Hidden in the Mists

Hidden In the Mists mediumAnne here, and today I'm interviewing Christina Courtenay about her new book, HIDDEN IN THE MISTS (released yesterday 18th August). As expected, this is a Viking story — and just as an aside, Christina's Viking stories have brought me happily back to this genre, after I'd thought I'd given up on Viking stories. Hers are fresh, original and really well researched. But this time Christina has departed from the time-slip plot and written a dual timeline story, one set in Viking times and the other in modern times.

Here’s a short summary: Skye Logan has been struggling to run her remote farm on Scotlands west coast alone ever since her marriage fell apart. When a handsome stranger turns up looking for work, it seems that her wish for help has been granted. But echoes of the distant past wont leave them alone, and it seems that the ghosts of the past have secrets … and they have something that they want Skye and Rafe to know.

Anne:  Christina, what inspired this story?

22 ViewChristina:  HIDDEN IN THE MISTS was written during the Covid pandemic when we were in lockdown here in the UK. Usually I like to travel to the places where my stories are set, but as we weren’t allowed to go anywhere I decided I had to use a location I’d already visited. Scotland is one of my favourite places and it seemed ideal as I wanted to write a dual time narrative that was partly about Vikings. They raided and settled along the west coast of Scotland and the islands there quite early on. It helped that I happen to have a very good friend who lives there and she was able to assist me whenever I needed any precise details. As I mentioned in last week’s blog post, the spark for this book also came from the Galloway Hoard, the fabulous Viking treasure found in 2014. The plot grew from there and the various elements came together in my imagination.

PenannularAnne:  The story follows two couples, one in ancient Viking times, and the other in modern times. Tell us about them.

Christina:  The couple in the past are called Óttarr and Ásta. He is a former thrall, now a free man working as a blacksmith in the settlement ruled by Ásta’s father. Óttarr has been biding his time until he has enough silver to leave and make a life elsewhere. He hates those who took him captive and is hellbent on taking revenge before he goes, but when Ásta’s father dies and her evil cousin Ketill usurps her rightful place as heir, Óttarr begins to see her in a new light and they grow close. He wants to help her but if he does, what becomes of his plans?

9 Highland calfIn the present, Skye has been living by herself on a remote farm on the west coast of Scotland since her marriage foundered the previous year. She barely makes ends meet but is desperate to stay put and continue her life of self-subsistence. When a stranger, Rafe, turns up wanting work without asking for much in return, it seems almost too good to be true. She doesn’t know whether to trust him, but slowly a rapport builds between them. Unfortunately, they are both keeping secrets and as we all know, secrets have a way of catching up with you …

The two couples are connected through time via pieces of jewellery they each wear and if only Skye and Rafe learn to listen to the ghosts that haunt them, they might have a chance at happiness.

RavensAnne:  And in both stories, each main character was dispossessed in some way and must struggle to regain what they lost. Did you plan this, or did it emerge in the writing?

Christina:  I came up with Óttarr’s story first as him being taken captive is the catalyst for the rest. As he hates everyone in the settlement where he was a thrall for so long, that included the chieftain’s daughter. Obviously, I had to have something happen that would make him see her in a different light – hence her evil cousin taking what was hers by right. In the plot for the present, I started with Skye and her marital and financial problems, then added Rafe, the mysterious stranger. He had to have a reason for roaming the country aimlessly and his backstory grew from there. I won’t give any spoilers, but he has a rather murky past that he doesn’t want Skye to find out about.

BirdheadAnne:  Did you have a favorite couple? And was one story harder to write than the other?

Christina:  No, I liked both couples because in my mind they were connected to each other, with lots of similar experiences. Óttarr’s and Ásta’s story was harder to write, mainly because it is set in the past and I had to make sure their voices were different and the historical setting as authentic as I could make it.

Anne: I'm curious (and I'm sure readers are too) — did you write each of the stories separately and then weave them together, or did you write them in the order we read them in the book?

