A Blue Plaque for Georgette Heyer

Anne here, reporting an event that took place in London a few days ago, when Georgette Heyer's house in Wimbledon was given a prestigious English Heritage blue plaque. I wasn't there (sob!) but my friend, Dr Jennifer Kloester, Georgette Heyer's biographer (and an honorary Word Wench) flew over for the opening, and has kindly supplied the photos and much of the information for this blog. HeyerLaughing

The English Heritage blue plaque scheme, founded in 1866, and thought to be the oldest of its kind in the world, identifies and celebrates "the architecture of London's streets and the diversity and achievements of its past residents."

Heyer-blue-plaque

According to Jennifer Kloester, "An English Heritage Blue Plaque is a prestigious thing. They are awarded to those people who are deemed to have made a contribution to the nation's history. Georgette Heyer has now been admitted to the ranks of those authors who have made a significant contribution to the creative and cultural life of Britain."


Jen Kloester actually proposed the Heyer plaque so it was excellent that she was able to attend the ceremony and give a short speech. The plaque was unveiled by the wonderful Stephen Fry, and Georgette Heyer's daughter-in-law and nephew also made speeches. (Here is the house; the as-yet unveiled plaque is behind those red curtains.)1PlaqueVeiled

This is Jen's report of the day (written especially for the WordWenches):
Both the fans and the sun came out as a crowd gathered outside 103 Woodside in Wimbledon, the house where Georgette Heyer was born on 16 August 1902. The semi-detached Edwardian still looks as it would have when she was child and it looks even better now with its beautiful blue plaque attached and looking as though it had always been there.

It was a wonderful day of celebration kicked off by Professor Martin Daunton of Cambridge University and vice-chair of English Heritage who mentioned the long process every blue plaque nominee must go through before being given the green light.

As biographer and blue plaque proposer I was asked to speak and was delighted to do so – although I confess I was more nervous about this than about any other Heyer talk I have ever given! To the extent that I carefully wrote out my speech and read it word for word. I got a little emotional at the end – probably not surprising given the excitement of the day. I really felt as though finally I had achieved what I had always wanted for Georgette Heyer – official public recognition of her achievements. I smile every time I think of that blue plaque and what it means. Awesome! (Jen's speech will soon be published in full on her website.) 1KloesterSpeech

Georgette's nephew, retired major-general Jeremy Rougier, spoke about his formidable Aunt Georgette, how terrified he was of her in his youth and of how warm and kind and generous she could be.

1JeremyRougierSpeechSusanna, Lady Rougier (Heyer's daughter-in-law, seen laughing at  a funny story in Maj-Gen Rougier's speech) told us how Georgette used to ring her every morning for a good 'bitchy' gossip which they both used to enjoy and then abruptly there would be no more calls for a couple of months and Susie knew her mama-in-law was writing a new book. Just as abruptly the calls would start again and they would all go out to the Allegro or the Connaught for a celebratory dinner.

Stephen Fry, who did the honours of pulling the cord to reveal the plaque in all its glory, spoke brilliantly about his love of Heyer's novels, her wit, her language and especially her dialogue. He gave us several examples from the books and remarked on her extraordinary ability to bring the past to life. He was obviously delighted to be there and it was a great moment when he pulled the cord. 1StephenFry

Anne interjects to say, Stephen Fry was quoted thus in the Guardian newspaper: “She is a fabulous, witty writer who captured the life and language of Regency England superbly,” said the actor, writer and broadcaster. “I am delighted to see her honoured with an English Heritage blue plaque.”  

Jen finished with: The plaque itself is gorgeous and looks absolutely brilliant up on the house with those marvellous words: GEORGETTE HEYER NOVELIST WAS BORN HERE.

She added: Oh, and I should have ended my few words with the moment when Susie and Jeremy both said how pleased Georgette would have been with the plaque – only she would never have admitted it! 😀

Anne again: The unveiling of the plaque was followed by a fabulous afternoon tea organized by my friend, Jenny Haddon and others. There were several more speeches, personal reminiscences, and a number of readings from Heyer's works. (Jenny wrote Harlequins as Sophie Weston and as Sophie Page wrote a wonderful royal romance that Mary Jo and I still reread.) A former Chair of the Romance Novelists Association (and an honorary Word Wench) Jenny Haddon also created a Heyer Walk — a personally conducted wonderful walking tour of the various places in London where Georgette Heyer lived, worked and wrote about. 

1JennyHaddon_2The The Guardian newspaper said: "The author Jenny Haddon called Heyer’s writing “utter bliss”. “She can turn a scene from farce to tragedy – and the reverse – in a single word. One of the greatest delights, of course, is that she doesn’t expect you to know the conventions of her Regency or Georgian drawings rooms – unlike Jane Austen who was writing contemporary stories – so she draws it in for you, but so lightly that it is as if she’s reminding you,” said Haddon.

Jenny wrote a personal account of the blue plaque day here.  She also provided a link to another excellent account of the day by novelist Elizabeth Hawksley which gives some lovely personal insights into Heyer — well worth reading. And if you'd like to read a truly entertaining and intelligent essay on Heyer, there's one here.

Wench Jo Beverley wrote about the proposed blue plaque last year and posted quotes from a wide range of authors about Heyer's influence on them.

 Jennifer Kloester has been a guest on WordWenches several times, here and here  and here.  If you're attending the Romance Writers of America national conference in New York in July, don't miss her special anniversary presentation on Georgette Heyer.

So are you a fan of Georgette Heyer? And if so, which was your first Heyer and where/how did you discover her? 

275 thoughts on “A Blue Plaque for Georgette Heyer”

  1. I’m a long time reader of Heyer, whom I respect very much as a craftsperson. That said, there are only about half of her books which I still find interesting — mostly the regencies and her early moderns. I think some of her titles, like Venetia and Frederica, I’ve read too many times to appreciate; others such as These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub still draw me in every time. I really couldn’t tell you why, except perhaps that the books I still reread most often seem to have a higher level of energy to them. Her suppressed contemporaries interest me as portraits of those times and attitudes.
    In any case, this recognition is long overdue. It’s about time the lady got some respect. Every time I hear someone — usually someone who hasn’t read her books — class her with the fluff merchants, I want to break his nose. Or take away his iPad.

    Reply
  2. I’m a long time reader of Heyer, whom I respect very much as a craftsperson. That said, there are only about half of her books which I still find interesting — mostly the regencies and her early moderns. I think some of her titles, like Venetia and Frederica, I’ve read too many times to appreciate; others such as These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub still draw me in every time. I really couldn’t tell you why, except perhaps that the books I still reread most often seem to have a higher level of energy to them. Her suppressed contemporaries interest me as portraits of those times and attitudes.
    In any case, this recognition is long overdue. It’s about time the lady got some respect. Every time I hear someone — usually someone who hasn’t read her books — class her with the fluff merchants, I want to break his nose. Or take away his iPad.

    Reply
  3. I’m a long time reader of Heyer, whom I respect very much as a craftsperson. That said, there are only about half of her books which I still find interesting — mostly the regencies and her early moderns. I think some of her titles, like Venetia and Frederica, I’ve read too many times to appreciate; others such as These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub still draw me in every time. I really couldn’t tell you why, except perhaps that the books I still reread most often seem to have a higher level of energy to them. Her suppressed contemporaries interest me as portraits of those times and attitudes.
    In any case, this recognition is long overdue. It’s about time the lady got some respect. Every time I hear someone — usually someone who hasn’t read her books — class her with the fluff merchants, I want to break his nose. Or take away his iPad.

    Reply
  4. I’m a long time reader of Heyer, whom I respect very much as a craftsperson. That said, there are only about half of her books which I still find interesting — mostly the regencies and her early moderns. I think some of her titles, like Venetia and Frederica, I’ve read too many times to appreciate; others such as These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub still draw me in every time. I really couldn’t tell you why, except perhaps that the books I still reread most often seem to have a higher level of energy to them. Her suppressed contemporaries interest me as portraits of those times and attitudes.
    In any case, this recognition is long overdue. It’s about time the lady got some respect. Every time I hear someone — usually someone who hasn’t read her books — class her with the fluff merchants, I want to break his nose. Or take away his iPad.

    Reply
  5. I’m a long time reader of Heyer, whom I respect very much as a craftsperson. That said, there are only about half of her books which I still find interesting — mostly the regencies and her early moderns. I think some of her titles, like Venetia and Frederica, I’ve read too many times to appreciate; others such as These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub still draw me in every time. I really couldn’t tell you why, except perhaps that the books I still reread most often seem to have a higher level of energy to them. Her suppressed contemporaries interest me as portraits of those times and attitudes.
    In any case, this recognition is long overdue. It’s about time the lady got some respect. Every time I hear someone — usually someone who hasn’t read her books — class her with the fluff merchants, I want to break his nose. Or take away his iPad.

    Reply
  6. I lived in central (Zone One) London for a few years, and some of the blue plaques you’d see were for the most obscure people. It’s pretty bad it has taken this long for her to get one…
    I just looked up when she died (don’t know why I didn’t know that). Major health problems including a septic mosquito bite(!), and cancer from 60-80 cigarettes a day? I was wondering why she didn’t live beyond her early seventies!

    Reply
  7. I lived in central (Zone One) London for a few years, and some of the blue plaques you’d see were for the most obscure people. It’s pretty bad it has taken this long for her to get one…
    I just looked up when she died (don’t know why I didn’t know that). Major health problems including a septic mosquito bite(!), and cancer from 60-80 cigarettes a day? I was wondering why she didn’t live beyond her early seventies!

    Reply
  8. I lived in central (Zone One) London for a few years, and some of the blue plaques you’d see were for the most obscure people. It’s pretty bad it has taken this long for her to get one…
    I just looked up when she died (don’t know why I didn’t know that). Major health problems including a septic mosquito bite(!), and cancer from 60-80 cigarettes a day? I was wondering why she didn’t live beyond her early seventies!

    Reply
  9. I lived in central (Zone One) London for a few years, and some of the blue plaques you’d see were for the most obscure people. It’s pretty bad it has taken this long for her to get one…
    I just looked up when she died (don’t know why I didn’t know that). Major health problems including a septic mosquito bite(!), and cancer from 60-80 cigarettes a day? I was wondering why she didn’t live beyond her early seventies!

    Reply
  10. I lived in central (Zone One) London for a few years, and some of the blue plaques you’d see were for the most obscure people. It’s pretty bad it has taken this long for her to get one…
    I just looked up when she died (don’t know why I didn’t know that). Major health problems including a septic mosquito bite(!), and cancer from 60-80 cigarettes a day? I was wondering why she didn’t live beyond her early seventies!

    Reply
  11. So happy to see that Ms. Heyer is getting some long-overdue recognition! My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer novels back in the late 1960’s when I was 12 or so. The Talisman Ring was the first one I read and I fell in love with the Regency world as she created it. I still re-read her books every few years.

    Reply
  12. So happy to see that Ms. Heyer is getting some long-overdue recognition! My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer novels back in the late 1960’s when I was 12 or so. The Talisman Ring was the first one I read and I fell in love with the Regency world as she created it. I still re-read her books every few years.

    Reply
  13. So happy to see that Ms. Heyer is getting some long-overdue recognition! My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer novels back in the late 1960’s when I was 12 or so. The Talisman Ring was the first one I read and I fell in love with the Regency world as she created it. I still re-read her books every few years.

