Hello From Devon!

Blackswan Hello there from Devon! I have Charlie here, but I've neglected to take a picture of him in an interesting situation, so you get a black swan, instead. The black swans are a feature of Dawlish, where we're staying, but they seem particularly appropriate as the Duke of Ithorne's ship is the Black Swan, and the Kentish inn he and his friends use for secretive communication is also named that. There's a reason, but I'll explain that sometime next year.

Now, The Secret Wedding is the book of the moment. It's a bit odd to be over here when it will soon be on the shelves over there, but I'll be back by the official pub date. Excellent reviews are coming in. Booklist called it, “A top-notch tale of romantic suspense.” I wouldn't quite call it suspense myself, though there is a mystery. It's more a romantic adventure with a strong dose of romp. I love a good romp. Anyway, I hope you'll all rush out and buy it, and even more importantly, enjoy it!Tswfront

If you'd like to read an excerpt or two, go here. 

I was hoping to have done my research trip to Glastonbury by the time I was writing this blog, but that's for next week. What we have been doing is exploring the coast for places we'd like to live, and living a regular routine life instead of zipping around all our friends. 

We were tested a bit to begin with by the weather, which followed weather lore precisely. March, it is said, comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. So our first week was overcast with frequent rainy periods and occasional heavy rain and strong winds. But then the lion slunk away and the lamb frolicked in and we've had mostly sunshine and warmish temperatures. It's nice to know some things still follow the rules! April, of course, brings “April showers” which in particular are light rain while it is sunny. I remember on one visit when we were crossing high land, probably in Yorkshire, having an April shower of snow! Snow in sunshine is pretty.

English country birdsong is a beauty all its own. I try in my books to remember birdsong as background, because I know what a strong part of country ambience it is, but it's often an intellectual exercise. Being here refreshes the memory, but I need to relearn the bird songs to identify them. There are wood pigeons here — I'm pretty sure that's what they are — and their distinctive cooing is often a country background. I haven't heard any crows, however, or cuckoos. Such a variety of song birds, however, some exquisite.

There are places around the web with recording of English birdsongs, both individually and in chorus (I think I pointed to some a while back.) If you're a writer, I do recommend exploring them to get the feel for what your characters will be experiencing in a garden or woodland area. Of course now it's spring the chorus is particularly rich as the birds attract mates and mark territory.

I haven't hit a large bookstore yet (hard to find around here, actually)but in the local ones there's sometimes a section for Mills and Boon (sister to Harlequin/Sihouette) but anything we might think of as single title romance is in with general fiction. This probably helps individual authors to sell beyond genre, but it might hold back sales of others. I don't know. I do know that I was delighted by one vertical section in the local W H Smiths. It was labeled “Poetry and Mills and Boon.”

I was also charmed by one TV screen. There are the basic channels here, the BBC ones all being paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays, and then many others. As I clicked through the channels on the first night, the screen went blank and then showed “text message.” A moment later, it informed me “Yesterday will return tomorrow at 6 am.”

I felt obliged to sit and meditate on that for a while. 🙂

(Apparently Yesterday is the History Channel.)

I'm enjoying the papers, too. How does anyone get anything done when there's a large and complex national paper to read — and such a choice of them. Today's Telegraph had a little essay on the letter Z. Zed here, from the Greek, but taken to the New World as zee. Apparently older names for the letter were izzard, zad, and ezod. So X, Y, Izzard to you!

Regencydawlish

I meant to write more about historical places, but most towns along the coast here were so overhauled as seaside resorts in the Victorian and early 20th century that history has been occluded, plus before George III made sea air and bathing and this stretch of coast famous, they were mostly tiny fishing villages of no great significance. But there's a picture of some old Dawlish buildings which are probably not superficially different from Regency times.

Lymeregis We have visited Lyme Regis, of Jane Austen fame, which is a delightful small town of 3,000. That's a row of seafront Georgian houses. Of course Jane Austen visited, and then used it in Persuasion. Here's some history of Lyme Regis.

Goldenhind

Brixham, a small port still full of character, and where a replica of Drake's Golden Hind can be visited. You can find more here.

Brixham  is totally charming, but rather isolated.

That might seem strange in crowded England, but getting to places from them can be a bit difficult. Devon is known for its narrow roads, which are often single lane with skimpy passing places. Even the double lane roads are windy and hilly, and easily congested. It took us ages to get into and out of Brixham, and this was in March. I dread to think what it's like in summer! Lovely in one way as it has probably preserved the town's character, but I'm not sure I'd like to feel challenged if I wanted to drive off to visit friends, get medical treatment above the basic, or even to visit some shops of any size.Brixham

There's Brixham on your left.

Another thing about coastal Devon is that it keeps you fit. It's all hills!

I have to finish with the obligatory tourist scenery. I was up early one morning and caught the sunrise over Lyme Bay.Lymebaysunrise

Have you ever visited England, or do you live there now? If so, what are your favorite places? Would you like to visit England? If so, where would you like to go? To eliminate the obvious, it has to be somewhere outside of London.

All best wishes,

Jo


150 thoughts on “Hello From Devon!”

  1. Oh, Jo, you made me want to go online and book a ticket! I think it’s lovely that you and the dh and Charlie are enjoying spring back home in England. There’s a grand tradition, after all, of going off to the Colonies to make one’s fortune, then moving home again.
    Where would I like to visit? While, I lived in Oxford and got to know the Cotswolds rather well. That would be heavenly–I put my characters there regularly. 🙂 And any of the wild and windy places would be lovely to visit again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. Oh, Jo, you made me want to go online and book a ticket! I think it’s lovely that you and the dh and Charlie are enjoying spring back home in England. There’s a grand tradition, after all, of going off to the Colonies to make one’s fortune, then moving home again.
    Where would I like to visit? While, I lived in Oxford and got to know the Cotswolds rather well. That would be heavenly–I put my characters there regularly. 🙂 And any of the wild and windy places would be lovely to visit again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. Oh, Jo, you made me want to go online and book a ticket! I think it’s lovely that you and the dh and Charlie are enjoying spring back home in England. There’s a grand tradition, after all, of going off to the Colonies to make one’s fortune, then moving home again.
    Where would I like to visit? While, I lived in Oxford and got to know the Cotswolds rather well. That would be heavenly–I put my characters there regularly. 🙂 And any of the wild and windy places would be lovely to visit again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. Oh, Jo, you made me want to go online and book a ticket! I think it’s lovely that you and the dh and Charlie are enjoying spring back home in England. There’s a grand tradition, after all, of going off to the Colonies to make one’s fortune, then moving home again.
    Where would I like to visit? While, I lived in Oxford and got to know the Cotswolds rather well. That would be heavenly–I put my characters there regularly. 🙂 And any of the wild and windy places would be lovely to visit again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  5. Oh, Jo, you made me want to go online and book a ticket! I think it’s lovely that you and the dh and Charlie are enjoying spring back home in England. There’s a grand tradition, after all, of going off to the Colonies to make one’s fortune, then moving home again.
    Where would I like to visit? While, I lived in Oxford and got to know the Cotswolds rather well. That would be heavenly–I put my characters there regularly. 🙂 And any of the wild and windy places would be lovely to visit again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  6. Is Abbotsbury in Devon? I remember going there about the time I visited Lyme Regis, so I think it’s close. They have a swannery there–just amazing to walk along the paths and see baby swans in their nests. A coastal town, but tiny and well-preserved. I remember the church at the time had a special exhibit, a maze made of silk panels the local schoolchildren had painted, and music (by local people too, I think). Magical to walk through it. Across the street from the church, a tea room/bakery offers a dessert with warm toffee sauce. I’ve had many delightful days in Britain, but that one in Abbotsbury was special.

    Reply
  7. Is Abbotsbury in Devon? I remember going there about the time I visited Lyme Regis, so I think it’s close. They have a swannery there–just amazing to walk along the paths and see baby swans in their nests. A coastal town, but tiny and well-preserved. I remember the church at the time had a special exhibit, a maze made of silk panels the local schoolchildren had painted, and music (by local people too, I think). Magical to walk through it. Across the street from the church, a tea room/bakery offers a dessert with warm toffee sauce. I’ve had many delightful days in Britain, but that one in Abbotsbury was special.