Christina:  When I write dual time stories, I almost always write them in the order they appear in the book. I usually have each plot strand clear in my mind so I know where it’s supposed to go, and I weave them into each other by alternating the chapters/sections with present and past. Often, I find that they spark off each other, so for example if Skye has seen a ghost from the past, I then write the scene of who it is she saw from that person’s point of view when he/she was alive in their own time period. And if she or Rafe has a dream that includes something that happened in the past, I then show that scene in full from the past character’s viewpoint. It seems to evolve organically.

Rafes ringAnne: I loved the Viking jewellery motif, and I know you've researched quite a lot about it. Could you share some of your favorite pieces?

Christina:  Oh yes, I have accumulated quite a few pieces over the years. My all-time favourite is the replica gold ring that sparked the idea for Echoes of the Runes, the original of which can be found in the Historical Museum in Stockholm. And I have one covered in runes on which I based Rafe’s ring in my story. But I also love the pair of replica bronze shoulder (tortoise) brooches for my Viking outfit, and the little silver trefoil brooch that is used to hold together the top of the underdress (the serk). These are typical Viking items that a lot of the women back then would have worn. They also had penannular brooches/pins to fasten their cloaks, and instead of the trefoil motif, their brooches could have been in other shapes. I have one in the shape of a horse in Urnes style, one that is a stylized bird’s head and beak, and one with two ravens. I love wearing them all and always have a hard time deciding which one to choose.

28 WoolAnne: As well as the Viking research, you've also clearly delved into modern self-sufficiency practices, such as spinning and dying wool, among other things. Is this — or has this become — an interest of yours?

Christina:  Before the pandemic, I went on a weekend course to learn how to do weaving on a loom, and subsequently joined the local weaving guild as I enjoyed it so much. I’ve always loved handicrafts of different kinds (even though I’m not very good at them) and the other members did things like spinning and dyeing wool as well, which I found fascinating. One of my aunts was heavily into dyeing wool using anything found in nature and I loved watching her. I am fascinated by the idea of living off the land and being self-sufficient as much as possible, but it’s not easy. My heroine had to do more in order to make a living so I added the fact that she keeps sheep and spins/dyes her own wool.

TrefoilAnne:  HIDDEN IN THE MISTS has been getting some lovely reviews. Author Sue Moorcroft said: “Hidden in the Mists is her best book yet. Her meticulous research created such authenticity that I felt as if I were living the entwined past and present stories with the beautifully realised characters.”

Erin Green, a Goodreads reviewer said: "This beautiful time-slip story moves seamlessly between 2022 and AD 890. Symbolism, Nordic language, Viking traditions and decorative bangles forge an unforgettable tale of true love, honour and destiny. Highly recommended. Five stars."

Sandy Barker, another Goodreads reviewer called it "A beautiful, sometimes dark but always compelling, romantic read. Highly recommended."

Can you share a short excerpt from Hidden in the Mists, please?

Christina:  Yes, of course. Here is a scene where Skye is feeling a bit lonely and lost:-

Skye Logan gripped her mug of tea tightly with both hands, trying to draw the warmth into her very bones, but it wasn’t working. She stared out towards the island of Jura, which could be glimpsed in the distance across the sea, a beautiful sight she’d never tire of looking at. The water between there and the mainland was calm today, below a layer of morning mist that also swathed most of the island. It crept up towards the cottage, its soft swirls stirring restlessly on an unseen breeze. Indoors, here in her cosy kitchen, she was safe and warm, but the chill was lodged deep inside her and not even the wood-burning Rayburn could thaw her out.

6 Bay at low tideShe was starting to wonder if anything ever would.

It was barely light, but she’d been unable to sleep. She had always been an early riser, yet waking up pre-dawn was taking things a step too far. No point tossing and turning, though, not when she had so many chores always waiting for her attention. If she could just force down a bowl of porridge, she could get a head start.

She was about to turn away from the window when something caught her eye. A shadow came gliding into the little bay that belonged to her property, a rowing boat of some sort, although she couldn’t quite make it out. A shiver of unease slithered down her spine, making the hairs at the back of her neck stand on end.

‘Who on earth …?’

Perhaps someone from up or down the coast, out on an early-morning fishing trip? But as she watched, the vessel headed straight towards the sliver of beach where she kept her own boat during the summer. At high tide, like now, the water came halfway up the rocky outcroppings that framed the bay, and made it possible to row all the way in. At any other time, the boat would have got stuck in the mud and tangles of seaweed further out.