    Reply
  14. So happy to see that Ms. Heyer is getting some long-overdue recognition! My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer novels back in the late 1960’s when I was 12 or so. The Talisman Ring was the first one I read and I fell in love with the Regency world as she created it. I still re-read her books every few years.

    Reply
  15. So happy to see that Ms. Heyer is getting some long-overdue recognition! My mother introduced me to Georgette Heyer novels back in the late 1960’s when I was 12 or so. The Talisman Ring was the first one I read and I fell in love with the Regency world as she created it. I still re-read her books every few years.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for posting this, Anne! And a big WELL DONE for Dr. Jennifer Kloester, who is possibly the greatest living authority on Georgette Heyer, for making this happen. It can’t have been easy. The tea party after sounds lovely, and I -really- wish I’d been there to see Jennifer Kloester again and to meet Jenny Haddon and do some fan girl gushing.

    Reply
  17. Thanks for posting this, Anne! And a big WELL DONE for Dr. Jennifer Kloester, who is possibly the greatest living authority on Georgette Heyer, for making this happen. It can’t have been easy. The tea party after sounds lovely, and I -really- wish I’d been there to see Jennifer Kloester again and to meet Jenny Haddon and do some fan girl gushing.

    Reply
  18. Thanks for posting this, Anne! And a big WELL DONE for Dr. Jennifer Kloester, who is possibly the greatest living authority on Georgette Heyer, for making this happen. It can’t have been easy. The tea party after sounds lovely, and I -really- wish I’d been there to see Jennifer Kloester again and to meet Jenny Haddon and do some fan girl gushing.

    Reply
  19. Thanks for posting this, Anne! And a big WELL DONE for Dr. Jennifer Kloester, who is possibly the greatest living authority on Georgette Heyer, for making this happen. It can’t have been easy. The tea party after sounds lovely, and I -really- wish I’d been there to see Jennifer Kloester again and to meet Jenny Haddon and do some fan girl gushing.

    Reply
  20. Thanks for posting this, Anne! And a big WELL DONE for Dr. Jennifer Kloester, who is possibly the greatest living authority on Georgette Heyer, for making this happen. It can’t have been easy. The tea party after sounds lovely, and I -really- wish I’d been there to see Jennifer Kloester again and to meet Jenny Haddon and do some fan girl gushing.

    Reply
  21. I discovered her books in my teens when I first read Regency Buck. I still enjoy rereading Reluctant Widow, Friday’s Child, The Grand Sophy, The Masqueraders, The Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, etc. because they are so engaging.

    Reply
  22. I discovered her books in my teens when I first read Regency Buck. I still enjoy rereading Reluctant Widow, Friday’s Child, The Grand Sophy, The Masqueraders, The Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, etc. because they are so engaging.

    Reply
  23. I discovered her books in my teens when I first read Regency Buck. I still enjoy rereading Reluctant Widow, Friday’s Child, The Grand Sophy, The Masqueraders, The Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, etc. because they are so engaging.

    Reply
  24. I discovered her books in my teens when I first read Regency Buck. I still enjoy rereading Reluctant Widow, Friday’s Child, The Grand Sophy, The Masqueraders, The Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, etc. because they are so engaging.

    Reply
  25. I discovered her books in my teens when I first read Regency Buck. I still enjoy rereading Reluctant Widow, Friday’s Child, The Grand Sophy, The Masqueraders, The Unknown Ajax, Cotillion, etc. because they are so engaging.

    Reply
  26. I have been reading Georgette Heyer since her books appeared in paperbacks in the U. S. I still reread all those that I own (which is most of them) and I still enjoy them all (although some are almost memorized so I sometimes skim instead of giving them a thorough reading).
    Someone mentioned the light explanations of the period. I really adored those in my first readings because the explained so much of Austen to me.y

    Reply
  27. I have been reading Georgette Heyer since her books appeared in paperbacks in the U. S. I still reread all those that I own (which is most of them) and I still enjoy them all (although some are almost memorized so I sometimes skim instead of giving them a thorough reading).
    Someone mentioned the light explanations of the period. I really adored those in my first readings because the explained so much of Austen to me.y

    Reply
  28. I have been reading Georgette Heyer since her books appeared in paperbacks in the U. S. I still reread all those that I own (which is most of them) and I still enjoy them all (although some are almost memorized so I sometimes skim instead of giving them a thorough reading).
    Someone mentioned the light explanations of the period. I really adored those in my first readings because the explained so much of Austen to me.y

    Reply
  29. I have been reading Georgette Heyer since her books appeared in paperbacks in the U. S. I still reread all those that I own (which is most of them) and I still enjoy them all (although some are almost memorized so I sometimes skim instead of giving them a thorough reading).
    Someone mentioned the light explanations of the period. I really adored those in my first readings because the explained so much of Austen to me.y

    Reply
  30. I have been reading Georgette Heyer since her books appeared in paperbacks in the U. S. I still reread all those that I own (which is most of them) and I still enjoy them all (although some are almost memorized so I sometimes skim instead of giving them a thorough reading).
    Someone mentioned the light explanations of the period. I really adored those in my first readings because the explained so much of Austen to me.y

    Reply
  31. Exactly, witty conversation. Refreshing. I own all the historical novels and reread them constantly. Delightful, romantic, love affairs.

    Reply
  32. Exactly, witty conversation. Refreshing. I own all the historical novels and reread them constantly. Delightful, romantic, love affairs.

    Reply
  33. Exactly, witty conversation. Refreshing. I own all the historical novels and reread them constantly. Delightful, romantic, love affairs.

    Reply
  34. Exactly, witty conversation. Refreshing. I own all the historical novels and reread them constantly. Delightful, romantic, love affairs.

    Reply
  35. Exactly, witty conversation. Refreshing. I own all the historical novels and reread them constantly. Delightful, romantic, love affairs.

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Janice. She can still make me laugh — some of the exchanges in Friday's Child, the Convenient Marriage, The Unknown Ajax and Venetia, for instance — even though I've read them I don't know how many times.
    My friend Jenny Haddon was saying the other day that she'd been rereading some of Heyer's books that she hasn't read for ages — the ones she tends not to reread, and was finding it a lovely experience. I might do that as well.
    And yes, a biff on the nose for all those patronizing know-alls who condemn her books without ever having read them.

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Janice. She can still make me laugh — some of the exchanges in Friday's Child, the Convenient Marriage, The Unknown Ajax and Venetia, for instance — even though I've read them I don't know how many times.
    My friend Jenny Haddon was saying the other day that she'd been rereading some of Heyer's books that she hasn't read for ages — the ones she tends not to reread, and was finding it a lovely experience. I might do that as well.
    And yes, a biff on the nose for all those patronizing know-alls who condemn her books without ever having read them.

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Janice. She can still make me laugh — some of the exchanges in Friday's Child, the Convenient Marriage, The Unknown Ajax and Venetia, for instance — even though I've read them I don't know how many times.
    My friend Jenny Haddon was saying the other day that she'd been rereading some of Heyer's books that she hasn't read for ages — the ones she tends not to reread, and was finding it a lovely experience. I might do that as well.
    And yes, a biff on the nose for all those patronizing know-alls who condemn her books without ever having read them.

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Janice. She can still make me laugh — some of the exchanges in Friday's Child, the Convenient Marriage, The Unknown Ajax and Venetia, for instance — even though I've read them I don't know how many times.
    My friend Jenny Haddon was saying the other day that she'd been rereading some of Heyer's books that she hasn't read for ages — the ones she tends not to reread, and was finding it a lovely experience. I might do that as well.
    And yes, a biff on the nose for all those patronizing know-alls who condemn her books without ever having read them.

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Janice. She can still make me laugh — some of the exchanges in Friday's Child, the Convenient Marriage, The Unknown Ajax and Venetia, for instance — even though I've read them I don't know how many times.
    My friend Jenny Haddon was saying the other day that she'd been rereading some of Heyer's books that she hasn't read for ages — the ones she tends not to reread, and was finding it a lovely experience. I might do that as well.
    And yes, a biff on the nose for all those patronizing know-alls who condemn her books without ever having read them.

    Reply
  41. Yes, Sonya, it's the romance cringe factor at work — the one area of popular fiction where people who think they have taste (or wish to appear to have it) refuse to go.
    Blind, ignorant, prejudice .. and a little stupid as well.
    I read this on Wikipedia:
    "Heyer was also overlooked by the Encyclopædia Britannica. The 1974 edition of the encyclopædia, published shortly after her death, included entries on popular writers Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, but did not mention Heyer.[87]"
    So yes, definitely about time!

    Reply
  42. Yes, Sonya, it's the romance cringe factor at work — the one area of popular fiction where people who think they have taste (or wish to appear to have it) refuse to go.
    Blind, ignorant, prejudice .. and a little stupid as well.
    I read this on Wikipedia:
    "Heyer was also overlooked by the Encyclopædia Britannica. The 1974 edition of the encyclopædia, published shortly after her death, included entries on popular writers Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, but did not mention Heyer.[87]"
    So yes, definitely about time!

    Reply
  43. Yes, Sonya, it's the romance cringe factor at work — the one area of popular fiction where people who think they have taste (or wish to appear to have it) refuse to go.
    Blind, ignorant, prejudice .. and a little stupid as well.
    I read this on Wikipedia:
    "Heyer was also overlooked by the Encyclopædia Britannica. The 1974 edition of the encyclopædia, published shortly after her death, included entries on popular writers Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, but did not mention Heyer.[87]"
    So yes, definitely about time!

    Reply
  44. Yes, Sonya, it's the romance cringe factor at work — the one area of popular fiction where people who think they have taste (or wish to appear to have it) refuse to go.
    Blind, ignorant, prejudice .. and a little stupid as well.
    I read this on Wikipedia:
    "Heyer was also overlooked by the Encyclopædia Britannica. The 1974 edition of the encyclopædia, published shortly after her death, included entries on popular writers Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, but did not mention Heyer.[87]"
    So yes, definitely about time!

    Reply
  45. Yes, Sonya, it's the romance cringe factor at work — the one area of popular fiction where people who think they have taste (or wish to appear to have it) refuse to go.
    Blind, ignorant, prejudice .. and a little stupid as well.
    I read this on Wikipedia:
    "Heyer was also overlooked by the Encyclopædia Britannica. The 1974 edition of the encyclopædia, published shortly after her death, included entries on popular writers Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, but did not mention Heyer.[87]"
    So yes, definitely about time!

    Reply
  46. Hi Judy, lovely to meet another reader who also grew up with Heyer — I was eleven when I read my first — These Old Shades. I'm planning to reread the Talisman Ring soon — need to pity a maiden dressed in white, in a tumbril. . . I haven't read it for ages — in fact the last time I read it I think it was on audie — one of the first audios I'd heard and I was amazed at how many lines I could speak with the narrator — even though Talisman Ring wasn't one of my faves.

    Reply
  47. Hi Judy, lovely to meet another reader who also grew up with Heyer — I was eleven when I read my first — These Old Shades. I'm planning to reread the Talisman Ring soon — need to pity a maiden dressed in white, in a tumbril. . . I haven't read it for ages — in fact the last time I read it I think it was on audie — one of the first audios I'd heard and I was amazed at how many lines I could speak with the narrator — even though Talisman Ring wasn't one of my faves.

