Heyer made me do it

JobeverleysmHi, Jo here. A few days ago I heard that English Heritage will be giving Georgette Heyer a blue plaque. These are put outside houses in London which are connected with notable people, so it's a great moment for Heyer and the historical romance genre. It will be placed on the house where she was born at 103 Woodside in Wimbledon.

This got writers talking about the influence Georgette Heyer had on them, and it was such a range of writers that I thought it would make a good blog, and I asked some of them to say a little about her influence and choose a favourite Heyer. As expected, many write Regency romance, but there's suspense, time travel, YA fantasy, and humorous contemporary here, too.

For those who don't know, Georgette Heyer wrote romance novels from 1921 to 1972. Her early novels were Georgian, but in 1935 she began to write in the Regency period, which up till then had been mostly overlooked, so she can be called the creator of the Regency romance genre. You can read more about her here.

On to the writers.

Katie Fford Fford

 I reckon I learnt to write from Georgette Heyer – something that was picked up at my first book signing. It's a bit odd considering I write contemporary fiction – and alas, not nearly as well as GH!I think it has to be The Grand Sophy. Although I still love Friday's Child which was the first I read. (Someone left a copy of it at our house and couldn't read quite a lot of the words but I still got swept along.) The Talisman Ring is also a favourite.

9780709085249[1]Beth Elliott 

The first Georgette Heyer novel I read was 'The Grand Sophy' I read it in snatches when my mother was out as she thought I was too young for such stories. I was a bossy little girl and Sophy appealed to me immensely as she managed to manipulate everyone, but she did it nicely. I've loved her ever since. It says a lot that all my heroines are a mix of Cinderella and Sophy.That shows up in my first Regency tale, 'The Wild Card'.

Imogen Hewson LINKED
I read Heyer as a young teenager, and she was the first author to give me the heart-stopping sensation that, for me, is the marker of a really good romance scene. That, as well as her wonderfully endearing characters, is something I've wanted to recreate ever since. My favourite Heyer book is Cotillion, for her creation of a surprise-attack hero. I didn't even know he was the hero until near the end, even though I desperately wanted him to be! My latest release is LINKED (working title: Telepathic Twins in Space!), a YA.

RegencyLondonLouise Allen

I've loved all of Heyer's Georgian/Regency novels since I was a teenager.She inspired my writing because through her I discovered that historical novels could be witty, romantic and historically accurate. I'm a member of the London Library which she used and browsing in the history stacks I can almost feel her presence. I have two absolute favourites – The Grand Sophy and The Spanish Bride. She also gave me a love of London history: my most recent release is Walks Through Regency London – ten self-guided, illustrated, walks through Heyer's London.

Rosemary A Smith The-butterfly-dance-lindford-romance-library
My favourite has to be 'The Talisman Ring'. Mainly because I love secrets! History has always been one of my great passions, especially Regency, Tudor and Victorian times, and  Miss Heyer had a wonderful way of describing things in the Regency period. Hopefully my readers will get as much pleasure from the way I write, as I did when reading books like 'The Talisman Ring'. My most recent book is The Butterfly Dance.

Resized POASAnnie Burrows

My sister was a Heyer fan first. But now I have my own collection of her books. I love her Regency romances so much that I re-read them all in turn, picking one from the right hand end of the shelf, and putting it back at the far left. Last weekend I read April Lady and Pistols for Two, an anthology. Now I write Regency romance for Harlequin Mills & Boon. My next Regency Romance, Portrait of a Scandal, comes out in September 2014. I like to think my hero is a bit like Lord Sheringham from Friday's Child…

Mary Strand Cooper's Folly - smaller - 200x300x72

My secretary gave me my first Heyer novel the day I returned to work after my first RWA conference, where I'd won the Golden Heart with my first book. Her words: "If you're going to write romance, you need to read Georgette Heyer."  It was FREDERICA. It remains my favorite. What I love about her books is also what influences me as a writer: gripping plots, action, strong heroines, clever dialogue, and humor. My debut novel, COOPER'S FOLLY, was just released by Bell Bridge Books in January

Viscount Besieged 500 x 700Elizabeth Bailey

I read Heyer from age 11 and was hooked from the off. When I started writing novels, it seemed the most natural thing in the world to plump for historical romance. It took some time to find my own voice, and even now I find Heyerisms creeping into my prose! She was the doyenne of the genre. The Reluctant Widow is my favourite – mainly because she's the only witty heroine. My most recent book is The Viscount Besieged.

Anne Lethbridge Return of the Prodigal Gilvry

Dad and I used to fight over who would read the Georgette Heyer first when he brought them back from the library. They were my first introduction to the world of romance. Good old Dad. The characters became like old friends and the laughs and the tears were a bonus for an army brat teen always on the move. As an adult, I collected three complete sets, though the first one is now yellow and falling apart. When I started writing, she was my inspiration.  My favourite is These Old Shades. My up coming release is The Return of the Prodigal Gilvry out in May 2014.

A Gallant Defender_MEDIUM WEBFenella J Miller

I discovered Heyer when I was eleven and devoured all of her early books and borrowed new titles from the library as they appeared – even my father approved. I developed my abiding love of Regency and Historical romance from her. The first two books I sold were both Regency romantic adventures, hopefully in what might be called 'the Georgette Heyer' tradition. The Grand Sophy is still my favourite. My latest book is A Gallant Defender – a Regency adventure of course!

Anna Jacobs Trader'sReward

Heyer made me love history, witty words and romantic stories. My first novel published was very much in her style, though I doubt I write as wittily. It won me a $10,000 prize and publication. Thank you, Georgette. Her books also made me aware that minor characters could be strongly tched, and I love doing these cameos. I love 'Friday's Child' and 'A Civil Contract' equally. They're very different but both have superb characterisation, which is what I enjoy most.  In April 'The Trader's Reward' is coming out, set in Australia in 1871-2.

Fly or FallGilli Allen

As a young teenager my older sister was a fan of Georgette Heyer and began writing her own Regency romance. I was ten and I had only been reading fluently for a few years. The notion that you could WRITE the book you wanted to read hit me like a sledgehammer. My sister finished her novel but then wrote no more. Bitten by the bug I wrote copiously through my own teenage years, never finishing anything. It was only when I was married and home with my son that I resumed writing, and actually completed a book.  My favourite Heyer is Cotillion. My latest novel is FLY OR FALL

Christina Courtenay TSKOD_large

*I first discovered Georgette Heyer in my high school library and quickly realised her books were much more fun than my homework! She taught me more about grammar and vocabulary than any of my teachers, not to mention history of course, as she made the Regency world come alive. Later, when I came to write historicals myself, it was her superb story-telling I aspired to – she was amazing! My favourite book of hers is Cotillion, it makes me laugh every time. Her comic timing is just perfect in that book.* *My latest release is The Secret Kiss of Darkness, a time slip.

Bella’s Betrothal 333x500 (1)Anne Stenhouse
Georgette Heyer's historical romances influenced me because of their dramatic content. I love the dialogue – I know she probably made up the slang – and the love the 'battle of wits' between hero and heroine. I also enjoy the way she gives scope to the heroes in romance. I can't choose a favourite. They're wonderful. My most recent release is is Bella's Betrothal, Edinburgh 1826.

 

Lynne Connolly LightningUnbound-R

Georgette Heyer influenced me enormously. The originator of the Regency romance genre, nobody has surpassed her for wit and romance. I wrote my first stories as Georgette Heyer fan fiction. Of course it wasn't called "Fanfic" back then. Many of her books end abruptly and I wanted to know what happened afterwards! They're long gone, but I enjoyed writing them and they started me on my life's path. My newest historical release will be "Lightning Unbound" about the gods of ancient
Greece and Rome in Georgian Britain.

51RdPLh23IL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Anne Stuart
When I first started writing I wanted to be a cross between Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer. I still do. Georgette is my ultimate comfort read, my solace in times of despair. With an omniscient viewpoint and no description of emotion at all she manages to convey the most powerful of feelings, all with elegance and wit. My favorite is VENETIA and always has been, though DEVIL'S CUB and THE MASQUERADERS come in as close seconds. My next book is Never Marry A Viscount in September 2014.

Jane Bidder Guilty

I devoured GH as a teenager. I worked my way through all her books at Harrow library in the 70s. She howed me that heroines have guts. Friday's Child stands out in my mind. I was drawn to the title because, even then, I've been interested in the day that someone was born on. Guilty by Jane Bidder. Published by Accent Press.

AndelAnd now me.

Like a number of others, I was introduced to Heyer by one of my sisters at about eleven. The book was Powder and Patch, one of her early works, and it entranced me. I read her voraciously through my teens and have re-read my favourites now and then ever since. I enjoy much about her books, but above all her humour. Amongst Heyer fans, one has only to say "Nemesis" or "the Baluchistan Hound" to get smiles and even chuckles.  Like others here I find it hard to pick a favourite Heyer, but I'll go for Frederica, for the family, the beleaguered hero, and the Baluchistan Hound. My next book, coming shortly, is A Shocking Delight.

So, are you a Heyer fan? Which book did you read first? Which is your favourite? Don't wimp out — choose!

Inspired to try your first Heyer? You could choose one of the favourites listed. Thus far we have The Grand Sophy (x4), Friday's Child (x3), Cotillion (x2), Frederica (x2),The Talisman Ring, The Reluctant Widow, These Old Shades, and Venetia

For fans, do you have a favourite funny moment? Or a most touching moment?

Has she inspired you to write, even if your fiction hasn't been completed yet?

Cheers,

Jo

340 thoughts on “Heyer made me do it”

  1. My first Heyer was ‘These Old Shades’ which remains my favourite and which hooked me on Heyer’s books, especially as my wife has a large audio collection! I particularly like them for the historical insights.
    A friend recently observed that Jane Austen never uses the word ‘Ton’ for English high society and when I commented that in my experience the earliest books using the word were those of Heyer, she speculated that Heyer might have invented it, though the Meriam-Webster online dictionary gives the first known use as 1756.
    Anyone know who first referred to ‘the ton’ in literature? 🙂

    Reply
  2. My first Heyer was ‘These Old Shades’ which remains my favourite and which hooked me on Heyer’s books, especially as my wife has a large audio collection! I particularly like them for the historical insights.
    A friend recently observed that Jane Austen never uses the word ‘Ton’ for English high society and when I commented that in my experience the earliest books using the word were those of Heyer, she speculated that Heyer might have invented it, though the Meriam-Webster online dictionary gives the first known use as 1756.
    Anyone know who first referred to ‘the ton’ in literature? 🙂

    Reply
  3. My first Heyer was ‘These Old Shades’ which remains my favourite and which hooked me on Heyer’s books, especially as my wife has a large audio collection! I particularly like them for the historical insights.
    A friend recently observed that Jane Austen never uses the word ‘Ton’ for English high society and when I commented that in my experience the earliest books using the word were those of Heyer, she speculated that Heyer might have invented it, though the Meriam-Webster online dictionary gives the first known use as 1756.
    Anyone know who first referred to ‘the ton’ in literature? 🙂

    Reply
  4. My first Heyer was ‘These Old Shades’ which remains my favourite and which hooked me on Heyer’s books, especially as my wife has a large audio collection! I particularly like them for the historical insights.
    A friend recently observed that Jane Austen never uses the word ‘Ton’ for English high society and when I commented that in my experience the earliest books using the word were those of Heyer, she speculated that Heyer might have invented it, though the Meriam-Webster online dictionary gives the first known use as 1756.
    Anyone know who first referred to ‘the ton’ in literature? 🙂

    Reply
  5. My first Heyer was ‘These Old Shades’ which remains my favourite and which hooked me on Heyer’s books, especially as my wife has a large audio collection! I particularly like them for the historical insights.
    A friend recently observed that Jane Austen never uses the word ‘Ton’ for English high society and when I commented that in my experience the earliest books using the word were those of Heyer, she speculated that Heyer might have invented it, though the Meriam-Webster online dictionary gives the first known use as 1756.
    Anyone know who first referred to ‘the ton’ in literature? 🙂

    Reply
  6. Heyer on audio, Quantum! What a pleasure, as long as it’s well read. I came across an audio edition of These Old Shades which was awful. The actor portrayed Avon in entirely the wrong way.
    Ton, from “bon ton” is French and not a Heyer invention, though I’m not sure Regency people used it as much as Heyer. It might have been more Georgian. It’s hard to search for because the word ton has other meanings.
    I recently came across “fashionables” in Regency newspapers, which seemed to be used a lot to mean “the in crowd elite.”

    Reply
  7. Heyer on audio, Quantum! What a pleasure, as long as it’s well read. I came across an audio edition of These Old Shades which was awful. The actor portrayed Avon in entirely the wrong way.
    Ton, from “bon ton” is French and not a Heyer invention, though I’m not sure Regency people used it as much as Heyer. It might have been more Georgian. It’s hard to search for because the word ton has other meanings.
    I recently came across “fashionables” in Regency newspapers, which seemed to be used a lot to mean “the in crowd elite.”

    Reply
  8. Heyer on audio, Quantum! What a pleasure, as long as it’s well read. I came across an audio edition of These Old Shades which was awful. The actor portrayed Avon in entirely the wrong way.
    Ton, from “bon ton” is French and not a Heyer invention, though I’m not sure Regency people used it as much as Heyer. It might have been more Georgian. It’s hard to search for because the word ton has other meanings.
    I recently came across “fashionables” in Regency newspapers, which seemed to be used a lot to mean “the in crowd elite.”

    Reply
  9. Heyer on audio, Quantum! What a pleasure, as long as it’s well read. I came across an audio edition of These Old Shades which was awful. The actor portrayed Avon in entirely the wrong way.
    Ton, from “bon ton” is French and not a Heyer invention, though I’m not sure Regency people used it as much as Heyer. It might have been more Georgian. It’s hard to search for because the word ton has other meanings.
    I recently came across “fashionables” in Regency newspapers, which seemed to be used a lot to mean “the in crowd elite.”