TortoiseThere was a hazy figure, all alone, and she saw him or her put the oars away and stand up, jumping on to the shore. A her, definitely – it had to be a female, as Skye could see now that she was small, with a long plait falling forward as she pulled the boat onto the sand and tied it to a nearby rock. When she straightened up, a flash of metal glinted off what looked like two large pieces of jewellery, one either side of her chest above her bosom. Her clothing was long and blew slightly in the breeze; some sort of layered maxi dress. She kneeled on the beach for a while. Then she picked up a sack and headed for the line of trees, where the forest abutted Skye’s garden and fields.

‘Hey!’ Skye knocked on the window and tried to wave at the intruder to gain her attention, but it had no effect. She ought to go outside and confront her, but instinct made her stay where she was. The woman could be dangerous; deranged even. Why else was she sneaking around on someone else’s property? Skye was suddenly glad her front door was still locked. There was something eerie about the individual; the way her shape seemed so insubstantial at times, Skye wasn’t entirely convinced she was real.

‘Perhaps I’m dreaming,’ she murmured. Had she fallen asleep at last, only to imagine herself having breakfast?

But when she placed her fingers on the glass of the window, it felt cool to the touch and not in the least dreamlike.

‘I’m going mad,’ she muttered.

3 ArgyllShe was painfully aware of how isolated she was here, far from any other habitation. Since her soon-to-be-ex-husband Craig had left her, she’d been living on her own with only her two Border collies for company. Wait, the dogs! She glanced at them and was surprised to see them sleeping peacefully in their squishy beds next to the Rayburn. Pepsi and Cola were excellent guard dogs and ought to have been barking furiously right now. The woman outside hadn’t exactly been stealthy, but they appeared oblivious. What on earth was going on?

As she turned back to the window, the shadowy figure was disappearing into the forest. Skye waited a few minutes, but the woman didn’t come back, and when she glanced towards the beach, the boat was gone too.

‘How is that possible?’ she whispered, thoroughly spooked now. ‘Who took it?’ It had been there only moments before, she’d swear to it.

There was no reasonable explanation that she could come up with, and the whole episode left her feeling shaken and unsettled. What had just happened?

UrnesAnne:  What's next for you?

Christina:  I’m about to start edits on the fifth book in the Runes Viking series – PROMISES OF THE RUNES. This is the story of Ivar, older brother of two of the heroines in previous books, and it is mostly set in Norway. Having had the main time travelling characters female up to now, it was exciting to be able to write one with a male protagonist in the spotlight. He gets to go on quite an adventure!

Anne:  And will you be giving away a copy of HIDDEN IN THE MISTS?

Christina:  Yes absolutely, I’ll choose a winner at random from anyone (anywhere in the world) who answers the question below.

Thank you so much for interviewing me, Anne, and your kind words about my book!

Question for readers:  My heroes both have a bit of a ‘bad boy’ vibe about them and they’re definitely alpha heroes – do you like those, and if so, who’s your absolute favourite? Contemporary or historical, either is fine with me!

130 thoughts on “Hidden in the Mists”

  1. It has been many a year since I’ve read a Viking story, but this one sure sounds interesting.
    As for heroes, I’m ok with either an alpha or beta hero. It all depends on the love story. As for bad boy vibes – they are okay, but they don’t make my heart go piddy-pat.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  2. It has been many a year since I’ve read a Viking story, but this one sure sounds interesting.
    As for heroes, I’m ok with either an alpha or beta hero. It all depends on the love story. As for bad boy vibes – they are okay, but they don’t make my heart go piddy-pat.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  3. It has been many a year since I’ve read a Viking story, but this one sure sounds interesting.
    As for heroes, I’m ok with either an alpha or beta hero. It all depends on the love story. As for bad boy vibes – they are okay, but they don’t make my heart go piddy-pat.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  4. It has been many a year since I’ve read a Viking story, but this one sure sounds interesting.
    As for heroes, I’m ok with either an alpha or beta hero. It all depends on the love story. As for bad boy vibes – they are okay, but they don’t make my heart go piddy-pat.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  5. It has been many a year since I’ve read a Viking story, but this one sure sounds interesting.
    As for heroes, I’m ok with either an alpha or beta hero. It all depends on the love story. As for bad boy vibes – they are okay, but they don’t make my heart go piddy-pat.
    Best of luck with the book.