    Reply
  8. Is Abbotsbury in Devon? I remember going there about the time I visited Lyme Regis, so I think it’s close. They have a swannery there–just amazing to walk along the paths and see baby swans in their nests. A coastal town, but tiny and well-preserved. I remember the church at the time had a special exhibit, a maze made of silk panels the local schoolchildren had painted, and music (by local people too, I think). Magical to walk through it. Across the street from the church, a tea room/bakery offers a dessert with warm toffee sauce. I’ve had many delightful days in Britain, but that one in Abbotsbury was special.

    Reply
  9. Is Abbotsbury in Devon? I remember going there about the time I visited Lyme Regis, so I think it’s close. They have a swannery there–just amazing to walk along the paths and see baby swans in their nests. A coastal town, but tiny and well-preserved. I remember the church at the time had a special exhibit, a maze made of silk panels the local schoolchildren had painted, and music (by local people too, I think). Magical to walk through it. Across the street from the church, a tea room/bakery offers a dessert with warm toffee sauce. I’ve had many delightful days in Britain, but that one in Abbotsbury was special.

    Reply
  10. Is Abbotsbury in Devon? I remember going there about the time I visited Lyme Regis, so I think it’s close. They have a swannery there–just amazing to walk along the paths and see baby swans in their nests. A coastal town, but tiny and well-preserved. I remember the church at the time had a special exhibit, a maze made of silk panels the local schoolchildren had painted, and music (by local people too, I think). Magical to walk through it. Across the street from the church, a tea room/bakery offers a dessert with warm toffee sauce. I’ve had many delightful days in Britain, but that one in Abbotsbury was special.

    Reply
  11. Jo, I think it’s lovely you’ve taken time to share your visit with us. I’ve never been to England but would love to visit Sherwood forest. I understand they even have a Robin Hood festival there. What fun!

    Reply
  12. Jo, I think it’s lovely you’ve taken time to share your visit with us. I’ve never been to England but would love to visit Sherwood forest. I understand they even have a Robin Hood festival there. What fun!

    Reply
  13. Jo, I think it’s lovely you’ve taken time to share your visit with us. I’ve never been to England but would love to visit Sherwood forest. I understand they even have a Robin Hood festival there. What fun!

    Reply
  14. Jo, I think it’s lovely you’ve taken time to share your visit with us. I’ve never been to England but would love to visit Sherwood forest. I understand they even have a Robin Hood festival there. What fun!

    Reply
  15. Jo, I think it’s lovely you’ve taken time to share your visit with us. I’ve never been to England but would love to visit Sherwood forest. I understand they even have a Robin Hood festival there. What fun!

    Reply
  16. Jo, it sounds like you’re having a wonderful trip!
    When I lived in England 1997-98, I was based in Bristol. I spent a lot of time on the train visiting my then boyfriend (now husband). He was working in Reading, not the most exciting of towns, so we’d go into London for a lot of our dates. But I also visited Bath often, along with some of the lesser-known towns near Bristol. Avebury was a favorite–getting to explore that huge stone circle–and I also enjoyed Glastonbury and Wells.
    When I go back, I want to finally get to York and spend more time in the Lake District. Also, there are things I didn’t care about ten years ago that I are now on my must-see list–e.g., having become so fascinated with the Duke of Wellington over the past few years, I’m determined to visit Stratfield Saye and Apsley House.

    Reply
  17. Jo, it sounds like you’re having a wonderful trip!
    When I lived in England 1997-98, I was based in Bristol. I spent a lot of time on the train visiting my then boyfriend (now husband). He was working in Reading, not the most exciting of towns, so we’d go into London for a lot of our dates. But I also visited Bath often, along with some of the lesser-known towns near Bristol. Avebury was a favorite–getting to explore that huge stone circle–and I also enjoyed Glastonbury and Wells.
    When I go back, I want to finally get to York and spend more time in the Lake District. Also, there are things I didn’t care about ten years ago that I are now on my must-see list–e.g., having become so fascinated with the Duke of Wellington over the past few years, I’m determined to visit Stratfield Saye and Apsley House.

    Reply
  18. Jo, it sounds like you’re having a wonderful trip!
    When I lived in England 1997-98, I was based in Bristol. I spent a lot of time on the train visiting my then boyfriend (now husband). He was working in Reading, not the most exciting of towns, so we’d go into London for a lot of our dates. But I also visited Bath often, along with some of the lesser-known towns near Bristol. Avebury was a favorite–getting to explore that huge stone circle–and I also enjoyed Glastonbury and Wells.
    When I go back, I want to finally get to York and spend more time in the Lake District. Also, there are things I didn’t care about ten years ago that I are now on my must-see list–e.g., having become so fascinated with the Duke of Wellington over the past few years, I’m determined to visit Stratfield Saye and Apsley House.

    Reply
  19. Jo, it sounds like you’re having a wonderful trip!
    When I lived in England 1997-98, I was based in Bristol. I spent a lot of time on the train visiting my then boyfriend (now husband). He was working in Reading, not the most exciting of towns, so we’d go into London for a lot of our dates. But I also visited Bath often, along with some of the lesser-known towns near Bristol. Avebury was a favorite–getting to explore that huge stone circle–and I also enjoyed Glastonbury and Wells.
    When I go back, I want to finally get to York and spend more time in the Lake District. Also, there are things I didn’t care about ten years ago that I are now on my must-see list–e.g., having become so fascinated with the Duke of Wellington over the past few years, I’m determined to visit Stratfield Saye and Apsley House.

    Reply
  20. Jo, it sounds like you’re having a wonderful trip!
    When I lived in England 1997-98, I was based in Bristol. I spent a lot of time on the train visiting my then boyfriend (now husband). He was working in Reading, not the most exciting of towns, so we’d go into London for a lot of our dates. But I also visited Bath often, along with some of the lesser-known towns near Bristol. Avebury was a favorite–getting to explore that huge stone circle–and I also enjoyed Glastonbury and Wells.
    When I go back, I want to finally get to York and spend more time in the Lake District. Also, there are things I didn’t care about ten years ago that I are now on my must-see list–e.g., having become so fascinated with the Duke of Wellington over the past few years, I’m determined to visit Stratfield Saye and Apsley House.

    Reply
  21. I visited with my mother in 1969. (I was in 9th grade.) My mother’s father’s mother’s family was English and Salisbury was one of the places my grandfather had visited when he went to Europe with his mother and aunt in 1896 at the age of 13…
    We walked out to Stonehenge from the town, which was apparently weird (and more than I’d dream of doing today.)
    We spent most of our time in London.

    Reply
  22. I visited with my mother in 1969. (I was in 9th grade.) My mother’s father’s mother’s family was English and Salisbury was one of the places my grandfather had visited when he went to Europe with his mother and aunt in 1896 at the age of 13…
    We walked out to Stonehenge from the town, which was apparently weird (and more than I’d dream of doing today.)
    We spent most of our time in London.

    Reply
  23. I visited with my mother in 1969. (I was in 9th grade.) My mother’s father’s mother’s family was English and Salisbury was one of the places my grandfather had visited when he went to Europe with his mother and aunt in 1896 at the age of 13…
    We walked out to Stonehenge from the town, which was apparently weird (and more than I’d dream of doing today.)
    We spent most of our time in London.

    Reply
  24. I visited with my mother in 1969. (I was in 9th grade.) My mother’s father’s mother’s family was English and Salisbury was one of the places my grandfather had visited when he went to Europe with his mother and aunt in 1896 at the age of 13…
    We walked out to Stonehenge from the town, which was apparently weird (and more than I’d dream of doing today.)
    We spent most of our time in London.

    Reply
  25. I visited with my mother in 1969. (I was in 9th grade.) My mother’s father’s mother’s family was English and Salisbury was one of the places my grandfather had visited when he went to Europe with his mother and aunt in 1896 at the age of 13…
    We walked out to Stonehenge from the town, which was apparently weird (and more than I’d dream of doing today.)
    We spent most of our time in London.

