Georgette Heyer and These Old Shades

Anne here, and today I'm bringing you another Georgette Heyer blog featuring some snippets from The Novels of Georgette Heyer, an upcoming book by Jennifer Kloester, Heyer's biographer. They are, of course, published with Jen's permission. (We'll let you know when the book goes on sale.)
Georgette-heyer

Today we are dipping into These Old Shades, which was my first ever Georgette Heyer. You've probably heard me tell this story, so forgive me if you have and skip this paragraph. I was 11 and my friend Merryn and I, both prolific readers, were fed up with having to stick to the books in the children's library. But the rules said you had to be over 12, so . . . 

It was a dare. Merryn dared me to borrow a book from the adult section. I said, "All right, I will! Which book should I get?" She said her mother liked Georgette Heyer, so I grabbed the first one I saw, which happened to be These Old Shades. It was a weird title and I had no idea what it would be like, but I didn't care. And to our amazement, the librarian didn't bat an eye!

So These Old Shades became my first Heyer, and I not only devoured it, it will always hold a special place in my heart. (Coincidentally it was Jen Kloester's first as well.) Since then, on many different Heyer sites, people often ask, "What was your first Heyer?" I think we remember our first because it ushered us into a whole new reading world, a world to which many of us became, and remain, addicted. 

TOS1stSo, on to Heyer and These Old Shades. Georgette was very close to her beloved father, who was friend and mentor as well as father. On 15 June 1925 George Heyer had a heart attack and died in front of his 22-year-old daughter. 

After that Georgette struggled to write for months. But she had a contract to fulfil, and eventually, she returned to a story she'd begun three years earlier as a kind of sequel to her first book, The Black Moth.

At the time (1923, long before her father's death and in a burst of enthusiasm for the book) she wrote this to her agent:

The sequel is naturally a much better book than the Moth itself, and is designed to catch the public’s taste. I have also tried to arrange it so that anyone who reads it need not first read the Moth. It deals with my priceless villain, and ends awfully happily. Tracy becomes quite a decent person, and marries a girl about half his age! I’ve packed it full of incident and adventure, and have made my heroine masquerade as a boy for the first few chapters. This, I find, always attracts people! 
Georgette Heyer to L.P. Moore, letter, 23 January 1923. 

Interesting, isn't it, how clear-headed she was — and at such a young age — about what readers would respond to. And how determined she was to "catch the public's taste."

But her father's death had devastated her, and for months she wrote nothing. She told her agent, ‘I don’t think I have the heart to write a period novel.’ As well, her mother was grieving badly, and the family was now without the income from her father's work. It soon became clear that much of the financial support of the family, which included her two younger brothers (aged 13 and 17) was going to fall on Georgette.

Enter her own personal hero. Richard Rougier, a former beau, returned from Africa, and proposed, and on the 20th July 1925, a month after her father's death, they were married.

Georgette-and-Ronalds-wedding-768x1395Georgette persevered with the book, and Heinemann published These Old Shades in October 1926. (That's the first edition cover above on the left) From the very first These Old Shades sold well, and in its first ten years, These Old Shades was reprinted almost thirty times — not bad for a 25 year old author.

According to Kloester, completing These Old Shades helped Heyer find her way back to the literary world she loved. And for me, aged 11, it became a gateway to a world I've always loved.

You will notice that I have said very little about the actual story. That's because to explain it would spoil it for new readers, and I hope these posts will entice new readers to read Heyer (and old ones to reread These Old Shades.)  It's not a Regency-era novel, it's set earlier than that, and the hero is dressed in velvets and lace, wears jewels and high-heeled shoes — and is gorgeously masculine.

I will however, point you to a link that will explain the meaning of the title, which puzzled me for years. It's from a poem by Austin Dobson entitled ‘Epilogue', and, in a nutshell, the poet is explaining that he's rejecting the modern world in favor of the old world. 

"Whereas with these old Shades of mine,
Their ways and dress delight me;
And should I trip by word or line,
They cannot well indict me."

The whole poem is here.

So here's a question for you — if you're a Heyer reader, what was the first Heyer you ever read? Was it special to you? And if you're not a Heyer reader, is there a book that opened a new world for you that you never forgot?

310 thoughts on “Georgette Heyer and These Old Shades”

  1. This was my first too, and my mother’s favourite. I can still remember her handing it to me at the Coburg library, saying ‘You might enjoy this’.
    It was my first adult book too! My sister is named after the heroine 🙂 She is just as beautiful and spirited!

    Reply
  2. This was my first too, and my mother’s favourite. I can still remember her handing it to me at the Coburg library, saying ‘You might enjoy this’.
    It was my first adult book too! My sister is named after the heroine 🙂 She is just as beautiful and spirited!

    Reply
  3. This was my first too, and my mother’s favourite. I can still remember her handing it to me at the Coburg library, saying ‘You might enjoy this’.
    It was my first adult book too! My sister is named after the heroine 🙂 She is just as beautiful and spirited!

    Reply
  4. This was my first too, and my mother’s favourite. I can still remember her handing it to me at the Coburg library, saying ‘You might enjoy this’.
    It was my first adult book too! My sister is named after the heroine 🙂 She is just as beautiful and spirited!

    Reply
  5. This was my first too, and my mother’s favourite. I can still remember her handing it to me at the Coburg library, saying ‘You might enjoy this’.
    It was my first adult book too! My sister is named after the heroine 🙂 She is just as beautiful and spirited!

    Reply
  6. Mine was Arabella around age 11ish. I didn’t read TOS for many yrs bec the German title was ‘Der Page und die Herzogin’ (the page boy and the duchess). I was clearly a snob even back then bec that did not sound like anything I would want to read 😉 thankfully I got over that eventually.

    Reply
  7. Mine was Arabella around age 11ish. I didn’t read TOS for many yrs bec the German title was ‘Der Page und die Herzogin’ (the page boy and the duchess). I was clearly a snob even back then bec that did not sound like anything I would want to read 😉 thankfully I got over that eventually.

    Reply
  8. Mine was Arabella around age 11ish. I didn’t read TOS for many yrs bec the German title was ‘Der Page und die Herzogin’ (the page boy and the duchess). I was clearly a snob even back then bec that did not sound like anything I would want to read 😉 thankfully I got over that eventually.

    Reply
  9. Mine was Arabella around age 11ish. I didn’t read TOS for many yrs bec the German title was ‘Der Page und die Herzogin’ (the page boy and the duchess). I was clearly a snob even back then bec that did not sound like anything I would want to read 😉 thankfully I got over that eventually.

    Reply
  10. Mine was Arabella around age 11ish. I didn’t read TOS for many yrs bec the German title was ‘Der Page und die Herzogin’ (the page boy and the duchess). I was clearly a snob even back then bec that did not sound like anything I would want to read 😉 thankfully I got over that eventually.

    Reply
  11. I don’t remember the first Georgette Heyer I read. I know I was about 12 when I started reading her, Barbara Cartland, and a third author I can’t remember. (This was about 1971). I do remember that I didn’t like “Theses Old Shads” because the hero was older than my father. (My father was only 20 years older than me and I still have an issue with an age difference greater than 12 years). I have since re-read “These Old Shades” many times and love the characters but can’t quite get over the age gap

    Reply
  12. I don’t remember the first Georgette Heyer I read. I know I was about 12 when I started reading her, Barbara Cartland, and a third author I can’t remember. (This was about 1971). I do remember that I didn’t like “Theses Old Shads” because the hero was older than my father. (My father was only 20 years older than me and I still have an issue with an age difference greater than 12 years). I have since re-read “These Old Shades” many times and love the characters but can’t quite get over the age gap

    Reply
  13. I don’t remember the first Georgette Heyer I read. I know I was about 12 when I started reading her, Barbara Cartland, and a third author I can’t remember. (This was about 1971). I do remember that I didn’t like “Theses Old Shads” because the hero was older than my father. (My father was only 20 years older than me and I still have an issue with an age difference greater than 12 years). I have since re-read “These Old Shades” many times and love the characters but can’t quite get over the age gap

    Reply
  14. I don’t remember the first Georgette Heyer I read. I know I was about 12 when I started reading her, Barbara Cartland, and a third author I can’t remember. (This was about 1971). I do remember that I didn’t like “Theses Old Shads” because the hero was older than my father. (My father was only 20 years older than me and I still have an issue with an age difference greater than 12 years). I have since re-read “These Old Shades” many times and love the characters but can’t quite get over the age gap

    Reply
  15. I don’t remember the first Georgette Heyer I read. I know I was about 12 when I started reading her, Barbara Cartland, and a third author I can’t remember. (This was about 1971). I do remember that I didn’t like “Theses Old Shads” because the hero was older than my father. (My father was only 20 years older than me and I still have an issue with an age difference greater than 12 years). I have since re-read “These Old Shades” many times and love the characters but can’t quite get over the age gap

    Reply
  16. SYLVESTER! That’s still a favorite of mine, with the stern duke, ditzy widow, and shy but perceptive writer heroine. I’ve loved most Heyer books (obviously!), but These Old Shades is low on my list, largely because of the age difference, But apart from that, it’s a rousing good story.

    Reply
  17. SYLVESTER! That’s still a favorite of mine, with the stern duke, ditzy widow, and shy but perceptive writer heroine. I’ve loved most Heyer books (obviously!), but These Old Shades is low on my list, largely because of the age difference, But apart from that, it’s a rousing good story.

    Reply
  18. SYLVESTER! That’s still a favorite of mine, with the stern duke, ditzy widow, and shy but perceptive writer heroine. I’ve loved most Heyer books (obviously!), but These Old Shades is low on my list, largely because of the age difference, But apart from that, it’s a rousing good story.

    Reply
  19. SYLVESTER! That’s still a favorite of mine, with the stern duke, ditzy widow, and shy but perceptive writer heroine. I’ve loved most Heyer books (obviously!), but These Old Shades is low on my list, largely because of the age difference, But apart from that, it’s a rousing good story.

    Reply
  20. SYLVESTER! That’s still a favorite of mine, with the stern duke, ditzy widow, and shy but perceptive writer heroine. I’ve loved most Heyer books (obviously!), but These Old Shades is low on my list, largely because of the age difference, But apart from that, it’s a rousing good story.

    Reply
  21. Me too! My favorite aunt was a huge Heyer fan and she started me off with The Reluctant Widow. I’ve reread it many times over the years. The trio of These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army is one of the best series ever written in the Regency genre. They were gateway books to Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, and so many others who bring that time period to life.

    Reply
  22. Me too! My favorite aunt was a huge Heyer fan and she started me off with The Reluctant Widow. I’ve reread it many times over the years. The trio of These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army is one of the best series ever written in the Regency genre. They were gateway books to Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, and so many others who bring that time period to life.

    Reply
  23. Me too! My favorite aunt was a huge Heyer fan and she started me off with The Reluctant Widow. I’ve reread it many times over the years. The trio of These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army is one of the best series ever written in the Regency genre. They were gateway books to Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, and so many others who bring that time period to life.

    Reply
  24. Me too! My favorite aunt was a huge Heyer fan and she started me off with The Reluctant Widow. I’ve reread it many times over the years. The trio of These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army is one of the best series ever written in the Regency genre. They were gateway books to Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, and so many others who bring that time period to life.

    Reply
  25. Me too! My favorite aunt was a huge Heyer fan and she started me off with The Reluctant Widow. I’ve reread it many times over the years. The trio of These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army is one of the best series ever written in the Regency genre. They were gateway books to Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, and so many others who bring that time period to life.

    Reply
  26. Georgette Heyer was my Mom’s favourite author and I was about 12 when she handed me “The Talisman Ring”. I loved it and have been reading, re-reading and listening to Heyer’s books ever since.

    Reply
  27. Georgette Heyer was my Mom’s favourite author and I was about 12 when she handed me “The Talisman Ring”. I loved it and have been reading, re-reading and listening to Heyer’s books ever since.

    Reply
  28. Georgette Heyer was my Mom’s favourite author and I was about 12 when she handed me “The Talisman Ring”. I loved it and have been reading, re-reading and listening to Heyer’s books ever since.

    Reply
  29. Georgette Heyer was my Mom’s favourite author and I was about 12 when she handed me “The Talisman Ring”. I loved it and have been reading, re-reading and listening to Heyer’s books ever since.

    Reply
  30. Georgette Heyer was my Mom’s favourite author and I was about 12 when she handed me “The Talisman Ring”. I loved it and have been reading, re-reading and listening to Heyer’s books ever since.