    Reply
  48. Hi Judy, lovely to meet another reader who also grew up with Heyer — I was eleven when I read my first — These Old Shades. I'm planning to reread the Talisman Ring soon — need to pity a maiden dressed in white, in a tumbril. . . I haven't read it for ages — in fact the last time I read it I think it was on audie — one of the first audios I'd heard and I was amazed at how many lines I could speak with the narrator — even though Talisman Ring wasn't one of my faves.

    Reply
  49. Hi Judy, lovely to meet another reader who also grew up with Heyer — I was eleven when I read my first — These Old Shades. I'm planning to reread the Talisman Ring soon — need to pity a maiden dressed in white, in a tumbril. . . I haven't read it for ages — in fact the last time I read it I think it was on audie — one of the first audios I'd heard and I was amazed at how many lines I could speak with the narrator — even though Talisman Ring wasn't one of my faves.

    Reply
  50. Hi Judy, lovely to meet another reader who also grew up with Heyer — I was eleven when I read my first — These Old Shades. I'm planning to reread the Talisman Ring soon — need to pity a maiden dressed in white, in a tumbril. . . I haven't read it for ages — in fact the last time I read it I think it was on audie — one of the first audios I'd heard and I was amazed at how many lines I could speak with the narrator — even though Talisman Ring wasn't one of my faves.

    Reply
  51. Yes, Mary Jo, Jen Kloester has done a magnificent job in getting the blue plaque proposed and up and running. And she certainly is the greatest living expert on all things Heyer. I hope people get to see her presentation at RWAnational. She's a very good speaker.

    Reply
  52. Yes, Mary Jo, Jen Kloester has done a magnificent job in getting the blue plaque proposed and up and running. And she certainly is the greatest living expert on all things Heyer. I hope people get to see her presentation at RWAnational. She's a very good speaker.

    Reply
  53. Yes, Mary Jo, Jen Kloester has done a magnificent job in getting the blue plaque proposed and up and running. And she certainly is the greatest living expert on all things Heyer. I hope people get to see her presentation at RWAnational. She's a very good speaker.

    Reply
  54. Yes, Mary Jo, Jen Kloester has done a magnificent job in getting the blue plaque proposed and up and running. And she certainly is the greatest living expert on all things Heyer. I hope people get to see her presentation at RWAnational. She's a very good speaker.

    Reply
  55. Yes, Mary Jo, Jen Kloester has done a magnificent job in getting the blue plaque proposed and up and running. And she certainly is the greatest living expert on all things Heyer. I hope people get to see her presentation at RWAnational. She's a very good speaker.

    Reply
  56. It's funny how you skim read some of them — I do too, I think because sometimes I pick up her books just to dip my toe back into Heyerworld. Like a quick phone call to an old friend.

    Reply
  57. It's funny how you skim read some of them — I do too, I think because sometimes I pick up her books just to dip my toe back into Heyerworld. Like a quick phone call to an old friend.

    Reply
  58. It's funny how you skim read some of them — I do too, I think because sometimes I pick up her books just to dip my toe back into Heyerworld. Like a quick phone call to an old friend.

    Reply
  59. It's funny how you skim read some of them — I do too, I think because sometimes I pick up her books just to dip my toe back into Heyerworld. Like a quick phone call to an old friend.

    Reply
  60. It's funny how you skim read some of them — I do too, I think because sometimes I pick up her books just to dip my toe back into Heyerworld. Like a quick phone call to an old friend.

    Reply
  61. They are a delight, aren't they, Peggy? I'm always surprised when I meet romance readers — or writers — who've never read her. Such a treat that they're missing out on, and a lovely long backlist to glom.

    Reply
  62. They are a delight, aren't they, Peggy? I'm always surprised when I meet romance readers — or writers — who've never read her. Such a treat that they're missing out on, and a lovely long backlist to glom.

    Reply
  63. They are a delight, aren't they, Peggy? I'm always surprised when I meet romance readers — or writers — who've never read her. Such a treat that they're missing out on, and a lovely long backlist to glom.

    Reply
  64. They are a delight, aren't they, Peggy? I'm always surprised when I meet romance readers — or writers — who've never read her. Such a treat that they're missing out on, and a lovely long backlist to glom.

    Reply
  65. They are a delight, aren't they, Peggy? I'm always surprised when I meet romance readers — or writers — who've never read her. Such a treat that they're missing out on, and a lovely long backlist to glom.

    Reply
  66. How wonderful that Heyer has received this recognition. Thanks for sharing, Anne and Jennifer. One of the things that has always bothered me is that often even some critics (generally male)who see themselves as praising Heyer undercut the acclaim. One such (sorry I have long forgotten his name) compared reading her books to taking a “literary bubble bath.” I guess he missed An Infamous Army.
    These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer book, and I had hardly turned the final page before I was searching for other books by her. I didn’t stop until I had read everything I could find. That was decades ago, and I still reread at least a couple of Heyer books every year. I think most of her romances count as someone’s favorite Heyer. My top five are Frederica, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, The Unknown Ajax, and Venetia, but I have a full shelf of Heyer keepers and almost as many in digital format, thanks to Sourcebook’s reissues.

    Reply
  67. How wonderful that Heyer has received this recognition. Thanks for sharing, Anne and Jennifer. One of the things that has always bothered me is that often even some critics (generally male)who see themselves as praising Heyer undercut the acclaim. One such (sorry I have long forgotten his name) compared reading her books to taking a “literary bubble bath.” I guess he missed An Infamous Army.
    These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer book, and I had hardly turned the final page before I was searching for other books by her. I didn’t stop until I had read everything I could find. That was decades ago, and I still reread at least a couple of Heyer books every year. I think most of her romances count as someone’s favorite Heyer. My top five are Frederica, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, The Unknown Ajax, and Venetia, but I have a full shelf of Heyer keepers and almost as many in digital format, thanks to Sourcebook’s reissues.

    Reply
  68. How wonderful that Heyer has received this recognition. Thanks for sharing, Anne and Jennifer. One of the things that has always bothered me is that often even some critics (generally male)who see themselves as praising Heyer undercut the acclaim. One such (sorry I have long forgotten his name) compared reading her books to taking a “literary bubble bath.” I guess he missed An Infamous Army.
    These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer book, and I had hardly turned the final page before I was searching for other books by her. I didn’t stop until I had read everything I could find. That was decades ago, and I still reread at least a couple of Heyer books every year. I think most of her romances count as someone’s favorite Heyer. My top five are Frederica, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, The Unknown Ajax, and Venetia, but I have a full shelf of Heyer keepers and almost as many in digital format, thanks to Sourcebook’s reissues.

    Reply
  69. How wonderful that Heyer has received this recognition. Thanks for sharing, Anne and Jennifer. One of the things that has always bothered me is that often even some critics (generally male)who see themselves as praising Heyer undercut the acclaim. One such (sorry I have long forgotten his name) compared reading her books to taking a “literary bubble bath.” I guess he missed An Infamous Army.
    These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer book, and I had hardly turned the final page before I was searching for other books by her. I didn’t stop until I had read everything I could find. That was decades ago, and I still reread at least a couple of Heyer books every year. I think most of her romances count as someone’s favorite Heyer. My top five are Frederica, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, The Unknown Ajax, and Venetia, but I have a full shelf of Heyer keepers and almost as many in digital format, thanks to Sourcebook’s reissues.

    Reply
  70. How wonderful that Heyer has received this recognition. Thanks for sharing, Anne and Jennifer. One of the things that has always bothered me is that often even some critics (generally male)who see themselves as praising Heyer undercut the acclaim. One such (sorry I have long forgotten his name) compared reading her books to taking a “literary bubble bath.” I guess he missed An Infamous Army.
    These Old Shades was my first Georgette Heyer book, and I had hardly turned the final page before I was searching for other books by her. I didn’t stop until I had read everything I could find. That was decades ago, and I still reread at least a couple of Heyer books every year. I think most of her romances count as someone’s favorite Heyer. My top five are Frederica, The Grand Sophy, Cotillion, The Unknown Ajax, and Venetia, but I have a full shelf of Heyer keepers and almost as many in digital format, thanks to Sourcebook’s reissues.

    Reply
  71. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer. I borrowed it from my housemate – an American linguist doing post doc research in Melbourne at the time. She (my housemate) had a huge collection of genre fiction, and introduced me to quite a few romance and fantasy classics. She had extraordinarily long toes, and liked to take long baths with a book, turning the hot tap with her feet whenever the water got a bit chilly.
    After I read Sprig Muslin, I glommed Heyer. My favourite is Venetia. My, I love that book!
    I’m still amazed at how fast and funny Heyer could write. She deserves her plaque.

    Reply
  72. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer. I borrowed it from my housemate – an American linguist doing post doc research in Melbourne at the time. She (my housemate) had a huge collection of genre fiction, and introduced me to quite a few romance and fantasy classics. She had extraordinarily long toes, and liked to take long baths with a book, turning the hot tap with her feet whenever the water got a bit chilly.
    After I read Sprig Muslin, I glommed Heyer. My favourite is Venetia. My, I love that book!
    I’m still amazed at how fast and funny Heyer could write. She deserves her plaque.

    Reply
  73. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer. I borrowed it from my housemate – an American linguist doing post doc research in Melbourne at the time. She (my housemate) had a huge collection of genre fiction, and introduced me to quite a few romance and fantasy classics. She had extraordinarily long toes, and liked to take long baths with a book, turning the hot tap with her feet whenever the water got a bit chilly.
    After I read Sprig Muslin, I glommed Heyer. My favourite is Venetia. My, I love that book!
    I’m still amazed at how fast and funny Heyer could write. She deserves her plaque.

    Reply
  74. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer. I borrowed it from my housemate – an American linguist doing post doc research in Melbourne at the time. She (my housemate) had a huge collection of genre fiction, and introduced me to quite a few romance and fantasy classics. She had extraordinarily long toes, and liked to take long baths with a book, turning the hot tap with her feet whenever the water got a bit chilly.
    After I read Sprig Muslin, I glommed Heyer. My favourite is Venetia. My, I love that book!
    I’m still amazed at how fast and funny Heyer could write. She deserves her plaque.

    Reply
  75. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer. I borrowed it from my housemate – an American linguist doing post doc research in Melbourne at the time. She (my housemate) had a huge collection of genre fiction, and introduced me to quite a few romance and fantasy classics. She had extraordinarily long toes, and liked to take long baths with a book, turning the hot tap with her feet whenever the water got a bit chilly.
    After I read Sprig Muslin, I glommed Heyer. My favourite is Venetia. My, I love that book!
    I’m still amazed at how fast and funny Heyer could write. She deserves her plaque.

    Reply
  76. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer and was given to my younger sister in hardback form for one of her birthdays in the late sixties. (I have forgiven her now as she has since given to book to me). I read everything I could find of hers in the school library and then when I first started work in January 1974, every pay day, I would go to the closest place I could find with her books and buy another one. I cannot really pick a firm favourite, but a few of my books, such as Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades and Regency Buck, to name a couple, have alas fallen into such disrepair that they have had to be replaced.
    Congratulations to Georgette (and it is about time too!)

    Reply
  77. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer and was given to my younger sister in hardback form for one of her birthdays in the late sixties. (I have forgiven her now as she has since given to book to me). I read everything I could find of hers in the school library and then when I first started work in January 1974, every pay day, I would go to the closest place I could find with her books and buy another one. I cannot really pick a firm favourite, but a few of my books, such as Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades and Regency Buck, to name a couple, have alas fallen into such disrepair that they have had to be replaced.
    Congratulations to Georgette (and it is about time too!)