    Reply
  26. My husband likes to hike, and I wanted to go to England because of all the books I’ve read (from Jane Austen & Dorothy Sayers to you folks) so we went to Cornwall and Devon and day hiked along the coastal path. It is one of the wonderful things about England that there should be such a path where you can walk all along the coast of Cornwall and Devon, through the edges of farmers fields, across beaches and hilltops, and even end up finding the occasional pub right on the path. We had thought of doing one of those trips where you walk and someone takes your luggage to the next inn, but realized that we could stay in one or two centers, take the train and a cab if necessary, for less cost. In Cornwall we stayed in Lostwithiel. In Devon we stayed at Shelley’s Inn in Lynnmouth. Devon was remarkable for the intense green (in summer) and patchwork quilt look of the fields. I thought some about Dorothy Sayers’ Have His carcase when we were hiking in Devon, though we were near, but not at some of the places mentioned in that book. We were only there for a few weeks. We also did get to Bath. I have really enjoyed actually being able to picture Bath. It was a good trip.
    Merry

    Reply
  27. My husband likes to hike, and I wanted to go to England because of all the books I’ve read (from Jane Austen & Dorothy Sayers to you folks) so we went to Cornwall and Devon and day hiked along the coastal path. It is one of the wonderful things about England that there should be such a path where you can walk all along the coast of Cornwall and Devon, through the edges of farmers fields, across beaches and hilltops, and even end up finding the occasional pub right on the path. We had thought of doing one of those trips where you walk and someone takes your luggage to the next inn, but realized that we could stay in one or two centers, take the train and a cab if necessary, for less cost. In Cornwall we stayed in Lostwithiel. In Devon we stayed at Shelley’s Inn in Lynnmouth. Devon was remarkable for the intense green (in summer) and patchwork quilt look of the fields. I thought some about Dorothy Sayers’ Have His carcase when we were hiking in Devon, though we were near, but not at some of the places mentioned in that book. We were only there for a few weeks. We also did get to Bath. I have really enjoyed actually being able to picture Bath. It was a good trip.
    Merry

    Reply
  28. My husband likes to hike, and I wanted to go to England because of all the books I’ve read (from Jane Austen & Dorothy Sayers to you folks) so we went to Cornwall and Devon and day hiked along the coastal path. It is one of the wonderful things about England that there should be such a path where you can walk all along the coast of Cornwall and Devon, through the edges of farmers fields, across beaches and hilltops, and even end up finding the occasional pub right on the path. We had thought of doing one of those trips where you walk and someone takes your luggage to the next inn, but realized that we could stay in one or two centers, take the train and a cab if necessary, for less cost. In Cornwall we stayed in Lostwithiel. In Devon we stayed at Shelley’s Inn in Lynnmouth. Devon was remarkable for the intense green (in summer) and patchwork quilt look of the fields. I thought some about Dorothy Sayers’ Have His carcase when we were hiking in Devon, though we were near, but not at some of the places mentioned in that book. We were only there for a few weeks. We also did get to Bath. I have really enjoyed actually being able to picture Bath. It was a good trip.
    Merry

    Reply
  29. My husband likes to hike, and I wanted to go to England because of all the books I’ve read (from Jane Austen & Dorothy Sayers to you folks) so we went to Cornwall and Devon and day hiked along the coastal path. It is one of the wonderful things about England that there should be such a path where you can walk all along the coast of Cornwall and Devon, through the edges of farmers fields, across beaches and hilltops, and even end up finding the occasional pub right on the path. We had thought of doing one of those trips where you walk and someone takes your luggage to the next inn, but realized that we could stay in one or two centers, take the train and a cab if necessary, for less cost. In Cornwall we stayed in Lostwithiel. In Devon we stayed at Shelley’s Inn in Lynnmouth. Devon was remarkable for the intense green (in summer) and patchwork quilt look of the fields. I thought some about Dorothy Sayers’ Have His carcase when we were hiking in Devon, though we were near, but not at some of the places mentioned in that book. We were only there for a few weeks. We also did get to Bath. I have really enjoyed actually being able to picture Bath. It was a good trip.
    Merry

    Reply
  30. My husband likes to hike, and I wanted to go to England because of all the books I’ve read (from Jane Austen & Dorothy Sayers to you folks) so we went to Cornwall and Devon and day hiked along the coastal path. It is one of the wonderful things about England that there should be such a path where you can walk all along the coast of Cornwall and Devon, through the edges of farmers fields, across beaches and hilltops, and even end up finding the occasional pub right on the path. We had thought of doing one of those trips where you walk and someone takes your luggage to the next inn, but realized that we could stay in one or two centers, take the train and a cab if necessary, for less cost. In Cornwall we stayed in Lostwithiel. In Devon we stayed at Shelley’s Inn in Lynnmouth. Devon was remarkable for the intense green (in summer) and patchwork quilt look of the fields. I thought some about Dorothy Sayers’ Have His carcase when we were hiking in Devon, though we were near, but not at some of the places mentioned in that book. We were only there for a few weeks. We also did get to Bath. I have really enjoyed actually being able to picture Bath. It was a good trip.
    Merry

    Reply
  31. You asked “where would you like to go”? Given that I have read “Gaudy Night” (Dorothy Sayers) over and over–and over and over— Oxford. Unfortunately we didn’t get to Oxford or Cambridge on our trip described in my previous post.
    Merry

    Reply
  32. You asked “where would you like to go”? Given that I have read “Gaudy Night” (Dorothy Sayers) over and over–and over and over— Oxford. Unfortunately we didn’t get to Oxford or Cambridge on our trip described in my previous post.
    Merry

    Reply
  33. You asked “where would you like to go”? Given that I have read “Gaudy Night” (Dorothy Sayers) over and over–and over and over— Oxford. Unfortunately we didn’t get to Oxford or Cambridge on our trip described in my previous post.
    Merry

    Reply
  34. You asked “where would you like to go”? Given that I have read “Gaudy Night” (Dorothy Sayers) over and over–and over and over— Oxford. Unfortunately we didn’t get to Oxford or Cambridge on our trip described in my previous post.
    Merry

    Reply
  35. You asked “where would you like to go”? Given that I have read “Gaudy Night” (Dorothy Sayers) over and over–and over and over— Oxford. Unfortunately we didn’t get to Oxford or Cambridge on our trip described in my previous post.
    Merry

    Reply
  36. This wasn’t England, but we visited Linlithgow and one of our strongest memories was all the white swans, swimming in icy water. As Australians, white swans are a rare sight, as is icy water.

    Reply
  37. This wasn’t England, but we visited Linlithgow and one of our strongest memories was all the white swans, swimming in icy water. As Australians, white swans are a rare sight, as is icy water.

    Reply
  38. This wasn’t England, but we visited Linlithgow and one of our strongest memories was all the white swans, swimming in icy water. As Australians, white swans are a rare sight, as is icy water.

    Reply
  39. This wasn’t England, but we visited Linlithgow and one of our strongest memories was all the white swans, swimming in icy water. As Australians, white swans are a rare sight, as is icy water.

    Reply
  40. This wasn’t England, but we visited Linlithgow and one of our strongest memories was all the white swans, swimming in icy water. As Australians, white swans are a rare sight, as is icy water.

    Reply
  41. O, to be home now that Spring is here.
    Maplescome Farm Cottages,
    Beesfield Lane near a Kentish village and the old Roman Villa of Lullingstone in the next Village

    Reply
  42. O, to be home now that Spring is here.
    Maplescome Farm Cottages,
    Beesfield Lane near a Kentish village and the old Roman Villa of Lullingstone in the next Village

    Reply
  43. O, to be home now that Spring is here.
    Maplescome Farm Cottages,
    Beesfield Lane near a Kentish village and the old Roman Villa of Lullingstone in the next Village

    Reply
  44. O, to be home now that Spring is here.
    Maplescome Farm Cottages,
    Beesfield Lane near a Kentish village and the old Roman Villa of Lullingstone in the next Village

    Reply
  45. O, to be home now that Spring is here.
    Maplescome Farm Cottages,
    Beesfield Lane near a Kentish village and the old Roman Villa of Lullingstone in the next Village

    Reply
  46. From Sherrie:
    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us, Jo! English architecture is so interesting–for instance, the seafront Georgian houses and the rows upon rows of houses in Brixham. What I find peculiar to my American sensibilities is how most of the houses are not separated from each other. Instead, they are divided by a common wall.
    I know this is quite common in Europe, but I wondered how thick those walls were, and if your neighbors could hear you through the walls? Would there ever be a door in the walls leading from one house to the other? I’m trying to imagine how one would sell one of those homes and what “rules” there may be regarding the maintenance of common walls. And if someone buys a lot at the end of a row of connected houses, do they just start building their new house right up against the last house on the row? Fascinating stuff! If I ever get the chance to visit England, I would love to go through some of those houses!