    Reply
  31. Back in the 1950s an important – and I guess now mostly forgotten – part of the British literary scene were the reprint book clubs. These printed cheap (utilitarian but well made) hardbacks a few months after the original editions and well before any paperback came out, and provided the publishers with a guarantee of tens of thousands of extra sales. The clubs’ output comprised both fiction and nonfiction, the latter being mostly historical accounts of the recent war. My parents subscribed to two or three of these clubs, so there were always new books to around the house and from the age of nine or ten I was reading almost everything on my parent’s bookshelves (I bounced off “Pilgrims Progress” and “The Mill on the Floss”, and I recall that “Lorna Doone” was a bit of a struggle). All the non fiction gave me a lasting taste for history, though when it comes to Heyer, the most useful reading was Arthur Bryant’s popular history trilogy covering the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars – I actually understood all those references to the Peninsular War that were slipped into her novels.
    So, to get round to the actual subject of the posting, my first Heyer was determined by the output of the Companion Book Club and was “The Quiet Gentleman”. Definitely not as romantic as “These Old Shades” – more a ‘plot to murder for an inheritance’ mystery in fact – but I loved it, including the low key romance. I searched the shelves for more and found one that my father had given to my mother for Easter 1947, namely “The Reluctant Widow” which became my second Heyer. Oddly enough, also not particularly romantic, more of a spy comedy which descends to farce whenever the dog takes a hand. I didn’t realise at the time, but it has the most convincing espionage plot I’ve ever read in a Regency Romance.
    As for “These Old Shades”, it was a long time before I read it, though by then I had acquired a copy of “Devil’s Cub” that was being discarded by my school library, and I am almost afraid to admit that I prefer the sequel to the original and think Mary Challoner a better heroine than Leonie.
    I have to agree with Mary Jo Putney about “Sylvester”. I can never decide on a “Best Heyer”, though based on re-reads it might be one of “Sylvester”, “Faro’s Daughter”, “Regency Buck”, “The Nonesuch”, “Venetia”, “The Masqueraders” or “The Corinthian” (in no particular order, and realising that some of these titles do not normally get much mention, though the last two do match ”These Old Shades” when it comes to girls dressed as boys).

    Reply
  32. Back in the 1950s an important – and I guess now mostly forgotten – part of the British literary scene were the reprint book clubs. These printed cheap (utilitarian but well made) hardbacks a few months after the original editions and well before any paperback came out, and provided the publishers with a guarantee of tens of thousands of extra sales. The clubs’ output comprised both fiction and nonfiction, the latter being mostly historical accounts of the recent war. My parents subscribed to two or three of these clubs, so there were always new books to around the house and from the age of nine or ten I was reading almost everything on my parent’s bookshelves (I bounced off “Pilgrims Progress” and “The Mill on the Floss”, and I recall that “Lorna Doone” was a bit of a struggle). All the non fiction gave me a lasting taste for history, though when it comes to Heyer, the most useful reading was Arthur Bryant’s popular history trilogy covering the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars – I actually understood all those references to the Peninsular War that were slipped into her novels.
    So, to get round to the actual subject of the posting, my first Heyer was determined by the output of the Companion Book Club and was “The Quiet Gentleman”. Definitely not as romantic as “These Old Shades” – more a ‘plot to murder for an inheritance’ mystery in fact – but I loved it, including the low key romance. I searched the shelves for more and found one that my father had given to my mother for Easter 1947, namely “The Reluctant Widow” which became my second Heyer. Oddly enough, also not particularly romantic, more of a spy comedy which descends to farce whenever the dog takes a hand. I didn’t realise at the time, but it has the most convincing espionage plot I’ve ever read in a Regency Romance.
    As for “These Old Shades”, it was a long time before I read it, though by then I had acquired a copy of “Devil’s Cub” that was being discarded by my school library, and I am almost afraid to admit that I prefer the sequel to the original and think Mary Challoner a better heroine than Leonie.
    I have to agree with Mary Jo Putney about “Sylvester”. I can never decide on a “Best Heyer”, though based on re-reads it might be one of “Sylvester”, “Faro’s Daughter”, “Regency Buck”, “The Nonesuch”, “Venetia”, “The Masqueraders” or “The Corinthian” (in no particular order, and realising that some of these titles do not normally get much mention, though the last two do match ”These Old Shades” when it comes to girls dressed as boys).

    Reply
  33. Back in the 1950s an important – and I guess now mostly forgotten – part of the British literary scene were the reprint book clubs. These printed cheap (utilitarian but well made) hardbacks a few months after the original editions and well before any paperback came out, and provided the publishers with a guarantee of tens of thousands of extra sales. The clubs’ output comprised both fiction and nonfiction, the latter being mostly historical accounts of the recent war. My parents subscribed to two or three of these clubs, so there were always new books to around the house and from the age of nine or ten I was reading almost everything on my parent’s bookshelves (I bounced off “Pilgrims Progress” and “The Mill on the Floss”, and I recall that “Lorna Doone” was a bit of a struggle). All the non fiction gave me a lasting taste for history, though when it comes to Heyer, the most useful reading was Arthur Bryant’s popular history trilogy covering the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars – I actually understood all those references to the Peninsular War that were slipped into her novels.
    So, to get round to the actual subject of the posting, my first Heyer was determined by the output of the Companion Book Club and was “The Quiet Gentleman”. Definitely not as romantic as “These Old Shades” – more a ‘plot to murder for an inheritance’ mystery in fact – but I loved it, including the low key romance. I searched the shelves for more and found one that my father had given to my mother for Easter 1947, namely “The Reluctant Widow” which became my second Heyer. Oddly enough, also not particularly romantic, more of a spy comedy which descends to farce whenever the dog takes a hand. I didn’t realise at the time, but it has the most convincing espionage plot I’ve ever read in a Regency Romance.
    As for “These Old Shades”, it was a long time before I read it, though by then I had acquired a copy of “Devil’s Cub” that was being discarded by my school library, and I am almost afraid to admit that I prefer the sequel to the original and think Mary Challoner a better heroine than Leonie.
    I have to agree with Mary Jo Putney about “Sylvester”. I can never decide on a “Best Heyer”, though based on re-reads it might be one of “Sylvester”, “Faro’s Daughter”, “Regency Buck”, “The Nonesuch”, “Venetia”, “The Masqueraders” or “The Corinthian” (in no particular order, and realising that some of these titles do not normally get much mention, though the last two do match ”These Old Shades” when it comes to girls dressed as boys).

    Reply
  34. Back in the 1950s an important – and I guess now mostly forgotten – part of the British literary scene were the reprint book clubs. These printed cheap (utilitarian but well made) hardbacks a few months after the original editions and well before any paperback came out, and provided the publishers with a guarantee of tens of thousands of extra sales. The clubs’ output comprised both fiction and nonfiction, the latter being mostly historical accounts of the recent war. My parents subscribed to two or three of these clubs, so there were always new books to around the house and from the age of nine or ten I was reading almost everything on my parent’s bookshelves (I bounced off “Pilgrims Progress” and “The Mill on the Floss”, and I recall that “Lorna Doone” was a bit of a struggle). All the non fiction gave me a lasting taste for history, though when it comes to Heyer, the most useful reading was Arthur Bryant’s popular history trilogy covering the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars – I actually understood all those references to the Peninsular War that were slipped into her novels.
    So, to get round to the actual subject of the posting, my first Heyer was determined by the output of the Companion Book Club and was “The Quiet Gentleman”. Definitely not as romantic as “These Old Shades” – more a ‘plot to murder for an inheritance’ mystery in fact – but I loved it, including the low key romance. I searched the shelves for more and found one that my father had given to my mother for Easter 1947, namely “The Reluctant Widow” which became my second Heyer. Oddly enough, also not particularly romantic, more of a spy comedy which descends to farce whenever the dog takes a hand. I didn’t realise at the time, but it has the most convincing espionage plot I’ve ever read in a Regency Romance.
    As for “These Old Shades”, it was a long time before I read it, though by then I had acquired a copy of “Devil’s Cub” that was being discarded by my school library, and I am almost afraid to admit that I prefer the sequel to the original and think Mary Challoner a better heroine than Leonie.
    I have to agree with Mary Jo Putney about “Sylvester”. I can never decide on a “Best Heyer”, though based on re-reads it might be one of “Sylvester”, “Faro’s Daughter”, “Regency Buck”, “The Nonesuch”, “Venetia”, “The Masqueraders” or “The Corinthian” (in no particular order, and realising that some of these titles do not normally get much mention, though the last two do match ”These Old Shades” when it comes to girls dressed as boys).

    Reply
  35. Back in the 1950s an important – and I guess now mostly forgotten – part of the British literary scene were the reprint book clubs. These printed cheap (utilitarian but well made) hardbacks a few months after the original editions and well before any paperback came out, and provided the publishers with a guarantee of tens of thousands of extra sales. The clubs’ output comprised both fiction and nonfiction, the latter being mostly historical accounts of the recent war. My parents subscribed to two or three of these clubs, so there were always new books to around the house and from the age of nine or ten I was reading almost everything on my parent’s bookshelves (I bounced off “Pilgrims Progress” and “The Mill on the Floss”, and I recall that “Lorna Doone” was a bit of a struggle). All the non fiction gave me a lasting taste for history, though when it comes to Heyer, the most useful reading was Arthur Bryant’s popular history trilogy covering the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars – I actually understood all those references to the Peninsular War that were slipped into her novels.
    So, to get round to the actual subject of the posting, my first Heyer was determined by the output of the Companion Book Club and was “The Quiet Gentleman”. Definitely not as romantic as “These Old Shades” – more a ‘plot to murder for an inheritance’ mystery in fact – but I loved it, including the low key romance. I searched the shelves for more and found one that my father had given to my mother for Easter 1947, namely “The Reluctant Widow” which became my second Heyer. Oddly enough, also not particularly romantic, more of a spy comedy which descends to farce whenever the dog takes a hand. I didn’t realise at the time, but it has the most convincing espionage plot I’ve ever read in a Regency Romance.
    As for “These Old Shades”, it was a long time before I read it, though by then I had acquired a copy of “Devil’s Cub” that was being discarded by my school library, and I am almost afraid to admit that I prefer the sequel to the original and think Mary Challoner a better heroine than Leonie.
    I have to agree with Mary Jo Putney about “Sylvester”. I can never decide on a “Best Heyer”, though based on re-reads it might be one of “Sylvester”, “Faro’s Daughter”, “Regency Buck”, “The Nonesuch”, “Venetia”, “The Masqueraders” or “The Corinthian” (in no particular order, and realising that some of these titles do not normally get much mention, though the last two do match ”These Old Shades” when it comes to girls dressed as boys).

    Reply
  36. My first Heyer was actually one of her mysteries when I was a teenager: Behold, Here’s Poison. It was fine, but didn’t wow me enough to read more until I was much older. Since then, I have really loved some of Heyer’s romances, but I do have a soft spot for her mysteries as well.

    Reply
  37. My first Heyer was actually one of her mysteries when I was a teenager: Behold, Here’s Poison. It was fine, but didn’t wow me enough to read more until I was much older. Since then, I have really loved some of Heyer’s romances, but I do have a soft spot for her mysteries as well.

    Reply
  38. My first Heyer was actually one of her mysteries when I was a teenager: Behold, Here’s Poison. It was fine, but didn’t wow me enough to read more until I was much older. Since then, I have really loved some of Heyer’s romances, but I do have a soft spot for her mysteries as well.

    Reply
  39. My first Heyer was actually one of her mysteries when I was a teenager: Behold, Here’s Poison. It was fine, but didn’t wow me enough to read more until I was much older. Since then, I have really loved some of Heyer’s romances, but I do have a soft spot for her mysteries as well.

    Reply
  40. My first Heyer was actually one of her mysteries when I was a teenager: Behold, Here’s Poison. It was fine, but didn’t wow me enough to read more until I was much older. Since then, I have really loved some of Heyer’s romances, but I do have a soft spot for her mysteries as well.

    Reply
  41. The Black Moth was my first. My Aunt (& Godmother) was an avid reader & also a single, career woman. For a couple weeks during the summer for a few years my sister & I plus a few other female cousins would stay with her. We probably aged from about 12 to 14 -old enough to be left alone while our Aunt was at work. She lived in Madison WI & there were lots of bookstores to explore. We found Georgette Heyer & all bought various titles & passed them around with each other. We loved the stories & the covers. None of us had read that genre or time period before. What a great discovery! That being said – I don’t remember reading These Old Shades. I know- weird. I will have to remedy that!