    Reply
  6. Ooh, Christina–Scotland, two love stories, VIKING JEWELERY!!! Sign me up! As for heroes, mine lean toward beta, but as tough as they need to be when that’s required. Anne and Christina, thanks for the lovely interview and preview.

    Reply
  7. Ooh, Christina–Scotland, two love stories, VIKING JEWELERY!!! Sign me up! As for heroes, mine lean toward beta, but as tough as they need to be when that’s required. Anne and Christina, thanks for the lovely interview and preview.

    Reply
  8. Ooh, Christina–Scotland, two love stories, VIKING JEWELERY!!! Sign me up! As for heroes, mine lean toward beta, but as tough as they need to be when that’s required. Anne and Christina, thanks for the lovely interview and preview.

    Reply
  9. Ooh, Christina–Scotland, two love stories, VIKING JEWELERY!!! Sign me up! As for heroes, mine lean toward beta, but as tough as they need to be when that’s required. Anne and Christina, thanks for the lovely interview and preview.

    Reply
  10. Ooh, Christina–Scotland, two love stories, VIKING JEWELERY!!! Sign me up! As for heroes, mine lean toward beta, but as tough as they need to be when that’s required. Anne and Christina, thanks for the lovely interview and preview.

    Reply
  11. What a wonderful interview, Christina and Anne. Thank you! I enjoyed seeing those lovely pieces of jewelry, too.
    I’ve no objection to an alpha or bad boy hero. A favorite alpha hero is Dragos from Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.

    Reply
  12. What a wonderful interview, Christina and Anne. Thank you! I enjoyed seeing those lovely pieces of jewelry, too.
    I’ve no objection to an alpha or bad boy hero. A favorite alpha hero is Dragos from Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.

    Reply
  13. What a wonderful interview, Christina and Anne. Thank you! I enjoyed seeing those lovely pieces of jewelry, too.
    I’ve no objection to an alpha or bad boy hero. A favorite alpha hero is Dragos from Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.

    Reply
  14. What a wonderful interview, Christina and Anne. Thank you! I enjoyed seeing those lovely pieces of jewelry, too.
    I’ve no objection to an alpha or bad boy hero. A favorite alpha hero is Dragos from Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.

    Reply
  15. What a wonderful interview, Christina and Anne. Thank you! I enjoyed seeing those lovely pieces of jewelry, too.
    I’ve no objection to an alpha or bad boy hero. A favorite alpha hero is Dragos from Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.

    Reply
  16. Thank you Mary! It’s a good thing there are all types of heroes, isn’t it – I think it all depends on how they are written too.

    Reply
  17. Thank you Mary! It’s a good thing there are all types of heroes, isn’t it – I think it all depends on how they are written too.

    Reply
  18. Thank you Mary! It’s a good thing there are all types of heroes, isn’t it – I think it all depends on how they are written too.

    Reply
  19. Thank you Mary! It’s a good thing there are all types of heroes, isn’t it – I think it all depends on how they are written too.

    Reply
  20. Thank you Mary! It’s a good thing there are all types of heroes, isn’t it – I think it all depends on how they are written too.

    Reply
  21. Thank you, Mary Jo, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I can never get enough of Viking jewellery – just need more occasions to wear it! And Scotland will always be one of my favourite destinations.

    Reply
  22. Thank you, Mary Jo, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I can never get enough of Viking jewellery – just need more occasions to wear it! And Scotland will always be one of my favourite destinations.

    Reply
  23. Thank you, Mary Jo, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I can never get enough of Viking jewellery – just need more occasions to wear it! And Scotland will always be one of my favourite destinations.

    Reply
  24. Thank you, Mary Jo, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I can never get enough of Viking jewellery – just need more occasions to wear it! And Scotland will always be one of my favourite destinations.