    Reply
  78. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer and was given to my younger sister in hardback form for one of her birthdays in the late sixties. (I have forgiven her now as she has since given to book to me). I read everything I could find of hers in the school library and then when I first started work in January 1974, every pay day, I would go to the closest place I could find with her books and buy another one. I cannot really pick a firm favourite, but a few of my books, such as Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades and Regency Buck, to name a couple, have alas fallen into such disrepair that they have had to be replaced.
    Congratulations to Georgette (and it is about time too!)

    Reply
  79. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer and was given to my younger sister in hardback form for one of her birthdays in the late sixties. (I have forgiven her now as she has since given to book to me). I read everything I could find of hers in the school library and then when I first started work in January 1974, every pay day, I would go to the closest place I could find with her books and buy another one. I cannot really pick a firm favourite, but a few of my books, such as Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades and Regency Buck, to name a couple, have alas fallen into such disrepair that they have had to be replaced.
    Congratulations to Georgette (and it is about time too!)

    Reply
  80. Sprig Muslin was my first Heyer and was given to my younger sister in hardback form for one of her birthdays in the late sixties. (I have forgiven her now as she has since given to book to me). I read everything I could find of hers in the school library and then when I first started work in January 1974, every pay day, I would go to the closest place I could find with her books and buy another one. I cannot really pick a firm favourite, but a few of my books, such as Devil’s Cub, These Old Shades and Regency Buck, to name a couple, have alas fallen into such disrepair that they have had to be replaced.
    Congratulations to Georgette (and it is about time too!)

    Reply
  81. Thanks for another fabulous post, Anne, and so many great comments. It was a truly magical day and I can honestly say that the most wonderful part was hearing Georgette Heyer spoken of in such positive terms by those who knew her as well as those who knew her novels (like Stephen Fry – who is a huge fan). The beautiful Blue Plaque is a long-overdue recognition of her talent and I like to think it can only be good for other wonderful writers in the genre. Heyer was a remarkable writer and I’m pretty sure that people will go on reading (and re-reading) her books for years to come.

    Reply
  82. Thanks for another fabulous post, Anne, and so many great comments. It was a truly magical day and I can honestly say that the most wonderful part was hearing Georgette Heyer spoken of in such positive terms by those who knew her as well as those who knew her novels (like Stephen Fry – who is a huge fan). The beautiful Blue Plaque is a long-overdue recognition of her talent and I like to think it can only be good for other wonderful writers in the genre. Heyer was a remarkable writer and I’m pretty sure that people will go on reading (and re-reading) her books for years to come.

    Reply
  83. Thanks for another fabulous post, Anne, and so many great comments. It was a truly magical day and I can honestly say that the most wonderful part was hearing Georgette Heyer spoken of in such positive terms by those who knew her as well as those who knew her novels (like Stephen Fry – who is a huge fan). The beautiful Blue Plaque is a long-overdue recognition of her talent and I like to think it can only be good for other wonderful writers in the genre. Heyer was a remarkable writer and I’m pretty sure that people will go on reading (and re-reading) her books for years to come.

    Reply
  84. Thanks for another fabulous post, Anne, and so many great comments. It was a truly magical day and I can honestly say that the most wonderful part was hearing Georgette Heyer spoken of in such positive terms by those who knew her as well as those who knew her novels (like Stephen Fry – who is a huge fan). The beautiful Blue Plaque is a long-overdue recognition of her talent and I like to think it can only be good for other wonderful writers in the genre. Heyer was a remarkable writer and I’m pretty sure that people will go on reading (and re-reading) her books for years to come.

    Reply
  85. Thanks for another fabulous post, Anne, and so many great comments. It was a truly magical day and I can honestly say that the most wonderful part was hearing Georgette Heyer spoken of in such positive terms by those who knew her as well as those who knew her novels (like Stephen Fry – who is a huge fan). The beautiful Blue Plaque is a long-overdue recognition of her talent and I like to think it can only be good for other wonderful writers in the genre. Heyer was a remarkable writer and I’m pretty sure that people will go on reading (and re-reading) her books for years to come.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for the post!!
    I discovered G. Heyer in my teens together with my mother. She got a book as a gift (we believe it was Grand Sophie)- in German translation – and I was allowed to read it too!!! Later her books were a good way to “exercise” my English and I still love them as a kind of chocolate in reading (you know the taste but enjoy it anyway).
    Last year I presented myself with a “Heyer tour” through London, Bath and Brighton and the next time I will visit London I now HAVE to go to Wimbledon!

    Reply
  87. Thanks for the post!!
    I discovered G. Heyer in my teens together with my mother. She got a book as a gift (we believe it was Grand Sophie)- in German translation – and I was allowed to read it too!!! Later her books were a good way to “exercise” my English and I still love them as a kind of chocolate in reading (you know the taste but enjoy it anyway).
    Last year I presented myself with a “Heyer tour” through London, Bath and Brighton and the next time I will visit London I now HAVE to go to Wimbledon!

    Reply
  88. Thanks for the post!!
    I discovered G. Heyer in my teens together with my mother. She got a book as a gift (we believe it was Grand Sophie)- in German translation – and I was allowed to read it too!!! Later her books were a good way to “exercise” my English and I still love them as a kind of chocolate in reading (you know the taste but enjoy it anyway).
    Last year I presented myself with a “Heyer tour” through London, Bath and Brighton and the next time I will visit London I now HAVE to go to Wimbledon!

    Reply
  89. Thanks for the post!!
    I discovered G. Heyer in my teens together with my mother. She got a book as a gift (we believe it was Grand Sophie)- in German translation – and I was allowed to read it too!!! Later her books were a good way to “exercise” my English and I still love them as a kind of chocolate in reading (you know the taste but enjoy it anyway).
    Last year I presented myself with a “Heyer tour” through London, Bath and Brighton and the next time I will visit London I now HAVE to go to Wimbledon!

    Reply
  90. Thanks for the post!!
    I discovered G. Heyer in my teens together with my mother. She got a book as a gift (we believe it was Grand Sophie)- in German translation – and I was allowed to read it too!!! Later her books were a good way to “exercise” my English and I still love them as a kind of chocolate in reading (you know the taste but enjoy it anyway).
    Last year I presented myself with a “Heyer tour” through London, Bath and Brighton and the next time I will visit London I now HAVE to go to Wimbledon!

    Reply
  91. My first Georgette Heyer was These Old Shades, and I have been in love with the Duke of Avon ever since. I found it in the library, and I often wonder about the hands of fate and synchronicity that make a library book leap off the shelf and into a reader’s imagination. Whatever the secret, God bless librarians.

    Reply
  92. My first Georgette Heyer was These Old Shades, and I have been in love with the Duke of Avon ever since. I found it in the library, and I often wonder about the hands of fate and synchronicity that make a library book leap off the shelf and into a reader’s imagination. Whatever the secret, God bless librarians.

    Reply
  93. My first Georgette Heyer was These Old Shades, and I have been in love with the Duke of Avon ever since. I found it in the library, and I often wonder about the hands of fate and synchronicity that make a library book leap off the shelf and into a reader’s imagination. Whatever the secret, God bless librarians.

    Reply
  94. My first Georgette Heyer was These Old Shades, and I have been in love with the Duke of Avon ever since. I found it in the library, and I often wonder about the hands of fate and synchronicity that make a library book leap off the shelf and into a reader’s imagination. Whatever the secret, God bless librarians.

    Reply
  95. My first Georgette Heyer was These Old Shades, and I have been in love with the Duke of Avon ever since. I found it in the library, and I often wonder about the hands of fate and synchronicity that make a library book leap off the shelf and into a reader’s imagination. Whatever the secret, God bless librarians.

    Reply
  96. THESE OLD SHADES was my first. I read them in college (OFCOURSE I had to get as many as I could find)in Geneseo NY now SUNY GENESEO. I began collecting them as soon as I could & still have them. TOS is still my fav. Began collecting Stephanie Laurens because the CYNSTER family reminded me of Heyer’s books. Anyone out there find they think so too?

    Reply
  97. THESE OLD SHADES was my first. I read them in college (OFCOURSE I had to get as many as I could find)in Geneseo NY now SUNY GENESEO. I began collecting them as soon as I could & still have them. TOS is still my fav. Began collecting Stephanie Laurens because the CYNSTER family reminded me of Heyer’s books. Anyone out there find they think so too?

    Reply
  98. THESE OLD SHADES was my first. I read them in college (OFCOURSE I had to get as many as I could find)in Geneseo NY now SUNY GENESEO. I began collecting them as soon as I could & still have them. TOS is still my fav. Began collecting Stephanie Laurens because the CYNSTER family reminded me of Heyer’s books. Anyone out there find they think so too?

    Reply
  99. THESE OLD SHADES was my first. I read them in college (OFCOURSE I had to get as many as I could find)in Geneseo NY now SUNY GENESEO. I began collecting them as soon as I could & still have them. TOS is still my fav. Began collecting Stephanie Laurens because the CYNSTER family reminded me of Heyer’s books. Anyone out there find they think so too?

    Reply
  100. THESE OLD SHADES was my first. I read them in college (OFCOURSE I had to get as many as I could find)in Geneseo NY now SUNY GENESEO. I began collecting them as soon as I could & still have them. TOS is still my fav. Began collecting Stephanie Laurens because the CYNSTER family reminded me of Heyer’s books. Anyone out there find they think so too?

    Reply
  101. My mother, who would have fainted if you accused her of reading a romance novel, loved Georgette Heyer. As a result, I discovered her books as a teenager and still enjoy them. Black Sheep has one of the best hero/heroine “meet cute” scenes I’ve ever read, a scene (and book) that stands up to many rereadings. Of course, so do many (if not most) of her other books.

    Reply
  102. My mother, who would have fainted if you accused her of reading a romance novel, loved Georgette Heyer. As a result, I discovered her books as a teenager and still enjoy them. Black Sheep has one of the best hero/heroine “meet cute” scenes I’ve ever read, a scene (and book) that stands up to many rereadings. Of course, so do many (if not most) of her other books.

    Reply
  103. My mother, who would have fainted if you accused her of reading a romance novel, loved Georgette Heyer. As a result, I discovered her books as a teenager and still enjoy them. Black Sheep has one of the best hero/heroine “meet cute” scenes I’ve ever read, a scene (and book) that stands up to many rereadings. Of course, so do many (if not most) of her other books.

    Reply
  104. My mother, who would have fainted if you accused her of reading a romance novel, loved Georgette Heyer. As a result, I discovered her books as a teenager and still enjoy them. Black Sheep has one of the best hero/heroine “meet cute” scenes I’ve ever read, a scene (and book) that stands up to many rereadings. Of course, so do many (if not most) of her other books.

    Reply
  105. My mother, who would have fainted if you accused her of reading a romance novel, loved Georgette Heyer. As a result, I discovered her books as a teenager and still enjoy them. Black Sheep has one of the best hero/heroine “meet cute” scenes I’ve ever read, a scene (and book) that stands up to many rereadings. Of course, so do many (if not most) of her other books.