    Reply
  10. Heyer on audio, Quantum! What a pleasure, as long as it’s well read. I came across an audio edition of These Old Shades which was awful. The actor portrayed Avon in entirely the wrong way.
    Ton, from “bon ton” is French and not a Heyer invention, though I’m not sure Regency people used it as much as Heyer. It might have been more Georgian. It’s hard to search for because the word ton has other meanings.
    I recently came across “fashionables” in Regency newspapers, which seemed to be used a lot to mean “the in crowd elite.”

    Reply
  11. I know I’ve read Heyer both in the 70s when I was in high school and later on in my 20s. But I don’t remember my first book, and I couldn’t pick a favorite, not recalling titles or plots. Like the Mary Stewart books, it’s time to re-read. Having had the end of winter dismals, I have been drawn back into comfort reads. These sound like a ray of sunshine.

    Reply
  12. I know I’ve read Heyer both in the 70s when I was in high school and later on in my 20s. But I don’t remember my first book, and I couldn’t pick a favorite, not recalling titles or plots. Like the Mary Stewart books, it’s time to re-read. Having had the end of winter dismals, I have been drawn back into comfort reads. These sound like a ray of sunshine.

    Reply
  13. I know I’ve read Heyer both in the 70s when I was in high school and later on in my 20s. But I don’t remember my first book, and I couldn’t pick a favorite, not recalling titles or plots. Like the Mary Stewart books, it’s time to re-read. Having had the end of winter dismals, I have been drawn back into comfort reads. These sound like a ray of sunshine.

    Reply
  14. I know I’ve read Heyer both in the 70s when I was in high school and later on in my 20s. But I don’t remember my first book, and I couldn’t pick a favorite, not recalling titles or plots. Like the Mary Stewart books, it’s time to re-read. Having had the end of winter dismals, I have been drawn back into comfort reads. These sound like a ray of sunshine.

    Reply
  15. I know I’ve read Heyer both in the 70s when I was in high school and later on in my 20s. But I don’t remember my first book, and I couldn’t pick a favorite, not recalling titles or plots. Like the Mary Stewart books, it’s time to re-read. Having had the end of winter dismals, I have been drawn back into comfort reads. These sound like a ray of sunshine.

    Reply
  16. I came late to the Heyer books. I was through college and teaching when I saw a fellow teacher reading one. I’ve been hooked since then. I searched used bookstores till I had a complete set of her works. I’ve reread them many times. My copy of The Grand Sophy, my favorite, is falling apart. Comfort read is the perfect description for her work.

    Reply
  17. I came late to the Heyer books. I was through college and teaching when I saw a fellow teacher reading one. I’ve been hooked since then. I searched used bookstores till I had a complete set of her works. I’ve reread them many times. My copy of The Grand Sophy, my favorite, is falling apart. Comfort read is the perfect description for her work.

    Reply
  18. I came late to the Heyer books. I was through college and teaching when I saw a fellow teacher reading one. I’ve been hooked since then. I searched used bookstores till I had a complete set of her works. I’ve reread them many times. My copy of The Grand Sophy, my favorite, is falling apart. Comfort read is the perfect description for her work.

    Reply
  19. I came late to the Heyer books. I was through college and teaching when I saw a fellow teacher reading one. I’ve been hooked since then. I searched used bookstores till I had a complete set of her works. I’ve reread them many times. My copy of The Grand Sophy, my favorite, is falling apart. Comfort read is the perfect description for her work.

    Reply
  20. I came late to the Heyer books. I was through college and teaching when I saw a fellow teacher reading one. I’ve been hooked since then. I searched used bookstores till I had a complete set of her works. I’ve reread them many times. My copy of The Grand Sophy, my favorite, is falling apart. Comfort read is the perfect description for her work.

    Reply
  21. I love Georgette Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances, and re-read them constantly. I first came across them in my early teens, and found them in the library having exhausted the children’s section. I was attracted by the matching Barbosa covers, think, but loved them and read them all one after the other! I rediscovered them when I was a student, and discovered what perfect relaxation reading they are (and comfort reading too).
    It’s really difficult to choose a favourite, but it’s between Frederica, The Grand Sophy, or The Talisman Ring. I love the characters, their interaction, the wonderful language, the pacing – and also that her books are completely reliably accurate because of the detailed research she did. I feel as though I would know how to conduct myself should I find myself transported back to a ball in London in the Regency, and that I would understand the language and the subtleties, and know what I should and should not do.
    Subconsciously I measure all historical fiction against hers, which I think is only fair and reasonable!
    (I own the full set, thanks.)

    Reply
  22. I love Georgette Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances, and re-read them constantly. I first came across them in my early teens, and found them in the library having exhausted the children’s section. I was attracted by the matching Barbosa covers, think, but loved them and read them all one after the other! I rediscovered them when I was a student, and discovered what perfect relaxation reading they are (and comfort reading too).
    It’s really difficult to choose a favourite, but it’s between Frederica, The Grand Sophy, or The Talisman Ring. I love the characters, their interaction, the wonderful language, the pacing – and also that her books are completely reliably accurate because of the detailed research she did. I feel as though I would know how to conduct myself should I find myself transported back to a ball in London in the Regency, and that I would understand the language and the subtleties, and know what I should and should not do.
    Subconsciously I measure all historical fiction against hers, which I think is only fair and reasonable!
    (I own the full set, thanks.)

    Reply
  23. I love Georgette Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances, and re-read them constantly. I first came across them in my early teens, and found them in the library having exhausted the children’s section. I was attracted by the matching Barbosa covers, think, but loved them and read them all one after the other! I rediscovered them when I was a student, and discovered what perfect relaxation reading they are (and comfort reading too).
    It’s really difficult to choose a favourite, but it’s between Frederica, The Grand Sophy, or The Talisman Ring. I love the characters, their interaction, the wonderful language, the pacing – and also that her books are completely reliably accurate because of the detailed research she did. I feel as though I would know how to conduct myself should I find myself transported back to a ball in London in the Regency, and that I would understand the language and the subtleties, and know what I should and should not do.
    Subconsciously I measure all historical fiction against hers, which I think is only fair and reasonable!
    (I own the full set, thanks.)

    Reply
  24. I love Georgette Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances, and re-read them constantly. I first came across them in my early teens, and found them in the library having exhausted the children’s section. I was attracted by the matching Barbosa covers, think, but loved them and read them all one after the other! I rediscovered them when I was a student, and discovered what perfect relaxation reading they are (and comfort reading too).
    It’s really difficult to choose a favourite, but it’s between Frederica, The Grand Sophy, or The Talisman Ring. I love the characters, their interaction, the wonderful language, the pacing – and also that her books are completely reliably accurate because of the detailed research she did. I feel as though I would know how to conduct myself should I find myself transported back to a ball in London in the Regency, and that I would understand the language and the subtleties, and know what I should and should not do.
    Subconsciously I measure all historical fiction against hers, which I think is only fair and reasonable!
    (I own the full set, thanks.)

    Reply
  25. I love Georgette Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances, and re-read them constantly. I first came across them in my early teens, and found them in the library having exhausted the children’s section. I was attracted by the matching Barbosa covers, think, but loved them and read them all one after the other! I rediscovered them when I was a student, and discovered what perfect relaxation reading they are (and comfort reading too).
    It’s really difficult to choose a favourite, but it’s between Frederica, The Grand Sophy, or The Talisman Ring. I love the characters, their interaction, the wonderful language, the pacing – and also that her books are completely reliably accurate because of the detailed research she did. I feel as though I would know how to conduct myself should I find myself transported back to a ball in London in the Regency, and that I would understand the language and the subtleties, and know what I should and should not do.
    Subconsciously I measure all historical fiction against hers, which I think is only fair and reasonable!
    (I own the full set, thanks.)

    Reply
  26. Just like HJ, I found GH’s books after exhausting the children’s section of our public library. I’ve continued to read them over the decades since. My favorite phrase from “The Talisman Ring” is “ventre a terre”. It makes me grin every time. I have them all on my keeper shelf, and treasure her characters, plots, and wonderful use of language. It’s so hard to choose just one, but the top 3 are “Devil’s Cub”, “Cotillion” and “The Talisman Ring”.

    Reply
  27. Just like HJ, I found GH’s books after exhausting the children’s section of our public library. I’ve continued to read them over the decades since. My favorite phrase from “The Talisman Ring” is “ventre a terre”. It makes me grin every time. I have them all on my keeper shelf, and treasure her characters, plots, and wonderful use of language. It’s so hard to choose just one, but the top 3 are “Devil’s Cub”, “Cotillion” and “The Talisman Ring”.

    Reply
  28. Just like HJ, I found GH’s books after exhausting the children’s section of our public library. I’ve continued to read them over the decades since. My favorite phrase from “The Talisman Ring” is “ventre a terre”. It makes me grin every time. I have them all on my keeper shelf, and treasure her characters, plots, and wonderful use of language. It’s so hard to choose just one, but the top 3 are “Devil’s Cub”, “Cotillion” and “The Talisman Ring”.

    Reply
  29. Just like HJ, I found GH’s books after exhausting the children’s section of our public library. I’ve continued to read them over the decades since. My favorite phrase from “The Talisman Ring” is “ventre a terre”. It makes me grin every time. I have them all on my keeper shelf, and treasure her characters, plots, and wonderful use of language. It’s so hard to choose just one, but the top 3 are “Devil’s Cub”, “Cotillion” and “The Talisman Ring”.

    Reply
  30. Just like HJ, I found GH’s books after exhausting the children’s section of our public library. I’ve continued to read them over the decades since. My favorite phrase from “The Talisman Ring” is “ventre a terre”. It makes me grin every time. I have them all on my keeper shelf, and treasure her characters, plots, and wonderful use of language. It’s so hard to choose just one, but the top 3 are “Devil’s Cub”, “Cotillion” and “The Talisman Ring”.

    Reply
  31. Nothing like a discussion of My First Heyer to liven a cold morning! I discovered GH in the basement of an economy bookstore when I was in college. I was a poor student and always in need of more reading, and I didn’t know that stripped books were being sold illegally. All I knew was that I could afford a nickel a book, and I did. My first GH was SYLVESTER; OR, THE WICKED UNCLE, a mock Gothic with the first Regency heroine to secretly write Gothic novels on the side. It’s still wonderful.
    Favorites? Impossible to choose! But I always have preferred her more mature heroines like VENETIA. BLACK SHEEP is another favorite. And who could not love Hugo is THE UNKNOWN AJAX? Or BATH TANGLE. Or, of course, THE GRAND SOPHY. A CIVIL CONTRACT.
    The beginning of my first Signet Regency, THE DIABOLICAL BARON, was pure Heyer, though not as well written, of course.
    Even in SFF, writers like Lois McMaster Bujold and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller cheerfully acknowledge their debt to Heyer. Few authors have influenced so many later writers.

    Reply
  32. Nothing like a discussion of My First Heyer to liven a cold morning! I discovered GH in the basement of an economy bookstore when I was in college. I was a poor student and always in need of more reading, and I didn’t know that stripped books were being sold illegally. All I knew was that I could afford a nickel a book, and I did. My first GH was SYLVESTER; OR, THE WICKED UNCLE, a mock Gothic with the first Regency heroine to secretly write Gothic novels on the side. It’s still wonderful.
    Favorites? Impossible to choose! But I always have preferred her more mature heroines like VENETIA. BLACK SHEEP is another favorite. And who could not love Hugo is THE UNKNOWN AJAX? Or BATH TANGLE. Or, of course, THE GRAND SOPHY. A CIVIL CONTRACT.
    The beginning of my first Signet Regency, THE DIABOLICAL BARON, was pure Heyer, though not as well written, of course.
    Even in SFF, writers like Lois McMaster Bujold and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller cheerfully acknowledge their debt to Heyer. Few authors have influenced so many later writers.

    Reply
  33. Nothing like a discussion of My First Heyer to liven a cold morning! I discovered GH in the basement of an economy bookstore when I was in college. I was a poor student and always in need of more reading, and I didn’t know that stripped books were being sold illegally. All I knew was that I could afford a nickel a book, and I did. My first GH was SYLVESTER; OR, THE WICKED UNCLE, a mock Gothic with the first Regency heroine to secretly write Gothic novels on the side. It’s still wonderful.
    Favorites? Impossible to choose! But I always have preferred her more mature heroines like VENETIA. BLACK SHEEP is another favorite. And who could not love Hugo is THE UNKNOWN AJAX? Or BATH TANGLE. Or, of course, THE GRAND SOPHY. A CIVIL CONTRACT.
    The beginning of my first Signet Regency, THE DIABOLICAL BARON, was pure Heyer, though not as well written, of course.
    Even in SFF, writers like Lois McMaster Bujold and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller cheerfully acknowledge their debt to Heyer. Few authors have influenced so many later writers.

    Reply
  34. Nothing like a discussion of My First Heyer to liven a cold morning! I discovered GH in the basement of an economy bookstore when I was in college. I was a poor student and always in need of more reading, and I didn’t know that stripped books were being sold illegally. All I knew was that I could afford a nickel a book, and I did. My first GH was SYLVESTER; OR, THE WICKED UNCLE, a mock Gothic with the first Regency heroine to secretly write Gothic novels on the side. It’s still wonderful.
    Favorites? Impossible to choose! But I always have preferred her more mature heroines like VENETIA. BLACK SHEEP is another favorite. And who could not love Hugo is THE UNKNOWN AJAX? Or BATH TANGLE. Or, of course, THE GRAND SOPHY. A CIVIL CONTRACT.
    The beginning of my first Signet Regency, THE DIABOLICAL BARON, was pure Heyer, though not as well written, of course.
    Even in SFF, writers like Lois McMaster Bujold and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller cheerfully acknowledge their debt to Heyer. Few authors have influenced so many later writers.