    Reply
  25. Thank you, Mary Jo, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I can never get enough of Viking jewellery – just need more occasions to wear it! And Scotland will always be one of my favourite destinations.

    Reply
  26. Great interview ladies! And Hidden in the Mist sounds fantastic Christina. I’m not usually into bad boy heroes but Jonas Merrick in Anna Campbell’s Seven Nights in A Rogue’s Bed caught me by surprise, and I did end up falling for him (along with Sidonie;)

    Reply
  27. Great interview ladies! And Hidden in the Mist sounds fantastic Christina. I’m not usually into bad boy heroes but Jonas Merrick in Anna Campbell’s Seven Nights in A Rogue’s Bed caught me by surprise, and I did end up falling for him (along with Sidonie;)

    Reply
  28. Great interview ladies! And Hidden in the Mist sounds fantastic Christina. I’m not usually into bad boy heroes but Jonas Merrick in Anna Campbell’s Seven Nights in A Rogue’s Bed caught me by surprise, and I did end up falling for him (along with Sidonie;)

    Reply
  29. Great interview ladies! And Hidden in the Mist sounds fantastic Christina. I’m not usually into bad boy heroes but Jonas Merrick in Anna Campbell’s Seven Nights in A Rogue’s Bed caught me by surprise, and I did end up falling for him (along with Sidonie;)

    Reply
  30. Great interview ladies! And Hidden in the Mist sounds fantastic Christina. I’m not usually into bad boy heroes but Jonas Merrick in Anna Campbell’s Seven Nights in A Rogue’s Bed caught me by surprise, and I did end up falling for him (along with Sidonie;)

    Reply
  31. Christina-your book sounds wonderful. I’m eager to read it. As for “bad boy ” heroes, my favorite has to be J. D. Robb’s “Roarke,” who makes debut in Naked in Death. Here’s a man who dragged himself up and forward from deadly alleys in Ireland, surviving by any means necessary. Went from being a master thief to a world-building/owning man of virtually unlimited wealth. And still has enough humanity left in him to realize that he, master of all he surveys, has lost his heart to the woman (cop) whose only goal is to lock him away for murder. Works for me.

    Reply
  32. Christina-your book sounds wonderful. I’m eager to read it. As for “bad boy ” heroes, my favorite has to be J. D. Robb’s “Roarke,” who makes debut in Naked in Death. Here’s a man who dragged himself up and forward from deadly alleys in Ireland, surviving by any means necessary. Went from being a master thief to a world-building/owning man of virtually unlimited wealth. And still has enough humanity left in him to realize that he, master of all he surveys, has lost his heart to the woman (cop) whose only goal is to lock him away for murder. Works for me.

    Reply
  33. Christina-your book sounds wonderful. I’m eager to read it. As for “bad boy ” heroes, my favorite has to be J. D. Robb’s “Roarke,” who makes debut in Naked in Death. Here’s a man who dragged himself up and forward from deadly alleys in Ireland, surviving by any means necessary. Went from being a master thief to a world-building/owning man of virtually unlimited wealth. And still has enough humanity left in him to realize that he, master of all he surveys, has lost his heart to the woman (cop) whose only goal is to lock him away for murder. Works for me.

    Reply
  34. Christina-your book sounds wonderful. I’m eager to read it. As for “bad boy ” heroes, my favorite has to be J. D. Robb’s “Roarke,” who makes debut in Naked in Death. Here’s a man who dragged himself up and forward from deadly alleys in Ireland, surviving by any means necessary. Went from being a master thief to a world-building/owning man of virtually unlimited wealth. And still has enough humanity left in him to realize that he, master of all he surveys, has lost his heart to the woman (cop) whose only goal is to lock him away for murder. Works for me.

    Reply
  35. Christina-your book sounds wonderful. I’m eager to read it. As for “bad boy ” heroes, my favorite has to be J. D. Robb’s “Roarke,” who makes debut in Naked in Death. Here’s a man who dragged himself up and forward from deadly alleys in Ireland, surviving by any means necessary. Went from being a master thief to a world-building/owning man of virtually unlimited wealth. And still has enough humanity left in him to realize that he, master of all he surveys, has lost his heart to the woman (cop) whose only goal is to lock him away for murder. Works for me.