    Reply
  106. LOL Susan — I was a bit like that, too — I'd read all of Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, too, but firmly believed I "didn't read romance." But am I ever glad I learned better. 🙂

    Reply
  107. LOL Susan — I was a bit like that, too — I'd read all of Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, too, but firmly believed I "didn't read romance." But am I ever glad I learned better. 🙂

    Reply
  108. LOL Susan — I was a bit like that, too — I'd read all of Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, too, but firmly believed I "didn't read romance." But am I ever glad I learned better. 🙂

    Reply
  109. LOL Susan — I was a bit like that, too — I'd read all of Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, too, but firmly believed I "didn't read romance." But am I ever glad I learned better. 🙂

    Reply
  110. LOL Susan — I was a bit like that, too — I'd read all of Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, too, but firmly believed I "didn't read romance." But am I ever glad I learned better. 🙂

    Reply
  111. Dottie, These Old Shades was my first, too. And Stephanie Laurens is a friend of mine and yes indeed, she is a big Heyer fan. I suspect you would find shades of Heyer in every writer who grew up with her, because she effectively invented the Regency romance genre, and we can't escape her influence. Not that I'd ever want to.

    Reply
  112. Dottie, These Old Shades was my first, too. And Stephanie Laurens is a friend of mine and yes indeed, she is a big Heyer fan. I suspect you would find shades of Heyer in every writer who grew up with her, because she effectively invented the Regency romance genre, and we can't escape her influence. Not that I'd ever want to.

    Reply
  113. Dottie, These Old Shades was my first, too. And Stephanie Laurens is a friend of mine and yes indeed, she is a big Heyer fan. I suspect you would find shades of Heyer in every writer who grew up with her, because she effectively invented the Regency romance genre, and we can't escape her influence. Not that I'd ever want to.

    Reply
  114. Dottie, These Old Shades was my first, too. And Stephanie Laurens is a friend of mine and yes indeed, she is a big Heyer fan. I suspect you would find shades of Heyer in every writer who grew up with her, because she effectively invented the Regency romance genre, and we can't escape her influence. Not that I'd ever want to.

    Reply
  115. Dottie, These Old Shades was my first, too. And Stephanie Laurens is a friend of mine and yes indeed, she is a big Heyer fan. I suspect you would find shades of Heyer in every writer who grew up with her, because she effectively invented the Regency romance genre, and we can't escape her influence. Not that I'd ever want to.

    Reply
  116. Laura, I could agree more! My first was also These Old Shades and it was also a library book — I borrowed it from the adult section of the Belmont Library (Geelong) on a dare from a friend. We were both eleven, and you weren't supposed to be allowed to borrow from the adult section until you were twelve! With trepidation I checked it out — we picked Heyer as she was my friend's mother's favourite — and the lovely librarian didn't turn a hair. The glee with which I took it home… "God bless librarians." Indeed

    Reply
  117. Laura, I could agree more! My first was also These Old Shades and it was also a library book — I borrowed it from the adult section of the Belmont Library (Geelong) on a dare from a friend. We were both eleven, and you weren't supposed to be allowed to borrow from the adult section until you were twelve! With trepidation I checked it out — we picked Heyer as she was my friend's mother's favourite — and the lovely librarian didn't turn a hair. The glee with which I took it home… "God bless librarians." Indeed

    Reply
  118. Laura, I could agree more! My first was also These Old Shades and it was also a library book — I borrowed it from the adult section of the Belmont Library (Geelong) on a dare from a friend. We were both eleven, and you weren't supposed to be allowed to borrow from the adult section until you were twelve! With trepidation I checked it out — we picked Heyer as she was my friend's mother's favourite — and the lovely librarian didn't turn a hair. The glee with which I took it home… "God bless librarians." Indeed

    Reply
  119. Laura, I could agree more! My first was also These Old Shades and it was also a library book — I borrowed it from the adult section of the Belmont Library (Geelong) on a dare from a friend. We were both eleven, and you weren't supposed to be allowed to borrow from the adult section until you were twelve! With trepidation I checked it out — we picked Heyer as she was my friend's mother's favourite — and the lovely librarian didn't turn a hair. The glee with which I took it home… "God bless librarians." Indeed

    Reply
  120. Laura, I could agree more! My first was also These Old Shades and it was also a library book — I borrowed it from the adult section of the Belmont Library (Geelong) on a dare from a friend. We were both eleven, and you weren't supposed to be allowed to borrow from the adult section until you were twelve! With trepidation I checked it out — we picked Heyer as she was my friend's mother's favourite — and the lovely librarian didn't turn a hair. The glee with which I took it home… "God bless librarians." Indeed

    Reply
  121. When I started Romantic Times on 1981, I devoted several articles to Georgette Heyer. Her husband and son were alive at the time and we exchanged letters and occasionally telephoned.
    They were setting up a Georgette Heyer prize at the time and wanted her to be remembered.

    Reply
  122. When I started Romantic Times on 1981, I devoted several articles to Georgette Heyer. Her husband and son were alive at the time and we exchanged letters and occasionally telephoned.
    They were setting up a Georgette Heyer prize at the time and wanted her to be remembered.

    Reply
  123. When I started Romantic Times on 1981, I devoted several articles to Georgette Heyer. Her husband and son were alive at the time and we exchanged letters and occasionally telephoned.
    They were setting up a Georgette Heyer prize at the time and wanted her to be remembered.

    Reply
  124. When I started Romantic Times on 1981, I devoted several articles to Georgette Heyer. Her husband and son were alive at the time and we exchanged letters and occasionally telephoned.
    They were setting up a Georgette Heyer prize at the time and wanted her to be remembered.

    Reply
  125. When I started Romantic Times on 1981, I devoted several articles to Georgette Heyer. Her husband and son were alive at the time and we exchanged letters and occasionally telephoned.
    They were setting up a Georgette Heyer prize at the time and wanted her to be remembered.

    Reply
  126. Thank you Kathryn — and I very much hope YOU get a blue plaque on your home (some day ) for all that you've done for romance readers and writers! As well as for Heyer.

    Reply
  127. Thank you Kathryn — and I very much hope YOU get a blue plaque on your home (some day ) for all that you've done for romance readers and writers! As well as for Heyer.

    Reply
  128. Thank you Kathryn — and I very much hope YOU get a blue plaque on your home (some day ) for all that you've done for romance readers and writers! As well as for Heyer.

    Reply
  129. Thank you Kathryn — and I very much hope YOU get a blue plaque on your home (some day ) for all that you've done for romance readers and writers! As well as for Heyer.

    Reply
  130. Thank you Kathryn — and I very much hope YOU get a blue plaque on your home (some day ) for all that you've done for romance readers and writers! As well as for Heyer.

    Reply
  131. It’s been such a long time since reading my first Georgette Hey story that I don’t remember which one it was , but it was probably my first Historic Romance read.

    Reply
  132. It’s been such a long time since reading my first Georgette Hey story that I don’t remember which one it was , but it was probably my first Historic Romance read.

    Reply
  133. It’s been such a long time since reading my first Georgette Hey story that I don’t remember which one it was , but it was probably my first Historic Romance read.

    Reply
  134. It’s been such a long time since reading my first Georgette Hey story that I don’t remember which one it was , but it was probably my first Historic Romance read.

    Reply
  135. It’s been such a long time since reading my first Georgette Hey story that I don’t remember which one it was , but it was probably my first Historic Romance read.

    Reply
  136. She was an elegant writer and I admired her skill, however I didn’t connect emotionally with her work as I do with many other writers. The exception was Venetia, which remains a favorite to this day. IMO, that Blue Plaque was long overdue.

    Reply
  137. She was an elegant writer and I admired her skill, however I didn’t connect emotionally with her work as I do with many other writers. The exception was Venetia, which remains a favorite to this day. IMO, that Blue Plaque was long overdue.

    Reply
  138. She was an elegant writer and I admired her skill, however I didn’t connect emotionally with her work as I do with many other writers. The exception was Venetia, which remains a favorite to this day. IMO, that Blue Plaque was long overdue.

    Reply
  139. She was an elegant writer and I admired her skill, however I didn’t connect emotionally with her work as I do with many other writers. The exception was Venetia, which remains a favorite to this day. IMO, that Blue Plaque was long overdue.

    Reply
  140. She was an elegant writer and I admired her skill, however I didn’t connect emotionally with her work as I do with many other writers. The exception was Venetia, which remains a favorite to this day. IMO, that Blue Plaque was long overdue.

    Reply
  141. a "literary bubble bath." 
    Indeed! snort! He should be so lucky!
    Patronizing snob.
    How interesting that TOS should be the first Heyer for so many of us. And it's far from the easiest to read. Though I don't understand people who say they can't read Heyer because they don't understand the slang and the terminology. At the age of eleven I was able to work most of it out through context, and it never slowed me down or hindered my enjoyment of it in the slightest. I suppose you're just a sponge at that age.  My top five (except that I can never decide) would be very similar to yours, I think. Venetia is certainly the one I hand to people who've never read Heyer.

    Reply
  142. a "literary bubble bath." 
    Indeed! snort! He should be so lucky!
    Patronizing snob.
    How interesting that TOS should be the first Heyer for so many of us. And it's far from the easiest to read. Though I don't understand people who say they can't read Heyer because they don't understand the slang and the terminology. At the age of eleven I was able to work most of it out through context, and it never slowed me down or hindered my enjoyment of it in the slightest. I suppose you're just a sponge at that age.  My top five (except that I can never decide) would be very similar to yours, I think. Venetia is certainly the one I hand to people who've never read Heyer.

    Reply
  143. a "literary bubble bath." 
    Indeed! snort! He should be so lucky!
    Patronizing snob.
    How interesting that TOS should be the first Heyer for so many of us. And it's far from the easiest to read. Though I don't understand people who say they can't read Heyer because they don't understand the slang and the terminology. At the age of eleven I was able to work most of it out through context, and it never slowed me down or hindered my enjoyment of it in the slightest. I suppose you're just a sponge at that age.  My top five (except that I can never decide) would be very similar to yours, I think. Venetia is certainly the one I hand to people who've never read Heyer.

    Reply
  144. a "literary bubble bath." 
    Indeed! snort! He should be so lucky!
    Patronizing snob.
    How interesting that TOS should be the first Heyer for so many of us. And it's far from the easiest to read. Though I don't understand people who say they can't read Heyer because they don't understand the slang and the terminology. At the age of eleven I was able to work most of it out through context, and it never slowed me down or hindered my enjoyment of it in the slightest. I suppose you're just a sponge at that age.  My top five (except that I can never decide) would be very similar to yours, I think. Venetia is certainly the one I hand to people who've never read Heyer.

    Reply
  145. a "literary bubble bath." 
    Indeed! snort! He should be so lucky!
    Patronizing snob.
    How interesting that TOS should be the first Heyer for so many of us. And it's far from the easiest to read. Though I don't understand people who say they can't read Heyer because they don't understand the slang and the terminology. At the age of eleven I was able to work most of it out through context, and it never slowed me down or hindered my enjoyment of it in the slightest. I suppose you're just a sponge at that age.  My top five (except that I can never decide) would be very similar to yours, I think. Venetia is certainly the one I hand to people who've never read Heyer.

    Reply
  146. Shannon, I have never understood people who read in the bath. I had a friend who used to visit from the country, where they were building their own house, and the first thing she'd do on arrival — after the obligatory cuppa — was to fill the bath and climb into it with a book from my bookshelves and that's the last we'd see of her for a few hours. And yes, Venetia is one of my all-time faves, too. I envy Heyer's speed of writing, not to mention her clever and witty conversations in the books.