    Reply
  35. Nothing like a discussion of My First Heyer to liven a cold morning! I discovered GH in the basement of an economy bookstore when I was in college. I was a poor student and always in need of more reading, and I didn’t know that stripped books were being sold illegally. All I knew was that I could afford a nickel a book, and I did. My first GH was SYLVESTER; OR, THE WICKED UNCLE, a mock Gothic with the first Regency heroine to secretly write Gothic novels on the side. It’s still wonderful.
    Favorites? Impossible to choose! But I always have preferred her more mature heroines like VENETIA. BLACK SHEEP is another favorite. And who could not love Hugo is THE UNKNOWN AJAX? Or BATH TANGLE. Or, of course, THE GRAND SOPHY. A CIVIL CONTRACT.
    The beginning of my first Signet Regency, THE DIABOLICAL BARON, was pure Heyer, though not as well written, of course.
    Even in SFF, writers like Lois McMaster Bujold and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller cheerfully acknowledge their debt to Heyer. Few authors have influenced so many later writers.

    Reply
  36. This is a most enjoyable post, almost like a club for Heyer enthusiasts. She has been an inspiration to so many writers and her wit and ability to bring the Regency [and other ] periods alive is amazing. I love all her historical stories and reread them often. Nobody has mentioned Beauvallet, and even there she created a vivid sense of the period.

    Reply
  37. This is a most enjoyable post, almost like a club for Heyer enthusiasts. She has been an inspiration to so many writers and her wit and ability to bring the Regency [and other ] periods alive is amazing. I love all her historical stories and reread them often. Nobody has mentioned Beauvallet, and even there she created a vivid sense of the period.

    Reply
  38. This is a most enjoyable post, almost like a club for Heyer enthusiasts. She has been an inspiration to so many writers and her wit and ability to bring the Regency [and other ] periods alive is amazing. I love all her historical stories and reread them often. Nobody has mentioned Beauvallet, and even there she created a vivid sense of the period.

    Reply
  39. This is a most enjoyable post, almost like a club for Heyer enthusiasts. She has been an inspiration to so many writers and her wit and ability to bring the Regency [and other ] periods alive is amazing. I love all her historical stories and reread them often. Nobody has mentioned Beauvallet, and even there she created a vivid sense of the period.

    Reply
  40. This is a most enjoyable post, almost like a club for Heyer enthusiasts. She has been an inspiration to so many writers and her wit and ability to bring the Regency [and other ] periods alive is amazing. I love all her historical stories and reread them often. Nobody has mentioned Beauvallet, and even there she created a vivid sense of the period.

    Reply
  41. My first heyer was a very battered second hand copy of Powder and Patch – I still have it held together with sello tape ! My favourite is The Reluctant Widow.The heroine has such a wonderful sense of humour and her referring to the hero as an odious man still makes me grin.It was GH along with a little help from the Scarlet Pimpernel who made me give up writing pony stories for my friends and introduced them to my version of Regency Romance – at the age of thirteen !Rereading some of those attempts I think it a wonder I had any friends left!!

    Reply
  42. My first heyer was a very battered second hand copy of Powder and Patch – I still have it held together with sello tape ! My favourite is The Reluctant Widow.The heroine has such a wonderful sense of humour and her referring to the hero as an odious man still makes me grin.It was GH along with a little help from the Scarlet Pimpernel who made me give up writing pony stories for my friends and introduced them to my version of Regency Romance – at the age of thirteen !Rereading some of those attempts I think it a wonder I had any friends left!!

    Reply
  43. My first heyer was a very battered second hand copy of Powder and Patch – I still have it held together with sello tape ! My favourite is The Reluctant Widow.The heroine has such a wonderful sense of humour and her referring to the hero as an odious man still makes me grin.It was GH along with a little help from the Scarlet Pimpernel who made me give up writing pony stories for my friends and introduced them to my version of Regency Romance – at the age of thirteen !Rereading some of those attempts I think it a wonder I had any friends left!!

    Reply
  44. My first heyer was a very battered second hand copy of Powder and Patch – I still have it held together with sello tape ! My favourite is The Reluctant Widow.The heroine has such a wonderful sense of humour and her referring to the hero as an odious man still makes me grin.It was GH along with a little help from the Scarlet Pimpernel who made me give up writing pony stories for my friends and introduced them to my version of Regency Romance – at the age of thirteen !Rereading some of those attempts I think it a wonder I had any friends left!!

    Reply
  45. My first heyer was a very battered second hand copy of Powder and Patch – I still have it held together with sello tape ! My favourite is The Reluctant Widow.The heroine has such a wonderful sense of humour and her referring to the hero as an odious man still makes me grin.It was GH along with a little help from the Scarlet Pimpernel who made me give up writing pony stories for my friends and introduced them to my version of Regency Romance – at the age of thirteen !Rereading some of those attempts I think it a wonder I had any friends left!!

    Reply
  46. I can’t decide between The Old Shades and Venetia. Shades is the more epic and elegant; the tension of that first time I read it was almost painful. Venetia is magnetically attractive as I always rather fancied myself as her. And the audio version read by Richard Armitage sends shivers into my er, you can guess.
    However, Léonie inspired me to write my own heroine, Carina, also full of espièglerie…

    Reply
  47. I can’t decide between The Old Shades and Venetia. Shades is the more epic and elegant; the tension of that first time I read it was almost painful. Venetia is magnetically attractive as I always rather fancied myself as her. And the audio version read by Richard Armitage sends shivers into my er, you can guess.
    However, Léonie inspired me to write my own heroine, Carina, also full of espièglerie…

    Reply
  48. I can’t decide between The Old Shades and Venetia. Shades is the more epic and elegant; the tension of that first time I read it was almost painful. Venetia is magnetically attractive as I always rather fancied myself as her. And the audio version read by Richard Armitage sends shivers into my er, you can guess.
    However, Léonie inspired me to write my own heroine, Carina, also full of espièglerie…

    Reply
  49. I can’t decide between The Old Shades and Venetia. Shades is the more epic and elegant; the tension of that first time I read it was almost painful. Venetia is magnetically attractive as I always rather fancied myself as her. And the audio version read by Richard Armitage sends shivers into my er, you can guess.
    However, Léonie inspired me to write my own heroine, Carina, also full of espièglerie…

    Reply
  50. I can’t decide between The Old Shades and Venetia. Shades is the more epic and elegant; the tension of that first time I read it was almost painful. Venetia is magnetically attractive as I always rather fancied myself as her. And the audio version read by Richard Armitage sends shivers into my er, you can guess.
    However, Léonie inspired me to write my own heroine, Carina, also full of espièglerie…

    Reply
  51. The Grand Sophy, Frederica, and The Talisman Ring. They’re coming up a lot. I have to admit that I don’t find TTR as memorable as other people do.

    Reply
  52. The Grand Sophy, Frederica, and The Talisman Ring. They’re coming up a lot. I have to admit that I don’t find TTR as memorable as other people do.

    Reply
  53. The Grand Sophy, Frederica, and The Talisman Ring. They’re coming up a lot. I have to admit that I don’t find TTR as memorable as other people do.

    Reply
  54. The Grand Sophy, Frederica, and The Talisman Ring. They’re coming up a lot. I have to admit that I don’t find TTR as memorable as other people do.

    Reply
  55. The Grand Sophy, Frederica, and The Talisman Ring. They’re coming up a lot. I have to admit that I don’t find TTR as memorable as other people do.

    Reply
  56. First mention of Sylvester, Mary Jo. It’s a good one. And no one’s mentioned Arabella, which used to be one of my favourites. I’ve not read it for a while. I wonder if it’ll hold up.

    Reply
  57. First mention of Sylvester, Mary Jo. It’s a good one. And no one’s mentioned Arabella, which used to be one of my favourites. I’ve not read it for a while. I wonder if it’ll hold up.

    Reply
  58. First mention of Sylvester, Mary Jo. It’s a good one. And no one’s mentioned Arabella, which used to be one of my favourites. I’ve not read it for a while. I wonder if it’ll hold up.

    Reply
  59. First mention of Sylvester, Mary Jo. It’s a good one. And no one’s mentioned Arabella, which used to be one of my favourites. I’ve not read it for a while. I wonder if it’ll hold up.

    Reply
  60. First mention of Sylvester, Mary Jo. It’s a good one. And no one’s mentioned Arabella, which used to be one of my favourites. I’ve not read it for a while. I wonder if it’ll hold up.

    Reply
  61. I wonder if your Powder and Patch is the one I first read, Jo — with the face and the powdered hair? And The Scarlet Pimpernel was one of my great influences, too.

    Reply
  62. I wonder if your Powder and Patch is the one I first read, Jo — with the face and the powdered hair? And The Scarlet Pimpernel was one of my great influences, too.

    Reply
  63. I wonder if your Powder and Patch is the one I first read, Jo — with the face and the powdered hair? And The Scarlet Pimpernel was one of my great influences, too.

    Reply
  64. I wonder if your Powder and Patch is the one I first read, Jo — with the face and the powdered hair? And The Scarlet Pimpernel was one of my great influences, too.

    Reply
  65. I wonder if your Powder and Patch is the one I first read, Jo — with the face and the powdered hair? And The Scarlet Pimpernel was one of my great influences, too.

    Reply
  66. These Old Shades and Venetia are quite different, aren’t they, Alison, but they are both dramatic with dark elements.
    Heyer was versatile, wasn’t she?

    Reply
  67. These Old Shades and Venetia are quite different, aren’t they, Alison, but they are both dramatic with dark elements.
    Heyer was versatile, wasn’t she?

    Reply
  68. These Old Shades and Venetia are quite different, aren’t they, Alison, but they are both dramatic with dark elements.
    Heyer was versatile, wasn’t she?

    Reply
  69. These Old Shades and Venetia are quite different, aren’t they, Alison, but they are both dramatic with dark elements.
    Heyer was versatile, wasn’t she?

    Reply
  70. These Old Shades and Venetia are quite different, aren’t they, Alison, but they are both dramatic with dark elements.
    Heyer was versatile, wasn’t she?

    Reply
  71. I too found Georgette in my local library as a young teen.
    My favorites include the Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, and These Old Shades. I also have a fondness for The Toll-Gate partly because everyone in it is tall! (I was quite tall as a kid although you’d never guess it now!)

    Reply
  72. I too found Georgette in my local library as a young teen.
    My favorites include the Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, and These Old Shades. I also have a fondness for The Toll-Gate partly because everyone in it is tall! (I was quite tall as a kid although you’d never guess it now!)

    Reply
  73. I too found Georgette in my local library as a young teen.
    My favorites include the Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, and These Old Shades. I also have a fondness for The Toll-Gate partly because everyone in it is tall! (I was quite tall as a kid although you’d never guess it now!)

    Reply
  74. I too found Georgette in my local library as a young teen.
    My favorites include the Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, and These Old Shades. I also have a fondness for The Toll-Gate partly because everyone in it is tall! (I was quite tall as a kid although you’d never guess it now!)

    Reply
  75. I too found Georgette in my local library as a young teen.
    My favorites include the Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, and These Old Shades. I also have a fondness for The Toll-Gate partly because everyone in it is tall! (I was quite tall as a kid although you’d never guess it now!)

    Reply
  76. Wow, it’s amazing that we all sat together as teenagers reading Ms. Heyer til the books fall apart – and thought we were the only ones! My copies are falling to pieces, but I still reread them instead of new copies. She turned me on to Regencies, and now that is all I will write. My favorites? Oh, Venetia, for sure, loved the way the wicked Marquis loved her. The Devil’s Cub (sigh) – I was the prim and proper Mary. The Unknown Ajax – Hugo played with them all but she loved him anyway. Arabella – who could not love Mr. Beaumaris in love? He adopted her dog! What a wonderful discussion and vivid memories. I’m a die-hard Heyer fan and can only hope my stories lead you toward Georgette Heyer and everyone above to a love for Regencies by a new generation!

    Reply
  77. Wow, it’s amazing that we all sat together as teenagers reading Ms. Heyer til the books fall apart – and thought we were the only ones! My copies are falling to pieces, but I still reread them instead of new copies. She turned me on to Regencies, and now that is all I will write. My favorites? Oh, Venetia, for sure, loved the way the wicked Marquis loved her. The Devil’s Cub (sigh) – I was the prim and proper Mary. The Unknown Ajax – Hugo played with them all but she loved him anyway. Arabella – who could not love Mr. Beaumaris in love? He adopted her dog! What a wonderful discussion and vivid memories. I’m a die-hard Heyer fan and can only hope my stories lead you toward Georgette Heyer and everyone above to a love for Regencies by a new generation!

    Reply
  78. Wow, it’s amazing that we all sat together as teenagers reading Ms. Heyer til the books fall apart – and thought we were the only ones! My copies are falling to pieces, but I still reread them instead of new copies. She turned me on to Regencies, and now that is all I will write. My favorites? Oh, Venetia, for sure, loved the way the wicked Marquis loved her. The Devil’s Cub (sigh) – I was the prim and proper Mary. The Unknown Ajax – Hugo played with them all but she loved him anyway. Arabella – who could not love Mr. Beaumaris in love? He adopted her dog! What a wonderful discussion and vivid memories. I’m a die-hard Heyer fan and can only hope my stories lead you toward Georgette Heyer and everyone above to a love for Regencies by a new generation!

    Reply
  79. Wow, it’s amazing that we all sat together as teenagers reading Ms. Heyer til the books fall apart – and thought we were the only ones! My copies are falling to pieces, but I still reread them instead of new copies. She turned me on to Regencies, and now that is all I will write. My favorites? Oh, Venetia, for sure, loved the way the wicked Marquis loved her. The Devil’s Cub (sigh) – I was the prim and proper Mary. The Unknown Ajax – Hugo played with them all but she loved him anyway. Arabella – who could not love Mr. Beaumaris in love? He adopted her dog! What a wonderful discussion and vivid memories. I’m a die-hard Heyer fan and can only hope my stories lead you toward Georgette Heyer and everyone above to a love for Regencies by a new generation!