    Reply
  36. I’m not really into bad boy heroes. They usually annoy me too much at the start of a story to enjoy carrying on. I read an ARC of Hidden in the Mists and I LOVED it!! The two stories are equally interesting.
    The past story is usually the one I read the book for but the present story in this one is so interesting. I really liked Skye. She just appealed to me.
    Any of you here planning to read it are in for a real treat.
    Best of luck with it Christina.

    Reply
  37. I’m not really into bad boy heroes. They usually annoy me too much at the start of a story to enjoy carrying on. I read an ARC of Hidden in the Mists and I LOVED it!! The two stories are equally interesting.
    The past story is usually the one I read the book for but the present story in this one is so interesting. I really liked Skye. She just appealed to me.
    Any of you here planning to read it are in for a real treat.
    Best of luck with it Christina.

    Reply
  38. I’m not really into bad boy heroes. They usually annoy me too much at the start of a story to enjoy carrying on. I read an ARC of Hidden in the Mists and I LOVED it!! The two stories are equally interesting.
    The past story is usually the one I read the book for but the present story in this one is so interesting. I really liked Skye. She just appealed to me.
    Any of you here planning to read it are in for a real treat.
    Best of luck with it Christina.

    Reply
  39. I’m not really into bad boy heroes. They usually annoy me too much at the start of a story to enjoy carrying on. I read an ARC of Hidden in the Mists and I LOVED it!! The two stories are equally interesting.
    The past story is usually the one I read the book for but the present story in this one is so interesting. I really liked Skye. She just appealed to me.
    Any of you here planning to read it are in for a real treat.
    Best of luck with it Christina.

    Reply
  40. I’m not really into bad boy heroes. They usually annoy me too much at the start of a story to enjoy carrying on. I read an ARC of Hidden in the Mists and I LOVED it!! The two stories are equally interesting.
    The past story is usually the one I read the book for but the present story in this one is so interesting. I really liked Skye. She just appealed to me.
    Any of you here planning to read it are in for a real treat.
    Best of luck with it Christina.

    Reply
  41. Thank you so much Teresa, I’m so happy you liked it! And great that you felt both stories worked – that’s always tricky to do.

    Reply
  42. Thank you so much Teresa, I’m so happy you liked it! And great that you felt both stories worked – that’s always tricky to do.

    Reply
  43. Thank you so much Teresa, I’m so happy you liked it! And great that you felt both stories worked – that’s always tricky to do.

    Reply
  44. Thank you so much Teresa, I’m so happy you liked it! And great that you felt both stories worked – that’s always tricky to do.

    Reply
  45. Thank you so much Teresa, I’m so happy you liked it! And great that you felt both stories worked – that’s always tricky to do.

    Reply
  46. I must admit that Ms Courtenay has made me see stories about Vikings in a completely new light. Thanks so much for this post and the wonderful pictures. I think that you have made these two couples sound quite interesting. Funny, life is not easy no matter when or where it is lived.
    Hope everyone is well.

    Reply
  47. I must admit that Ms Courtenay has made me see stories about Vikings in a completely new light. Thanks so much for this post and the wonderful pictures. I think that you have made these two couples sound quite interesting. Funny, life is not easy no matter when or where it is lived.
    Hope everyone is well.

    Reply
  48. I must admit that Ms Courtenay has made me see stories about Vikings in a completely new light. Thanks so much for this post and the wonderful pictures. I think that you have made these two couples sound quite interesting. Funny, life is not easy no matter when or where it is lived.
    Hope everyone is well.

    Reply
  49. I must admit that Ms Courtenay has made me see stories about Vikings in a completely new light. Thanks so much for this post and the wonderful pictures. I think that you have made these two couples sound quite interesting. Funny, life is not easy no matter when or where it is lived.
    Hope everyone is well.

    Reply
  50. I must admit that Ms Courtenay has made me see stories about Vikings in a completely new light. Thanks so much for this post and the wonderful pictures. I think that you have made these two couples sound quite interesting. Funny, life is not easy no matter when or where it is lived.
    Hope everyone is well.