    Reply
  147. Shannon, I have never understood people who read in the bath. I had a friend who used to visit from the country, where they were building their own house, and the first thing she'd do on arrival — after the obligatory cuppa — was to fill the bath and climb into it with a book from my bookshelves and that's the last we'd see of her for a few hours. And yes, Venetia is one of my all-time faves, too. I envy Heyer's speed of writing, not to mention her clever and witty conversations in the books.

    Reply
  148. Shannon, I have never understood people who read in the bath. I had a friend who used to visit from the country, where they were building their own house, and the first thing she'd do on arrival — after the obligatory cuppa — was to fill the bath and climb into it with a book from my bookshelves and that's the last we'd see of her for a few hours. And yes, Venetia is one of my all-time faves, too. I envy Heyer's speed of writing, not to mention her clever and witty conversations in the books.

    Reply
  149. Shannon, I have never understood people who read in the bath. I had a friend who used to visit from the country, where they were building their own house, and the first thing she'd do on arrival — after the obligatory cuppa — was to fill the bath and climb into it with a book from my bookshelves and that's the last we'd see of her for a few hours. And yes, Venetia is one of my all-time faves, too. I envy Heyer's speed of writing, not to mention her clever and witty conversations in the books.

    Reply
  150. Shannon, I have never understood people who read in the bath. I had a friend who used to visit from the country, where they were building their own house, and the first thing she'd do on arrival — after the obligatory cuppa — was to fill the bath and climb into it with a book from my bookshelves and that's the last we'd see of her for a few hours. And yes, Venetia is one of my all-time faves, too. I envy Heyer's speed of writing, not to mention her clever and witty conversations in the books.

    Reply
  151. Jenny, how lovely to spend a little of your pay each payday on a Heyer.
    I did much the same when I was a teenager, coming home from school and would stop at Berry's Antiques in the city, and browse through the used books at the back of the shop — most of which were from deceased estates. I got a number of Heyer hardbacks for 20c each, and each one was a prize. I've bought new editions, too, mostly so I can press them on friends who have yet to read Heyer, but also to protect my precious old pre-loved hardbacks.

    Reply
  152. Jenny, how lovely to spend a little of your pay each payday on a Heyer.
    I did much the same when I was a teenager, coming home from school and would stop at Berry's Antiques in the city, and browse through the used books at the back of the shop — most of which were from deceased estates. I got a number of Heyer hardbacks for 20c each, and each one was a prize. I've bought new editions, too, mostly so I can press them on friends who have yet to read Heyer, but also to protect my precious old pre-loved hardbacks.

    Reply
  153. Jenny, how lovely to spend a little of your pay each payday on a Heyer.
    I did much the same when I was a teenager, coming home from school and would stop at Berry's Antiques in the city, and browse through the used books at the back of the shop — most of which were from deceased estates. I got a number of Heyer hardbacks for 20c each, and each one was a prize. I've bought new editions, too, mostly so I can press them on friends who have yet to read Heyer, but also to protect my precious old pre-loved hardbacks.

    Reply
  154. Jenny, how lovely to spend a little of your pay each payday on a Heyer.
    I did much the same when I was a teenager, coming home from school and would stop at Berry's Antiques in the city, and browse through the used books at the back of the shop — most of which were from deceased estates. I got a number of Heyer hardbacks for 20c each, and each one was a prize. I've bought new editions, too, mostly so I can press them on friends who have yet to read Heyer, but also to protect my precious old pre-loved hardbacks.

    Reply
  155. Jenny, how lovely to spend a little of your pay each payday on a Heyer.
    I did much the same when I was a teenager, coming home from school and would stop at Berry's Antiques in the city, and browse through the used books at the back of the shop — most of which were from deceased estates. I got a number of Heyer hardbacks for 20c each, and each one was a prize. I've bought new editions, too, mostly so I can press them on friends who have yet to read Heyer, but also to protect my precious old pre-loved hardbacks.

    Reply
  156. Petra, I'm always impressed by anyone who can read a novel in another language. But what a joy to have discovered Heyer in translation first. I must dig out my photos from the Heyer walking tour I did with Jenny Haddon so many years ago. I could pop a tour onto the wench blog, couldn't I?

    Reply
  157. Petra, I'm always impressed by anyone who can read a novel in another language. But what a joy to have discovered Heyer in translation first. I must dig out my photos from the Heyer walking tour I did with Jenny Haddon so many years ago. I could pop a tour onto the wench blog, couldn't I?

    Reply
  158. Petra, I'm always impressed by anyone who can read a novel in another language. But what a joy to have discovered Heyer in translation first. I must dig out my photos from the Heyer walking tour I did with Jenny Haddon so many years ago. I could pop a tour onto the wench blog, couldn't I?

    Reply
  159. Petra, I'm always impressed by anyone who can read a novel in another language. But what a joy to have discovered Heyer in translation first. I must dig out my photos from the Heyer walking tour I did with Jenny Haddon so many years ago. I could pop a tour onto the wench blog, couldn't I?

    Reply
  160. Petra, I'm always impressed by anyone who can read a novel in another language. But what a joy to have discovered Heyer in translation first. I must dig out my photos from the Heyer walking tour I did with Jenny Haddon so many years ago. I could pop a tour onto the wench blog, couldn't I?

    Reply
  161. I was reading historical novels before Heyer — lots of children's historicals in the small country libraries I haunted as a child and I probably developed my taste for them then — but she was probably my first historical romance — not that I knew it was romance back then

    Reply
  162. I was reading historical novels before Heyer — lots of children's historicals in the small country libraries I haunted as a child and I probably developed my taste for them then — but she was probably my first historical romance — not that I knew it was romance back then

    Reply
  163. I was reading historical novels before Heyer — lots of children's historicals in the small country libraries I haunted as a child and I probably developed my taste for them then — but she was probably my first historical romance — not that I knew it was romance back then

    Reply
  164. I was reading historical novels before Heyer — lots of children's historicals in the small country libraries I haunted as a child and I probably developed my taste for them then — but she was probably my first historical romance — not that I knew it was romance back then

    Reply
  165. I was reading historical novels before Heyer — lots of children's historicals in the small country libraries I haunted as a child and I probably developed my taste for them then — but she was probably my first historical romance — not that I knew it was romance back then

    Reply
  166. Vicki, yes, it was long overdue, I agree, and kudos to Jennifer Kloester for proposing it. It's a pity you didn't connect with Heyer's books emotionally, but I'll agree, Venetia is a treasure.

    Reply
  167. Vicki, yes, it was long overdue, I agree, and kudos to Jennifer Kloester for proposing it. It's a pity you didn't connect with Heyer's books emotionally, but I'll agree, Venetia is a treasure.

    Reply
  168. Vicki, yes, it was long overdue, I agree, and kudos to Jennifer Kloester for proposing it. It's a pity you didn't connect with Heyer's books emotionally, but I'll agree, Venetia is a treasure.

    Reply
  169. Vicki, yes, it was long overdue, I agree, and kudos to Jennifer Kloester for proposing it. It's a pity you didn't connect with Heyer's books emotionally, but I'll agree, Venetia is a treasure.

    Reply
  170. Vicki, yes, it was long overdue, I agree, and kudos to Jennifer Kloester for proposing it. It's a pity you didn't connect with Heyer's books emotionally, but I'll agree, Venetia is a treasure.

    Reply
  171. First Heyer was The Masqueraders from the school library and I’m not sure how I found it because all the Georgette Heyer’s were on the bottom shelf! Next was These Old Shades and I then read every Heyer in the school collection and went n to read the ones available in the regional library. One thing I find curious to this day – my hometown’s name comes from the heroine of The Spanish Bride – you’d have thought that the librarian would have put a note about that at the beginning of the book. I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown.
    I became good friends with a neighbour when we discovered we were both madly in love with Georgette Heyer books!

    Reply
  172. First Heyer was The Masqueraders from the school library and I’m not sure how I found it because all the Georgette Heyer’s were on the bottom shelf! Next was These Old Shades and I then read every Heyer in the school collection and went n to read the ones available in the regional library. One thing I find curious to this day – my hometown’s name comes from the heroine of The Spanish Bride – you’d have thought that the librarian would have put a note about that at the beginning of the book. I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown.
    I became good friends with a neighbour when we discovered we were both madly in love with Georgette Heyer books!

    Reply
  173. First Heyer was The Masqueraders from the school library and I’m not sure how I found it because all the Georgette Heyer’s were on the bottom shelf! Next was These Old Shades and I then read every Heyer in the school collection and went n to read the ones available in the regional library. One thing I find curious to this day – my hometown’s name comes from the heroine of The Spanish Bride – you’d have thought that the librarian would have put a note about that at the beginning of the book. I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown.
    I became good friends with a neighbour when we discovered we were both madly in love with Georgette Heyer books!

    Reply
  174. First Heyer was The Masqueraders from the school library and I’m not sure how I found it because all the Georgette Heyer’s were on the bottom shelf! Next was These Old Shades and I then read every Heyer in the school collection and went n to read the ones available in the regional library. One thing I find curious to this day – my hometown’s name comes from the heroine of The Spanish Bride – you’d have thought that the librarian would have put a note about that at the beginning of the book. I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown.
    I became good friends with a neighbour when we discovered we were both madly in love with Georgette Heyer books!

    Reply
  175. First Heyer was The Masqueraders from the school library and I’m not sure how I found it because all the Georgette Heyer’s were on the bottom shelf! Next was These Old Shades and I then read every Heyer in the school collection and went n to read the ones available in the regional library. One thing I find curious to this day – my hometown’s name comes from the heroine of The Spanish Bride – you’d have thought that the librarian would have put a note about that at the beginning of the book. I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown.
    I became good friends with a neighbour when we discovered we were both madly in love with Georgette Heyer books!

    Reply
  176. Thanks lor, sounds like you and I both owe a lot to libraries.
    “I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown”
    Are you from South Africa? Because I know it was *years* before I made the connection between the township of Ladysmith — which I only knew because of the band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo — and Juana and Harry Smith.
    Or are there more LadySmith towns in the world? Lovely if there were. I love the sound of Harry Smith naming places after his wife. Theirs really does sound like a real life love story.

    Reply
  177. Thanks lor, sounds like you and I both owe a lot to libraries.
    “I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown”
    Are you from South Africa? Because I know it was *years* before I made the connection between the township of Ladysmith — which I only knew because of the band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo — and Juana and Harry Smith.
    Or are there more LadySmith towns in the world? Lovely if there were. I love the sound of Harry Smith naming places after his wife. Theirs really does sound like a real life love story.

    Reply
  178. Thanks lor, sounds like you and I both owe a lot to libraries.
    “I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown”
    Are you from South Africa? Because I know it was *years* before I made the connection between the township of Ladysmith — which I only knew because of the band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo — and Juana and Harry Smith.
    Or are there more LadySmith towns in the world? Lovely if there were. I love the sound of Harry Smith naming places after his wife. Theirs really does sound like a real life love story.

    Reply
  179. Thanks lor, sounds like you and I both owe a lot to libraries.
    “I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown”
    Are you from South Africa? Because I know it was *years* before I made the connection between the township of Ladysmith — which I only knew because of the band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo — and Juana and Harry Smith.
    Or are there more LadySmith towns in the world? Lovely if there were. I love the sound of Harry Smith naming places after his wife. Theirs really does sound like a real life love story.