    Reply
  80. Wow, it’s amazing that we all sat together as teenagers reading Ms. Heyer til the books fall apart – and thought we were the only ones! My copies are falling to pieces, but I still reread them instead of new copies. She turned me on to Regencies, and now that is all I will write. My favorites? Oh, Venetia, for sure, loved the way the wicked Marquis loved her. The Devil’s Cub (sigh) – I was the prim and proper Mary. The Unknown Ajax – Hugo played with them all but she loved him anyway. Arabella – who could not love Mr. Beaumaris in love? He adopted her dog! What a wonderful discussion and vivid memories. I’m a die-hard Heyer fan and can only hope my stories lead you toward Georgette Heyer and everyone above to a love for Regencies by a new generation!

    Reply
  81. I must say, like Mary Jo, I’m a huge fan of Sylvester (love naughty Edmund and Sir Nugent Fotherby is one of her best barmy dandies ever)and the scene where Sylvester loses his temper with the heroine in the ballroom is absolutely heart-stopping.
    I also enjoy The Foundling, which is about a quiet, dutiful, well-behaved young Duke finding himself and becoming slightly less well-behaved. The romance is a bit low key but the villain is priceless. And his sexy cousin Gideon has stalked my heroes most of my writing life. If I were ever to write fanfic, it would be Gideon’s love story.
    My first (unpublished) full length novel was a Georgian, School of GH. It made me laugh at the time. Must look at it again.

    Reply
  82. I must say, like Mary Jo, I’m a huge fan of Sylvester (love naughty Edmund and Sir Nugent Fotherby is one of her best barmy dandies ever)and the scene where Sylvester loses his temper with the heroine in the ballroom is absolutely heart-stopping.
    I also enjoy The Foundling, which is about a quiet, dutiful, well-behaved young Duke finding himself and becoming slightly less well-behaved. The romance is a bit low key but the villain is priceless. And his sexy cousin Gideon has stalked my heroes most of my writing life. If I were ever to write fanfic, it would be Gideon’s love story.
    My first (unpublished) full length novel was a Georgian, School of GH. It made me laugh at the time. Must look at it again.

    Reply
  83. I must say, like Mary Jo, I’m a huge fan of Sylvester (love naughty Edmund and Sir Nugent Fotherby is one of her best barmy dandies ever)and the scene where Sylvester loses his temper with the heroine in the ballroom is absolutely heart-stopping.
    I also enjoy The Foundling, which is about a quiet, dutiful, well-behaved young Duke finding himself and becoming slightly less well-behaved. The romance is a bit low key but the villain is priceless. And his sexy cousin Gideon has stalked my heroes most of my writing life. If I were ever to write fanfic, it would be Gideon’s love story.
    My first (unpublished) full length novel was a Georgian, School of GH. It made me laugh at the time. Must look at it again.

    Reply
  84. I must say, like Mary Jo, I’m a huge fan of Sylvester (love naughty Edmund and Sir Nugent Fotherby is one of her best barmy dandies ever)and the scene where Sylvester loses his temper with the heroine in the ballroom is absolutely heart-stopping.
    I also enjoy The Foundling, which is about a quiet, dutiful, well-behaved young Duke finding himself and becoming slightly less well-behaved. The romance is a bit low key but the villain is priceless. And his sexy cousin Gideon has stalked my heroes most of my writing life. If I were ever to write fanfic, it would be Gideon’s love story.
    My first (unpublished) full length novel was a Georgian, School of GH. It made me laugh at the time. Must look at it again.

    Reply
  85. I must say, like Mary Jo, I’m a huge fan of Sylvester (love naughty Edmund and Sir Nugent Fotherby is one of her best barmy dandies ever)and the scene where Sylvester loses his temper with the heroine in the ballroom is absolutely heart-stopping.
    I also enjoy The Foundling, which is about a quiet, dutiful, well-behaved young Duke finding himself and becoming slightly less well-behaved. The romance is a bit low key but the villain is priceless. And his sexy cousin Gideon has stalked my heroes most of my writing life. If I were ever to write fanfic, it would be Gideon’s love story.
    My first (unpublished) full length novel was a Georgian, School of GH. It made me laugh at the time. Must look at it again.

    Reply
  86. Interesting thread of Heyer-reading dads. (Mine did too.) Do you think our fathers’ generation was less sensitive to being thought unmasculine? Or are there more guys reading romance these days than I realize?
    I recently reread Arabella (for the first time since I really got serious about learning to write) and found myself wondering if GH could even get published nowadays. But like Anne Stuart, she and Mary Stewart were (still are!) my writing heroines. Guess I’ll pick Venetia, Frederica and Devil’s Cub. Might give you a different selection tomorrow!

    Reply
  87. Interesting thread of Heyer-reading dads. (Mine did too.) Do you think our fathers’ generation was less sensitive to being thought unmasculine? Or are there more guys reading romance these days than I realize?
    I recently reread Arabella (for the first time since I really got serious about learning to write) and found myself wondering if GH could even get published nowadays. But like Anne Stuart, she and Mary Stewart were (still are!) my writing heroines. Guess I’ll pick Venetia, Frederica and Devil’s Cub. Might give you a different selection tomorrow!

    Reply
  88. Interesting thread of Heyer-reading dads. (Mine did too.) Do you think our fathers’ generation was less sensitive to being thought unmasculine? Or are there more guys reading romance these days than I realize?
    I recently reread Arabella (for the first time since I really got serious about learning to write) and found myself wondering if GH could even get published nowadays. But like Anne Stuart, she and Mary Stewart were (still are!) my writing heroines. Guess I’ll pick Venetia, Frederica and Devil’s Cub. Might give you a different selection tomorrow!

    Reply
  89. Interesting thread of Heyer-reading dads. (Mine did too.) Do you think our fathers’ generation was less sensitive to being thought unmasculine? Or are there more guys reading romance these days than I realize?
    I recently reread Arabella (for the first time since I really got serious about learning to write) and found myself wondering if GH could even get published nowadays. But like Anne Stuart, she and Mary Stewart were (still are!) my writing heroines. Guess I’ll pick Venetia, Frederica and Devil’s Cub. Might give you a different selection tomorrow!

    Reply
  90. Interesting thread of Heyer-reading dads. (Mine did too.) Do you think our fathers’ generation was less sensitive to being thought unmasculine? Or are there more guys reading romance these days than I realize?
    I recently reread Arabella (for the first time since I really got serious about learning to write) and found myself wondering if GH could even get published nowadays. But like Anne Stuart, she and Mary Stewart were (still are!) my writing heroines. Guess I’ll pick Venetia, Frederica and Devil’s Cub. Might give you a different selection tomorrow!

    Reply
  91. My first book was Friday’s Child. It was on the top shelf of my mother’s bookcase, and was a WWII edition, with only two colours on the wrapper (red and white), and cloth over the bookends. I still have it because it was the entry into a wonderful world. Like many I find Heyer wonderful when feeling a bit down. It immediately cheers me up. Also I have read my copies many times, and am now collecting new copies, just so I’m not left with nothing to read in an emergency. I have also started to download to my kindle for the same reason. My favourite character? Well Frederica, but also Hugo, and the Toll Gate’s John Staples. Wonderful characters. Wouldn’t it be great if you walked down the street, and there they were?

    Reply
  92. My first book was Friday’s Child. It was on the top shelf of my mother’s bookcase, and was a WWII edition, with only two colours on the wrapper (red and white), and cloth over the bookends. I still have it because it was the entry into a wonderful world. Like many I find Heyer wonderful when feeling a bit down. It immediately cheers me up. Also I have read my copies many times, and am now collecting new copies, just so I’m not left with nothing to read in an emergency. I have also started to download to my kindle for the same reason. My favourite character? Well Frederica, but also Hugo, and the Toll Gate’s John Staples. Wonderful characters. Wouldn’t it be great if you walked down the street, and there they were?

    Reply
  93. My first book was Friday’s Child. It was on the top shelf of my mother’s bookcase, and was a WWII edition, with only two colours on the wrapper (red and white), and cloth over the bookends. I still have it because it was the entry into a wonderful world. Like many I find Heyer wonderful when feeling a bit down. It immediately cheers me up. Also I have read my copies many times, and am now collecting new copies, just so I’m not left with nothing to read in an emergency. I have also started to download to my kindle for the same reason. My favourite character? Well Frederica, but also Hugo, and the Toll Gate’s John Staples. Wonderful characters. Wouldn’t it be great if you walked down the street, and there they were?

    Reply
  94. My first book was Friday’s Child. It was on the top shelf of my mother’s bookcase, and was a WWII edition, with only two colours on the wrapper (red and white), and cloth over the bookends. I still have it because it was the entry into a wonderful world. Like many I find Heyer wonderful when feeling a bit down. It immediately cheers me up. Also I have read my copies many times, and am now collecting new copies, just so I’m not left with nothing to read in an emergency. I have also started to download to my kindle for the same reason. My favourite character? Well Frederica, but also Hugo, and the Toll Gate’s John Staples. Wonderful characters. Wouldn’t it be great if you walked down the street, and there they were?

    Reply
  95. My first book was Friday’s Child. It was on the top shelf of my mother’s bookcase, and was a WWII edition, with only two colours on the wrapper (red and white), and cloth over the bookends. I still have it because it was the entry into a wonderful world. Like many I find Heyer wonderful when feeling a bit down. It immediately cheers me up. Also I have read my copies many times, and am now collecting new copies, just so I’m not left with nothing to read in an emergency. I have also started to download to my kindle for the same reason. My favourite character? Well Frederica, but also Hugo, and the Toll Gate’s John Staples. Wonderful characters. Wouldn’t it be great if you walked down the street, and there they were?

    Reply
  96. My first book was A Lady of Quality. I don’t remember where I came upon it, sadly. I didn’t love it, but I thought I’d give Heyer another chance, since I loved her language so much. I picked up These Old Shades next, and did I ever love it! Now I have the set and adore them all. Like everyone else, I read them when I need a good laugh. If I have to pick just one, then I love Devil’s Cub best. I was completely impressed when Mary fired that gun! I’m so happy to read this lovely string of comments about her novels. 🙂

    Reply
  97. My first book was A Lady of Quality. I don’t remember where I came upon it, sadly. I didn’t love it, but I thought I’d give Heyer another chance, since I loved her language so much. I picked up These Old Shades next, and did I ever love it! Now I have the set and adore them all. Like everyone else, I read them when I need a good laugh. If I have to pick just one, then I love Devil’s Cub best. I was completely impressed when Mary fired that gun! I’m so happy to read this lovely string of comments about her novels. 🙂

    Reply
  98. My first book was A Lady of Quality. I don’t remember where I came upon it, sadly. I didn’t love it, but I thought I’d give Heyer another chance, since I loved her language so much. I picked up These Old Shades next, and did I ever love it! Now I have the set and adore them all. Like everyone else, I read them when I need a good laugh. If I have to pick just one, then I love Devil’s Cub best. I was completely impressed when Mary fired that gun! I’m so happy to read this lovely string of comments about her novels. 🙂

    Reply
  99. My first book was A Lady of Quality. I don’t remember where I came upon it, sadly. I didn’t love it, but I thought I’d give Heyer another chance, since I loved her language so much. I picked up These Old Shades next, and did I ever love it! Now I have the set and adore them all. Like everyone else, I read them when I need a good laugh. If I have to pick just one, then I love Devil’s Cub best. I was completely impressed when Mary fired that gun! I’m so happy to read this lovely string of comments about her novels. 🙂

    Reply
  100. My first book was A Lady of Quality. I don’t remember where I came upon it, sadly. I didn’t love it, but I thought I’d give Heyer another chance, since I loved her language so much. I picked up These Old Shades next, and did I ever love it! Now I have the set and adore them all. Like everyone else, I read them when I need a good laugh. If I have to pick just one, then I love Devil’s Cub best. I was completely impressed when Mary fired that gun! I’m so happy to read this lovely string of comments about her novels. 🙂

    Reply
  101. I can’t remember exactly which Heyer I read first, but it was definitely one of the ones that Ace pirated in the 60s. I think a friend may have mentioned her name, or it may have been that I saw those Ace paperbacks (many of which I still have) on the rack at the grocery store, but whichever, I was hooked after the first one. My favorite is probably These Old Shades, because it’s funny and romantic and epic, and Avon is still the coolest of the cool. After that I like Devil’s Cub, Cotillion and A Civil Contract.
    Recently I’ve been locating her moderns and reading them; I have Barren Corn in the TBR now. I shake my head at some of her views but I find them fascinating.
    And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Sourcebooks Casablanca for bringing GH back into print in the US, and in such nice editions.

    Reply
  102. I can’t remember exactly which Heyer I read first, but it was definitely one of the ones that Ace pirated in the 60s. I think a friend may have mentioned her name, or it may have been that I saw those Ace paperbacks (many of which I still have) on the rack at the grocery store, but whichever, I was hooked after the first one. My favorite is probably These Old Shades, because it’s funny and romantic and epic, and Avon is still the coolest of the cool. After that I like Devil’s Cub, Cotillion and A Civil Contract.
    Recently I’ve been locating her moderns and reading them; I have Barren Corn in the TBR now. I shake my head at some of her views but I find them fascinating.
    And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Sourcebooks Casablanca for bringing GH back into print in the US, and in such nice editions.

    Reply
  103. I can’t remember exactly which Heyer I read first, but it was definitely one of the ones that Ace pirated in the 60s. I think a friend may have mentioned her name, or it may have been that I saw those Ace paperbacks (many of which I still have) on the rack at the grocery store, but whichever, I was hooked after the first one. My favorite is probably These Old Shades, because it’s funny and romantic and epic, and Avon is still the coolest of the cool. After that I like Devil’s Cub, Cotillion and A Civil Contract.
    Recently I’ve been locating her moderns and reading them; I have Barren Corn in the TBR now. I shake my head at some of her views but I find them fascinating.
    And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Sourcebooks Casablanca for bringing GH back into print in the US, and in such nice editions.

    Reply
  104. I can’t remember exactly which Heyer I read first, but it was definitely one of the ones that Ace pirated in the 60s. I think a friend may have mentioned her name, or it may have been that I saw those Ace paperbacks (many of which I still have) on the rack at the grocery store, but whichever, I was hooked after the first one. My favorite is probably These Old Shades, because it’s funny and romantic and epic, and Avon is still the coolest of the cool. After that I like Devil’s Cub, Cotillion and A Civil Contract.
    Recently I’ve been locating her moderns and reading them; I have Barren Corn in the TBR now. I shake my head at some of her views but I find them fascinating.
    And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Sourcebooks Casablanca for bringing GH back into print in the US, and in such nice editions.