    Reply
  47. From Sherrie:
    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us, Jo! English architecture is so interesting–for instance, the seafront Georgian houses and the rows upon rows of houses in Brixham. What I find peculiar to my American sensibilities is how most of the houses are not separated from each other. Instead, they are divided by a common wall.
    I know this is quite common in Europe, but I wondered how thick those walls were, and if your neighbors could hear you through the walls? Would there ever be a door in the walls leading from one house to the other? I’m trying to imagine how one would sell one of those homes and what “rules” there may be regarding the maintenance of common walls. And if someone buys a lot at the end of a row of connected houses, do they just start building their new house right up against the last house on the row? Fascinating stuff! If I ever get the chance to visit England, I would love to go through some of those houses!

    Reply
  48. From Sherrie:
    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us, Jo! English architecture is so interesting–for instance, the seafront Georgian houses and the rows upon rows of houses in Brixham. What I find peculiar to my American sensibilities is how most of the houses are not separated from each other. Instead, they are divided by a common wall.
    I know this is quite common in Europe, but I wondered how thick those walls were, and if your neighbors could hear you through the walls? Would there ever be a door in the walls leading from one house to the other? I’m trying to imagine how one would sell one of those homes and what “rules” there may be regarding the maintenance of common walls. And if someone buys a lot at the end of a row of connected houses, do they just start building their new house right up against the last house on the row? Fascinating stuff! If I ever get the chance to visit England, I would love to go through some of those houses!

    Reply
  49. From Sherrie:
    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us, Jo! English architecture is so interesting–for instance, the seafront Georgian houses and the rows upon rows of houses in Brixham. What I find peculiar to my American sensibilities is how most of the houses are not separated from each other. Instead, they are divided by a common wall.
    I know this is quite common in Europe, but I wondered how thick those walls were, and if your neighbors could hear you through the walls? Would there ever be a door in the walls leading from one house to the other? I’m trying to imagine how one would sell one of those homes and what “rules” there may be regarding the maintenance of common walls. And if someone buys a lot at the end of a row of connected houses, do they just start building their new house right up against the last house on the row? Fascinating stuff! If I ever get the chance to visit England, I would love to go through some of those houses!

    Reply
  50. From Sherrie:
    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us, Jo! English architecture is so interesting–for instance, the seafront Georgian houses and the rows upon rows of houses in Brixham. What I find peculiar to my American sensibilities is how most of the houses are not separated from each other. Instead, they are divided by a common wall.
    I know this is quite common in Europe, but I wondered how thick those walls were, and if your neighbors could hear you through the walls? Would there ever be a door in the walls leading from one house to the other? I’m trying to imagine how one would sell one of those homes and what “rules” there may be regarding the maintenance of common walls. And if someone buys a lot at the end of a row of connected houses, do they just start building their new house right up against the last house on the row? Fascinating stuff! If I ever get the chance to visit England, I would love to go through some of those houses!

    Reply
  51. Sounds like you’re settling in easily, Jo. 🙂 Great photos – the one of Brixham reminded me of Dartmouth.
    Two of my favorite places are the medieval towns of Rye and Lavenham. Talk about stepping back into history! We’re going to England in June (your post made me want to go sooner) and this time I want to see Cornwall as we ran out of time on our last visit.

    Reply
  52. Sounds like you’re settling in easily, Jo. 🙂 Great photos – the one of Brixham reminded me of Dartmouth.
    Two of my favorite places are the medieval towns of Rye and Lavenham. Talk about stepping back into history! We’re going to England in June (your post made me want to go sooner) and this time I want to see Cornwall as we ran out of time on our last visit.

    Reply
  53. Sounds like you’re settling in easily, Jo. 🙂 Great photos – the one of Brixham reminded me of Dartmouth.
    Two of my favorite places are the medieval towns of Rye and Lavenham. Talk about stepping back into history! We’re going to England in June (your post made me want to go sooner) and this time I want to see Cornwall as we ran out of time on our last visit.

    Reply
  54. Sounds like you’re settling in easily, Jo. 🙂 Great photos – the one of Brixham reminded me of Dartmouth.
    Two of my favorite places are the medieval towns of Rye and Lavenham. Talk about stepping back into history! We’re going to England in June (your post made me want to go sooner) and this time I want to see Cornwall as we ran out of time on our last visit.

    Reply
  55. Sounds like you’re settling in easily, Jo. 🙂 Great photos – the one of Brixham reminded me of Dartmouth.
    Two of my favorite places are the medieval towns of Rye and Lavenham. Talk about stepping back into history! We’re going to England in June (your post made me want to go sooner) and this time I want to see Cornwall as we ran out of time on our last visit.

    Reply
  56. The one place I would love to visit again is in North Devon. It is the village of Clovelly. It is privately owned and kept in the style of the mid-19th century. No vehicles are allowed. My mother and I walked down to the port while my father and son took the jitney down. We had a great lunch at the port’s restaurant. The village is built into the hillside. It was great to see groceries delivered by sledge which was hitched to a post at each stop. The website is http://www.clovelly.co.uk. The village is well worth a visit.

    Reply
  57. The one place I would love to visit again is in North Devon. It is the village of Clovelly. It is privately owned and kept in the style of the mid-19th century. No vehicles are allowed. My mother and I walked down to the port while my father and son took the jitney down. We had a great lunch at the port’s restaurant. The village is built into the hillside. It was great to see groceries delivered by sledge which was hitched to a post at each stop. The website is http://www.clovelly.co.uk. The village is well worth a visit.

    Reply
  58. The one place I would love to visit again is in North Devon. It is the village of Clovelly. It is privately owned and kept in the style of the mid-19th century. No vehicles are allowed. My mother and I walked down to the port while my father and son took the jitney down. We had a great lunch at the port’s restaurant. The village is built into the hillside. It was great to see groceries delivered by sledge which was hitched to a post at each stop. The website is http://www.clovelly.co.uk. The village is well worth a visit.

    Reply
  59. The one place I would love to visit again is in North Devon. It is the village of Clovelly. It is privately owned and kept in the style of the mid-19th century. No vehicles are allowed. My mother and I walked down to the port while my father and son took the jitney down. We had a great lunch at the port’s restaurant. The village is built into the hillside. It was great to see groceries delivered by sledge which was hitched to a post at each stop. The website is http://www.clovelly.co.uk. The village is well worth a visit.

    Reply
  60. The one place I would love to visit again is in North Devon. It is the village of Clovelly. It is privately owned and kept in the style of the mid-19th century. No vehicles are allowed. My mother and I walked down to the port while my father and son took the jitney down. We had a great lunch at the port’s restaurant. The village is built into the hillside. It was great to see groceries delivered by sledge which was hitched to a post at each stop. The website is http://www.clovelly.co.uk. The village is well worth a visit.

    Reply
  61. “paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays”
    This isn’t quite correct – owning a TV does not mean that you need a TV licence (the UK TV licence is a licence to watch, not a licence to own).
    You can use your TV for watching DVDs, listening to music, playing video games, or watching archive services like iPlayer without needing a licence. A licence is only required if you watch live television.
    There is more information on when you do, and don’t, require a licence at http://www.televisionlicence.info/

    Reply
  62. “paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays”
    This isn’t quite correct – owning a TV does not mean that you need a TV licence (the UK TV licence is a licence to watch, not a licence to own).
    You can use your TV for watching DVDs, listening to music, playing video games, or watching archive services like iPlayer without needing a licence. A licence is only required if you watch live television.
    There is more information on when you do, and don’t, require a licence at http://www.televisionlicence.info/

    Reply
  63. “paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays”
    This isn’t quite correct – owning a TV does not mean that you need a TV licence (the UK TV licence is a licence to watch, not a licence to own).
    You can use your TV for watching DVDs, listening to music, playing video games, or watching archive services like iPlayer without needing a licence. A licence is only required if you watch live television.
    There is more information on when you do, and don’t, require a licence at http://www.televisionlicence.info/

    Reply
  64. “paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays”
    This isn’t quite correct – owning a TV does not mean that you need a TV licence (the UK TV licence is a licence to watch, not a licence to own).
    You can use your TV for watching DVDs, listening to music, playing video games, or watching archive services like iPlayer without needing a licence. A licence is only required if you watch live television.
    There is more information on when you do, and don’t, require a licence at http://www.televisionlicence.info/

    Reply
  65. “paid for by the TV licence that everyone with a TV pays”
    This isn’t quite correct – owning a TV does not mean that you need a TV licence (the UK TV licence is a licence to watch, not a licence to own).
    You can use your TV for watching DVDs, listening to music, playing video games, or watching archive services like iPlayer without needing a licence. A licence is only required if you watch live television.
    There is more information on when you do, and don’t, require a licence at http://www.televisionlicence.info/

    Reply
  66. I live in Durham in the North- East of England and it is a hidden gem. Even though it is a World Heritage Site, no one ever seems to hear about it. I came here for university and have never wanted to leave since.
    Wood pigeons are easy to recognise by their call. My kids joke that it is a mother cooing “Don’t do that you two” Try saying this through a mounthful of water and you get a pretty good impression.