    Reply
  42. The Black Moth was my first. My Aunt (& Godmother) was an avid reader & also a single, career woman. For a couple weeks during the summer for a few years my sister & I plus a few other female cousins would stay with her. We probably aged from about 12 to 14 -old enough to be left alone while our Aunt was at work. She lived in Madison WI & there were lots of bookstores to explore. We found Georgette Heyer & all bought various titles & passed them around with each other. We loved the stories & the covers. None of us had read that genre or time period before. What a great discovery! That being said – I don’t remember reading These Old Shades. I know- weird. I will have to remedy that!

    Reply
  43. The Black Moth was my first. My Aunt (& Godmother) was an avid reader & also a single, career woman. For a couple weeks during the summer for a few years my sister & I plus a few other female cousins would stay with her. We probably aged from about 12 to 14 -old enough to be left alone while our Aunt was at work. She lived in Madison WI & there were lots of bookstores to explore. We found Georgette Heyer & all bought various titles & passed them around with each other. We loved the stories & the covers. None of us had read that genre or time period before. What a great discovery! That being said – I don’t remember reading These Old Shades. I know- weird. I will have to remedy that!

    Reply
  44. The Black Moth was my first. My Aunt (& Godmother) was an avid reader & also a single, career woman. For a couple weeks during the summer for a few years my sister & I plus a few other female cousins would stay with her. We probably aged from about 12 to 14 -old enough to be left alone while our Aunt was at work. She lived in Madison WI & there were lots of bookstores to explore. We found Georgette Heyer & all bought various titles & passed them around with each other. We loved the stories & the covers. None of us had read that genre or time period before. What a great discovery! That being said – I don’t remember reading These Old Shades. I know- weird. I will have to remedy that!

    Reply
  45. The Black Moth was my first. My Aunt (& Godmother) was an avid reader & also a single, career woman. For a couple weeks during the summer for a few years my sister & I plus a few other female cousins would stay with her. We probably aged from about 12 to 14 -old enough to be left alone while our Aunt was at work. She lived in Madison WI & there were lots of bookstores to explore. We found Georgette Heyer & all bought various titles & passed them around with each other. We loved the stories & the covers. None of us had read that genre or time period before. What a great discovery! That being said – I don’t remember reading These Old Shades. I know- weird. I will have to remedy that!

    Reply
  46. I am 90 years old now, and it has been a long time since I first discovered Heyer, but I think it was A CIVIL CONTRACT, and it remains a favorite. I just took it off the shelf and may read it again now. Marriages of convenience always make an interesting romance in my opinion.

    Reply
  47. I am 90 years old now, and it has been a long time since I first discovered Heyer, but I think it was A CIVIL CONTRACT, and it remains a favorite. I just took it off the shelf and may read it again now. Marriages of convenience always make an interesting romance in my opinion.

    Reply
  48. I am 90 years old now, and it has been a long time since I first discovered Heyer, but I think it was A CIVIL CONTRACT, and it remains a favorite. I just took it off the shelf and may read it again now. Marriages of convenience always make an interesting romance in my opinion.

    Reply
  49. I am 90 years old now, and it has been a long time since I first discovered Heyer, but I think it was A CIVIL CONTRACT, and it remains a favorite. I just took it off the shelf and may read it again now. Marriages of convenience always make an interesting romance in my opinion.

    Reply
  50. I am 90 years old now, and it has been a long time since I first discovered Heyer, but I think it was A CIVIL CONTRACT, and it remains a favorite. I just took it off the shelf and may read it again now. Marriages of convenience always make an interesting romance in my opinion.

    Reply
  51. My mother gave me her copy of The Grand Sophy to read when I was about 12. After that I read her other titles and loaned the rest from the library.

    Reply
  52. My mother gave me her copy of The Grand Sophy to read when I was about 12. After that I read her other titles and loaned the rest from the library.

    Reply
  53. My mother gave me her copy of The Grand Sophy to read when I was about 12. After that I read her other titles and loaned the rest from the library.

    Reply
  54. My mother gave me her copy of The Grand Sophy to read when I was about 12. After that I read her other titles and loaned the rest from the library.

    Reply
  55. My mother gave me her copy of The Grand Sophy to read when I was about 12. After that I read her other titles and loaned the rest from the library.

    Reply
  56. I can’t remember which one it was, but it was one of the US Ace reprints back in the 1960s – whichever one came out first.
    I had started looking at romance paperbacks because I had two friends then who loved gothics. I had learned to like 19th century style writing in university and they would pass along similar style books to me (I don’t think they ever kept books for rereads). So when I saw the infamous Jack Gaughan covers on the Ace paperbacks, I was intrigued. They didn’t look like standard romances, which I did not care for. Those covers are hated and ridiculed by most fans, but they did their job; they got me to pick up the books.
    I’m thinking it was Arabella, but I could be wrong; I glommed them as I found them and I still have them 🙂

    Reply
  57. I can’t remember which one it was, but it was one of the US Ace reprints back in the 1960s – whichever one came out first.
    I had started looking at romance paperbacks because I had two friends then who loved gothics. I had learned to like 19th century style writing in university and they would pass along similar style books to me (I don’t think they ever kept books for rereads). So when I saw the infamous Jack Gaughan covers on the Ace paperbacks, I was intrigued. They didn’t look like standard romances, which I did not care for. Those covers are hated and ridiculed by most fans, but they did their job; they got me to pick up the books.
    I’m thinking it was Arabella, but I could be wrong; I glommed them as I found them and I still have them 🙂

    Reply
  58. I can’t remember which one it was, but it was one of the US Ace reprints back in the 1960s – whichever one came out first.
    I had started looking at romance paperbacks because I had two friends then who loved gothics. I had learned to like 19th century style writing in university and they would pass along similar style books to me (I don’t think they ever kept books for rereads). So when I saw the infamous Jack Gaughan covers on the Ace paperbacks, I was intrigued. They didn’t look like standard romances, which I did not care for. Those covers are hated and ridiculed by most fans, but they did their job; they got me to pick up the books.
    I’m thinking it was Arabella, but I could be wrong; I glommed them as I found them and I still have them 🙂

    Reply
  59. I can’t remember which one it was, but it was one of the US Ace reprints back in the 1960s – whichever one came out first.
    I had started looking at romance paperbacks because I had two friends then who loved gothics. I had learned to like 19th century style writing in university and they would pass along similar style books to me (I don’t think they ever kept books for rereads). So when I saw the infamous Jack Gaughan covers on the Ace paperbacks, I was intrigued. They didn’t look like standard romances, which I did not care for. Those covers are hated and ridiculed by most fans, but they did their job; they got me to pick up the books.
    I’m thinking it was Arabella, but I could be wrong; I glommed them as I found them and I still have them 🙂

    Reply
  60. I can’t remember which one it was, but it was one of the US Ace reprints back in the 1960s – whichever one came out first.
    I had started looking at romance paperbacks because I had two friends then who loved gothics. I had learned to like 19th century style writing in university and they would pass along similar style books to me (I don’t think they ever kept books for rereads). So when I saw the infamous Jack Gaughan covers on the Ace paperbacks, I was intrigued. They didn’t look like standard romances, which I did not care for. Those covers are hated and ridiculed by most fans, but they did their job; they got me to pick up the books.
    I’m thinking it was Arabella, but I could be wrong; I glommed them as I found them and I still have them 🙂

    Reply
  61. LOL on the “I’m not going to like that” — titles can put you off a book, I agree. It was years before I understood the meaning behind the title of These old Shades. But the page boy and the duchess seems wrong to me. Avon was a Duke. Oh well, I suppose it made sense to the publisher at the time.
    And “the rich Miss Tallant” and Ulysses is another favorite of mine.

    Reply
  62. LOL on the “I’m not going to like that” — titles can put you off a book, I agree. It was years before I understood the meaning behind the title of These old Shades. But the page boy and the duchess seems wrong to me. Avon was a Duke. Oh well, I suppose it made sense to the publisher at the time.
    And “the rich Miss Tallant” and Ulysses is another favorite of mine.

    Reply
  63. LOL on the “I’m not going to like that” — titles can put you off a book, I agree. It was years before I understood the meaning behind the title of These old Shades. But the page boy and the duchess seems wrong to me. Avon was a Duke. Oh well, I suppose it made sense to the publisher at the time.
    And “the rich Miss Tallant” and Ulysses is another favorite of mine.

    Reply
  64. LOL on the “I’m not going to like that” — titles can put you off a book, I agree. It was years before I understood the meaning behind the title of These old Shades. But the page boy and the duchess seems wrong to me. Avon was a Duke. Oh well, I suppose it made sense to the publisher at the time.
    And “the rich Miss Tallant” and Ulysses is another favorite of mine.

    Reply
  65. LOL on the “I’m not going to like that” — titles can put you off a book, I agree. It was years before I understood the meaning behind the title of These old Shades. But the page boy and the duchess seems wrong to me. Avon was a Duke. Oh well, I suppose it made sense to the publisher at the time.
    And “the rich Miss Tallant” and Ulysses is another favorite of mine.

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Catherine — I’m going to have to reread The Reluctant Widow with closer attention to the opening chapters. It’s quite a different experience, I find, rereading a book at a writer, not simply as a reader. Sometimes it spoils a book, bit with a good book it just makes me admire the writer more.

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Catherine — I’m going to have to reread The Reluctant Widow with closer attention to the opening chapters. It’s quite a different experience, I find, rereading a book at a writer, not simply as a reader. Sometimes it spoils a book, bit with a good book it just makes me admire the writer more.

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Catherine — I’m going to have to reread The Reluctant Widow with closer attention to the opening chapters. It’s quite a different experience, I find, rereading a book at a writer, not simply as a reader. Sometimes it spoils a book, bit with a good book it just makes me admire the writer more.

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Catherine — I’m going to have to reread The Reluctant Widow with closer attention to the opening chapters. It’s quite a different experience, I find, rereading a book at a writer, not simply as a reader. Sometimes it spoils a book, bit with a good book it just makes me admire the writer more.

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Catherine — I’m going to have to reread The Reluctant Widow with closer attention to the opening chapters. It’s quite a different experience, I find, rereading a book at a writer, not simply as a reader. Sometimes it spoils a book, bit with a good book it just makes me admire the writer more.

    Reply
  71. Caryn, what an excellent aunt you had. And yes, Heyer was/is a gateway to many writers of Regency-era novels. I would argue, in fact, that she invented the regency subgenre.

    Reply
  72. Caryn, what an excellent aunt you had. And yes, Heyer was/is a gateway to many writers of Regency-era novels. I would argue, in fact, that she invented the regency subgenre.

    Reply
  73. Caryn, what an excellent aunt you had. And yes, Heyer was/is a gateway to many writers of Regency-era novels. I would argue, in fact, that she invented the regency subgenre.

    Reply
  74. Caryn, what an excellent aunt you had. And yes, Heyer was/is a gateway to many writers of Regency-era novels. I would argue, in fact, that she invented the regency subgenre.

    Reply
  75. Caryn, what an excellent aunt you had. And yes, Heyer was/is a gateway to many writers of Regency-era novels. I would argue, in fact, that she invented the regency subgenre.

    Reply
  76. Thanks, Carla — yes the age difference bothers a lot of people, but it wasn’t unusual in those days. And at least Avon resisted it at first, and Leonie was adamant in what she wanted — unlike many real life situations, where it was the man who chose and the woman/girl who had no choice.

    Reply
  77. Thanks, Carla — yes the age difference bothers a lot of people, but it wasn’t unusual in those days. And at least Avon resisted it at first, and Leonie was adamant in what she wanted — unlike many real life situations, where it was the man who chose and the woman/girl who had no choice.

    Reply
  78. Thanks, Carla — yes the age difference bothers a lot of people, but it wasn’t unusual in those days. And at least Avon resisted it at first, and Leonie was adamant in what she wanted — unlike many real life situations, where it was the man who chose and the woman/girl who had no choice.

    Reply
  79. Thanks, Carla — yes the age difference bothers a lot of people, but it wasn’t unusual in those days. And at least Avon resisted it at first, and Leonie was adamant in what she wanted — unlike many real life situations, where it was the man who chose and the woman/girl who had no choice.