    Reply
  105. I can’t remember exactly which Heyer I read first, but it was definitely one of the ones that Ace pirated in the 60s. I think a friend may have mentioned her name, or it may have been that I saw those Ace paperbacks (many of which I still have) on the rack at the grocery store, but whichever, I was hooked after the first one. My favorite is probably These Old Shades, because it’s funny and romantic and epic, and Avon is still the coolest of the cool. After that I like Devil’s Cub, Cotillion and A Civil Contract.
    Recently I’ve been locating her moderns and reading them; I have Barren Corn in the TBR now. I shake my head at some of her views but I find them fascinating.
    And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Sourcebooks Casablanca for bringing GH back into print in the US, and in such nice editions.

    Reply
  106. I was introduced to Georgette Heyer at the age of nine after I’d read all of Jane Austen and all of the Bronte sisters. The two retired librarians who lived next door to us in England had a library in their house which a nine year old American thought was the coolest thing ever. I read leather bound copies of every single Georgette Heyer written sitting in a big chair in front of the fireplace in that library. My favorite? Venetia. Followed by The Quiet Gentleman and Devil’s Cub. I bought paperback copies when we returned to the States and I still have them, but I’ve started buying new copies as those old paperbacks are beginning to fade! And yes, she is one of the reasons I write Regency romance.

    Reply
  107. I was introduced to Georgette Heyer at the age of nine after I’d read all of Jane Austen and all of the Bronte sisters. The two retired librarians who lived next door to us in England had a library in their house which a nine year old American thought was the coolest thing ever. I read leather bound copies of every single Georgette Heyer written sitting in a big chair in front of the fireplace in that library. My favorite? Venetia. Followed by The Quiet Gentleman and Devil’s Cub. I bought paperback copies when we returned to the States and I still have them, but I’ve started buying new copies as those old paperbacks are beginning to fade! And yes, she is one of the reasons I write Regency romance.

    Reply
  108. I was introduced to Georgette Heyer at the age of nine after I’d read all of Jane Austen and all of the Bronte sisters. The two retired librarians who lived next door to us in England had a library in their house which a nine year old American thought was the coolest thing ever. I read leather bound copies of every single Georgette Heyer written sitting in a big chair in front of the fireplace in that library. My favorite? Venetia. Followed by The Quiet Gentleman and Devil’s Cub. I bought paperback copies when we returned to the States and I still have them, but I’ve started buying new copies as those old paperbacks are beginning to fade! And yes, she is one of the reasons I write Regency romance.

    Reply
  109. I was introduced to Georgette Heyer at the age of nine after I’d read all of Jane Austen and all of the Bronte sisters. The two retired librarians who lived next door to us in England had a library in their house which a nine year old American thought was the coolest thing ever. I read leather bound copies of every single Georgette Heyer written sitting in a big chair in front of the fireplace in that library. My favorite? Venetia. Followed by The Quiet Gentleman and Devil’s Cub. I bought paperback copies when we returned to the States and I still have them, but I’ve started buying new copies as those old paperbacks are beginning to fade! And yes, she is one of the reasons I write Regency romance.

    Reply
  110. I was introduced to Georgette Heyer at the age of nine after I’d read all of Jane Austen and all of the Bronte sisters. The two retired librarians who lived next door to us in England had a library in their house which a nine year old American thought was the coolest thing ever. I read leather bound copies of every single Georgette Heyer written sitting in a big chair in front of the fireplace in that library. My favorite? Venetia. Followed by The Quiet Gentleman and Devil’s Cub. I bought paperback copies when we returned to the States and I still have them, but I’ve started buying new copies as those old paperbacks are beginning to fade! And yes, she is one of the reasons I write Regency romance.

    Reply
  111. I’m on at least my third full set of GH. I started when I was 10 or 11 and that set was sold when my parents moved and I was in college. My favorite is These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub….one of her few sequels, I consider them one. I adore all the main characters and can’t count the times I’ve read them. Concerning the comment as to whether or not GH would be saleale today…what she lacks in descriptive ‘physical romance’ she makes up for with story, wit and humor. I’m one that sometimes skims past the sex scenes preferring to get back to the story. I’m sure she would still have a niche and a place on the best seller list.

    Reply
  112. I’m on at least my third full set of GH. I started when I was 10 or 11 and that set was sold when my parents moved and I was in college. My favorite is These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub….one of her few sequels, I consider them one. I adore all the main characters and can’t count the times I’ve read them. Concerning the comment as to whether or not GH would be saleale today…what she lacks in descriptive ‘physical romance’ she makes up for with story, wit and humor. I’m one that sometimes skims past the sex scenes preferring to get back to the story. I’m sure she would still have a niche and a place on the best seller list.

    Reply
  113. I’m on at least my third full set of GH. I started when I was 10 or 11 and that set was sold when my parents moved and I was in college. My favorite is These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub….one of her few sequels, I consider them one. I adore all the main characters and can’t count the times I’ve read them. Concerning the comment as to whether or not GH would be saleale today…what she lacks in descriptive ‘physical romance’ she makes up for with story, wit and humor. I’m one that sometimes skims past the sex scenes preferring to get back to the story. I’m sure she would still have a niche and a place on the best seller list.

    Reply
  114. I’m on at least my third full set of GH. I started when I was 10 or 11 and that set was sold when my parents moved and I was in college. My favorite is These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub….one of her few sequels, I consider them one. I adore all the main characters and can’t count the times I’ve read them. Concerning the comment as to whether or not GH would be saleale today…what she lacks in descriptive ‘physical romance’ she makes up for with story, wit and humor. I’m one that sometimes skims past the sex scenes preferring to get back to the story. I’m sure she would still have a niche and a place on the best seller list.

    Reply
  115. I’m on at least my third full set of GH. I started when I was 10 or 11 and that set was sold when my parents moved and I was in college. My favorite is These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub….one of her few sequels, I consider them one. I adore all the main characters and can’t count the times I’ve read them. Concerning the comment as to whether or not GH would be saleale today…what she lacks in descriptive ‘physical romance’ she makes up for with story, wit and humor. I’m one that sometimes skims past the sex scenes preferring to get back to the story. I’m sure she would still have a niche and a place on the best seller list.

    Reply
  116. I picked up a Heyer book on my very first trip to London when I was 24, so I was late to the party too. I can’t remember which one, but I was completely smitten ever after. I have, I think, read them all, including her mysteries. I just reread Frederica a couple of weeks ago on my vacation in Florida, Baluchistan hound and all.
    I think I love These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub the best, but I wouldn’t swear to it. My big regret–I gave away a nearly complete paperback collection to a library during a move, long before I decided to write. Have kicked myself ever since, but have been downloading books to my Kindle as they come up on sale. I’m even in the middle of reading a recent Heyer biography.
    Jo, your new photograph is lovely!

    Reply
  117. I picked up a Heyer book on my very first trip to London when I was 24, so I was late to the party too. I can’t remember which one, but I was completely smitten ever after. I have, I think, read them all, including her mysteries. I just reread Frederica a couple of weeks ago on my vacation in Florida, Baluchistan hound and all.
    I think I love These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub the best, but I wouldn’t swear to it. My big regret–I gave away a nearly complete paperback collection to a library during a move, long before I decided to write. Have kicked myself ever since, but have been downloading books to my Kindle as they come up on sale. I’m even in the middle of reading a recent Heyer biography.
    Jo, your new photograph is lovely!

    Reply
  118. I picked up a Heyer book on my very first trip to London when I was 24, so I was late to the party too. I can’t remember which one, but I was completely smitten ever after. I have, I think, read them all, including her mysteries. I just reread Frederica a couple of weeks ago on my vacation in Florida, Baluchistan hound and all.
    I think I love These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub the best, but I wouldn’t swear to it. My big regret–I gave away a nearly complete paperback collection to a library during a move, long before I decided to write. Have kicked myself ever since, but have been downloading books to my Kindle as they come up on sale. I’m even in the middle of reading a recent Heyer biography.
    Jo, your new photograph is lovely!

    Reply
  119. I picked up a Heyer book on my very first trip to London when I was 24, so I was late to the party too. I can’t remember which one, but I was completely smitten ever after. I have, I think, read them all, including her mysteries. I just reread Frederica a couple of weeks ago on my vacation in Florida, Baluchistan hound and all.
    I think I love These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub the best, but I wouldn’t swear to it. My big regret–I gave away a nearly complete paperback collection to a library during a move, long before I decided to write. Have kicked myself ever since, but have been downloading books to my Kindle as they come up on sale. I’m even in the middle of reading a recent Heyer biography.
    Jo, your new photograph is lovely!

    Reply
  120. I picked up a Heyer book on my very first trip to London when I was 24, so I was late to the party too. I can’t remember which one, but I was completely smitten ever after. I have, I think, read them all, including her mysteries. I just reread Frederica a couple of weeks ago on my vacation in Florida, Baluchistan hound and all.
    I think I love These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub the best, but I wouldn’t swear to it. My big regret–I gave away a nearly complete paperback collection to a library during a move, long before I decided to write. Have kicked myself ever since, but have been downloading books to my Kindle as they come up on sale. I’m even in the middle of reading a recent Heyer biography.
    Jo, your new photograph is lovely!

    Reply
  121. It’s not only dads who love Heyer. I introduced my husband to the delights of her books via ‘Friday’s Child’ and he’s now a fan and reading steadily through them.
    What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.
    Incidentally, no one has mentioned her murder mysteries. I own them all, but they’re not nearly as good. I gather it was her husband who pushed her to write them. I wish she’d written another dozen historical romances instead.

    Reply
  122. It’s not only dads who love Heyer. I introduced my husband to the delights of her books via ‘Friday’s Child’ and he’s now a fan and reading steadily through them.
    What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.
    Incidentally, no one has mentioned her murder mysteries. I own them all, but they’re not nearly as good. I gather it was her husband who pushed her to write them. I wish she’d written another dozen historical romances instead.

    Reply
  123. It’s not only dads who love Heyer. I introduced my husband to the delights of her books via ‘Friday’s Child’ and he’s now a fan and reading steadily through them.
    What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.
    Incidentally, no one has mentioned her murder mysteries. I own them all, but they’re not nearly as good. I gather it was her husband who pushed her to write them. I wish she’d written another dozen historical romances instead.

    Reply
  124. It’s not only dads who love Heyer. I introduced my husband to the delights of her books via ‘Friday’s Child’ and he’s now a fan and reading steadily through them.
    What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.
    Incidentally, no one has mentioned her murder mysteries. I own them all, but they’re not nearly as good. I gather it was her husband who pushed her to write them. I wish she’d written another dozen historical romances instead.

    Reply
  125. It’s not only dads who love Heyer. I introduced my husband to the delights of her books via ‘Friday’s Child’ and he’s now a fan and reading steadily through them.
    What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.
    Incidentally, no one has mentioned her murder mysteries. I own them all, but they’re not nearly as good. I gather it was her husband who pushed her to write them. I wish she’d written another dozen historical romances instead.

    Reply
  126. Yes, Mary, in one of the few things Heyer said about writing she talked about the proper and principled young lady conquering the dark and dangerous hero.She understood the appeal!

    Reply
  127. Yes, Mary, in one of the few things Heyer said about writing she talked about the proper and principled young lady conquering the dark and dangerous hero.She understood the appeal!

    Reply
  128. Yes, Mary, in one of the few things Heyer said about writing she talked about the proper and principled young lady conquering the dark and dangerous hero.She understood the appeal!

    Reply
  129. Yes, Mary, in one of the few things Heyer said about writing she talked about the proper and principled young lady conquering the dark and dangerous hero.She understood the appeal!

    Reply
  130. Yes, Mary, in one of the few things Heyer said about writing she talked about the proper and principled young lady conquering the dark and dangerous hero.She understood the appeal!

    Reply
  131. Jenny, I have to say that I’ve never been that keen on The Foundling, but it wasn’t the hero’s fault. I think it was in comparion to the rest of Heyer’s work. Gideon, however, was memorable, yes. 🙂

    Reply
  132. Jenny, I have to say that I’ve never been that keen on The Foundling, but it wasn’t the hero’s fault. I think it was in comparion to the rest of Heyer’s work. Gideon, however, was memorable, yes. 🙂

    Reply
  133. Jenny, I have to say that I’ve never been that keen on The Foundling, but it wasn’t the hero’s fault. I think it was in comparion to the rest of Heyer’s work. Gideon, however, was memorable, yes. 🙂

    Reply
  134. Jenny, I have to say that I’ve never been that keen on The Foundling, but it wasn’t the hero’s fault. I think it was in comparion to the rest of Heyer’s work. Gideon, however, was memorable, yes. 🙂

    Reply
  135. Jenny, I have to say that I’ve never been that keen on The Foundling, but it wasn’t the hero’s fault. I think it was in comparion to the rest of Heyer’s work. Gideon, however, was memorable, yes. 🙂

    Reply
  136. Kerryn, I think there are more men reading romance than it sometimes appears, but I think Heyer’s style had a bit of coolness which can turn off some modern readers, but which made her books more accessible to men.
    I remember meeting a really cool guy at university who had a scar down his cheek and seemed very intriguingly dangerous and bonding over Heyer. The scar could have been innocuously acquired, but he was just visiting a friend and I never found out.

    Reply
  137. Kerryn, I think there are more men reading romance than it sometimes appears, but I think Heyer’s style had a bit of coolness which can turn off some modern readers, but which made her books more accessible to men.
    I remember meeting a really cool guy at university who had a scar down his cheek and seemed very intriguingly dangerous and bonding over Heyer. The scar could have been innocuously acquired, but he was just visiting a friend and I never found out.