    Reply
  67. I live in Durham in the North- East of England and it is a hidden gem. Even though it is a World Heritage Site, no one ever seems to hear about it. I came here for university and have never wanted to leave since.
    Wood pigeons are easy to recognise by their call. My kids joke that it is a mother cooing “Don’t do that you two” Try saying this through a mounthful of water and you get a pretty good impression.

    Reply
  68. I live in Durham in the North- East of England and it is a hidden gem. Even though it is a World Heritage Site, no one ever seems to hear about it. I came here for university and have never wanted to leave since.
    Wood pigeons are easy to recognise by their call. My kids joke that it is a mother cooing “Don’t do that you two” Try saying this through a mounthful of water and you get a pretty good impression.

    Reply
  69. I live in Durham in the North- East of England and it is a hidden gem. Even though it is a World Heritage Site, no one ever seems to hear about it. I came here for university and have never wanted to leave since.
    Wood pigeons are easy to recognise by their call. My kids joke that it is a mother cooing “Don’t do that you two” Try saying this through a mounthful of water and you get a pretty good impression.

    Reply
  70. I live in Durham in the North- East of England and it is a hidden gem. Even though it is a World Heritage Site, no one ever seems to hear about it. I came here for university and have never wanted to leave since.
    Wood pigeons are easy to recognise by their call. My kids joke that it is a mother cooing “Don’t do that you two” Try saying this through a mounthful of water and you get a pretty good impression.

    Reply
  71. Gosh, we got an official correction notice! Thanks for the info. 🙂
    Isla, good definition of the wood pigeon sound. I find it very pleasant and soft.
    I agree about Durham. It’s a lovely town with great history.
    A blog reader pointed me to a website with continuous birdsong.
    http://www.birdsongradio.com
    I think this must be the radio station I tuned into one while out in the car. My husband and I were looking at each other, saying, “Where’s all that song coming from here?” It was very realistic.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  72. Gosh, we got an official correction notice! Thanks for the info. 🙂
    Isla, good definition of the wood pigeon sound. I find it very pleasant and soft.
    I agree about Durham. It’s a lovely town with great history.
    A blog reader pointed me to a website with continuous birdsong.
    http://www.birdsongradio.com
    I think this must be the radio station I tuned into one while out in the car. My husband and I were looking at each other, saying, “Where’s all that song coming from here?” It was very realistic.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  73. Gosh, we got an official correction notice! Thanks for the info. 🙂
    Isla, good definition of the wood pigeon sound. I find it very pleasant and soft.
    I agree about Durham. It’s a lovely town with great history.
    A blog reader pointed me to a website with continuous birdsong.
    http://www.birdsongradio.com
    I think this must be the radio station I tuned into one while out in the car. My husband and I were looking at each other, saying, “Where’s all that song coming from here?” It was very realistic.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  74. Gosh, we got an official correction notice! Thanks for the info. 🙂
    Isla, good definition of the wood pigeon sound. I find it very pleasant and soft.
    I agree about Durham. It’s a lovely town with great history.
    A blog reader pointed me to a website with continuous birdsong.
    http://www.birdsongradio.com
    I think this must be the radio station I tuned into one while out in the car. My husband and I were looking at each other, saying, “Where’s all that song coming from here?” It was very realistic.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  75. Gosh, we got an official correction notice! Thanks for the info. 🙂
    Isla, good definition of the wood pigeon sound. I find it very pleasant and soft.
    I agree about Durham. It’s a lovely town with great history.
    A blog reader pointed me to a website with continuous birdsong.
    http://www.birdsongradio.com
    I think this must be the radio station I tuned into one while out in the car. My husband and I were looking at each other, saying, “Where’s all that song coming from here?” It was very realistic.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  76. Hi Jo!
    Lovely post. Looking forward to your SECRET WEDDING!
    I’ve been fortunate to visit England a number of times. We were mostly in London, which is wonderful, but once my DH was interviewing for a position in Swindon. So we took the train out and then rented a car (What were we thinking? Driving on the wrong side of the road was more adventure than this American cared for!) to explore Wiltshire. Amesbury and the Chalk Horse country is amazing.
    Thanks for bringing back memories of the English countryside!

    Reply
  77. Hi Jo!
    Lovely post. Looking forward to your SECRET WEDDING!
    I’ve been fortunate to visit England a number of times. We were mostly in London, which is wonderful, but once my DH was interviewing for a position in Swindon. So we took the train out and then rented a car (What were we thinking? Driving on the wrong side of the road was more adventure than this American cared for!) to explore Wiltshire. Amesbury and the Chalk Horse country is amazing.
    Thanks for bringing back memories of the English countryside!

    Reply
  78. Hi Jo!
    Lovely post. Looking forward to your SECRET WEDDING!
    I’ve been fortunate to visit England a number of times. We were mostly in London, which is wonderful, but once my DH was interviewing for a position in Swindon. So we took the train out and then rented a car (What were we thinking? Driving on the wrong side of the road was more adventure than this American cared for!) to explore Wiltshire. Amesbury and the Chalk Horse country is amazing.
    Thanks for bringing back memories of the English countryside!

    Reply
  79. Hi Jo!
    Lovely post. Looking forward to your SECRET WEDDING!
    I’ve been fortunate to visit England a number of times. We were mostly in London, which is wonderful, but once my DH was interviewing for a position in Swindon. So we took the train out and then rented a car (What were we thinking? Driving on the wrong side of the road was more adventure than this American cared for!) to explore Wiltshire. Amesbury and the Chalk Horse country is amazing.
    Thanks for bringing back memories of the English countryside!

    Reply
  80. Hi Jo!
    Lovely post. Looking forward to your SECRET WEDDING!
    I’ve been fortunate to visit England a number of times. We were mostly in London, which is wonderful, but once my DH was interviewing for a position in Swindon. So we took the train out and then rented a car (What were we thinking? Driving on the wrong side of the road was more adventure than this American cared for!) to explore Wiltshire. Amesbury and the Chalk Horse country is amazing.
    Thanks for bringing back memories of the English countryside!

    Reply
  81. I visited England in 1972 with a college group, and saw Stratford, London, and the lake District, also one day in Edinburgh and one in Blackpool. If I could visit again, I would love to tour some of the National Trust homes, and the art museums. Any historic site would be great- like most Americans, I am in awe of the great age of things in Britain- I stood on Hadrian’s Wall and got goosebumps thinking,”A Roman Soldier stood Here”!!!

    Reply
  82. I visited England in 1972 with a college group, and saw Stratford, London, and the lake District, also one day in Edinburgh and one in Blackpool. If I could visit again, I would love to tour some of the National Trust homes, and the art museums. Any historic site would be great- like most Americans, I am in awe of the great age of things in Britain- I stood on Hadrian’s Wall and got goosebumps thinking,”A Roman Soldier stood Here”!!!

    Reply
  83. I visited England in 1972 with a college group, and saw Stratford, London, and the lake District, also one day in Edinburgh and one in Blackpool. If I could visit again, I would love to tour some of the National Trust homes, and the art museums. Any historic site would be great- like most Americans, I am in awe of the great age of things in Britain- I stood on Hadrian’s Wall and got goosebumps thinking,”A Roman Soldier stood Here”!!!

    Reply
  84. I visited England in 1972 with a college group, and saw Stratford, London, and the lake District, also one day in Edinburgh and one in Blackpool. If I could visit again, I would love to tour some of the National Trust homes, and the art museums. Any historic site would be great- like most Americans, I am in awe of the great age of things in Britain- I stood on Hadrian’s Wall and got goosebumps thinking,”A Roman Soldier stood Here”!!!