    Reply
  80. Thanks, Carla — yes the age difference bothers a lot of people, but it wasn’t unusual in those days. And at least Avon resisted it at first, and Leonie was adamant in what she wanted — unlike many real life situations, where it was the man who chose and the woman/girl who had no choice.

    Reply
  81. Mary Jo, I adore Sylvester and it might well become my next Heyer blog, As for the age difference between Avon and Leonie, it didn’t bother me in the least as a young reader, but later I did. But as I said in response to Carla (above) at least it was Leonie’s choice and Avon did try to resist at first.

    Reply
  82. Mary Jo, I adore Sylvester and it might well become my next Heyer blog, As for the age difference between Avon and Leonie, it didn’t bother me in the least as a young reader, but later I did. But as I said in response to Carla (above) at least it was Leonie’s choice and Avon did try to resist at first.

    Reply
  83. Mary Jo, I adore Sylvester and it might well become my next Heyer blog, As for the age difference between Avon and Leonie, it didn’t bother me in the least as a young reader, but later I did. But as I said in response to Carla (above) at least it was Leonie’s choice and Avon did try to resist at first.

    Reply
  84. Mary Jo, I adore Sylvester and it might well become my next Heyer blog, As for the age difference between Avon and Leonie, it didn’t bother me in the least as a young reader, but later I did. But as I said in response to Carla (above) at least it was Leonie’s choice and Avon did try to resist at first.

    Reply
  85. Mary Jo, I adore Sylvester and it might well become my next Heyer blog, As for the age difference between Avon and Leonie, it didn’t bother me in the least as a young reader, but later I did. But as I said in response to Carla (above) at least it was Leonie’s choice and Avon did try to resist at first.

    Reply
  86. What an excellent Mon! You know, the Talisman Ring wasn’t a favorite when I was younger, though I enjoyed it. But it wasn’t one that became a frequent reread, until a few years ago, when I bought it again on kindle, and I appreciated it so much more. I suspect when I was a kid, reading it, I missed all the lovely dry irony. These days it reduces me to admiration of Heyer’s wit and talent.

    Reply
  87. What an excellent Mon! You know, the Talisman Ring wasn’t a favorite when I was younger, though I enjoyed it. But it wasn’t one that became a frequent reread, until a few years ago, when I bought it again on kindle, and I appreciated it so much more. I suspect when I was a kid, reading it, I missed all the lovely dry irony. These days it reduces me to admiration of Heyer’s wit and talent.

    Reply
  88. What an excellent Mon! You know, the Talisman Ring wasn’t a favorite when I was younger, though I enjoyed it. But it wasn’t one that became a frequent reread, until a few years ago, when I bought it again on kindle, and I appreciated it so much more. I suspect when I was a kid, reading it, I missed all the lovely dry irony. These days it reduces me to admiration of Heyer’s wit and talent.

    Reply
  89. What an excellent Mon! You know, the Talisman Ring wasn’t a favorite when I was younger, though I enjoyed it. But it wasn’t one that became a frequent reread, until a few years ago, when I bought it again on kindle, and I appreciated it so much more. I suspect when I was a kid, reading it, I missed all the lovely dry irony. These days it reduces me to admiration of Heyer’s wit and talent.

    Reply
  90. What an excellent Mon! You know, the Talisman Ring wasn’t a favorite when I was younger, though I enjoyed it. But it wasn’t one that became a frequent reread, until a few years ago, when I bought it again on kindle, and I appreciated it so much more. I suspect when I was a kid, reading it, I missed all the lovely dry irony. These days it reduces me to admiration of Heyer’s wit and talent.

    Reply
  91. Thanks, Mike. As a child I read everything I could get my hands on, mostly through libraries, but I think I learned most of my history through reading historical novels, not non-fiction books. I needed a story to make we want to read on.
    I agree with you about Devil’s Cub — Mary Challoner is a brilliant heroine. But I do love the way Avon steals a scene at the end.
    I can never pick a favorite Heyer either — but would add The Unknown Ajax to your list.

    Reply
  92. Thanks, Mike. As a child I read everything I could get my hands on, mostly through libraries, but I think I learned most of my history through reading historical novels, not non-fiction books. I needed a story to make we want to read on.
    I agree with you about Devil’s Cub — Mary Challoner is a brilliant heroine. But I do love the way Avon steals a scene at the end.
    I can never pick a favorite Heyer either — but would add The Unknown Ajax to your list.

    Reply
  93. Thanks, Mike. As a child I read everything I could get my hands on, mostly through libraries, but I think I learned most of my history through reading historical novels, not non-fiction books. I needed a story to make we want to read on.
    I agree with you about Devil’s Cub — Mary Challoner is a brilliant heroine. But I do love the way Avon steals a scene at the end.
    I can never pick a favorite Heyer either — but would add The Unknown Ajax to your list.

    Reply
  94. Thanks, Mike. As a child I read everything I could get my hands on, mostly through libraries, but I think I learned most of my history through reading historical novels, not non-fiction books. I needed a story to make we want to read on.
    I agree with you about Devil’s Cub — Mary Challoner is a brilliant heroine. But I do love the way Avon steals a scene at the end.
    I can never pick a favorite Heyer either — but would add The Unknown Ajax to your list.

    Reply
  95. Thanks, Mike. As a child I read everything I could get my hands on, mostly through libraries, but I think I learned most of my history through reading historical novels, not non-fiction books. I needed a story to make we want to read on.
    I agree with you about Devil’s Cub — Mary Challoner is a brilliant heroine. But I do love the way Avon steals a scene at the end.
    I can never pick a favorite Heyer either — but would add The Unknown Ajax to your list.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Misti. I confess I’ve never fallen in love with Heyer’s mysteries, though I’ve read them. But it seems to me she— and therefore the reader— had more fun in the writing and plotting of her romances.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Misti. I confess I’ve never fallen in love with Heyer’s mysteries, though I’ve read them. But it seems to me she— and therefore the reader— had more fun in the writing and plotting of her romances.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Misti. I confess I’ve never fallen in love with Heyer’s mysteries, though I’ve read them. But it seems to me she— and therefore the reader— had more fun in the writing and plotting of her romances.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Misti. I confess I’ve never fallen in love with Heyer’s mysteries, though I’ve read them. But it seems to me she— and therefore the reader— had more fun in the writing and plotting of her romances.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Misti. I confess I’ve never fallen in love with Heyer’s mysteries, though I’ve read them. But it seems to me she— and therefore the reader— had more fun in the writing and plotting of her romances.

    Reply
  101. Thanks, Jeanne. I know I read The Black Moth, but it’s not one I’ve reread, and I have only hazy memories of the plot. I do remember being a bit shocked and slightly disbelieving when I heard that the villain of The Black moth was the hero of These Old Shades. But there it is in Heyer’s own words in that letter, so I might have to reread them both and notice the transformation process.
    Isn’t it lovely hearing how so many people were introduced to Heyer by beloved female relatives?

    Reply
  102. Thanks, Jeanne. I know I read The Black Moth, but it’s not one I’ve reread, and I have only hazy memories of the plot. I do remember being a bit shocked and slightly disbelieving when I heard that the villain of The Black moth was the hero of These Old Shades. But there it is in Heyer’s own words in that letter, so I might have to reread them both and notice the transformation process.
    Isn’t it lovely hearing how so many people were introduced to Heyer by beloved female relatives?

    Reply
  103. Thanks, Jeanne. I know I read The Black Moth, but it’s not one I’ve reread, and I have only hazy memories of the plot. I do remember being a bit shocked and slightly disbelieving when I heard that the villain of The Black moth was the hero of These Old Shades. But there it is in Heyer’s own words in that letter, so I might have to reread them both and notice the transformation process.
    Isn’t it lovely hearing how so many people were introduced to Heyer by beloved female relatives?

    Reply
  104. Thanks, Jeanne. I know I read The Black Moth, but it’s not one I’ve reread, and I have only hazy memories of the plot. I do remember being a bit shocked and slightly disbelieving when I heard that the villain of The Black moth was the hero of These Old Shades. But there it is in Heyer’s own words in that letter, so I might have to reread them both and notice the transformation process.
    Isn’t it lovely hearing how so many people were introduced to Heyer by beloved female relatives?

    Reply
  105. Thanks, Jeanne. I know I read The Black Moth, but it’s not one I’ve reread, and I have only hazy memories of the plot. I do remember being a bit shocked and slightly disbelieving when I heard that the villain of The Black moth was the hero of These Old Shades. But there it is in Heyer’s own words in that letter, so I might have to reread them both and notice the transformation process.
    Isn’t it lovely hearing how so many people were introduced to Heyer by beloved female relatives?

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Beverley. I know A CIVIL CONTRACT is quite a few people’s favorite, but I’ve always itched to write my version of the story and give Jenny a better romance. I know she was content to be a good wife and that Adam came to appreciate her, but I want her to have more than that — some real romance!
    And I also am a sucker for a Marriage of Convenience plot.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Beverley. I know A CIVIL CONTRACT is quite a few people’s favorite, but I’ve always itched to write my version of the story and give Jenny a better romance. I know she was content to be a good wife and that Adam came to appreciate her, but I want her to have more than that — some real romance!
    And I also am a sucker for a Marriage of Convenience plot.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Beverley. I know A CIVIL CONTRACT is quite a few people’s favorite, but I’ve always itched to write my version of the story and give Jenny a better romance. I know she was content to be a good wife and that Adam came to appreciate her, but I want her to have more than that — some real romance!
    And I also am a sucker for a Marriage of Convenience plot.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Beverley. I know A CIVIL CONTRACT is quite a few people’s favorite, but I’ve always itched to write my version of the story and give Jenny a better romance. I know she was content to be a good wife and that Adam came to appreciate her, but I want her to have more than that — some real romance!
    And I also am a sucker for a Marriage of Convenience plot.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Beverley. I know A CIVIL CONTRACT is quite a few people’s favorite, but I’ve always itched to write my version of the story and give Jenny a better romance. I know she was content to be a good wife and that Adam came to appreciate her, but I want her to have more than that — some real romance!
    And I also am a sucker for a Marriage of Convenience plot.

    Reply
  111. Lovely that you found Heyer and still have those books, Janice. I had a lovely time digging out various versions of the covers of These Old Shades, but Typepad doesn’t like too many images being posted so I had to be content with the first edition cover. There were some real shockers, too, but I’m sure no matter how good or bad the covers, the books will be treasured by the owners because of the stories inside.
    I would love to know what Heyer thought of the various covers though. I’ll see if Jen as any thoughts on that.

    Reply
  112. Lovely that you found Heyer and still have those books, Janice. I had a lovely time digging out various versions of the covers of These Old Shades, but Typepad doesn’t like too many images being posted so I had to be content with the first edition cover. There were some real shockers, too, but I’m sure no matter how good or bad the covers, the books will be treasured by the owners because of the stories inside.
    I would love to know what Heyer thought of the various covers though. I’ll see if Jen as any thoughts on that.

    Reply
  113. Lovely that you found Heyer and still have those books, Janice. I had a lovely time digging out various versions of the covers of These Old Shades, but Typepad doesn’t like too many images being posted so I had to be content with the first edition cover. There were some real shockers, too, but I’m sure no matter how good or bad the covers, the books will be treasured by the owners because of the stories inside.
    I would love to know what Heyer thought of the various covers though. I’ll see if Jen as any thoughts on that.

    Reply
  114. Lovely that you found Heyer and still have those books, Janice. I had a lovely time digging out various versions of the covers of These Old Shades, but Typepad doesn’t like too many images being posted so I had to be content with the first edition cover. There were some real shockers, too, but I’m sure no matter how good or bad the covers, the books will be treasured by the owners because of the stories inside.
    I would love to know what Heyer thought of the various covers though. I’ll see if Jen as any thoughts on that.

    Reply
  115. Lovely that you found Heyer and still have those books, Janice. I had a lovely time digging out various versions of the covers of These Old Shades, but Typepad doesn’t like too many images being posted so I had to be content with the first edition cover. There were some real shockers, too, but I’m sure no matter how good or bad the covers, the books will be treasured by the owners because of the stories inside.
    I would love to know what Heyer thought of the various covers though. I’ll see if Jen as any thoughts on that.

    Reply
  116. Thanks, Joanna. The Grand Sophy is a lot of people’s favorite, I know, and would certainly entice you to read more. And here’s another example of an excellent mother introducing a daughter to Heyer.

    Reply
  117. Thanks, Joanna. The Grand Sophy is a lot of people’s favorite, I know, and would certainly entice you to read more. And here’s another example of an excellent mother introducing a daughter to Heyer.