    Reply
  51. Congratulations, Christina! I had given up on Viking stories years ago, then you joined the Wenches and have brought me back into the fold! And now to have one set in the west of Scotland—thank you! I know how I shall spend tomorrow for certain.
    As for heroes, I am drawn to the alpha males who learn to love, but also to the bad boys with hidden hearts of gold. I just finished Sarah MacLean’s Bareknuckle Bastards series, so Devil/Devon and Beast/Whit immediately sprang to mind at your question. But there are so many others, too….

    Reply
  52. Congratulations, Christina! I had given up on Viking stories years ago, then you joined the Wenches and have brought me back into the fold! And now to have one set in the west of Scotland—thank you! I know how I shall spend tomorrow for certain.
    As for heroes, I am drawn to the alpha males who learn to love, but also to the bad boys with hidden hearts of gold. I just finished Sarah MacLean’s Bareknuckle Bastards series, so Devil/Devon and Beast/Whit immediately sprang to mind at your question. But there are so many others, too….

    Reply
  53. Congratulations, Christina! I had given up on Viking stories years ago, then you joined the Wenches and have brought me back into the fold! And now to have one set in the west of Scotland—thank you! I know how I shall spend tomorrow for certain.
    As for heroes, I am drawn to the alpha males who learn to love, but also to the bad boys with hidden hearts of gold. I just finished Sarah MacLean’s Bareknuckle Bastards series, so Devil/Devon and Beast/Whit immediately sprang to mind at your question. But there are so many others, too….

    Reply
  54. Congratulations, Christina! I had given up on Viking stories years ago, then you joined the Wenches and have brought me back into the fold! And now to have one set in the west of Scotland—thank you! I know how I shall spend tomorrow for certain.
    As for heroes, I am drawn to the alpha males who learn to love, but also to the bad boys with hidden hearts of gold. I just finished Sarah MacLean’s Bareknuckle Bastards series, so Devil/Devon and Beast/Whit immediately sprang to mind at your question. But there are so many others, too….

    Reply
  55. Congratulations, Christina! I had given up on Viking stories years ago, then you joined the Wenches and have brought me back into the fold! And now to have one set in the west of Scotland—thank you! I know how I shall spend tomorrow for certain.
    As for heroes, I am drawn to the alpha males who learn to love, but also to the bad boys with hidden hearts of gold. I just finished Sarah MacLean’s Bareknuckle Bastards series, so Devil/Devon and Beast/Whit immediately sprang to mind at your question. But there are so many others, too….

    Reply
  56. Thank you so much Constance! Scotland is amazing isn’t it!
    Thank you for the recommendation – I will check out that series, it sounds great!

    Reply
  57. Thank you so much Constance! Scotland is amazing isn’t it!
    Thank you for the recommendation – I will check out that series, it sounds great!

    Reply
  58. Thank you so much Constance! Scotland is amazing isn’t it!
    Thank you for the recommendation – I will check out that series, it sounds great!

    Reply
  59. Thank you so much Constance! Scotland is amazing isn’t it!
    Thank you for the recommendation – I will check out that series, it sounds great!

    Reply
  60. Thank you so much Constance! Scotland is amazing isn’t it!
    Thank you for the recommendation – I will check out that series, it sounds great!

    Reply
  61. Love the interview and I love reading any genre as for your question bad boys aren’t so bad Thank you for the book giveaway! This book sounds like a must read.

    Reply
  62. Love the interview and I love reading any genre as for your question bad boys aren’t so bad Thank you for the book giveaway! This book sounds like a must read.

    Reply
  63. Love the interview and I love reading any genre as for your question bad boys aren’t so bad Thank you for the book giveaway! This book sounds like a must read.

    Reply
  64. Love the interview and I love reading any genre as for your question bad boys aren’t so bad Thank you for the book giveaway! This book sounds like a must read.

    Reply
  65. Love the interview and I love reading any genre as for your question bad boys aren’t so bad Thank you for the book giveaway! This book sounds like a must read.

    Reply
  66. This book sounds very intriguing…
    As for bad boy/beta/alpha….I like them all! For me, it all depends on how the story is written and the relationship develops whether I like the H/h…
    I’m looking forward to reading your book!