    Reply
  138. Kerryn, I think there are more men reading romance than it sometimes appears, but I think Heyer’s style had a bit of coolness which can turn off some modern readers, but which made her books more accessible to men.
    I remember meeting a really cool guy at university who had a scar down his cheek and seemed very intriguingly dangerous and bonding over Heyer. The scar could have been innocuously acquired, but he was just visiting a friend and I never found out.

    Reply
  139. Kerryn, I think there are more men reading romance than it sometimes appears, but I think Heyer’s style had a bit of coolness which can turn off some modern readers, but which made her books more accessible to men.
    I remember meeting a really cool guy at university who had a scar down his cheek and seemed very intriguingly dangerous and bonding over Heyer. The scar could have been innocuously acquired, but he was just visiting a friend and I never found out.

    Reply
  140. Kerryn, I think there are more men reading romance than it sometimes appears, but I think Heyer’s style had a bit of coolness which can turn off some modern readers, but which made her books more accessible to men.
    I remember meeting a really cool guy at university who had a scar down his cheek and seemed very intriguingly dangerous and bonding over Heyer. The scar could have been innocuously acquired, but he was just visiting a friend and I never found out.

    Reply
  141. When I was younger I thought it was such a shame that Heyer had all these wonderful characters wandering Regency England and they rarely interacted. That was why I planned to write linked books from the first.
    I have realized that she might have been wise. It’s hard work keeping track of all the characters in 15 books!

    Reply
  142. When I was younger I thought it was such a shame that Heyer had all these wonderful characters wandering Regency England and they rarely interacted. That was why I planned to write linked books from the first.
    I have realized that she might have been wise. It’s hard work keeping track of all the characters in 15 books!

    Reply
  143. When I was younger I thought it was such a shame that Heyer had all these wonderful characters wandering Regency England and they rarely interacted. That was why I planned to write linked books from the first.
    I have realized that she might have been wise. It’s hard work keeping track of all the characters in 15 books!

    Reply
  144. When I was younger I thought it was such a shame that Heyer had all these wonderful characters wandering Regency England and they rarely interacted. That was why I planned to write linked books from the first.
    I have realized that she might have been wise. It’s hard work keeping track of all the characters in 15 books!

    Reply
  145. When I was younger I thought it was such a shame that Heyer had all these wonderful characters wandering Regency England and they rarely interacted. That was why I planned to write linked books from the first.
    I have realized that she might have been wise. It’s hard work keeping track of all the characters in 15 books!

    Reply
  146. Jenna, I think most people agree that A Lady of Quality isn’t one of Heyer’s best. Good for you for trying again. Yes, Mary firing the gun impressed Vidal, too, didn’t it?
    Jo

    Reply
  147. Jenna, I think most people agree that A Lady of Quality isn’t one of Heyer’s best. Good for you for trying again. Yes, Mary firing the gun impressed Vidal, too, didn’t it?
    Jo

    Reply
  148. Jenna, I think most people agree that A Lady of Quality isn’t one of Heyer’s best. Good for you for trying again. Yes, Mary firing the gun impressed Vidal, too, didn’t it?
    Jo

    Reply
  149. Jenna, I think most people agree that A Lady of Quality isn’t one of Heyer’s best. Good for you for trying again. Yes, Mary firing the gun impressed Vidal, too, didn’t it?
    Jo

    Reply
  150. Jenna, I think most people agree that A Lady of Quality isn’t one of Heyer’s best. Good for you for trying again. Yes, Mary firing the gun impressed Vidal, too, didn’t it?
    Jo

    Reply
  151. Leather bound editions in a big chair in front of a fireplace. Oh, Louisa, that’s such a lovely image.
    I have a memory of first reading The Scarlet Pimpernel tucked up on the sofa in front of a big fire when about the same age. I think I’d been ill and my mother had given me the book to pass the time. We didn’t own many books and mostly used the library, but for some reason we had that one. My first romance.

    Reply
  152. Leather bound editions in a big chair in front of a fireplace. Oh, Louisa, that’s such a lovely image.
    I have a memory of first reading The Scarlet Pimpernel tucked up on the sofa in front of a big fire when about the same age. I think I’d been ill and my mother had given me the book to pass the time. We didn’t own many books and mostly used the library, but for some reason we had that one. My first romance.

    Reply
  153. Leather bound editions in a big chair in front of a fireplace. Oh, Louisa, that’s such a lovely image.
    I have a memory of first reading The Scarlet Pimpernel tucked up on the sofa in front of a big fire when about the same age. I think I’d been ill and my mother had given me the book to pass the time. We didn’t own many books and mostly used the library, but for some reason we had that one. My first romance.

    Reply
  154. Leather bound editions in a big chair in front of a fireplace. Oh, Louisa, that’s such a lovely image.
    I have a memory of first reading The Scarlet Pimpernel tucked up on the sofa in front of a big fire when about the same age. I think I’d been ill and my mother had given me the book to pass the time. We didn’t own many books and mostly used the library, but for some reason we had that one. My first romance.

    Reply
  155. Leather bound editions in a big chair in front of a fireplace. Oh, Louisa, that’s such a lovely image.
    I have a memory of first reading The Scarlet Pimpernel tucked up on the sofa in front of a big fire when about the same age. I think I’d been ill and my mother had given me the book to pass the time. We didn’t own many books and mostly used the library, but for some reason we had that one. My first romance.

    Reply
  156. My dad was a voracious fan, as were both my brothers and all the females in the family too. Strange how Heyer’s romances manage to cross the male/female reading divide.
    And nobody’s yet mentioned The Convenient Marriage – a delight for me.

    Reply
  157. My dad was a voracious fan, as were both my brothers and all the females in the family too. Strange how Heyer’s romances manage to cross the male/female reading divide.
    And nobody’s yet mentioned The Convenient Marriage – a delight for me.

    Reply
  158. My dad was a voracious fan, as were both my brothers and all the females in the family too. Strange how Heyer’s romances manage to cross the male/female reading divide.
    And nobody’s yet mentioned The Convenient Marriage – a delight for me.

    Reply
  159. My dad was a voracious fan, as were both my brothers and all the females in the family too. Strange how Heyer’s romances manage to cross the male/female reading divide.
    And nobody’s yet mentioned The Convenient Marriage – a delight for me.

    Reply
  160. My dad was a voracious fan, as were both my brothers and all the females in the family too. Strange how Heyer’s romances manage to cross the male/female reading divide.
    And nobody’s yet mentioned The Convenient Marriage – a delight for me.

    Reply
  161. “What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.”
    So true, Anna. And I can remember very clearly thinking in my teens that one day I wanted to write books that gave people even a bit of the same pleasure.
    Yes, her murder mysteries aren’t as good. Whether it was her husband or not, murder mysteries were so much more respectable back then.

    Reply
  162. “What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.”
    So true, Anna. And I can remember very clearly thinking in my teens that one day I wanted to write books that gave people even a bit of the same pleasure.
    Yes, her murder mysteries aren’t as good. Whether it was her husband or not, murder mysteries were so much more respectable back then.

    Reply
  163. “What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.”
    So true, Anna. And I can remember very clearly thinking in my teens that one day I wanted to write books that gave people even a bit of the same pleasure.
    Yes, her murder mysteries aren’t as good. Whether it was her husband or not, murder mysteries were so much more respectable back then.

    Reply
  164. “What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.”
    So true, Anna. And I can remember very clearly thinking in my teens that one day I wanted to write books that gave people even a bit of the same pleasure.
    Yes, her murder mysteries aren’t as good. Whether it was her husband or not, murder mysteries were so much more respectable back then.

    Reply
  165. “What a wonderful legacy she’s left the world, and what pleasure she’s given to so many people.”
    So true, Anna. And I can remember very clearly thinking in my teens that one day I wanted to write books that gave people even a bit of the same pleasure.
    Yes, her murder mysteries aren’t as good. Whether it was her husband or not, murder mysteries were so much more respectable back then.

    Reply
  166. A wonderful post, Jo and it’s such a wonderful thing to think that Heyer will be acknowledged with a Blue Plaque at last. My first Heyer was Cotillion and Freddy remains my favourite hero but I have a huge fondness for A Civil Contract which I think is one of Heyer’s finest achievements. I also love Venetia, Sylvester and Black Sheep and there are parts of Sprig Muslin that give me great joy. Hester Theale is a wonderful character and Sir Gareth one of her most delightful heroes. Mind you, when people mention The Talisman Ring and Sophy I remember how much I love them too. One of the things I admire most about Heyer was her ability to create great characters. She was a master of the comic character – people like Jonathan Chawleigh, Mrs Floore, Sir Nugent Fotherby… I love the way that Heyerites have their own code for laughter – as you say, you only have to mention the Baluchistan Hound or Nemesis, or Claude and Polyphant, or Ludovic to raise a smile. What a wealth of riches she left us!

    Reply
  167. A wonderful post, Jo and it’s such a wonderful thing to think that Heyer will be acknowledged with a Blue Plaque at last. My first Heyer was Cotillion and Freddy remains my favourite hero but I have a huge fondness for A Civil Contract which I think is one of Heyer’s finest achievements. I also love Venetia, Sylvester and Black Sheep and there are parts of Sprig Muslin that give me great joy. Hester Theale is a wonderful character and Sir Gareth one of her most delightful heroes. Mind you, when people mention The Talisman Ring and Sophy I remember how much I love them too. One of the things I admire most about Heyer was her ability to create great characters. She was a master of the comic character – people like Jonathan Chawleigh, Mrs Floore, Sir Nugent Fotherby… I love the way that Heyerites have their own code for laughter – as you say, you only have to mention the Baluchistan Hound or Nemesis, or Claude and Polyphant, or Ludovic to raise a smile. What a wealth of riches she left us!

    Reply
  168. A wonderful post, Jo and it’s such a wonderful thing to think that Heyer will be acknowledged with a Blue Plaque at last. My first Heyer was Cotillion and Freddy remains my favourite hero but I have a huge fondness for A Civil Contract which I think is one of Heyer’s finest achievements. I also love Venetia, Sylvester and Black Sheep and there are parts of Sprig Muslin that give me great joy. Hester Theale is a wonderful character and Sir Gareth one of her most delightful heroes. Mind you, when people mention The Talisman Ring and Sophy I remember how much I love them too. One of the things I admire most about Heyer was her ability to create great characters. She was a master of the comic character – people like Jonathan Chawleigh, Mrs Floore, Sir Nugent Fotherby… I love the way that Heyerites have their own code for laughter – as you say, you only have to mention the Baluchistan Hound or Nemesis, or Claude and Polyphant, or Ludovic to raise a smile. What a wealth of riches she left us!

    Reply
  169. A wonderful post, Jo and it’s such a wonderful thing to think that Heyer will be acknowledged with a Blue Plaque at last. My first Heyer was Cotillion and Freddy remains my favourite hero but I have a huge fondness for A Civil Contract which I think is one of Heyer’s finest achievements. I also love Venetia, Sylvester and Black Sheep and there are parts of Sprig Muslin that give me great joy. Hester Theale is a wonderful character and Sir Gareth one of her most delightful heroes. Mind you, when people mention The Talisman Ring and Sophy I remember how much I love them too. One of the things I admire most about Heyer was her ability to create great characters. She was a master of the comic character – people like Jonathan Chawleigh, Mrs Floore, Sir Nugent Fotherby… I love the way that Heyerites have their own code for laughter – as you say, you only have to mention the Baluchistan Hound or Nemesis, or Claude and Polyphant, or Ludovic to raise a smile. What a wealth of riches she left us!

    Reply
  170. A wonderful post, Jo and it’s such a wonderful thing to think that Heyer will be acknowledged with a Blue Plaque at last. My first Heyer was Cotillion and Freddy remains my favourite hero but I have a huge fondness for A Civil Contract which I think is one of Heyer’s finest achievements. I also love Venetia, Sylvester and Black Sheep and there are parts of Sprig Muslin that give me great joy. Hester Theale is a wonderful character and Sir Gareth one of her most delightful heroes. Mind you, when people mention The Talisman Ring and Sophy I remember how much I love them too. One of the things I admire most about Heyer was her ability to create great characters. She was a master of the comic character – people like Jonathan Chawleigh, Mrs Floore, Sir Nugent Fotherby… I love the way that Heyerites have their own code for laughter – as you say, you only have to mention the Baluchistan Hound or Nemesis, or Claude and Polyphant, or Ludovic to raise a smile. What a wealth of riches she left us!

    Reply
  171. Like many, I was introduced to Heyer by my mother. I was about 11 reading Friday’s Child, and it was unlike anything I had ever picked up. For the first two chapters I was bewildered by the slang, then suddenly everything clicked and I have never looked back. My “big three” are Venetia, Devil’s Cub, and Frederica, but even a weak Heyer (Charity Girl, anyone) is much better than nearly everything else.

    Reply
  172. Like many, I was introduced to Heyer by my mother. I was about 11 reading Friday’s Child, and it was unlike anything I had ever picked up. For the first two chapters I was bewildered by the slang, then suddenly everything clicked and I have never looked back. My “big three” are Venetia, Devil’s Cub, and Frederica, but even a weak Heyer (Charity Girl, anyone) is much better than nearly everything else.

    Reply
  173. Like many, I was introduced to Heyer by my mother. I was about 11 reading Friday’s Child, and it was unlike anything I had ever picked up. For the first two chapters I was bewildered by the slang, then suddenly everything clicked and I have never looked back. My “big three” are Venetia, Devil’s Cub, and Frederica, but even a weak Heyer (Charity Girl, anyone) is much better than nearly everything else.

    Reply
  174. Like many, I was introduced to Heyer by my mother. I was about 11 reading Friday’s Child, and it was unlike anything I had ever picked up. For the first two chapters I was bewildered by the slang, then suddenly everything clicked and I have never looked back. My “big three” are Venetia, Devil’s Cub, and Frederica, but even a weak Heyer (Charity Girl, anyone) is much better than nearly everything else.

    Reply
  175. Like many, I was introduced to Heyer by my mother. I was about 11 reading Friday’s Child, and it was unlike anything I had ever picked up. For the first two chapters I was bewildered by the slang, then suddenly everything clicked and I have never looked back. My “big three” are Venetia, Devil’s Cub, and Frederica, but even a weak Heyer (Charity Girl, anyone) is much better than nearly everything else.