    Reply
  118. Thanks, Joanna. The Grand Sophy is a lot of people’s favorite, I know, and would certainly entice you to read more. And here’s another example of an excellent mother introducing a daughter to Heyer.

    Reply
  119. Thanks, Joanna. The Grand Sophy is a lot of people’s favorite, I know, and would certainly entice you to read more. And here’s another example of an excellent mother introducing a daughter to Heyer.

    Reply
  120. Thanks, Joanna. The Grand Sophy is a lot of people’s favorite, I know, and would certainly entice you to read more. And here’s another example of an excellent mother introducing a daughter to Heyer.

    Reply
  121. I think Sylvester was the first GH that I read, and I quickly gobbled up every book of hers I could find – and I turned mother onto them too. I loved These Old Shades as the precursor to Devil’s Cub – I liked the saga aspect. I was also mortally offended by a Barbara Cartland blatant rip-off of These old Shades. It was just dreadful, and the addition of her signature ellipses made me vow that I would never waste another quarter on Barbara again! Only the real deal Georgette Heyer for me! For a while Regency romance writers abounded, but you and Mary Balogh can always be depended on for new plots, great characters, and a good, fun read.

    Reply
  122. I think Sylvester was the first GH that I read, and I quickly gobbled up every book of hers I could find – and I turned mother onto them too. I loved These Old Shades as the precursor to Devil’s Cub – I liked the saga aspect. I was also mortally offended by a Barbara Cartland blatant rip-off of These old Shades. It was just dreadful, and the addition of her signature ellipses made me vow that I would never waste another quarter on Barbara again! Only the real deal Georgette Heyer for me! For a while Regency romance writers abounded, but you and Mary Balogh can always be depended on for new plots, great characters, and a good, fun read.

    Reply
  123. I think Sylvester was the first GH that I read, and I quickly gobbled up every book of hers I could find – and I turned mother onto them too. I loved These Old Shades as the precursor to Devil’s Cub – I liked the saga aspect. I was also mortally offended by a Barbara Cartland blatant rip-off of These old Shades. It was just dreadful, and the addition of her signature ellipses made me vow that I would never waste another quarter on Barbara again! Only the real deal Georgette Heyer for me! For a while Regency romance writers abounded, but you and Mary Balogh can always be depended on for new plots, great characters, and a good, fun read.

    Reply
  124. I think Sylvester was the first GH that I read, and I quickly gobbled up every book of hers I could find – and I turned mother onto them too. I loved These Old Shades as the precursor to Devil’s Cub – I liked the saga aspect. I was also mortally offended by a Barbara Cartland blatant rip-off of These old Shades. It was just dreadful, and the addition of her signature ellipses made me vow that I would never waste another quarter on Barbara again! Only the real deal Georgette Heyer for me! For a while Regency romance writers abounded, but you and Mary Balogh can always be depended on for new plots, great characters, and a good, fun read.

    Reply
  125. I think Sylvester was the first GH that I read, and I quickly gobbled up every book of hers I could find – and I turned mother onto them too. I loved These Old Shades as the precursor to Devil’s Cub – I liked the saga aspect. I was also mortally offended by a Barbara Cartland blatant rip-off of These old Shades. It was just dreadful, and the addition of her signature ellipses made me vow that I would never waste another quarter on Barbara again! Only the real deal Georgette Heyer for me! For a while Regency romance writers abounded, but you and Mary Balogh can always be depended on for new plots, great characters, and a good, fun read.

    Reply
  126. As a voracious reader, I honestly can’t remember which book was my first Heyer. Loved some more than others; but I appreciate the Georgians, the Regencies, and the mysteries. My favorites changed over time as I began to appreciate The Quiet Gentleman and “the Mountain” in the Masqueraders, over Kitty and Sherry, whom I liked when I was younger. But they’re books you can read over and over, enjoying a visit with old friends.

    Reply
  127. As a voracious reader, I honestly can’t remember which book was my first Heyer. Loved some more than others; but I appreciate the Georgians, the Regencies, and the mysteries. My favorites changed over time as I began to appreciate The Quiet Gentleman and “the Mountain” in the Masqueraders, over Kitty and Sherry, whom I liked when I was younger. But they’re books you can read over and over, enjoying a visit with old friends.

    Reply
  128. As a voracious reader, I honestly can’t remember which book was my first Heyer. Loved some more than others; but I appreciate the Georgians, the Regencies, and the mysteries. My favorites changed over time as I began to appreciate The Quiet Gentleman and “the Mountain” in the Masqueraders, over Kitty and Sherry, whom I liked when I was younger. But they’re books you can read over and over, enjoying a visit with old friends.

    Reply
  129. As a voracious reader, I honestly can’t remember which book was my first Heyer. Loved some more than others; but I appreciate the Georgians, the Regencies, and the mysteries. My favorites changed over time as I began to appreciate The Quiet Gentleman and “the Mountain” in the Masqueraders, over Kitty and Sherry, whom I liked when I was younger. But they’re books you can read over and over, enjoying a visit with old friends.

    Reply
  130. As a voracious reader, I honestly can’t remember which book was my first Heyer. Loved some more than others; but I appreciate the Georgians, the Regencies, and the mysteries. My favorites changed over time as I began to appreciate The Quiet Gentleman and “the Mountain” in the Masqueraders, over Kitty and Sherry, whom I liked when I was younger. But they’re books you can read over and over, enjoying a visit with old friends.

    Reply
  131. My first Georgette Heyer was Devil’s Cub. I was and still am a fan. I recently heard the audio book of Black Moth – and just like that I have discovered a new way to enjoy her books.

    Reply
  132. My first Georgette Heyer was Devil’s Cub. I was and still am a fan. I recently heard the audio book of Black Moth – and just like that I have discovered a new way to enjoy her books.

    Reply
  133. My first Georgette Heyer was Devil’s Cub. I was and still am a fan. I recently heard the audio book of Black Moth – and just like that I have discovered a new way to enjoy her books.

    Reply
  134. My first Georgette Heyer was Devil’s Cub. I was and still am a fan. I recently heard the audio book of Black Moth – and just like that I have discovered a new way to enjoy her books.

    Reply
  135. My first Georgette Heyer was Devil’s Cub. I was and still am a fan. I recently heard the audio book of Black Moth – and just like that I have discovered a new way to enjoy her books.

    Reply
  136. Both refer to Leonie, starting out as Avon’s page and becoming his duchess, so it does make sense after you’ve read the book but I was all ‘no grubby cross-class shenanigans’. In my defence I was a pre-teen who was into the princess fantasy bit. 😂

    Reply
  137. Both refer to Leonie, starting out as Avon’s page and becoming his duchess, so it does make sense after you’ve read the book but I was all ‘no grubby cross-class shenanigans’. In my defence I was a pre-teen who was into the princess fantasy bit. 😂

    Reply
  138. Both refer to Leonie, starting out as Avon’s page and becoming his duchess, so it does make sense after you’ve read the book but I was all ‘no grubby cross-class shenanigans’. In my defence I was a pre-teen who was into the princess fantasy bit. 😂

    Reply
  139. Both refer to Leonie, starting out as Avon’s page and becoming his duchess, so it does make sense after you’ve read the book but I was all ‘no grubby cross-class shenanigans’. In my defence I was a pre-teen who was into the princess fantasy bit. 😂

    Reply
  140. Both refer to Leonie, starting out as Avon’s page and becoming his duchess, so it does make sense after you’ve read the book but I was all ‘no grubby cross-class shenanigans’. In my defence I was a pre-teen who was into the princess fantasy bit. 😂

    Reply
  141. Please do, Anne! Jenny deserves *so* much better!
    Love MoC it’s my fave trope! Heyer did it beautifully in The Convenient Marriage.

    Reply
  142. Please do, Anne! Jenny deserves *so* much better!
    Love MoC it’s my fave trope! Heyer did it beautifully in The Convenient Marriage.

    Reply
  143. Please do, Anne! Jenny deserves *so* much better!
    Love MoC it’s my fave trope! Heyer did it beautifully in The Convenient Marriage.

    Reply
  144. Please do, Anne! Jenny deserves *so* much better!
    Love MoC it’s my fave trope! Heyer did it beautifully in The Convenient Marriage.

    Reply
  145. Please do, Anne! Jenny deserves *so* much better!
    Love MoC it’s my fave trope! Heyer did it beautifully in The Convenient Marriage.

    Reply
  146. My older sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer. I don’t remember which one or how old I was, but I was probably about 9 or 10.I’m not a big fan of audiobooks, but I did get a couple of Heyer books from the library that were read by Richard Armitage and loved them!

    Reply
  147. My older sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer. I don’t remember which one or how old I was, but I was probably about 9 or 10.I’m not a big fan of audiobooks, but I did get a couple of Heyer books from the library that were read by Richard Armitage and loved them!

    Reply
  148. My older sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer. I don’t remember which one or how old I was, but I was probably about 9 or 10.I’m not a big fan of audiobooks, but I did get a couple of Heyer books from the library that were read by Richard Armitage and loved them!

    Reply
  149. My older sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer. I don’t remember which one or how old I was, but I was probably about 9 or 10.I’m not a big fan of audiobooks, but I did get a couple of Heyer books from the library that were read by Richard Armitage and loved them!

    Reply
  150. My older sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer. I don’t remember which one or how old I was, but I was probably about 9 or 10.I’m not a big fan of audiobooks, but I did get a couple of Heyer books from the library that were read by Richard Armitage and loved them!

    Reply
  151. The Black Moth was my first Heyer novel and, while I love These Old Shades, The Moth remains my sentimental favourite.

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  152. The Black Moth was my first Heyer novel and, while I love These Old Shades, The Moth remains my sentimental favourite.

    Reply
  153. The Black Moth was my first Heyer novel and, while I love These Old Shades, The Moth remains my sentimental favourite.

    Reply
  154. The Black Moth was my first Heyer novel and, while I love These Old Shades, The Moth remains my sentimental favourite.

    Reply
  155. The Black Moth was my first Heyer novel and, while I love These Old Shades, The Moth remains my sentimental favourite.

    Reply
  156. These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer. It was an honor book at the library and I loved it so much I really didn’t want to return it. It’s still my favorite.

    Reply
  157. These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer. It was an honor book at the library and I loved it so much I really didn’t want to return it. It’s still my favorite.

    Reply
  158. These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer. It was an honor book at the library and I loved it so much I really didn’t want to return it. It’s still my favorite.

    Reply
  159. These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer. It was an honor book at the library and I loved it so much I really didn’t want to return it. It’s still my favorite.

    Reply
  160. These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer. It was an honor book at the library and I loved it so much I really didn’t want to return it. It’s still my favorite.

    Reply
  161. Thanks, Josie. I’ve never read that Cartland ripoff of These Old Shades, but I confess I’d love to read it, just out of curiosity. Heyer’s writing is so vivid and lively, and those books of Cartlands that I’ve read are pallid by comparison.
    And thanks for your kind words.

    Reply
  162. Thanks, Josie. I’ve never read that Cartland ripoff of These Old Shades, but I confess I’d love to read it, just out of curiosity. Heyer’s writing is so vivid and lively, and those books of Cartlands that I’ve read are pallid by comparison.
    And thanks for your kind words.

    Reply
  163. Thanks, Josie. I’ve never read that Cartland ripoff of These Old Shades, but I confess I’d love to read it, just out of curiosity. Heyer’s writing is so vivid and lively, and those books of Cartlands that I’ve read are pallid by comparison.
    And thanks for your kind words.

    Reply
  164. Thanks, Josie. I’ve never read that Cartland ripoff of These Old Shades, but I confess I’d love to read it, just out of curiosity. Heyer’s writing is so vivid and lively, and those books of Cartlands that I’ve read are pallid by comparison.
    And thanks for your kind words.

    Reply
  165. Thanks, Josie. I’ve never read that Cartland ripoff of These Old Shades, but I confess I’d love to read it, just out of curiosity. Heyer’s writing is so vivid and lively, and those books of Cartlands that I’ve read are pallid by comparison.
    And thanks for your kind words.

    Reply
  166. No, Susan, not a classic regency, but a good one, all the same. I had no problem with Prue’s disguise, but I couldn’t buy her brother as a lovely girl and l’inconnu. And oh, The Mountain! sigh.