    Reply
  85. I visited England in 1972 with a college group, and saw Stratford, London, and the lake District, also one day in Edinburgh and one in Blackpool. If I could visit again, I would love to tour some of the National Trust homes, and the art museums. Any historic site would be great- like most Americans, I am in awe of the great age of things in Britain- I stood on Hadrian’s Wall and got goosebumps thinking,”A Roman Soldier stood Here”!!!

    Reply
  86. Thanks for the pictures and shaking up my memory, Jo!
    I’ve been to England (and Scotland and Wales) several times and cannot wait to go there again.
    I find it very hard to choose a specific spot, but I did like Devon myself, better than Cornwall actually, although I cannot explain why.
    And so many places have stories and memories attached to them. E.g. I had lunch in Lyme Regis in a small restaurant and the owner/cook/waiter had a more than strong resemblance to John Cleese in Fawlty Towers, both in appearance and behaviour, so that was fun to say the least…
    But the place that comes to mind first is the New Forest, where my husband and I ended up at dawn once, in a small valley with a river, and moments later a herd of horses came to have breakfast there. It was pure magic…

    Reply
  87. Thanks for the pictures and shaking up my memory, Jo!
    I’ve been to England (and Scotland and Wales) several times and cannot wait to go there again.
    I find it very hard to choose a specific spot, but I did like Devon myself, better than Cornwall actually, although I cannot explain why.
    And so many places have stories and memories attached to them. E.g. I had lunch in Lyme Regis in a small restaurant and the owner/cook/waiter had a more than strong resemblance to John Cleese in Fawlty Towers, both in appearance and behaviour, so that was fun to say the least…
    But the place that comes to mind first is the New Forest, where my husband and I ended up at dawn once, in a small valley with a river, and moments later a herd of horses came to have breakfast there. It was pure magic…

    Reply
  88. Thanks for the pictures and shaking up my memory, Jo!
    I’ve been to England (and Scotland and Wales) several times and cannot wait to go there again.
    I find it very hard to choose a specific spot, but I did like Devon myself, better than Cornwall actually, although I cannot explain why.
    And so many places have stories and memories attached to them. E.g. I had lunch in Lyme Regis in a small restaurant and the owner/cook/waiter had a more than strong resemblance to John Cleese in Fawlty Towers, both in appearance and behaviour, so that was fun to say the least…
    But the place that comes to mind first is the New Forest, where my husband and I ended up at dawn once, in a small valley with a river, and moments later a herd of horses came to have breakfast there. It was pure magic…

    Reply
  89. Thanks for the pictures and shaking up my memory, Jo!
    I’ve been to England (and Scotland and Wales) several times and cannot wait to go there again.
    I find it very hard to choose a specific spot, but I did like Devon myself, better than Cornwall actually, although I cannot explain why.
    And so many places have stories and memories attached to them. E.g. I had lunch in Lyme Regis in a small restaurant and the owner/cook/waiter had a more than strong resemblance to John Cleese in Fawlty Towers, both in appearance and behaviour, so that was fun to say the least…
    But the place that comes to mind first is the New Forest, where my husband and I ended up at dawn once, in a small valley with a river, and moments later a herd of horses came to have breakfast there. It was pure magic…

    Reply
  90. Thanks for the pictures and shaking up my memory, Jo!
    I’ve been to England (and Scotland and Wales) several times and cannot wait to go there again.
    I find it very hard to choose a specific spot, but I did like Devon myself, better than Cornwall actually, although I cannot explain why.
    And so many places have stories and memories attached to them. E.g. I had lunch in Lyme Regis in a small restaurant and the owner/cook/waiter had a more than strong resemblance to John Cleese in Fawlty Towers, both in appearance and behaviour, so that was fun to say the least…
    But the place that comes to mind first is the New Forest, where my husband and I ended up at dawn once, in a small valley with a river, and moments later a herd of horses came to have breakfast there. It was pure magic…

    Reply
  91. I’ve never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to go there some day; maybe after my kids are finished with college. I’ve got 6 years until the yougest one is done. I wouldn’t even know where to begin a trip. I have a map so I can see the locations of the places about which I’m reading. Even the names are magical.

    Reply
  92. I’ve never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to go there some day; maybe after my kids are finished with college. I’ve got 6 years until the yougest one is done. I wouldn’t even know where to begin a trip. I have a map so I can see the locations of the places about which I’m reading. Even the names are magical.

    Reply
  93. I’ve never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to go there some day; maybe after my kids are finished with college. I’ve got 6 years until the yougest one is done. I wouldn’t even know where to begin a trip. I have a map so I can see the locations of the places about which I’m reading. Even the names are magical.

    Reply
  94. I’ve never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to go there some day; maybe after my kids are finished with college. I’ve got 6 years until the yougest one is done. I wouldn’t even know where to begin a trip. I have a map so I can see the locations of the places about which I’m reading. Even the names are magical.

    Reply
  95. I’ve never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to go there some day; maybe after my kids are finished with college. I’ve got 6 years until the yougest one is done. I wouldn’t even know where to begin a trip. I have a map so I can see the locations of the places about which I’m reading. Even the names are magical.

    Reply
  96. Abbotsbury is in Dorset, not terribly far from Dorchester (and an easy distance from Lyme Regis). My husband’s family are from that area and we return whenever we can.
    I particularly love Devon at just this season, when the primroses are blooming and the apple orchards are glowing pink. I was at school in Exeter and loved boating down the River Ex to Exmouth in summertime. But really I love all of Devon…and lots of the rest of Britain as well!

    Reply
  97. Abbotsbury is in Dorset, not terribly far from Dorchester (and an easy distance from Lyme Regis). My husband’s family are from that area and we return whenever we can.
    I particularly love Devon at just this season, when the primroses are blooming and the apple orchards are glowing pink. I was at school in Exeter and loved boating down the River Ex to Exmouth in summertime. But really I love all of Devon…and lots of the rest of Britain as well!

    Reply
  98. Abbotsbury is in Dorset, not terribly far from Dorchester (and an easy distance from Lyme Regis). My husband’s family are from that area and we return whenever we can.
    I particularly love Devon at just this season, when the primroses are blooming and the apple orchards are glowing pink. I was at school in Exeter and loved boating down the River Ex to Exmouth in summertime. But really I love all of Devon…and lots of the rest of Britain as well!

    Reply
  99. Abbotsbury is in Dorset, not terribly far from Dorchester (and an easy distance from Lyme Regis). My husband’s family are from that area and we return whenever we can.
    I particularly love Devon at just this season, when the primroses are blooming and the apple orchards are glowing pink. I was at school in Exeter and loved boating down the River Ex to Exmouth in summertime. But really I love all of Devon…and lots of the rest of Britain as well!

    Reply
  100. Abbotsbury is in Dorset, not terribly far from Dorchester (and an easy distance from Lyme Regis). My husband’s family are from that area and we return whenever we can.
    I particularly love Devon at just this season, when the primroses are blooming and the apple orchards are glowing pink. I was at school in Exeter and loved boating down the River Ex to Exmouth in summertime. But really I love all of Devon…and lots of the rest of Britain as well!

    Reply
  101. Visited England and Scotland in the late 70s. Dearly like to return.
    Enjoyed your pictures and comments.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  102. Visited England and Scotland in the late 70s. Dearly like to return.
    Enjoyed your pictures and comments.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  103. Visited England and Scotland in the late 70s. Dearly like to return.
    Enjoyed your pictures and comments.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  104. Visited England and Scotland in the late 70s. Dearly like to return.
    Enjoyed your pictures and comments.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  105. Visited England and Scotland in the late 70s. Dearly like to return.
    Enjoyed your pictures and comments.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  106. I am going to England for the first time in May. We will spend most of our time in London, but we do plan a couple of trips outside of town. We are going to the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Warwick Castle.

    Reply
  107. I am going to England for the first time in May. We will spend most of our time in London, but we do plan a couple of trips outside of town. We are going to the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Warwick Castle.

    Reply
  108. I am going to England for the first time in May. We will spend most of our time in London, but we do plan a couple of trips outside of town. We are going to the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Warwick Castle.

    Reply
  109. I am going to England for the first time in May. We will spend most of our time in London, but we do plan a couple of trips outside of town. We are going to the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Warwick Castle.

    Reply
  110. I am going to England for the first time in May. We will spend most of our time in London, but we do plan a couple of trips outside of town. We are going to the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Warwick Castle.