    Reply
  176. From the OED vol XVIII – just a precis because it’s too long to type the whole here – a. fashion, style, vogue, mode see also bon-ton 1769, Lloyd’s Evening Post, 1770, Sheridan, The Rivals, 1778 Miss Burney, Evelina…
    b. People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world 1770 – Venus Unmasked deVries and Fryer Miss “P.D. will only take engagements from billiard table gentlemen, gentlemen of the ton, and young shop men.”
    1815 Sporting Mag, 1854 J.S.C. Abbot, Napoleon
    In the US, there’s still a chain of clothing shops called “Bon Ton.”

    Reply
  177. From the OED vol XVIII – just a precis because it’s too long to type the whole here – a. fashion, style, vogue, mode see also bon-ton 1769, Lloyd’s Evening Post, 1770, Sheridan, The Rivals, 1778 Miss Burney, Evelina…
    b. People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world 1770 – Venus Unmasked deVries and Fryer Miss “P.D. will only take engagements from billiard table gentlemen, gentlemen of the ton, and young shop men.”
    1815 Sporting Mag, 1854 J.S.C. Abbot, Napoleon
    In the US, there’s still a chain of clothing shops called “Bon Ton.”

    Reply
  178. From the OED vol XVIII – just a precis because it’s too long to type the whole here – a. fashion, style, vogue, mode see also bon-ton 1769, Lloyd’s Evening Post, 1770, Sheridan, The Rivals, 1778 Miss Burney, Evelina…
    b. People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world 1770 – Venus Unmasked deVries and Fryer Miss “P.D. will only take engagements from billiard table gentlemen, gentlemen of the ton, and young shop men.”
    1815 Sporting Mag, 1854 J.S.C. Abbot, Napoleon
    In the US, there’s still a chain of clothing shops called “Bon Ton.”

    Reply
  179. From the OED vol XVIII – just a precis because it’s too long to type the whole here – a. fashion, style, vogue, mode see also bon-ton 1769, Lloyd’s Evening Post, 1770, Sheridan, The Rivals, 1778 Miss Burney, Evelina…
    b. People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world 1770 – Venus Unmasked deVries and Fryer Miss “P.D. will only take engagements from billiard table gentlemen, gentlemen of the ton, and young shop men.”
    1815 Sporting Mag, 1854 J.S.C. Abbot, Napoleon
    In the US, there’s still a chain of clothing shops called “Bon Ton.”

    Reply
  180. From the OED vol XVIII – just a precis because it’s too long to type the whole here – a. fashion, style, vogue, mode see also bon-ton 1769, Lloyd’s Evening Post, 1770, Sheridan, The Rivals, 1778 Miss Burney, Evelina…
    b. People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world 1770 – Venus Unmasked deVries and Fryer Miss “P.D. will only take engagements from billiard table gentlemen, gentlemen of the ton, and young shop men.”
    1815 Sporting Mag, 1854 J.S.C. Abbot, Napoleon
    In the US, there’s still a chain of clothing shops called “Bon Ton.”

    Reply
  181. I can’t remember when I started reading Heyer, but I’ve loved her for years. Her witty dialogue greatly influenced me, as well as the lightness she brought to her stories. There are a great many people who try to denigrate her research, but she was meticulous. Tweeted.

    Reply
  182. I can’t remember when I started reading Heyer, but I’ve loved her for years. Her witty dialogue greatly influenced me, as well as the lightness she brought to her stories. There are a great many people who try to denigrate her research, but she was meticulous. Tweeted.

    Reply
  183. I can’t remember when I started reading Heyer, but I’ve loved her for years. Her witty dialogue greatly influenced me, as well as the lightness she brought to her stories. There are a great many people who try to denigrate her research, but she was meticulous. Tweeted.

    Reply
  184. I can’t remember when I started reading Heyer, but I’ve loved her for years. Her witty dialogue greatly influenced me, as well as the lightness she brought to her stories. There are a great many people who try to denigrate her research, but she was meticulous. Tweeted.

    Reply
  185. I can’t remember when I started reading Heyer, but I’ve loved her for years. Her witty dialogue greatly influenced me, as well as the lightness she brought to her stories. There are a great many people who try to denigrate her research, but she was meticulous. Tweeted.

    Reply
  186. My mother introduced me to Heyer when I was about 11, and I still revisit the books regularly. It’s hard to pick favorites as there are only a few I don’t like as much (mostly the ones when Heyer separates the hero and heroine for much of the book–I think Charity Girl was one of those, if I recall correctly). I love Venetia and The Unknown Ajax. Hugo is a wonderful hero, not in the common mold.
    Heyer influenced me to set my own books in Regency England, though they are murder mysteries and are definitely not set in the world of the ton!

    Reply
  187. My mother introduced me to Heyer when I was about 11, and I still revisit the books regularly. It’s hard to pick favorites as there are only a few I don’t like as much (mostly the ones when Heyer separates the hero and heroine for much of the book–I think Charity Girl was one of those, if I recall correctly). I love Venetia and The Unknown Ajax. Hugo is a wonderful hero, not in the common mold.
    Heyer influenced me to set my own books in Regency England, though they are murder mysteries and are definitely not set in the world of the ton!

    Reply
  188. My mother introduced me to Heyer when I was about 11, and I still revisit the books regularly. It’s hard to pick favorites as there are only a few I don’t like as much (mostly the ones when Heyer separates the hero and heroine for much of the book–I think Charity Girl was one of those, if I recall correctly). I love Venetia and The Unknown Ajax. Hugo is a wonderful hero, not in the common mold.
    Heyer influenced me to set my own books in Regency England, though they are murder mysteries and are definitely not set in the world of the ton!

    Reply
  189. My mother introduced me to Heyer when I was about 11, and I still revisit the books regularly. It’s hard to pick favorites as there are only a few I don’t like as much (mostly the ones when Heyer separates the hero and heroine for much of the book–I think Charity Girl was one of those, if I recall correctly). I love Venetia and The Unknown Ajax. Hugo is a wonderful hero, not in the common mold.
    Heyer influenced me to set my own books in Regency England, though they are murder mysteries and are definitely not set in the world of the ton!

    Reply
  190. My mother introduced me to Heyer when I was about 11, and I still revisit the books regularly. It’s hard to pick favorites as there are only a few I don’t like as much (mostly the ones when Heyer separates the hero and heroine for much of the book–I think Charity Girl was one of those, if I recall correctly). I love Venetia and The Unknown Ajax. Hugo is a wonderful hero, not in the common mold.
    Heyer influenced me to set my own books in Regency England, though they are murder mysteries and are definitely not set in the world of the ton!

    Reply
  191. Thanks For the info Dixie!
    Case b seems closest to modern usage in romance novels
    People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world
    Not sure that Jane Austen would have read the DeVries and Freyer book about prostitution, with her father being a rector, so maybe she was unaware of the term! LOL
    I guess it was Georgette Heyer who really established use of the term ‘the ton’ in the romance novel to indicate English high society.

    Reply
  192. Thanks For the info Dixie!
    Case b seems closest to modern usage in romance novels
    People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world
    Not sure that Jane Austen would have read the DeVries and Freyer book about prostitution, with her father being a rector, so maybe she was unaware of the term! LOL
    I guess it was Georgette Heyer who really established use of the term ‘the ton’ in the romance novel to indicate English high society.

    Reply
  193. Thanks For the info Dixie!
    Case b seems closest to modern usage in romance novels
    People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world
    Not sure that Jane Austen would have read the DeVries and Freyer book about prostitution, with her father being a rector, so maybe she was unaware of the term! LOL
    I guess it was Georgette Heyer who really established use of the term ‘the ton’ in the romance novel to indicate English high society.

    Reply
  194. Thanks For the info Dixie!
    Case b seems closest to modern usage in romance novels
    People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world
    Not sure that Jane Austen would have read the DeVries and Freyer book about prostitution, with her father being a rector, so maybe she was unaware of the term! LOL
    I guess it was Georgette Heyer who really established use of the term ‘the ton’ in the romance novel to indicate English high society.

    Reply
  195. Thanks For the info Dixie!
    Case b seems closest to modern usage in romance novels
    People of fashion; fashionable society, the fashionable world
    Not sure that Jane Austen would have read the DeVries and Freyer book about prostitution, with her father being a rector, so maybe she was unaware of the term! LOL
    I guess it was Georgette Heyer who really established use of the term ‘the ton’ in the romance novel to indicate English high society.

    Reply
  196. My first Heyer was The Reluctant Widow, which is why it’s still a sentimental favorite. Not that I have just one favorite Heyer … though unsurprisingly most of my favorites have been mentioned. Besides her wonderful characterization and humor, I love her for her language — which is the one thing that none of her later disciples, for whatever reason, have been able to replicate.

    Reply
  197. My first Heyer was The Reluctant Widow, which is why it’s still a sentimental favorite. Not that I have just one favorite Heyer … though unsurprisingly most of my favorites have been mentioned. Besides her wonderful characterization and humor, I love her for her language — which is the one thing that none of her later disciples, for whatever reason, have been able to replicate.

    Reply
  198. My first Heyer was The Reluctant Widow, which is why it’s still a sentimental favorite. Not that I have just one favorite Heyer … though unsurprisingly most of my favorites have been mentioned. Besides her wonderful characterization and humor, I love her for her language — which is the one thing that none of her later disciples, for whatever reason, have been able to replicate.

    Reply
  199. My first Heyer was The Reluctant Widow, which is why it’s still a sentimental favorite. Not that I have just one favorite Heyer … though unsurprisingly most of my favorites have been mentioned. Besides her wonderful characterization and humor, I love her for her language — which is the one thing that none of her later disciples, for whatever reason, have been able to replicate.

    Reply
  200. My first Heyer was The Reluctant Widow, which is why it’s still a sentimental favorite. Not that I have just one favorite Heyer … though unsurprisingly most of my favorites have been mentioned. Besides her wonderful characterization and humor, I love her for her language — which is the one thing that none of her later disciples, for whatever reason, have been able to replicate.

    Reply
  201. I love all you regency gals– your stories have lifted and transported me! And I read all of Georgette’s books the winter after a friend introduced me to her work– nearly drove my hubby mad!
    Keep up the great stories– Georgette would be proud of all of you! xo Pamela

    Reply
  202. I love all you regency gals– your stories have lifted and transported me! And I read all of Georgette’s books the winter after a friend introduced me to her work– nearly drove my hubby mad!
    Keep up the great stories– Georgette would be proud of all of you! xo Pamela

    Reply
  203. I love all you regency gals– your stories have lifted and transported me! And I read all of Georgette’s books the winter after a friend introduced me to her work– nearly drove my hubby mad!
    Keep up the great stories– Georgette would be proud of all of you! xo Pamela

    Reply
  204. I love all you regency gals– your stories have lifted and transported me! And I read all of Georgette’s books the winter after a friend introduced me to her work– nearly drove my hubby mad!
    Keep up the great stories– Georgette would be proud of all of you! xo Pamela

    Reply
  205. I love all you regency gals– your stories have lifted and transported me! And I read all of Georgette’s books the winter after a friend introduced me to her work– nearly drove my hubby mad!
    Keep up the great stories– Georgette would be proud of all of you! xo Pamela

    Reply
  206. I picked up the audio book version of Sylvester (for the Armitage delivery). I knew it was abridged, but they cut out so much – including Sir Nugent’s tassels being removed, and his voluntary removal of a button from one of his coats… Absolutely ruined the story for me…

    Reply
  207. I picked up the audio book version of Sylvester (for the Armitage delivery). I knew it was abridged, but they cut out so much – including Sir Nugent’s tassels being removed, and his voluntary removal of a button from one of his coats… Absolutely ruined the story for me…

    Reply
  208. I picked up the audio book version of Sylvester (for the Armitage delivery). I knew it was abridged, but they cut out so much – including Sir Nugent’s tassels being removed, and his voluntary removal of a button from one of his coats… Absolutely ruined the story for me…

    Reply
  209. I picked up the audio book version of Sylvester (for the Armitage delivery). I knew it was abridged, but they cut out so much – including Sir Nugent’s tassels being removed, and his voluntary removal of a button from one of his coats… Absolutely ruined the story for me…

    Reply
  210. I picked up the audio book version of Sylvester (for the Armitage delivery). I knew it was abridged, but they cut out so much – including Sir Nugent’s tassels being removed, and his voluntary removal of a button from one of his coats… Absolutely ruined the story for me…

    Reply
  211. A late entry, but I love Devil’s Cub and A Civil Contract(two very different stories). Devil’s Cub has my favorite comic scene, involving Rupert and the wine he’s determined to ship back to England. There are still a lot of Heyer’s books I haven’t read, but the most recent one I reread was The Unknown Ajax, great book!

    Reply
  212. A late entry, but I love Devil’s Cub and A Civil Contract(two very different stories). Devil’s Cub has my favorite comic scene, involving Rupert and the wine he’s determined to ship back to England. There are still a lot of Heyer’s books I haven’t read, but the most recent one I reread was The Unknown Ajax, great book!

    Reply
  213. A late entry, but I love Devil’s Cub and A Civil Contract(two very different stories). Devil’s Cub has my favorite comic scene, involving Rupert and the wine he’s determined to ship back to England. There are still a lot of Heyer’s books I haven’t read, but the most recent one I reread was The Unknown Ajax, great book!

    Reply
  214. A late entry, but I love Devil’s Cub and A Civil Contract(two very different stories). Devil’s Cub has my favorite comic scene, involving Rupert and the wine he’s determined to ship back to England. There are still a lot of Heyer’s books I haven’t read, but the most recent one I reread was The Unknown Ajax, great book!

    Reply
  215. A late entry, but I love Devil’s Cub and A Civil Contract(two very different stories). Devil’s Cub has my favorite comic scene, involving Rupert and the wine he’s determined to ship back to England. There are still a lot of Heyer’s books I haven’t read, but the most recent one I reread was The Unknown Ajax, great book!