    Reply
  167. No, Susan, not a classic regency, but a good one, all the same. I had no problem with Prue’s disguise, but I couldn’t buy her brother as a lovely girl and l’inconnu. And oh, The Mountain! sigh.

    Reply
  168. No, Susan, not a classic regency, but a good one, all the same. I had no problem with Prue’s disguise, but I couldn’t buy her brother as a lovely girl and l’inconnu. And oh, The Mountain! sigh.

    Reply
  169. No, Susan, not a classic regency, but a good one, all the same. I had no problem with Prue’s disguise, but I couldn’t buy her brother as a lovely girl and l’inconnu. And oh, The Mountain! sigh.

    Reply
  170. No, Susan, not a classic regency, but a good one, all the same. I had no problem with Prue’s disguise, but I couldn’t buy her brother as a lovely girl and l’inconnu. And oh, The Mountain! sigh.

    Reply
  171. Yes, indeed Julie, the “old friend” analogy is spot on for me too. I still love Sherry and Kitten — the Nemesis conversation never fails to make me laugh, just as much as it did when I was a teenager.

    Reply
  172. Yes, indeed Julie, the “old friend” analogy is spot on for me too. I still love Sherry and Kitten — the Nemesis conversation never fails to make me laugh, just as much as it did when I was a teenager.

    Reply
  173. Yes, indeed Julie, the “old friend” analogy is spot on for me too. I still love Sherry and Kitten — the Nemesis conversation never fails to make me laugh, just as much as it did when I was a teenager.

    Reply
  174. Yes, indeed Julie, the “old friend” analogy is spot on for me too. I still love Sherry and Kitten — the Nemesis conversation never fails to make me laugh, just as much as it did when I was a teenager.

    Reply
  175. Yes, indeed Julie, the “old friend” analogy is spot on for me too. I still love Sherry and Kitten — the Nemesis conversation never fails to make me laugh, just as much as it did when I was a teenager.

    Reply
  176. I haven’t really started on the audio books, Betty, but I’m certain it’s a real pleasure. My first and only experience of Heyer via audio was years ago, and it was recorded onto cassette tapes by one of the members of the Georgette Heyer email group — a talented amateur. I’ve forgotten which book it was now. The tapes were mailed from member to member, and when it was my turn, I remember being amazed how many lines I was able to speak along with the narrator.

    Reply
  177. I haven’t really started on the audio books, Betty, but I’m certain it’s a real pleasure. My first and only experience of Heyer via audio was years ago, and it was recorded onto cassette tapes by one of the members of the Georgette Heyer email group — a talented amateur. I’ve forgotten which book it was now. The tapes were mailed from member to member, and when it was my turn, I remember being amazed how many lines I was able to speak along with the narrator.

    Reply
  178. I haven’t really started on the audio books, Betty, but I’m certain it’s a real pleasure. My first and only experience of Heyer via audio was years ago, and it was recorded onto cassette tapes by one of the members of the Georgette Heyer email group — a talented amateur. I’ve forgotten which book it was now. The tapes were mailed from member to member, and when it was my turn, I remember being amazed how many lines I was able to speak along with the narrator.

    Reply
  179. I haven’t really started on the audio books, Betty, but I’m certain it’s a real pleasure. My first and only experience of Heyer via audio was years ago, and it was recorded onto cassette tapes by one of the members of the Georgette Heyer email group — a talented amateur. I’ve forgotten which book it was now. The tapes were mailed from member to member, and when it was my turn, I remember being amazed how many lines I was able to speak along with the narrator.

    Reply
  180. I haven’t really started on the audio books, Betty, but I’m certain it’s a real pleasure. My first and only experience of Heyer via audio was years ago, and it was recorded onto cassette tapes by one of the members of the Georgette Heyer email group — a talented amateur. I’ve forgotten which book it was now. The tapes were mailed from member to member, and when it was my turn, I remember being amazed how many lines I was able to speak along with the narrator.

    Reply
  181. Paula, I understand why you didn’t want to return it. When a book means so much to you, it’s hard to give it back. It took me years to amass my collection of Heyers, having read so many as library books originally.

    Reply
  182. Paula, I understand why you didn’t want to return it. When a book means so much to you, it’s hard to give it back. It took me years to amass my collection of Heyers, having read so many as library books originally.

    Reply
  183. Paula, I understand why you didn’t want to return it. When a book means so much to you, it’s hard to give it back. It took me years to amass my collection of Heyers, having read so many as library books originally.

    Reply
  184. Paula, I understand why you didn’t want to return it. When a book means so much to you, it’s hard to give it back. It took me years to amass my collection of Heyers, having read so many as library books originally.

    Reply
  185. Paula, I understand why you didn’t want to return it. When a book means so much to you, it’s hard to give it back. It took me years to amass my collection of Heyers, having read so many as library books originally.

    Reply
  186. So These Old Shades was also my first Heyer novel, only I read it just Two months ago at the ripe old age of 59!! I loved it and have been on a mad search through local bookstores to find more of her books. I had been reading novels by Anne Stuart, and who I understand was influenced by Heyer (although her books are a lot racier) and thought I would give Heyer a shot. I am so glad I did! Her heroes are morally gray and so swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  187. So These Old Shades was also my first Heyer novel, only I read it just Two months ago at the ripe old age of 59!! I loved it and have been on a mad search through local bookstores to find more of her books. I had been reading novels by Anne Stuart, and who I understand was influenced by Heyer (although her books are a lot racier) and thought I would give Heyer a shot. I am so glad I did! Her heroes are morally gray and so swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  188. So These Old Shades was also my first Heyer novel, only I read it just Two months ago at the ripe old age of 59!! I loved it and have been on a mad search through local bookstores to find more of her books. I had been reading novels by Anne Stuart, and who I understand was influenced by Heyer (although her books are a lot racier) and thought I would give Heyer a shot. I am so glad I did! Her heroes are morally gray and so swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  189. So These Old Shades was also my first Heyer novel, only I read it just Two months ago at the ripe old age of 59!! I loved it and have been on a mad search through local bookstores to find more of her books. I had been reading novels by Anne Stuart, and who I understand was influenced by Heyer (although her books are a lot racier) and thought I would give Heyer a shot. I am so glad I did! Her heroes are morally gray and so swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  190. So These Old Shades was also my first Heyer novel, only I read it just Two months ago at the ripe old age of 59!! I loved it and have been on a mad search through local bookstores to find more of her books. I had been reading novels by Anne Stuart, and who I understand was influenced by Heyer (although her books are a lot racier) and thought I would give Heyer a shot. I am so glad I did! Her heroes are morally gray and so swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  191. Interesting, Anne, I never had trouble buying Robin’s disguise. He was described as slim & not that tall; Prue got the height. Plus the makeup in that era and he had obviously inherited his father’s acting ability–but Pop was unmatched for wit! Machiavellian would describe his mental rounds! and yes, I loved the Mountain! And when we met his sister–good laugh!

    Reply
  192. Interesting, Anne, I never had trouble buying Robin’s disguise. He was described as slim & not that tall; Prue got the height. Plus the makeup in that era and he had obviously inherited his father’s acting ability–but Pop was unmatched for wit! Machiavellian would describe his mental rounds! and yes, I loved the Mountain! And when we met his sister–good laugh!

    Reply
  193. Interesting, Anne, I never had trouble buying Robin’s disguise. He was described as slim & not that tall; Prue got the height. Plus the makeup in that era and he had obviously inherited his father’s acting ability–but Pop was unmatched for wit! Machiavellian would describe his mental rounds! and yes, I loved the Mountain! And when we met his sister–good laugh!

    Reply
  194. Interesting, Anne, I never had trouble buying Robin’s disguise. He was described as slim & not that tall; Prue got the height. Plus the makeup in that era and he had obviously inherited his father’s acting ability–but Pop was unmatched for wit! Machiavellian would describe his mental rounds! and yes, I loved the Mountain! And when we met his sister–good laugh!

    Reply
  195. Interesting, Anne, I never had trouble buying Robin’s disguise. He was described as slim & not that tall; Prue got the height. Plus the makeup in that era and he had obviously inherited his father’s acting ability–but Pop was unmatched for wit! Machiavellian would describe his mental rounds! and yes, I loved the Mountain! And when we met his sister–good laugh!

    Reply
  196. Devil’s Cub was my first Heyer & remains one of my top favorites. Such a wonderful heroine & she did shoot him! I didn’t realize there was a book telling Avon’s & Leonie’s story but I surely loved them when they showed up in Devil’s Cub. It was a very long time before I discovered These Old Shades & didn’t realize the relationship until a ways in.
    My 2nd Heyer was Talisman Ring & i remember laughing like crazy thru that one–the need that someone must gallop “ventre a terre” to prove their love, etc. Ahh, teenagers! The same everywhen! And the search in the dining room–yep, I’m chuckling now & may have to go reread!

    Reply
  197. Devil’s Cub was my first Heyer & remains one of my top favorites. Such a wonderful heroine & she did shoot him! I didn’t realize there was a book telling Avon’s & Leonie’s story but I surely loved them when they showed up in Devil’s Cub. It was a very long time before I discovered These Old Shades & didn’t realize the relationship until a ways in.
    My 2nd Heyer was Talisman Ring & i remember laughing like crazy thru that one–the need that someone must gallop “ventre a terre” to prove their love, etc. Ahh, teenagers! The same everywhen! And the search in the dining room–yep, I’m chuckling now & may have to go reread!

    Reply
  198. Devil’s Cub was my first Heyer & remains one of my top favorites. Such a wonderful heroine & she did shoot him! I didn’t realize there was a book telling Avon’s & Leonie’s story but I surely loved them when they showed up in Devil’s Cub. It was a very long time before I discovered These Old Shades & didn’t realize the relationship until a ways in.
    My 2nd Heyer was Talisman Ring & i remember laughing like crazy thru that one–the need that someone must gallop “ventre a terre” to prove their love, etc. Ahh, teenagers! The same everywhen! And the search in the dining room–yep, I’m chuckling now & may have to go reread!

    Reply
  199. Devil’s Cub was my first Heyer & remains one of my top favorites. Such a wonderful heroine & she did shoot him! I didn’t realize there was a book telling Avon’s & Leonie’s story but I surely loved them when they showed up in Devil’s Cub. It was a very long time before I discovered These Old Shades & didn’t realize the relationship until a ways in.
    My 2nd Heyer was Talisman Ring & i remember laughing like crazy thru that one–the need that someone must gallop “ventre a terre” to prove their love, etc. Ahh, teenagers! The same everywhen! And the search in the dining room–yep, I’m chuckling now & may have to go reread!

    Reply
  200. Devil’s Cub was my first Heyer & remains one of my top favorites. Such a wonderful heroine & she did shoot him! I didn’t realize there was a book telling Avon’s & Leonie’s story but I surely loved them when they showed up in Devil’s Cub. It was a very long time before I discovered These Old Shades & didn’t realize the relationship until a ways in.
    My 2nd Heyer was Talisman Ring & i remember laughing like crazy thru that one–the need that someone must gallop “ventre a terre” to prove their love, etc. Ahh, teenagers! The same everywhen! And the search in the dining room–yep, I’m chuckling now & may have to go reread!

    Reply
  201. These Old Shades was my first Heyer as well. My older cousin lent it to me in 1954 or thereabouts when I was 14. It appealed to my teenage sense of romance. I became addicted to Heyer and quickly read everything else of hers that was available. My love affair with Georgette Heyer has lasted for 70 years.

    Reply
  202. These Old Shades was my first Heyer as well. My older cousin lent it to me in 1954 or thereabouts when I was 14. It appealed to my teenage sense of romance. I became addicted to Heyer and quickly read everything else of hers that was available. My love affair with Georgette Heyer has lasted for 70 years.

    Reply
  203. These Old Shades was my first Heyer as well. My older cousin lent it to me in 1954 or thereabouts when I was 14. It appealed to my teenage sense of romance. I became addicted to Heyer and quickly read everything else of hers that was available. My love affair with Georgette Heyer has lasted for 70 years.

    Reply
  204. These Old Shades was my first Heyer as well. My older cousin lent it to me in 1954 or thereabouts when I was 14. It appealed to my teenage sense of romance. I became addicted to Heyer and quickly read everything else of hers that was available. My love affair with Georgette Heyer has lasted for 70 years.

    Reply
  205. These Old Shades was my first Heyer as well. My older cousin lent it to me in 1954 or thereabouts when I was 14. It appealed to my teenage sense of romance. I became addicted to Heyer and quickly read everything else of hers that was available. My love affair with Georgette Heyer has lasted for 70 years.