    Reply
  180. Thanks lor, sounds like you and I both owe a lot to libraries.
    “I was out of school for at least 20 years before I discovered the connection between Juanita and Harry Smith and my hometown”
    Are you from South Africa? Because I know it was *years* before I made the connection between the township of Ladysmith — which I only knew because of the band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo — and Juana and Harry Smith.
    Or are there more LadySmith towns in the world? Lovely if there were. I love the sound of Harry Smith naming places after his wife. Theirs really does sound like a real life love story.

    Reply
  181. There’s a Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. It’s indirectly linked to Harry and Juana as it was named in recognition of the lifting of the siege of Ladysmith.

    Reply
  182. There’s a Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. It’s indirectly linked to Harry and Juana as it was named in recognition of the lifting of the siege of Ladysmith.

    Reply
  183. There’s a Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. It’s indirectly linked to Harry and Juana as it was named in recognition of the lifting of the siege of Ladysmith.

    Reply
  184. There’s a Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. It’s indirectly linked to Harry and Juana as it was named in recognition of the lifting of the siege of Ladysmith.

    Reply
  185. There’s a Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. It’s indirectly linked to Harry and Juana as it was named in recognition of the lifting of the siege of Ladysmith.

    Reply
  186. Yes, Vicki, I've delved into that autobiography too, many years ago, and enjoyed it very much. Isn't it wonderful how so many historical documents are now easily available on the web? Thanks for providing the link for other wenchly readers.

    Reply
  187. Yes, Vicki, I've delved into that autobiography too, many years ago, and enjoyed it very much. Isn't it wonderful how so many historical documents are now easily available on the web? Thanks for providing the link for other wenchly readers.

    Reply
  188. Yes, Vicki, I've delved into that autobiography too, many years ago, and enjoyed it very much. Isn't it wonderful how so many historical documents are now easily available on the web? Thanks for providing the link for other wenchly readers.

    Reply
  189. Yes, Vicki, I've delved into that autobiography too, many years ago, and enjoyed it very much. Isn't it wonderful how so many historical documents are now easily available on the web? Thanks for providing the link for other wenchly readers.

    Reply
  190. Yes, Vicki, I've delved into that autobiography too, many years ago, and enjoyed it very much. Isn't it wonderful how so many historical documents are now easily available on the web? Thanks for providing the link for other wenchly readers.

    Reply
  191. The first Heyer book I read was “Simon the Coldheart.” She wrote medieval battle scenes with great skill.
    Loved reading “A Civil Contract”, “Cotillion” and many others. I didn’t realize I was reading a particular genre. I was drawn to each character study and story line she presented feeling so connected to them all.
    It’s great to have her novels so available today.

    Reply
  192. The first Heyer book I read was “Simon the Coldheart.” She wrote medieval battle scenes with great skill.
    Loved reading “A Civil Contract”, “Cotillion” and many others. I didn’t realize I was reading a particular genre. I was drawn to each character study and story line she presented feeling so connected to them all.
    It’s great to have her novels so available today.

    Reply
  193. The first Heyer book I read was “Simon the Coldheart.” She wrote medieval battle scenes with great skill.
    Loved reading “A Civil Contract”, “Cotillion” and many others. I didn’t realize I was reading a particular genre. I was drawn to each character study and story line she presented feeling so connected to them all.
    It’s great to have her novels so available today.

    Reply
  194. The first Heyer book I read was “Simon the Coldheart.” She wrote medieval battle scenes with great skill.
    Loved reading “A Civil Contract”, “Cotillion” and many others. I didn’t realize I was reading a particular genre. I was drawn to each character study and story line she presented feeling so connected to them all.
    It’s great to have her novels so available today.

    Reply
  195. The first Heyer book I read was “Simon the Coldheart.” She wrote medieval battle scenes with great skill.
    Loved reading “A Civil Contract”, “Cotillion” and many others. I didn’t realize I was reading a particular genre. I was drawn to each character study and story line she presented feeling so connected to them all.
    It’s great to have her novels so available today.

    Reply
  196. Patricia, I don't think she was writing a particular genre — though her Regencies became so popular they became the forerunners — and possibly the model of a genre. But certainly Simon the Coldheart wasn't genre fiction . I did like Simon and the way small boys followed him around, despite his gruffness. It's been ages since I reread it. Her battle scenes were wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  197. Patricia, I don't think she was writing a particular genre — though her Regencies became so popular they became the forerunners — and possibly the model of a genre. But certainly Simon the Coldheart wasn't genre fiction . I did like Simon and the way small boys followed him around, despite his gruffness. It's been ages since I reread it. Her battle scenes were wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  198. Patricia, I don't think she was writing a particular genre — though her Regencies became so popular they became the forerunners — and possibly the model of a genre. But certainly Simon the Coldheart wasn't genre fiction . I did like Simon and the way small boys followed him around, despite his gruffness. It's been ages since I reread it. Her battle scenes were wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  199. Patricia, I don't think she was writing a particular genre — though her Regencies became so popular they became the forerunners — and possibly the model of a genre. But certainly Simon the Coldheart wasn't genre fiction . I did like Simon and the way small boys followed him around, despite his gruffness. It's been ages since I reread it. Her battle scenes were wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  200. Patricia, I don't think she was writing a particular genre — though her Regencies became so popular they became the forerunners — and possibly the model of a genre. But certainly Simon the Coldheart wasn't genre fiction . I did like Simon and the way small boys followed him around, despite his gruffness. It's been ages since I reread it. Her battle scenes were wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  201. Yes, I consider myself a Georgette Heyer fan.
    The first Heyer book I read was The Talisman Ring.
    I knew her name because of the different romance webpages that I’ve followed for years, but I had not bought any of her books until my family and I were in Stanstead airport a few years ago.
    We were waiting for the time to take the plane, and we still had several pounds to spend, so I went to one of those bookshops that are in all the airports I know, and started browsing through the shelves.
    Yes, I know there’s something called ‘airport novel’ and yes, I’m one of those that enter a bookshop or goes to a newsstand no matter where they are.
    So, I was in this bookshop, and I saw this Georgette Heyer’s book and I said to myself, OK, let’s give it a try. Romance and mystery and a wonderful style. It was just the beginning.

    Reply
  202. Yes, I consider myself a Georgette Heyer fan.
    The first Heyer book I read was The Talisman Ring.
    I knew her name because of the different romance webpages that I’ve followed for years, but I had not bought any of her books until my family and I were in Stanstead airport a few years ago.
    We were waiting for the time to take the plane, and we still had several pounds to spend, so I went to one of those bookshops that are in all the airports I know, and started browsing through the shelves.
    Yes, I know there’s something called ‘airport novel’ and yes, I’m one of those that enter a bookshop or goes to a newsstand no matter where they are.
    So, I was in this bookshop, and I saw this Georgette Heyer’s book and I said to myself, OK, let’s give it a try. Romance and mystery and a wonderful style. It was just the beginning.

    Reply
  203. Yes, I consider myself a Georgette Heyer fan.
    The first Heyer book I read was The Talisman Ring.
    I knew her name because of the different romance webpages that I’ve followed for years, but I had not bought any of her books until my family and I were in Stanstead airport a few years ago.
    We were waiting for the time to take the plane, and we still had several pounds to spend, so I went to one of those bookshops that are in all the airports I know, and started browsing through the shelves.
    Yes, I know there’s something called ‘airport novel’ and yes, I’m one of those that enter a bookshop or goes to a newsstand no matter where they are.
    So, I was in this bookshop, and I saw this Georgette Heyer’s book and I said to myself, OK, let’s give it a try. Romance and mystery and a wonderful style. It was just the beginning.

    Reply
  204. Yes, I consider myself a Georgette Heyer fan.
    The first Heyer book I read was The Talisman Ring.
    I knew her name because of the different romance webpages that I’ve followed for years, but I had not bought any of her books until my family and I were in Stanstead airport a few years ago.
    We were waiting for the time to take the plane, and we still had several pounds to spend, so I went to one of those bookshops that are in all the airports I know, and started browsing through the shelves.
    Yes, I know there’s something called ‘airport novel’ and yes, I’m one of those that enter a bookshop or goes to a newsstand no matter where they are.
    So, I was in this bookshop, and I saw this Georgette Heyer’s book and I said to myself, OK, let’s give it a try. Romance and mystery and a wonderful style. It was just the beginning.

    Reply
  205. Yes, I consider myself a Georgette Heyer fan.
    The first Heyer book I read was The Talisman Ring.
    I knew her name because of the different romance webpages that I’ve followed for years, but I had not bought any of her books until my family and I were in Stanstead airport a few years ago.
    We were waiting for the time to take the plane, and we still had several pounds to spend, so I went to one of those bookshops that are in all the airports I know, and started browsing through the shelves.
    Yes, I know there’s something called ‘airport novel’ and yes, I’m one of those that enter a bookshop or goes to a newsstand no matter where they are.
    So, I was in this bookshop, and I saw this Georgette Heyer’s book and I said to myself, OK, let’s give it a try. Romance and mystery and a wonderful style. It was just the beginning.

    Reply
  206. My very first Heyer was The Black Sheep. I picked it up in a second hand bookshop and a love affair was born! My absolute favourites are The Nonesuch and The Toll Gate. For my last birthday my brother bought me first editions of three of her crime novels. I treasure them even though the Regencies are my favourites. Thrilled about the Blue Plaque tool

    Reply
  207. My very first Heyer was The Black Sheep. I picked it up in a second hand bookshop and a love affair was born! My absolute favourites are The Nonesuch and The Toll Gate. For my last birthday my brother bought me first editions of three of her crime novels. I treasure them even though the Regencies are my favourites. Thrilled about the Blue Plaque tool

    Reply
  208. My very first Heyer was The Black Sheep. I picked it up in a second hand bookshop and a love affair was born! My absolute favourites are The Nonesuch and The Toll Gate. For my last birthday my brother bought me first editions of three of her crime novels. I treasure them even though the Regencies are my favourites. Thrilled about the Blue Plaque tool

    Reply
  209. My very first Heyer was The Black Sheep. I picked it up in a second hand bookshop and a love affair was born! My absolute favourites are The Nonesuch and The Toll Gate. For my last birthday my brother bought me first editions of three of her crime novels. I treasure them even though the Regencies are my favourites. Thrilled about the Blue Plaque tool

    Reply
  210. My very first Heyer was The Black Sheep. I picked it up in a second hand bookshop and a love affair was born! My absolute favourites are The Nonesuch and The Toll Gate. For my last birthday my brother bought me first editions of three of her crime novels. I treasure them even though the Regencies are my favourites. Thrilled about the Blue Plaque tool

    Reply
  211. Teresa, I do love Miles Calverleigh. And what a lovely gift from your brother. Apparently my grandmother had what was probably a full set of Heyer first editions — she had them on permanent order from her bookshop, and each new book arrived the moment it was published. Alas, I am the youngest of my generation, and she died when I was a young girl. Many years later when my aunt read my first book, she commented that "Nana would have loved it — she adored Georgette Heyer." And she told me all about how Nana got each book hot off the presses. "Where are those books now?" I asked with bated breath. They all went to the charity shop. sigh.

    Reply
  212. Teresa, I do love Miles Calverleigh. And what a lovely gift from your brother. Apparently my grandmother had what was probably a full set of Heyer first editions — she had them on permanent order from her bookshop, and each new book arrived the moment it was published. Alas, I am the youngest of my generation, and she died when I was a young girl. Many years later when my aunt read my first book, she commented that "Nana would have loved it — she adored Georgette Heyer." And she told me all about how Nana got each book hot off the presses. "Where are those books now?" I asked with bated breath. They all went to the charity shop. sigh.