    Reply
  111. If you haven’t already done so, have a look at Topsham, which is close to Dawlish. Quite an odd little town with a lot of Dutch influence from the traders who used to put into port there. Some super birdwatching there too, if that interests you??? I actually live up in Leicestershire, about 45 minutes away from Stratford upon Avon, but if you really want ‘Olde England’, I think our most unspoilt towns and villages where your heroines could reside are in Suffolk.
    Enjoy your stay in good old Blighty!

    Reply
  112. If you haven’t already done so, have a look at Topsham, which is close to Dawlish. Quite an odd little town with a lot of Dutch influence from the traders who used to put into port there. Some super birdwatching there too, if that interests you??? I actually live up in Leicestershire, about 45 minutes away from Stratford upon Avon, but if you really want ‘Olde England’, I think our most unspoilt towns and villages where your heroines could reside are in Suffolk.
    Enjoy your stay in good old Blighty!

    Reply
  113. If you haven’t already done so, have a look at Topsham, which is close to Dawlish. Quite an odd little town with a lot of Dutch influence from the traders who used to put into port there. Some super birdwatching there too, if that interests you??? I actually live up in Leicestershire, about 45 minutes away from Stratford upon Avon, but if you really want ‘Olde England’, I think our most unspoilt towns and villages where your heroines could reside are in Suffolk.
    Enjoy your stay in good old Blighty!

    Reply
  114. If you haven’t already done so, have a look at Topsham, which is close to Dawlish. Quite an odd little town with a lot of Dutch influence from the traders who used to put into port there. Some super birdwatching there too, if that interests you??? I actually live up in Leicestershire, about 45 minutes away from Stratford upon Avon, but if you really want ‘Olde England’, I think our most unspoilt towns and villages where your heroines could reside are in Suffolk.
    Enjoy your stay in good old Blighty!

    Reply
  115. If you haven’t already done so, have a look at Topsham, which is close to Dawlish. Quite an odd little town with a lot of Dutch influence from the traders who used to put into port there. Some super birdwatching there too, if that interests you??? I actually live up in Leicestershire, about 45 minutes away from Stratford upon Avon, but if you really want ‘Olde England’, I think our most unspoilt towns and villages where your heroines could reside are in Suffolk.
    Enjoy your stay in good old Blighty!

    Reply
  116. I lived in Manchester in the mid-90s (as a student) and quite liked the area too – I would love to go back to see the changes in the city, which are supposed to be quite extensive. I have travelled all over the UK and have many favourite places, but if I could settle somewhere it would be in York. I love that city! The cathedral is beautiful and Yorkshire itself is lovely too….
    I am not an expert on row houses, but we have them here in Austria too so I guess it is the same in the UK. So… there is usually a fire wall between the two houses. And usually they are built by a company and then sold, so it would be unusal to add to the row! Aparently people love to live in detached houses (ie regular houses), but apparently semi-detatched (two houses build together) and row houses are just cheaper. Except for the Georgian and Victorian row houses which are beautiful inside. If you ever get to Bath, it si possible to visit one of the houses (I think in the Royal Crescent) – I just checked and here is the link to the virtual tour:
    http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/index.php?id=23
    hope it works. Enjoy!

    Reply
  117. I lived in Manchester in the mid-90s (as a student) and quite liked the area too – I would love to go back to see the changes in the city, which are supposed to be quite extensive. I have travelled all over the UK and have many favourite places, but if I could settle somewhere it would be in York. I love that city! The cathedral is beautiful and Yorkshire itself is lovely too….
    I am not an expert on row houses, but we have them here in Austria too so I guess it is the same in the UK. So… there is usually a fire wall between the two houses. And usually they are built by a company and then sold, so it would be unusal to add to the row! Aparently people love to live in detached houses (ie regular houses), but apparently semi-detatched (two houses build together) and row houses are just cheaper. Except for the Georgian and Victorian row houses which are beautiful inside. If you ever get to Bath, it si possible to visit one of the houses (I think in the Royal Crescent) – I just checked and here is the link to the virtual tour:
    http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/index.php?id=23
    hope it works. Enjoy!

    Reply
  118. I lived in Manchester in the mid-90s (as a student) and quite liked the area too – I would love to go back to see the changes in the city, which are supposed to be quite extensive. I have travelled all over the UK and have many favourite places, but if I could settle somewhere it would be in York. I love that city! The cathedral is beautiful and Yorkshire itself is lovely too….
    I am not an expert on row houses, but we have them here in Austria too so I guess it is the same in the UK. So… there is usually a fire wall between the two houses. And usually they are built by a company and then sold, so it would be unusal to add to the row! Aparently people love to live in detached houses (ie regular houses), but apparently semi-detatched (two houses build together) and row houses are just cheaper. Except for the Georgian and Victorian row houses which are beautiful inside. If you ever get to Bath, it si possible to visit one of the houses (I think in the Royal Crescent) – I just checked and here is the link to the virtual tour:
    http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/index.php?id=23
    hope it works. Enjoy!

    Reply
  119. I lived in Manchester in the mid-90s (as a student) and quite liked the area too – I would love to go back to see the changes in the city, which are supposed to be quite extensive. I have travelled all over the UK and have many favourite places, but if I could settle somewhere it would be in York. I love that city! The cathedral is beautiful and Yorkshire itself is lovely too….
    I am not an expert on row houses, but we have them here in Austria too so I guess it is the same in the UK. So… there is usually a fire wall between the two houses. And usually they are built by a company and then sold, so it would be unusal to add to the row! Aparently people love to live in detached houses (ie regular houses), but apparently semi-detatched (two houses build together) and row houses are just cheaper. Except for the Georgian and Victorian row houses which are beautiful inside. If you ever get to Bath, it si possible to visit one of the houses (I think in the Royal Crescent) – I just checked and here is the link to the virtual tour:
    http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/index.php?id=23
    hope it works. Enjoy!

    Reply
  120. I lived in Manchester in the mid-90s (as a student) and quite liked the area too – I would love to go back to see the changes in the city, which are supposed to be quite extensive. I have travelled all over the UK and have many favourite places, but if I could settle somewhere it would be in York. I love that city! The cathedral is beautiful and Yorkshire itself is lovely too….
    I am not an expert on row houses, but we have them here in Austria too so I guess it is the same in the UK. So… there is usually a fire wall between the two houses. And usually they are built by a company and then sold, so it would be unusal to add to the row! Aparently people love to live in detached houses (ie regular houses), but apparently semi-detatched (two houses build together) and row houses are just cheaper. Except for the Georgian and Victorian row houses which are beautiful inside. If you ever get to Bath, it si possible to visit one of the houses (I think in the Royal Crescent) – I just checked and here is the link to the virtual tour:
    http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/index.php?id=23
    hope it works. Enjoy!

    Reply
  121. I was there briefly, for just 4 days, when my husband was in London on business. Since our hotel was on Park Lane by Hyde Park, I wandered all over the Pickadilly Circus area, road the underground to the BM and 221B Bakers St museum. I did take a day trip to Bth and Stonehenge, but was violently ill from something I ate and didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I’d go back in a heartbeat, especially if I could stay for a couple weeks!

    Reply
  122. I was there briefly, for just 4 days, when my husband was in London on business. Since our hotel was on Park Lane by Hyde Park, I wandered all over the Pickadilly Circus area, road the underground to the BM and 221B Bakers St museum. I did take a day trip to Bth and Stonehenge, but was violently ill from something I ate and didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I’d go back in a heartbeat, especially if I could stay for a couple weeks!

    Reply
  123. I was there briefly, for just 4 days, when my husband was in London on business. Since our hotel was on Park Lane by Hyde Park, I wandered all over the Pickadilly Circus area, road the underground to the BM and 221B Bakers St museum. I did take a day trip to Bth and Stonehenge, but was violently ill from something I ate and didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I’d go back in a heartbeat, especially if I could stay for a couple weeks!

    Reply
  124. I was there briefly, for just 4 days, when my husband was in London on business. Since our hotel was on Park Lane by Hyde Park, I wandered all over the Pickadilly Circus area, road the underground to the BM and 221B Bakers St museum. I did take a day trip to Bth and Stonehenge, but was violently ill from something I ate and didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I’d go back in a heartbeat, especially if I could stay for a couple weeks!

    Reply
  125. I was there briefly, for just 4 days, when my husband was in London on business. Since our hotel was on Park Lane by Hyde Park, I wandered all over the Pickadilly Circus area, road the underground to the BM and 221B Bakers St museum. I did take a day trip to Bth and Stonehenge, but was violently ill from something I ate and didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I’d go back in a heartbeat, especially if I could stay for a couple weeks!