    Reply
  206. I am a big Heyer fan. The first book I came across was “Simon the Coldheart.” Her gift for writing medieval war scenes is impeccable.
    I went on to her Regency novels, which I loved as well.
    I have yet to read any of her mystery novels, but I will get to them.

    Reply
  207. I am a big Heyer fan. The first book I came across was “Simon the Coldheart.” Her gift for writing medieval war scenes is impeccable.
    I went on to her Regency novels, which I loved as well.
    I have yet to read any of her mystery novels, but I will get to them.

    Reply
  208. I am a big Heyer fan. The first book I came across was “Simon the Coldheart.” Her gift for writing medieval war scenes is impeccable.
    I went on to her Regency novels, which I loved as well.
    I have yet to read any of her mystery novels, but I will get to them.

    Reply
  209. I am a big Heyer fan. The first book I came across was “Simon the Coldheart.” Her gift for writing medieval war scenes is impeccable.
    I went on to her Regency novels, which I loved as well.
    I have yet to read any of her mystery novels, but I will get to them.

    Reply
  210. I am a big Heyer fan. The first book I came across was “Simon the Coldheart.” Her gift for writing medieval war scenes is impeccable.
    I went on to her Regency novels, which I loved as well.
    I have yet to read any of her mystery novels, but I will get to them.

    Reply
  211. The first Georgette Heyer book I read was Footsteps in the Dark. The second book was Why Shoot A Butler.
    I now have quite a few Heyer books including those two mysteries.
    When I read the mysteries, I realized what a talented author this woman was and that is when I started getting more of her books.
    Now, I have been blessed enough to know that Georgette Heyer was simply a marvelous author. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  212. The first Georgette Heyer book I read was Footsteps in the Dark. The second book was Why Shoot A Butler.
    I now have quite a few Heyer books including those two mysteries.
    When I read the mysteries, I realized what a talented author this woman was and that is when I started getting more of her books.
    Now, I have been blessed enough to know that Georgette Heyer was simply a marvelous author. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  213. The first Georgette Heyer book I read was Footsteps in the Dark. The second book was Why Shoot A Butler.
    I now have quite a few Heyer books including those two mysteries.
    When I read the mysteries, I realized what a talented author this woman was and that is when I started getting more of her books.
    Now, I have been blessed enough to know that Georgette Heyer was simply a marvelous author. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  214. The first Georgette Heyer book I read was Footsteps in the Dark. The second book was Why Shoot A Butler.
    I now have quite a few Heyer books including those two mysteries.
    When I read the mysteries, I realized what a talented author this woman was and that is when I started getting more of her books.
    Now, I have been blessed enough to know that Georgette Heyer was simply a marvelous author. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  215. The first Georgette Heyer book I read was Footsteps in the Dark. The second book was Why Shoot A Butler.
    I now have quite a few Heyer books including those two mysteries.
    When I read the mysteries, I realized what a talented author this woman was and that is when I started getting more of her books.
    Now, I have been blessed enough to know that Georgette Heyer was simply a marvelous author. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  216. When I was in my thirties I read in my weekly magazine, The People’s Friend about an author called Georgette Heyer and it named some of her books. About two weeks later I was in a second hand book shop and there on the shelf was The Black Moth!! It was meant to be. It was the only Heyer in the shop. I bought it, read it and fell in love. I collected all her books as soon as I could after that. At one stage they brought out a collection of six of her books and the following year six more and so on. It’s how I got most of them.
    My favorite has always been The Nonesuch but it’s hard to just pick one. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and last months read was These Old Shades. I didn’t get a chance to read it but it’s never been a favorite so I wasn’t too worried.
    Her books are marvelous and a real pick me up if I’m in a reading slump or just feeling down in the dumps. I’ll never get tired of re-reading them.
    On a side note, any hint as to when Jennifer Kloester’s new book will be out? A rough estimate.

    Reply
  217. When I was in my thirties I read in my weekly magazine, The People’s Friend about an author called Georgette Heyer and it named some of her books. About two weeks later I was in a second hand book shop and there on the shelf was The Black Moth!! It was meant to be. It was the only Heyer in the shop. I bought it, read it and fell in love. I collected all her books as soon as I could after that. At one stage they brought out a collection of six of her books and the following year six more and so on. It’s how I got most of them.
    My favorite has always been The Nonesuch but it’s hard to just pick one. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and last months read was These Old Shades. I didn’t get a chance to read it but it’s never been a favorite so I wasn’t too worried.
    Her books are marvelous and a real pick me up if I’m in a reading slump or just feeling down in the dumps. I’ll never get tired of re-reading them.
    On a side note, any hint as to when Jennifer Kloester’s new book will be out? A rough estimate.

    Reply
  218. When I was in my thirties I read in my weekly magazine, The People’s Friend about an author called Georgette Heyer and it named some of her books. About two weeks later I was in a second hand book shop and there on the shelf was The Black Moth!! It was meant to be. It was the only Heyer in the shop. I bought it, read it and fell in love. I collected all her books as soon as I could after that. At one stage they brought out a collection of six of her books and the following year six more and so on. It’s how I got most of them.
    My favorite has always been The Nonesuch but it’s hard to just pick one. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and last months read was These Old Shades. I didn’t get a chance to read it but it’s never been a favorite so I wasn’t too worried.
    Her books are marvelous and a real pick me up if I’m in a reading slump or just feeling down in the dumps. I’ll never get tired of re-reading them.
    On a side note, any hint as to when Jennifer Kloester’s new book will be out? A rough estimate.

    Reply
  219. When I was in my thirties I read in my weekly magazine, The People’s Friend about an author called Georgette Heyer and it named some of her books. About two weeks later I was in a second hand book shop and there on the shelf was The Black Moth!! It was meant to be. It was the only Heyer in the shop. I bought it, read it and fell in love. I collected all her books as soon as I could after that. At one stage they brought out a collection of six of her books and the following year six more and so on. It’s how I got most of them.
    My favorite has always been The Nonesuch but it’s hard to just pick one. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and last months read was These Old Shades. I didn’t get a chance to read it but it’s never been a favorite so I wasn’t too worried.
    Her books are marvelous and a real pick me up if I’m in a reading slump or just feeling down in the dumps. I’ll never get tired of re-reading them.
    On a side note, any hint as to when Jennifer Kloester’s new book will be out? A rough estimate.

    Reply
  220. When I was in my thirties I read in my weekly magazine, The People’s Friend about an author called Georgette Heyer and it named some of her books. About two weeks later I was in a second hand book shop and there on the shelf was The Black Moth!! It was meant to be. It was the only Heyer in the shop. I bought it, read it and fell in love. I collected all her books as soon as I could after that. At one stage they brought out a collection of six of her books and the following year six more and so on. It’s how I got most of them.
    My favorite has always been The Nonesuch but it’s hard to just pick one. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and last months read was These Old Shades. I didn’t get a chance to read it but it’s never been a favorite so I wasn’t too worried.
    Her books are marvelous and a real pick me up if I’m in a reading slump or just feeling down in the dumps. I’ll never get tired of re-reading them.
    On a side note, any hint as to when Jennifer Kloester’s new book will be out? A rough estimate.

    Reply
  221. Thanks, Karen. Quite a lot of romance writers — modern as well as historical — were influenced by Georgette Heyer. When my first book came out, a number of the Harlequin writers in Australia read it, and at my next conference several of them told me they could tell I was influenced by Heyer and went on to tell me how much they loved Heyer and which were their favorites.

    Reply
  222. Thanks, Karen. Quite a lot of romance writers — modern as well as historical — were influenced by Georgette Heyer. When my first book came out, a number of the Harlequin writers in Australia read it, and at my next conference several of them told me they could tell I was influenced by Heyer and went on to tell me how much they loved Heyer and which were their favorites.

    Reply
  223. Thanks, Karen. Quite a lot of romance writers — modern as well as historical — were influenced by Georgette Heyer. When my first book came out, a number of the Harlequin writers in Australia read it, and at my next conference several of them told me they could tell I was influenced by Heyer and went on to tell me how much they loved Heyer and which were their favorites.

    Reply
  224. Thanks, Karen. Quite a lot of romance writers — modern as well as historical — were influenced by Georgette Heyer. When my first book came out, a number of the Harlequin writers in Australia read it, and at my next conference several of them told me they could tell I was influenced by Heyer and went on to tell me how much they loved Heyer and which were their favorites.

    Reply
  225. Thanks, Karen. Quite a lot of romance writers — modern as well as historical — were influenced by Georgette Heyer. When my first book came out, a number of the Harlequin writers in Australia read it, and at my next conference several of them told me they could tell I was influenced by Heyer and went on to tell me how much they loved Heyer and which were their favorites.

    Reply
  226. I found Georgette Heyer in my high school library and devoured every single one they had! They kind of blur in my mind now, so I’m not sure which one came first, but it could have been These Old Shades. I know I loved it so much I wanted to name my first daughter Leonie (especially as we are both Leos), but sadly my husband vetoed that.

    Reply
  227. I found Georgette Heyer in my high school library and devoured every single one they had! They kind of blur in my mind now, so I’m not sure which one came first, but it could have been These Old Shades. I know I loved it so much I wanted to name my first daughter Leonie (especially as we are both Leos), but sadly my husband vetoed that.

    Reply
  228. I found Georgette Heyer in my high school library and devoured every single one they had! They kind of blur in my mind now, so I’m not sure which one came first, but it could have been These Old Shades. I know I loved it so much I wanted to name my first daughter Leonie (especially as we are both Leos), but sadly my husband vetoed that.

    Reply
  229. I found Georgette Heyer in my high school library and devoured every single one they had! They kind of blur in my mind now, so I’m not sure which one came first, but it could have been These Old Shades. I know I loved it so much I wanted to name my first daughter Leonie (especially as we are both Leos), but sadly my husband vetoed that.

    Reply
  230. I found Georgette Heyer in my high school library and devoured every single one they had! They kind of blur in my mind now, so I’m not sure which one came first, but it could have been These Old Shades. I know I loved it so much I wanted to name my first daughter Leonie (especially as we are both Leos), but sadly my husband vetoed that.

    Reply
  231. Karen, yes it’s a pleasant moment in Devil’s Cub when Avon appears and then Leonie, isn’t it? As for the Talisman Ringer I had to be an adult before I perceived how very funny was the contrast between the “ventre a terre” pair and the older couple. The dialogue is brilliant, as is everything else.

    Reply
  232. Karen, yes it’s a pleasant moment in Devil’s Cub when Avon appears and then Leonie, isn’t it? As for the Talisman Ringer I had to be an adult before I perceived how very funny was the contrast between the “ventre a terre” pair and the older couple. The dialogue is brilliant, as is everything else.

    Reply
  233. Karen, yes it’s a pleasant moment in Devil’s Cub when Avon appears and then Leonie, isn’t it? As for the Talisman Ringer I had to be an adult before I perceived how very funny was the contrast between the “ventre a terre” pair and the older couple. The dialogue is brilliant, as is everything else.

    Reply
  234. Karen, yes it’s a pleasant moment in Devil’s Cub when Avon appears and then Leonie, isn’t it? As for the Talisman Ringer I had to be an adult before I perceived how very funny was the contrast between the “ventre a terre” pair and the older couple. The dialogue is brilliant, as is everything else.

    Reply
  235. Karen, yes it’s a pleasant moment in Devil’s Cub when Avon appears and then Leonie, isn’t it? As for the Talisman Ringer I had to be an adult before I perceived how very funny was the contrast between the “ventre a terre” pair and the older couple. The dialogue is brilliant, as is everything else.

    Reply
  236. I think that’s how Heyer works for some of us, Ann — she grabs us and never lets us go. I really don’t understand those who don’t like her books, but it takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  237. I think that’s how Heyer works for some of us, Ann — she grabs us and never lets us go. I really don’t understand those who don’t like her books, but it takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  238. I think that’s how Heyer works for some of us, Ann — she grabs us and never lets us go. I really don’t understand those who don’t like her books, but it takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  239. I think that’s how Heyer works for some of us, Ann — she grabs us and never lets us go. I really don’t understand those who don’t like her books, but it takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  240. I think that’s how Heyer works for some of us, Ann — she grabs us and never lets us go. I really don’t understand those who don’t like her books, but it takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  241. Patricia, I also enjoyed Simon the Coldheart, and loved how his real nature was revealed by the little pages and dogs. Do you know, it’s so long since I read it that I’m quite hazy on the contents — I don’t remember the war scenes. Perhaps I skipped over them. I have a bad habit of skipping pages when it’s something I’m not interested in. Luckily our tastes change as we grow older, and these days I’d read the war scenes with interest.