    Reply
  213. Teresa, I do love Miles Calverleigh. And what a lovely gift from your brother. Apparently my grandmother had what was probably a full set of Heyer first editions — she had them on permanent order from her bookshop, and each new book arrived the moment it was published. Alas, I am the youngest of my generation, and she died when I was a young girl. Many years later when my aunt read my first book, she commented that "Nana would have loved it — she adored Georgette Heyer." And she told me all about how Nana got each book hot off the presses. "Where are those books now?" I asked with bated breath. They all went to the charity shop. sigh.

    Reply
  214. Teresa, I do love Miles Calverleigh. And what a lovely gift from your brother. Apparently my grandmother had what was probably a full set of Heyer first editions — she had them on permanent order from her bookshop, and each new book arrived the moment it was published. Alas, I am the youngest of my generation, and she died when I was a young girl. Many years later when my aunt read my first book, she commented that "Nana would have loved it — she adored Georgette Heyer." And she told me all about how Nana got each book hot off the presses. "Where are those books now?" I asked with bated breath. They all went to the charity shop. sigh.

    Reply
  215. Teresa, I do love Miles Calverleigh. And what a lovely gift from your brother. Apparently my grandmother had what was probably a full set of Heyer first editions — she had them on permanent order from her bookshop, and each new book arrived the moment it was published. Alas, I am the youngest of my generation, and she died when I was a young girl. Many years later when my aunt read my first book, she commented that "Nana would have loved it — she adored Georgette Heyer." And she told me all about how Nana got each book hot off the presses. "Where are those books now?" I asked with bated breath. They all went to the charity shop. sigh.

    Reply
  216. My first Heyer was The Conqueror (only I didn’t know it was by Heyer until years later). I read it from the library as a young reader and that book haunted me – until I found it again later. I can’t remember my first Heyer Regency, but These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub/ An Infamous Army are my favourites on one hand, and A Civil Contract equally on the other hand. Whatever book it was, by high school, the annual Heyer novel was my Christmas present to myself. I would buy it when published (Nov. I think), put it away, and late Christmas eve (or early Christmas morning, depending on how late the family’s tree decorating party lasted) I would curl up in bed and dig in. Although I am 5 generations Canadian, my family’s traditions were Victorian English, so much of what she wrote was familiar to me (decorating Christmas Eve, a traditional trifle (but not the roast goose) no presents until Boxing Day) I still have some of the hardback first editions, and have filled up the rest by re-purchasing paperbacks. (And yes, my parents allowed me one small present off the tree on Christmas morning, but it really didn’t matter, because I had my Heyer!)

    Reply
  217. My first Heyer was The Conqueror (only I didn’t know it was by Heyer until years later). I read it from the library as a young reader and that book haunted me – until I found it again later. I can’t remember my first Heyer Regency, but These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub/ An Infamous Army are my favourites on one hand, and A Civil Contract equally on the other hand. Whatever book it was, by high school, the annual Heyer novel was my Christmas present to myself. I would buy it when published (Nov. I think), put it away, and late Christmas eve (or early Christmas morning, depending on how late the family’s tree decorating party lasted) I would curl up in bed and dig in. Although I am 5 generations Canadian, my family’s traditions were Victorian English, so much of what she wrote was familiar to me (decorating Christmas Eve, a traditional trifle (but not the roast goose) no presents until Boxing Day) I still have some of the hardback first editions, and have filled up the rest by re-purchasing paperbacks. (And yes, my parents allowed me one small present off the tree on Christmas morning, but it really didn’t matter, because I had my Heyer!)

    Reply
  218. My first Heyer was The Conqueror (only I didn’t know it was by Heyer until years later). I read it from the library as a young reader and that book haunted me – until I found it again later. I can’t remember my first Heyer Regency, but These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub/ An Infamous Army are my favourites on one hand, and A Civil Contract equally on the other hand. Whatever book it was, by high school, the annual Heyer novel was my Christmas present to myself. I would buy it when published (Nov. I think), put it away, and late Christmas eve (or early Christmas morning, depending on how late the family’s tree decorating party lasted) I would curl up in bed and dig in. Although I am 5 generations Canadian, my family’s traditions were Victorian English, so much of what she wrote was familiar to me (decorating Christmas Eve, a traditional trifle (but not the roast goose) no presents until Boxing Day) I still have some of the hardback first editions, and have filled up the rest by re-purchasing paperbacks. (And yes, my parents allowed me one small present off the tree on Christmas morning, but it really didn’t matter, because I had my Heyer!)

    Reply
  219. My first Heyer was The Conqueror (only I didn’t know it was by Heyer until years later). I read it from the library as a young reader and that book haunted me – until I found it again later. I can’t remember my first Heyer Regency, but These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub/ An Infamous Army are my favourites on one hand, and A Civil Contract equally on the other hand. Whatever book it was, by high school, the annual Heyer novel was my Christmas present to myself. I would buy it when published (Nov. I think), put it away, and late Christmas eve (or early Christmas morning, depending on how late the family’s tree decorating party lasted) I would curl up in bed and dig in. Although I am 5 generations Canadian, my family’s traditions were Victorian English, so much of what she wrote was familiar to me (decorating Christmas Eve, a traditional trifle (but not the roast goose) no presents until Boxing Day) I still have some of the hardback first editions, and have filled up the rest by re-purchasing paperbacks. (And yes, my parents allowed me one small present off the tree on Christmas morning, but it really didn’t matter, because I had my Heyer!)

    Reply
  220. My first Heyer was The Conqueror (only I didn’t know it was by Heyer until years later). I read it from the library as a young reader and that book haunted me – until I found it again later. I can’t remember my first Heyer Regency, but These Old Shades/Devil’s Cub/ An Infamous Army are my favourites on one hand, and A Civil Contract equally on the other hand. Whatever book it was, by high school, the annual Heyer novel was my Christmas present to myself. I would buy it when published (Nov. I think), put it away, and late Christmas eve (or early Christmas morning, depending on how late the family’s tree decorating party lasted) I would curl up in bed and dig in. Although I am 5 generations Canadian, my family’s traditions were Victorian English, so much of what she wrote was familiar to me (decorating Christmas Eve, a traditional trifle (but not the roast goose) no presents until Boxing Day) I still have some of the hardback first editions, and have filled up the rest by re-purchasing paperbacks. (And yes, my parents allowed me one small present off the tree on Christmas morning, but it really didn’t matter, because I had my Heyer!)

    Reply
  221. Mary Jane, what a lovely evocation of your own little Christmas ritual. A Heyer each Christmas sounds perfect. Interesting how Australians and Canadians both seem to have kept similar British Christmas influences — though not the goose — as far as I know. I've always thought I'd never eaten roast goose, but as I typed this, I recalled that we kept goose (and chickens and ducks and all kinds of other farm animals) when I was very small — my parents were trying to be as self-sufficient as possible– so maybe I have eaten goose. But we left that place when I was four, so I don't remember. An English friend of mine sometimes cooks a goose for Christmas — might have to visit her one Christmas.

    Reply
  222. Mary Jane, what a lovely evocation of your own little Christmas ritual. A Heyer each Christmas sounds perfect. Interesting how Australians and Canadians both seem to have kept similar British Christmas influences — though not the goose — as far as I know. I've always thought I'd never eaten roast goose, but as I typed this, I recalled that we kept goose (and chickens and ducks and all kinds of other farm animals) when I was very small — my parents were trying to be as self-sufficient as possible– so maybe I have eaten goose. But we left that place when I was four, so I don't remember. An English friend of mine sometimes cooks a goose for Christmas — might have to visit her one Christmas.

    Reply
  223. Mary Jane, what a lovely evocation of your own little Christmas ritual. A Heyer each Christmas sounds perfect. Interesting how Australians and Canadians both seem to have kept similar British Christmas influences — though not the goose — as far as I know. I've always thought I'd never eaten roast goose, but as I typed this, I recalled that we kept goose (and chickens and ducks and all kinds of other farm animals) when I was very small — my parents were trying to be as self-sufficient as possible– so maybe I have eaten goose. But we left that place when I was four, so I don't remember. An English friend of mine sometimes cooks a goose for Christmas — might have to visit her one Christmas.

    Reply
  224. Mary Jane, what a lovely evocation of your own little Christmas ritual. A Heyer each Christmas sounds perfect. Interesting how Australians and Canadians both seem to have kept similar British Christmas influences — though not the goose — as far as I know. I've always thought I'd never eaten roast goose, but as I typed this, I recalled that we kept goose (and chickens and ducks and all kinds of other farm animals) when I was very small — my parents were trying to be as self-sufficient as possible– so maybe I have eaten goose. But we left that place when I was four, so I don't remember. An English friend of mine sometimes cooks a goose for Christmas — might have to visit her one Christmas.

    Reply
  225. Mary Jane, what a lovely evocation of your own little Christmas ritual. A Heyer each Christmas sounds perfect. Interesting how Australians and Canadians both seem to have kept similar British Christmas influences — though not the goose — as far as I know. I've always thought I'd never eaten roast goose, but as I typed this, I recalled that we kept goose (and chickens and ducks and all kinds of other farm animals) when I was very small — my parents were trying to be as self-sufficient as possible– so maybe I have eaten goose. But we left that place when I was four, so I don't remember. An English friend of mine sometimes cooks a goose for Christmas — might have to visit her one Christmas.

    Reply
  226. Thank you so much for sharing this and the links about the event! I only discovered Heyer in my mid twenties due to a reference by Elizabeth Boyle on her myspace page! Since I have have read almost all of her historical romances and come to love them as my ultimate comfort and mental refocus reads! Though I consider most of your books that I have and have read and when I can get my hands on them those as well! Thank each of you for all of your words both here and in your books!! They inspire me, give me hope and humor!!

    Reply
  227. Thank you so much for sharing this and the links about the event! I only discovered Heyer in my mid twenties due to a reference by Elizabeth Boyle on her myspace page! Since I have have read almost all of her historical romances and come to love them as my ultimate comfort and mental refocus reads! Though I consider most of your books that I have and have read and when I can get my hands on them those as well! Thank each of you for all of your words both here and in your books!! They inspire me, give me hope and humor!!

    Reply
  228. Thank you so much for sharing this and the links about the event! I only discovered Heyer in my mid twenties due to a reference by Elizabeth Boyle on her myspace page! Since I have have read almost all of her historical romances and come to love them as my ultimate comfort and mental refocus reads! Though I consider most of your books that I have and have read and when I can get my hands on them those as well! Thank each of you for all of your words both here and in your books!! They inspire me, give me hope and humor!!

    Reply
  229. Thank you so much for sharing this and the links about the event! I only discovered Heyer in my mid twenties due to a reference by Elizabeth Boyle on her myspace page! Since I have have read almost all of her historical romances and come to love them as my ultimate comfort and mental refocus reads! Though I consider most of your books that I have and have read and when I can get my hands on them those as well! Thank each of you for all of your words both here and in your books!! They inspire me, give me hope and humor!!

    Reply
  230. Thank you so much for sharing this and the links about the event! I only discovered Heyer in my mid twenties due to a reference by Elizabeth Boyle on her myspace page! Since I have have read almost all of her historical romances and come to love them as my ultimate comfort and mental refocus reads! Though I consider most of your books that I have and have read and when I can get my hands on them those as well! Thank each of you for all of your words both here and in your books!! They inspire me, give me hope and humor!!

    Reply

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