold and damp will eat into your bones, especially if you’re wearing summer weight clothing! But the fog moves so swiftly across the ocean, and seen from above, it is quite eerie.
    I fear I am losing the battle so far in the Great Rebellion. Bermuda has been shot down, so I don’t hold out many hopes of reaching the American shore!
    And Nina, I learned that accessing the brain’s name database is affected by hormones, so women are fighting a losing battle there, too!

    Reply
  38. The fog is a character element all of its own! We were fortunate and had lovely sunny days, but I’ve been there in June when I understood what Twain meant when he said the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco. That cold and damp will eat into your bones, especially if you’re wearing summer weight clothing! But the fog moves so swiftly across the ocean, and seen from above, it is quite eerie.
    I fear I am losing the battle so far in the Great Rebellion. Bermuda has been shot down, so I don’t hold out many hopes of reaching the American shore!
    And Nina, I learned that accessing the brain’s name database is affected by hormones, so women are fighting a losing battle there, too!

    Reply
  39. The fog is a character element all of its own! We were fortunate and had lovely sunny days, but I’ve been there in June when I understood what Twain meant when he said the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco. That cold and damp will eat into your bones, especially if you’re wearing summer weight clothing! But the fog moves so swiftly across the ocean, and seen from above, it is quite eerie.
    I fear I am losing the battle so far in the Great Rebellion. Bermuda has been shot down, so I don’t hold out many hopes of reaching the American shore!
    And Nina, I learned that accessing the brain’s name database is affected by hormones, so women are fighting a losing battle there, too!

    Reply
  40. The fog is a character element all of its own! We were fortunate and had lovely sunny days, but I’ve been there in June when I understood what Twain meant when he said the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco. That cold and damp will eat into your bones, especially if you’re wearing summer weight clothing! But the fog moves so swiftly across the ocean, and seen from above, it is quite eerie.
    I fear I am losing the battle so far in the Great Rebellion. Bermuda has been shot down, so I don’t hold out many hopes of reaching the American shore!
    And Nina, I learned that accessing the brain’s name database is affected by hormones, so women are fighting a losing battle there, too!

    Reply
  41. I’m a local (I’m at my office on the corner of Battery and Jackson right this minute) and I love the fog! As my best friend says: “I live in San Francisco so I can wear turtlenecks in July.”
    Right now the fog is still rolling in, so it should be a wonderful day (cold in the morning with afternoon sun and a high under 70, just perfect IMO).

    Reply
  42. I’m a local (I’m at my office on the corner of Battery and Jackson right this minute) and I love the fog! As my best friend says: “I live in San Francisco so I can wear turtlenecks in July.”
    Right now the fog is still rolling in, so it should be a wonderful day (cold in the morning with afternoon sun and a high under 70, just perfect IMO).

    Reply
  43. I’m a local (I’m at my office on the corner of Battery and Jackson right this minute) and I love the fog! As my best friend says: “I live in San Francisco so I can wear turtlenecks in July.”
    Right now the fog is still rolling in, so it should be a wonderful day (cold in the morning with afternoon sun and a high under 70, just perfect IMO).

    Reply
  44. I’m a local (I’m at my office on the corner of Battery and Jackson right this minute) and I love the fog! As my best friend says: “I live in San Francisco so I can wear turtlenecks in July.”
    Right now the fog is still rolling in, so it should be a wonderful day (cold in the morning with afternoon sun and a high under 70, just perfect IMO).

    Reply
  45. I’m a local (I’m at my office on the corner of Battery and Jackson right this minute) and I love the fog! As my best friend says: “I live in San Francisco so I can wear turtlenecks in July.”
    Right now the fog is still rolling in, so it should be a wonderful day (cold in the morning with afternoon sun and a high under 70, just perfect IMO).

    Reply
  46. Oh nifty, Kalen! I hadn’t realized you lived there, you lucky person. I do adore turtlenecks, although I’m not entirely certain I’d want to wear them year around. Must ponder that. But the more moderate temps are far more my style than 90 degrees and 90% humidity!

    Reply
  47. Oh nifty, Kalen! I hadn’t realized you lived there, you lucky person. I do adore turtlenecks, although I’m not entirely certain I’d want to wear them year around. Must ponder that. But the more moderate temps are far more my style than 90 degrees and 90% humidity!

    Reply
  48. Oh nifty, Kalen! I hadn’t realized you lived there, you lucky person. I do adore turtlenecks, although I’m not entirely certain I’d want to wear them year around. Must ponder that. But the more moderate temps are far more my style than 90 degrees and 90% humidity!

    Reply
  49. Oh nifty, Kalen! I hadn’t realized you lived there, you lucky person. I do adore turtlenecks, although I’m not entirely certain I’d want to wear them year around. Must ponder that. But the more moderate temps are far more my style than 90 degrees and 90% humidity!

    Reply
  50. Oh nifty, Kalen! I hadn’t realized you lived there, you lucky person. I do adore turtlenecks, although I’m not entirely certain I’d want to wear them year around. Must ponder that. But the more moderate temps are far more my style than 90 degrees and 90% humidity!

    Reply
  51. San Francisco is so beautiful. I’ve only been there once, but I enjoyed it thoroughly. Fog is one of my favorite things. My husband lived in San Anselmo and Berkeley for a while before we met.
    My best line for that uncomfortable I- know- your- face- but- can’t- remember- your- name moment is “Now, remind me of your name?” Nobody seems offended, and usually they laugh a little because they have those moments, too.

    Reply
  52. San Francisco is so beautiful. I’ve only been there once, but I enjoyed it thoroughly. Fog is one of my favorite things. My husband lived in San Anselmo and Berkeley for a while before we met.
    My best line for that uncomfortable I- know- your- face- but- can’t- remember- your- name moment is “Now, remind me of your name?” Nobody seems offended, and usually they laugh a little because they have those moments, too.

    Reply
  53. San Francisco is so beautiful. I’ve only been there once, but I enjoyed it thoroughly. Fog is one of my favorite things. My husband lived in San Anselmo and Berkeley for a while before we met.
    My best line for that uncomfortable I- know- your- face- but- can’t- remember- your- name moment is “Now, remind me of your name?” Nobody seems offended, and usually they laugh a little because they have those moments, too.

    Reply
  54. San Francisco is so beautiful. I’ve only been there once, but I enjoyed it thoroughly. Fog is one of my favorite things. My husband lived in San Anselmo and Berkeley for a while before we met.
    My best line for that uncomfortable I- know- your- face- but- can’t- remember- your- name moment is “Now, remind me of your name?” Nobody seems offended, and usually they laugh a little because they have those moments, too.

    Reply
  55. San Francisco is so beautiful. I’ve only been there once, but I enjoyed it thoroughly. Fog is one of my favorite things. My husband lived in San Anselmo and Berkeley for a while before we met.
    My best line for that uncomfortable I- know- your- face- but- can’t- remember- your- name moment is “Now, remind me of your name?” Nobody seems offended, and usually they laugh a little because they have those moments, too.

    Reply

Leave a Comment