    Reply
  242. Patricia, I also enjoyed Simon the Coldheart, and loved how his real nature was revealed by the little pages and dogs. Do you know, it’s so long since I read it that I’m quite hazy on the contents — I don’t remember the war scenes. Perhaps I skipped over them. I have a bad habit of skipping pages when it’s something I’m not interested in. Luckily our tastes change as we grow older, and these days I’d read the war scenes with interest.

    Reply
  243. Patricia, I also enjoyed Simon the Coldheart, and loved how his real nature was revealed by the little pages and dogs. Do you know, it’s so long since I read it that I’m quite hazy on the contents — I don’t remember the war scenes. Perhaps I skipped over them. I have a bad habit of skipping pages when it’s something I’m not interested in. Luckily our tastes change as we grow older, and these days I’d read the war scenes with interest.

    Reply
  244. Patricia, I also enjoyed Simon the Coldheart, and loved how his real nature was revealed by the little pages and dogs. Do you know, it’s so long since I read it that I’m quite hazy on the contents — I don’t remember the war scenes. Perhaps I skipped over them. I have a bad habit of skipping pages when it’s something I’m not interested in. Luckily our tastes change as we grow older, and these days I’d read the war scenes with interest.

    Reply
  245. Patricia, I also enjoyed Simon the Coldheart, and loved how his real nature was revealed by the little pages and dogs. Do you know, it’s so long since I read it that I’m quite hazy on the contents — I don’t remember the war scenes. Perhaps I skipped over them. I have a bad habit of skipping pages when it’s something I’m not interested in. Luckily our tastes change as we grow older, and these days I’d read the war scenes with interest.

    Reply
  246. Oh, the Nonesuch, another fave of mine. The Beautiful Miss Wield. LOL
    What a lovely way to discover Heyer, and getting them in half-dozen batches sounds brilliant.
    Back when I was first starting to write there was only one Heyer group on line, and I met some people through that that I’m still in contact with (pauses to wave to Janice) But sadly that group split, I think because of in-fighting. Now there are so many groups on line it’s hard to keep up.
    As for Jen’s new book, no I don’t have a definite date. I gather it’s still in the hands of the editor/publisher, and Jen is travelling — and is possibly in the UK now, after riding on camels and suchlike in various parts of the Orient. Camels don’t do very well with wifi, I gather.
    But as soon as I have a date, I’ll let everyone know.

    Reply
  247. Oh, the Nonesuch, another fave of mine. The Beautiful Miss Wield. LOL
    What a lovely way to discover Heyer, and getting them in half-dozen batches sounds brilliant.
    Back when I was first starting to write there was only one Heyer group on line, and I met some people through that that I’m still in contact with (pauses to wave to Janice) But sadly that group split, I think because of in-fighting. Now there are so many groups on line it’s hard to keep up.
    As for Jen’s new book, no I don’t have a definite date. I gather it’s still in the hands of the editor/publisher, and Jen is travelling — and is possibly in the UK now, after riding on camels and suchlike in various parts of the Orient. Camels don’t do very well with wifi, I gather.
    But as soon as I have a date, I’ll let everyone know.

    Reply
  248. Oh, the Nonesuch, another fave of mine. The Beautiful Miss Wield. LOL
    What a lovely way to discover Heyer, and getting them in half-dozen batches sounds brilliant.
    Back when I was first starting to write there was only one Heyer group on line, and I met some people through that that I’m still in contact with (pauses to wave to Janice) But sadly that group split, I think because of in-fighting. Now there are so many groups on line it’s hard to keep up.
    As for Jen’s new book, no I don’t have a definite date. I gather it’s still in the hands of the editor/publisher, and Jen is travelling — and is possibly in the UK now, after riding on camels and suchlike in various parts of the Orient. Camels don’t do very well with wifi, I gather.
    But as soon as I have a date, I’ll let everyone know.

    Reply
  249. Oh, the Nonesuch, another fave of mine. The Beautiful Miss Wield. LOL
    What a lovely way to discover Heyer, and getting them in half-dozen batches sounds brilliant.
    Back when I was first starting to write there was only one Heyer group on line, and I met some people through that that I’m still in contact with (pauses to wave to Janice) But sadly that group split, I think because of in-fighting. Now there are so many groups on line it’s hard to keep up.
    As for Jen’s new book, no I don’t have a definite date. I gather it’s still in the hands of the editor/publisher, and Jen is travelling — and is possibly in the UK now, after riding on camels and suchlike in various parts of the Orient. Camels don’t do very well with wifi, I gather.
    But as soon as I have a date, I’ll let everyone know.

    Reply
  250. Oh, the Nonesuch, another fave of mine. The Beautiful Miss Wield. LOL
    What a lovely way to discover Heyer, and getting them in half-dozen batches sounds brilliant.
    Back when I was first starting to write there was only one Heyer group on line, and I met some people through that that I’m still in contact with (pauses to wave to Janice) But sadly that group split, I think because of in-fighting. Now there are so many groups on line it’s hard to keep up.
    As for Jen’s new book, no I don’t have a definite date. I gather it’s still in the hands of the editor/publisher, and Jen is travelling — and is possibly in the UK now, after riding on camels and suchlike in various parts of the Orient. Camels don’t do very well with wifi, I gather.
    But as soon as I have a date, I’ll let everyone know.

    Reply
  251. Robyn ‘s mother(first comment) named Robyn’s younger sister after Leonie, so maybe you can borrow her occasionally.
    It’s lovely that high school libraries had Heyer on the shelves. Mine didn’t. But my local libraries did, mostly in those pale green hardbacks, and oh the joy when I entered a new library and saw a whole line of that pale green.
    Then when we moved to the city and I travelled to school through the city centre, I found an antique shop that sold all kinds of old books for 20c each, and I was able to start my own Heyer collection.

    Reply
  252. Robyn ‘s mother(first comment) named Robyn’s younger sister after Leonie, so maybe you can borrow her occasionally.
    It’s lovely that high school libraries had Heyer on the shelves. Mine didn’t. But my local libraries did, mostly in those pale green hardbacks, and oh the joy when I entered a new library and saw a whole line of that pale green.
    Then when we moved to the city and I travelled to school through the city centre, I found an antique shop that sold all kinds of old books for 20c each, and I was able to start my own Heyer collection.

    Reply
  253. Robyn ‘s mother(first comment) named Robyn’s younger sister after Leonie, so maybe you can borrow her occasionally.
    It’s lovely that high school libraries had Heyer on the shelves. Mine didn’t. But my local libraries did, mostly in those pale green hardbacks, and oh the joy when I entered a new library and saw a whole line of that pale green.
    Then when we moved to the city and I travelled to school through the city centre, I found an antique shop that sold all kinds of old books for 20c each, and I was able to start my own Heyer collection.

    Reply
  254. Robyn ‘s mother(first comment) named Robyn’s younger sister after Leonie, so maybe you can borrow her occasionally.
    It’s lovely that high school libraries had Heyer on the shelves. Mine didn’t. But my local libraries did, mostly in those pale green hardbacks, and oh the joy when I entered a new library and saw a whole line of that pale green.
    Then when we moved to the city and I travelled to school through the city centre, I found an antique shop that sold all kinds of old books for 20c each, and I was able to start my own Heyer collection.

    Reply
  255. Robyn ‘s mother(first comment) named Robyn’s younger sister after Leonie, so maybe you can borrow her occasionally.
    It’s lovely that high school libraries had Heyer on the shelves. Mine didn’t. But my local libraries did, mostly in those pale green hardbacks, and oh the joy when I entered a new library and saw a whole line of that pale green.
    Then when we moved to the city and I travelled to school through the city centre, I found an antique shop that sold all kinds of old books for 20c each, and I was able to start my own Heyer collection.

    Reply
  256. I don’t remember which Heyer I read first, but I do know I read Devil’s Cub before These Old Shades. I still prefer Devil’s Cub, although it’s wonderful to see Avon and Leonie show up in that book, many years into their marriage.
    It strikes me that the original cover of These Old Shades is very modern looking. It seems like we’ve come full circle, because it looks something like the illustrated covers on recent books, with simple color block images.

    Reply
  257. I don’t remember which Heyer I read first, but I do know I read Devil’s Cub before These Old Shades. I still prefer Devil’s Cub, although it’s wonderful to see Avon and Leonie show up in that book, many years into their marriage.
    It strikes me that the original cover of These Old Shades is very modern looking. It seems like we’ve come full circle, because it looks something like the illustrated covers on recent books, with simple color block images.

    Reply
  258. I don’t remember which Heyer I read first, but I do know I read Devil’s Cub before These Old Shades. I still prefer Devil’s Cub, although it’s wonderful to see Avon and Leonie show up in that book, many years into their marriage.
    It strikes me that the original cover of These Old Shades is very modern looking. It seems like we’ve come full circle, because it looks something like the illustrated covers on recent books, with simple color block images.

    Reply
  259. I don’t remember which Heyer I read first, but I do know I read Devil’s Cub before These Old Shades. I still prefer Devil’s Cub, although it’s wonderful to see Avon and Leonie show up in that book, many years into their marriage.
    It strikes me that the original cover of These Old Shades is very modern looking. It seems like we’ve come full circle, because it looks something like the illustrated covers on recent books, with simple color block images.

    Reply
  260. I don’t remember which Heyer I read first, but I do know I read Devil’s Cub before These Old Shades. I still prefer Devil’s Cub, although it’s wonderful to see Avon and Leonie show up in that book, many years into their marriage.
    It strikes me that the original cover of These Old Shades is very modern looking. It seems like we’ve come full circle, because it looks something like the illustrated covers on recent books, with simple color block images.

    Reply
  261. I honestly don’t remember which Heyer I read first. However, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub are probably my favorites. I loved seeing them with their son. Leonie was such a unique character and a fascinating mother. Thanks for the background information!

    Reply
  262. I honestly don’t remember which Heyer I read first. However, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub are probably my favorites. I loved seeing them with their son. Leonie was such a unique character and a fascinating mother. Thanks for the background information!

    Reply
  263. I honestly don’t remember which Heyer I read first. However, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub are probably my favorites. I loved seeing them with their son. Leonie was such a unique character and a fascinating mother. Thanks for the background information!

    Reply
  264. I honestly don’t remember which Heyer I read first. However, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub are probably my favorites. I loved seeing them with their son. Leonie was such a unique character and a fascinating mother. Thanks for the background information!

    Reply
  265. I honestly don’t remember which Heyer I read first. However, These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub are probably my favorites. I loved seeing them with their son. Leonie was such a unique character and a fascinating mother. Thanks for the background information!

    Reply
  266. I don’t remember which Heyer book I read first, but I only read her mysteries. And liked them. My first memorable book was also a mystery: Crocodile on the Sandbank–Elizabeth Peters–I fell in love with her main characters. I’ve read it often so maybe that’s why it’s memorable. I discovered Ms. Heyer later.

    Reply
  267. I don’t remember which Heyer book I read first, but I only read her mysteries. And liked them. My first memorable book was also a mystery: Crocodile on the Sandbank–Elizabeth Peters–I fell in love with her main characters. I’ve read it often so maybe that’s why it’s memorable. I discovered Ms. Heyer later.

    Reply
  268. I don’t remember which Heyer book I read first, but I only read her mysteries. And liked them. My first memorable book was also a mystery: Crocodile on the Sandbank–Elizabeth Peters–I fell in love with her main characters. I’ve read it often so maybe that’s why it’s memorable. I discovered Ms. Heyer later.

    Reply
  269. I don’t remember which Heyer book I read first, but I only read her mysteries. And liked them. My first memorable book was also a mystery: Crocodile on the Sandbank–Elizabeth Peters–I fell in love with her main characters. I’ve read it often so maybe that’s why it’s memorable. I discovered Ms. Heyer later.

    Reply
  270. I don’t remember which Heyer book I read first, but I only read her mysteries. And liked them. My first memorable book was also a mystery: Crocodile on the Sandbank–Elizabeth Peters–I fell in love with her main characters. I’ve read it often so maybe that’s why it’s memorable. I discovered Ms. Heyer later.

    Reply

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