    Reply
  216. First read GH as a teenager in high school and I only found her because I was shelving books in the school library (she was on the bottom shelf); first book was The Masqueraders quickly followed by These Old Shades and the rest of the very few GH’s there. Favourites include The Quiet Gentleman, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, The Toll-Gate, The Talisman Ring, The Foundling … well, I could go on and on. I have several paperbacks that have literally been read to death. I was able to purchase most of the e-versions of her books several years ago when they were all on special celebrating the 100th anniversary of her birth. I particularly enjoy the fact that the namesake of my hometown is the heroine of The Spanish Bride!
    Lorraine

    Reply
  217. First read GH as a teenager in high school and I only found her because I was shelving books in the school library (she was on the bottom shelf); first book was The Masqueraders quickly followed by These Old Shades and the rest of the very few GH’s there. Favourites include The Quiet Gentleman, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, The Toll-Gate, The Talisman Ring, The Foundling … well, I could go on and on. I have several paperbacks that have literally been read to death. I was able to purchase most of the e-versions of her books several years ago when they were all on special celebrating the 100th anniversary of her birth. I particularly enjoy the fact that the namesake of my hometown is the heroine of The Spanish Bride!
    Lorraine

    Reply
  218. First read GH as a teenager in high school and I only found her because I was shelving books in the school library (she was on the bottom shelf); first book was The Masqueraders quickly followed by These Old Shades and the rest of the very few GH’s there. Favourites include The Quiet Gentleman, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, The Toll-Gate, The Talisman Ring, The Foundling … well, I could go on and on. I have several paperbacks that have literally been read to death. I was able to purchase most of the e-versions of her books several years ago when they were all on special celebrating the 100th anniversary of her birth. I particularly enjoy the fact that the namesake of my hometown is the heroine of The Spanish Bride!
    Lorraine

    Reply
  219. First read GH as a teenager in high school and I only found her because I was shelving books in the school library (she was on the bottom shelf); first book was The Masqueraders quickly followed by These Old Shades and the rest of the very few GH’s there. Favourites include The Quiet Gentleman, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, The Toll-Gate, The Talisman Ring, The Foundling … well, I could go on and on. I have several paperbacks that have literally been read to death. I was able to purchase most of the e-versions of her books several years ago when they were all on special celebrating the 100th anniversary of her birth. I particularly enjoy the fact that the namesake of my hometown is the heroine of The Spanish Bride!
    Lorraine

    Reply
  220. First read GH as a teenager in high school and I only found her because I was shelving books in the school library (she was on the bottom shelf); first book was The Masqueraders quickly followed by These Old Shades and the rest of the very few GH’s there. Favourites include The Quiet Gentleman, Venetia, The Grand Sophy, The Toll-Gate, The Talisman Ring, The Foundling … well, I could go on and on. I have several paperbacks that have literally been read to death. I was able to purchase most of the e-versions of her books several years ago when they were all on special celebrating the 100th anniversary of her birth. I particularly enjoy the fact that the namesake of my hometown is the heroine of The Spanish Bride!
    Lorraine

    Reply
  221. You’ve worn out three sets! That’s impressive.
    I’m not sure it’s the lack of sex that might hold back Heyer today so much as a slower pacing and style. Clearly everyone here enjoys her, but some modern readers want a zippier pace.

    Reply
  222. You’ve worn out three sets! That’s impressive.
    I’m not sure it’s the lack of sex that might hold back Heyer today so much as a slower pacing and style. Clearly everyone here enjoys her, but some modern readers want a zippier pace.

    Reply
  223. You’ve worn out three sets! That’s impressive.
    I’m not sure it’s the lack of sex that might hold back Heyer today so much as a slower pacing and style. Clearly everyone here enjoys her, but some modern readers want a zippier pace.

    Reply
  224. You’ve worn out three sets! That’s impressive.
    I’m not sure it’s the lack of sex that might hold back Heyer today so much as a slower pacing and style. Clearly everyone here enjoys her, but some modern readers want a zippier pace.

    Reply
  225. You’ve worn out three sets! That’s impressive.
    I’m not sure it’s the lack of sex that might hold back Heyer today so much as a slower pacing and style. Clearly everyone here enjoys her, but some modern readers want a zippier pace.

    Reply
  226. I’ve got every book she ever wrote, all the romances, mysteries and the moderns, the short stories. I’ve only ever read the moderns once, they were too depressing. Of the mysteries, half I really liked, half were so so. Well, except for one that I really didn’t like and refuse to reread.
    As for when I first read her…early teens? I don’t remember whether it was my mom finding her first or I found her at the library or the used bookstore. All I know is that I spent years collecting all her books. I do remember anxiously awaiting publication of My Lord John and how it just leaves you hanging there.
    Which do I like the most? Love Devil’s Cub, Venetia, These Old Shades, Reluctant Widow, Masqueraders, The Toll Gate, The Unknown Ajax, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, Fredricka, The Quiet Gentleman plus all the others mentioned so far. There are indeed a few that just don’t hit the mark for me but when I’m in one of my massive re-read all her books binges, I’ll even read them. But not the moderns or that awful mystery I don’t like.
    If I had to choose just one, probably The Grand Sophy. I can tell this is going to tip me over into a read them all to refresh my memory binge.

    Reply
  227. I’ve got every book she ever wrote, all the romances, mysteries and the moderns, the short stories. I’ve only ever read the moderns once, they were too depressing. Of the mysteries, half I really liked, half were so so. Well, except for one that I really didn’t like and refuse to reread.
    As for when I first read her…early teens? I don’t remember whether it was my mom finding her first or I found her at the library or the used bookstore. All I know is that I spent years collecting all her books. I do remember anxiously awaiting publication of My Lord John and how it just leaves you hanging there.
    Which do I like the most? Love Devil’s Cub, Venetia, These Old Shades, Reluctant Widow, Masqueraders, The Toll Gate, The Unknown Ajax, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, Fredricka, The Quiet Gentleman plus all the others mentioned so far. There are indeed a few that just don’t hit the mark for me but when I’m in one of my massive re-read all her books binges, I’ll even read them. But not the moderns or that awful mystery I don’t like.
    If I had to choose just one, probably The Grand Sophy. I can tell this is going to tip me over into a read them all to refresh my memory binge.

    Reply
  228. I’ve got every book she ever wrote, all the romances, mysteries and the moderns, the short stories. I’ve only ever read the moderns once, they were too depressing. Of the mysteries, half I really liked, half were so so. Well, except for one that I really didn’t like and refuse to reread.
    As for when I first read her…early teens? I don’t remember whether it was my mom finding her first or I found her at the library or the used bookstore. All I know is that I spent years collecting all her books. I do remember anxiously awaiting publication of My Lord John and how it just leaves you hanging there.
    Which do I like the most? Love Devil’s Cub, Venetia, These Old Shades, Reluctant Widow, Masqueraders, The Toll Gate, The Unknown Ajax, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, Fredricka, The Quiet Gentleman plus all the others mentioned so far. There are indeed a few that just don’t hit the mark for me but when I’m in one of my massive re-read all her books binges, I’ll even read them. But not the moderns or that awful mystery I don’t like.
    If I had to choose just one, probably The Grand Sophy. I can tell this is going to tip me over into a read them all to refresh my memory binge.

    Reply
  229. I’ve got every book she ever wrote, all the romances, mysteries and the moderns, the short stories. I’ve only ever read the moderns once, they were too depressing. Of the mysteries, half I really liked, half were so so. Well, except for one that I really didn’t like and refuse to reread.
    As for when I first read her…early teens? I don’t remember whether it was my mom finding her first or I found her at the library or the used bookstore. All I know is that I spent years collecting all her books. I do remember anxiously awaiting publication of My Lord John and how it just leaves you hanging there.
    Which do I like the most? Love Devil’s Cub, Venetia, These Old Shades, Reluctant Widow, Masqueraders, The Toll Gate, The Unknown Ajax, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, Fredricka, The Quiet Gentleman plus all the others mentioned so far. There are indeed a few that just don’t hit the mark for me but when I’m in one of my massive re-read all her books binges, I’ll even read them. But not the moderns or that awful mystery I don’t like.
    If I had to choose just one, probably The Grand Sophy. I can tell this is going to tip me over into a read them all to refresh my memory binge.

    Reply
  230. I’ve got every book she ever wrote, all the romances, mysteries and the moderns, the short stories. I’ve only ever read the moderns once, they were too depressing. Of the mysteries, half I really liked, half were so so. Well, except for one that I really didn’t like and refuse to reread.
    As for when I first read her…early teens? I don’t remember whether it was my mom finding her first or I found her at the library or the used bookstore. All I know is that I spent years collecting all her books. I do remember anxiously awaiting publication of My Lord John and how it just leaves you hanging there.
    Which do I like the most? Love Devil’s Cub, Venetia, These Old Shades, Reluctant Widow, Masqueraders, The Toll Gate, The Unknown Ajax, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, Fredricka, The Quiet Gentleman plus all the others mentioned so far. There are indeed a few that just don’t hit the mark for me but when I’m in one of my massive re-read all her books binges, I’ll even read them. But not the moderns or that awful mystery I don’t like.
    If I had to choose just one, probably The Grand Sophy. I can tell this is going to tip me over into a read them all to refresh my memory binge.

    Reply
  231. I’m late to the party, but wanted to chime in. I can’t remember which one of Heyer’s books I read first, but it came from the local library when I was in high school. I read through all the titles that the library had and picked up additional titles at public libraries as I moved around after college. I finally read Sylvester, one of my favorites, when it got reissued at some point. When my mom and I visited her cousin in Scotland. I was interested to see she had the whole series in hardback! My favorites are Cotillion and Friday’s Child, but I love so many others, including Fredericka, Arabella, and the aforementioned Sylvester. As for heroes, Freddie is my favorite.

    Reply
  232. I’m late to the party, but wanted to chime in. I can’t remember which one of Heyer’s books I read first, but it came from the local library when I was in high school. I read through all the titles that the library had and picked up additional titles at public libraries as I moved around after college. I finally read Sylvester, one of my favorites, when it got reissued at some point. When my mom and I visited her cousin in Scotland. I was interested to see she had the whole series in hardback! My favorites are Cotillion and Friday’s Child, but I love so many others, including Fredericka, Arabella, and the aforementioned Sylvester. As for heroes, Freddie is my favorite.

    Reply
  233. I’m late to the party, but wanted to chime in. I can’t remember which one of Heyer’s books I read first, but it came from the local library when I was in high school. I read through all the titles that the library had and picked up additional titles at public libraries as I moved around after college. I finally read Sylvester, one of my favorites, when it got reissued at some point. When my mom and I visited her cousin in Scotland. I was interested to see she had the whole series in hardback! My favorites are Cotillion and Friday’s Child, but I love so many others, including Fredericka, Arabella, and the aforementioned Sylvester. As for heroes, Freddie is my favorite.

    Reply
  234. I’m late to the party, but wanted to chime in. I can’t remember which one of Heyer’s books I read first, but it came from the local library when I was in high school. I read through all the titles that the library had and picked up additional titles at public libraries as I moved around after college. I finally read Sylvester, one of my favorites, when it got reissued at some point. When my mom and I visited her cousin in Scotland. I was interested to see she had the whole series in hardback! My favorites are Cotillion and Friday’s Child, but I love so many others, including Fredericka, Arabella, and the aforementioned Sylvester. As for heroes, Freddie is my favorite.

    Reply
  235. I’m late to the party, but wanted to chime in. I can’t remember which one of Heyer’s books I read first, but it came from the local library when I was in high school. I read through all the titles that the library had and picked up additional titles at public libraries as I moved around after college. I finally read Sylvester, one of my favorites, when it got reissued at some point. When my mom and I visited her cousin in Scotland. I was interested to see she had the whole series in hardback! My favorites are Cotillion and Friday’s Child, but I love so many others, including Fredericka, Arabella, and the aforementioned Sylvester. As for heroes, Freddie is my favorite.

    Reply
  236. MY first Heyer was These Old Shades – Leonie and Justin were great characters.
    For humour, Frederica and Cotillion are favourites
    For romance, and “a world well lost” – then Venetia
    But for sound historical content then it has to be “An Infamous Army” – it weaves to together the story of Waterloo and the bringing together of favourite characters from Devils Cub and Regency Buck.
    Close second is Spanish Bride
    I re-read these all the time.

    Reply
  237. MY first Heyer was These Old Shades – Leonie and Justin were great characters.
    For humour, Frederica and Cotillion are favourites
    For romance, and “a world well lost” – then Venetia
    But for sound historical content then it has to be “An Infamous Army” – it weaves to together the story of Waterloo and the bringing together of favourite characters from Devils Cub and Regency Buck.
    Close second is Spanish Bride
    I re-read these all the time.

    Reply
  238. MY first Heyer was These Old Shades – Leonie and Justin were great characters.
    For humour, Frederica and Cotillion are favourites
    For romance, and “a world well lost” – then Venetia
    But for sound historical content then it has to be “An Infamous Army” – it weaves to together the story of Waterloo and the bringing together of favourite characters from Devils Cub and Regency Buck.
    Close second is Spanish Bride
    I re-read these all the time.

    Reply
  239. MY first Heyer was These Old Shades – Leonie and Justin were great characters.
    For humour, Frederica and Cotillion are favourites
    For romance, and “a world well lost” – then Venetia
    But for sound historical content then it has to be “An Infamous Army” – it weaves to together the story of Waterloo and the bringing together of favourite characters from Devils Cub and Regency Buck.
    Close second is Spanish Bride
    I re-read these all the time.

    Reply
  240. MY first Heyer was These Old Shades – Leonie and Justin were great characters.
    For humour, Frederica and Cotillion are favourites
    For romance, and “a world well lost” – then Venetia
    But for sound historical content then it has to be “An Infamous Army” – it weaves to together the story of Waterloo and the bringing together of favourite characters from Devils Cub and Regency Buck.
    Close second is Spanish Bride
    I re-read these all the time.

    Reply

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