    Reply
  67. This book sounds very intriguing…
    As for bad boy/beta/alpha….I like them all! For me, it all depends on how the story is written and the relationship develops whether I like the H/h…
    I’m looking forward to reading your book!

    Reply
  68. This book sounds very intriguing…
    As for bad boy/beta/alpha….I like them all! For me, it all depends on how the story is written and the relationship develops whether I like the H/h…
    I’m looking forward to reading your book!

    Reply
  69. This book sounds very intriguing…
    As for bad boy/beta/alpha….I like them all! For me, it all depends on how the story is written and the relationship develops whether I like the H/h…
    I’m looking forward to reading your book!

    Reply
  70. This book sounds very intriguing…
    As for bad boy/beta/alpha….I like them all! For me, it all depends on how the story is written and the relationship develops whether I like the H/h…
    I’m looking forward to reading your book!

    Reply
  71. I think I like heroes that have a bit of a playful, mischievous streak the best. In terms of my favorite alpha character, maybe Lyon Redmond in Julie Ann Long’s series? Does he count as an alpha character? It’s hard to think of any of my favorite characters as giving off “bad boy” vibes because by the end of the books I like them so much all I can remember is how great they are!

    Reply
  72. I think I like heroes that have a bit of a playful, mischievous streak the best. In terms of my favorite alpha character, maybe Lyon Redmond in Julie Ann Long’s series? Does he count as an alpha character? It’s hard to think of any of my favorite characters as giving off “bad boy” vibes because by the end of the books I like them so much all I can remember is how great they are!

    Reply
  73. I think I like heroes that have a bit of a playful, mischievous streak the best. In terms of my favorite alpha character, maybe Lyon Redmond in Julie Ann Long’s series? Does he count as an alpha character? It’s hard to think of any of my favorite characters as giving off “bad boy” vibes because by the end of the books I like them so much all I can remember is how great they are!

    Reply
  74. I think I like heroes that have a bit of a playful, mischievous streak the best. In terms of my favorite alpha character, maybe Lyon Redmond in Julie Ann Long’s series? Does he count as an alpha character? It’s hard to think of any of my favorite characters as giving off “bad boy” vibes because by the end of the books I like them so much all I can remember is how great they are!

    Reply
  75. I think I like heroes that have a bit of a playful, mischievous streak the best. In terms of my favorite alpha character, maybe Lyon Redmond in Julie Ann Long’s series? Does he count as an alpha character? It’s hard to think of any of my favorite characters as giving off “bad boy” vibes because by the end of the books I like them so much all I can remember is how great they are!

    Reply
  76. Thank you so much Vicki! Yes, I agree that’s a great way of looking at it and heroes vary greatly no matter what type they are.

    Reply
  77. Thank you so much Vicki! Yes, I agree that’s a great way of looking at it and heroes vary greatly no matter what type they are.

    Reply
  78. Thank you so much Vicki! Yes, I agree that’s a great way of looking at it and heroes vary greatly no matter what type they are.

    Reply
  79. Thank you so much Vicki! Yes, I agree that’s a great way of looking at it and heroes vary greatly no matter what type they are.

    Reply
  80. Thank you so much Vicki! Yes, I agree that’s a great way of looking at it and heroes vary greatly no matter what type they are.

    Reply
  81. That’s true, Lauren – they do seem to change by the end of a story when the heroine has “tamed” them to a certain extent. I really like heroes with a mischievous streak too!

    Reply
  82. That’s true, Lauren – they do seem to change by the end of a story when the heroine has “tamed” them to a certain extent. I really like heroes with a mischievous streak too!

    Reply
  83. That’s true, Lauren – they do seem to change by the end of a story when the heroine has “tamed” them to a certain extent. I really like heroes with a mischievous streak too!

    Reply
  84. That’s true, Lauren – they do seem to change by the end of a story when the heroine has “tamed” them to a certain extent. I really like heroes with a mischievous streak too!

    Reply
  85. That’s true, Lauren – they do seem to change by the end of a story when the heroine has “tamed” them to a certain extent. I really like heroes with a mischievous streak too!

    Reply

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