    Reply
  126. “oh to be in England” etc etc. I was born and raised In Crewe in Cheshire but now live in Vancouver. I like to get back as often as I can, any excuse, next one is my new neice or nephew and when I go I like to travel to a place thats special to me from my childhood (Dawlish is one, very happy memories of summer camping) I also like to try and discover new places especially if I have read about them in books. My fave spots are Delamere Forest and Chester. Enjoy your self and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  127. “oh to be in England” etc etc. I was born and raised In Crewe in Cheshire but now live in Vancouver. I like to get back as often as I can, any excuse, next one is my new neice or nephew and when I go I like to travel to a place thats special to me from my childhood (Dawlish is one, very happy memories of summer camping) I also like to try and discover new places especially if I have read about them in books. My fave spots are Delamere Forest and Chester. Enjoy your self and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  128. “oh to be in England” etc etc. I was born and raised In Crewe in Cheshire but now live in Vancouver. I like to get back as often as I can, any excuse, next one is my new neice or nephew and when I go I like to travel to a place thats special to me from my childhood (Dawlish is one, very happy memories of summer camping) I also like to try and discover new places especially if I have read about them in books. My fave spots are Delamere Forest and Chester. Enjoy your self and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  129. “oh to be in England” etc etc. I was born and raised In Crewe in Cheshire but now live in Vancouver. I like to get back as often as I can, any excuse, next one is my new neice or nephew and when I go I like to travel to a place thats special to me from my childhood (Dawlish is one, very happy memories of summer camping) I also like to try and discover new places especially if I have read about them in books. My fave spots are Delamere Forest and Chester. Enjoy your self and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  130. “oh to be in England” etc etc. I was born and raised In Crewe in Cheshire but now live in Vancouver. I like to get back as often as I can, any excuse, next one is my new neice or nephew and when I go I like to travel to a place thats special to me from my childhood (Dawlish is one, very happy memories of summer camping) I also like to try and discover new places especially if I have read about them in books. My fave spots are Delamere Forest and Chester. Enjoy your self and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  131. North Devon is the most beautiful part of England (in my opinion). I lived in Barnstaple for 3 years and every weekend there would be a new village to explore and pub to eat Sunday lunch in. Sunday lunch is something I really miss on this side of the Atlantic. A big meal of roast something (lamb is my favourite)with a lovely pud! (pudding aka afters aka dessert over here). It would last a good two hours and you would be full up ’til bedtime.

    Reply
  132. North Devon is the most beautiful part of England (in my opinion). I lived in Barnstaple for 3 years and every weekend there would be a new village to explore and pub to eat Sunday lunch in. Sunday lunch is something I really miss on this side of the Atlantic. A big meal of roast something (lamb is my favourite)with a lovely pud! (pudding aka afters aka dessert over here). It would last a good two hours and you would be full up ’til bedtime.

    Reply
  133. North Devon is the most beautiful part of England (in my opinion). I lived in Barnstaple for 3 years and every weekend there would be a new village to explore and pub to eat Sunday lunch in. Sunday lunch is something I really miss on this side of the Atlantic. A big meal of roast something (lamb is my favourite)with a lovely pud! (pudding aka afters aka dessert over here). It would last a good two hours and you would be full up ’til bedtime.

    Reply
  134. North Devon is the most beautiful part of England (in my opinion). I lived in Barnstaple for 3 years and every weekend there would be a new village to explore and pub to eat Sunday lunch in. Sunday lunch is something I really miss on this side of the Atlantic. A big meal of roast something (lamb is my favourite)with a lovely pud! (pudding aka afters aka dessert over here). It would last a good two hours and you would be full up ’til bedtime.

    Reply
  135. North Devon is the most beautiful part of England (in my opinion). I lived in Barnstaple for 3 years and every weekend there would be a new village to explore and pub to eat Sunday lunch in. Sunday lunch is something I really miss on this side of the Atlantic. A big meal of roast something (lamb is my favourite)with a lovely pud! (pudding aka afters aka dessert over here). It would last a good two hours and you would be full up ’til bedtime.

    Reply
  136. I lived in North Yorkshire for 5 years and have to say the city of York is one of my favorite in the whole world. Just before we left in 2006, we saw the quadrennial (I think) performance of the medieval mystery plays there–it was awesome, particularly in that setting.
    I had to laugh, though, at the official correction from the TV licensing authority. During our 5 years there, we did not own a British TV, only an American one, for playing DVDs and tapes, and so were incapable of receiving a British TV signal. However, we were HOUNDED and threatened on a regular basis by the TVLA, who “knew” that we “must” have a TV that we weren’t reporting, and if only we would come clean they would forgive us …

    Reply
  137. I lived in North Yorkshire for 5 years and have to say the city of York is one of my favorite in the whole world. Just before we left in 2006, we saw the quadrennial (I think) performance of the medieval mystery plays there–it was awesome, particularly in that setting.
    I had to laugh, though, at the official correction from the TV licensing authority. During our 5 years there, we did not own a British TV, only an American one, for playing DVDs and tapes, and so were incapable of receiving a British TV signal. However, we were HOUNDED and threatened on a regular basis by the TVLA, who “knew” that we “must” have a TV that we weren’t reporting, and if only we would come clean they would forgive us …

    Reply
  138. I lived in North Yorkshire for 5 years and have to say the city of York is one of my favorite in the whole world. Just before we left in 2006, we saw the quadrennial (I think) performance of the medieval mystery plays there–it was awesome, particularly in that setting.
    I had to laugh, though, at the official correction from the TV licensing authority. During our 5 years there, we did not own a British TV, only an American one, for playing DVDs and tapes, and so were incapable of receiving a British TV signal. However, we were HOUNDED and threatened on a regular basis by the TVLA, who “knew” that we “must” have a TV that we weren’t reporting, and if only we would come clean they would forgive us …

    Reply
  139. I lived in North Yorkshire for 5 years and have to say the city of York is one of my favorite in the whole world. Just before we left in 2006, we saw the quadrennial (I think) performance of the medieval mystery plays there–it was awesome, particularly in that setting.
    I had to laugh, though, at the official correction from the TV licensing authority. During our 5 years there, we did not own a British TV, only an American one, for playing DVDs and tapes, and so were incapable of receiving a British TV signal. However, we were HOUNDED and threatened on a regular basis by the TVLA, who “knew” that we “must” have a TV that we weren’t reporting, and if only we would come clean they would forgive us …

    Reply
  140. I lived in North Yorkshire for 5 years and have to say the city of York is one of my favorite in the whole world. Just before we left in 2006, we saw the quadrennial (I think) performance of the medieval mystery plays there–it was awesome, particularly in that setting.
    I had to laugh, though, at the official correction from the TV licensing authority. During our 5 years there, we did not own a British TV, only an American one, for playing DVDs and tapes, and so were incapable of receiving a British TV signal. However, we were HOUNDED and threatened on a regular basis by the TVLA, who “knew” that we “must” have a TV that we weren’t reporting, and if only we would come clean they would forgive us …

    Reply
  141. Jo: I have long wanted to visit the Rhododendrons in Essex — is that the garden? shoot, my memory is going.:-) I loved the bit about “Yesterday will return …”. It made me think of a highway sign here in San Diego (now unfortunately replaced). It said “Cruise Ships use Airport Exit”. I always though of large cruise ships moving down the highway and trying to exit gracefully to go to the airport. The mind is a wondrous thing.
    I’m reading The Secret Wedding on my Kindle. Great to have it delivered automatically 🙂
    Wishing you best of luck on finding the right place for you.

    Reply
  142. Jo: I have long wanted to visit the Rhododendrons in Essex — is that the garden? shoot, my memory is going.:-) I loved the bit about “Yesterday will return …”. It made me think of a highway sign here in San Diego (now unfortunately replaced). It said “Cruise Ships use Airport Exit”. I always though of large cruise ships moving down the highway and trying to exit gracefully to go to the airport. The mind is a wondrous thing.
    I’m reading The Secret Wedding on my Kindle. Great to have it delivered automatically 🙂
    Wishing you best of luck on finding the right place for you.

    Reply
  143. Jo: I have long wanted to visit the Rhododendrons in Essex — is that the garden? shoot, my memory is going.:-) I loved the bit about “Yesterday will return …”. It made me think of a highway sign here in San Diego (now unfortunately replaced). It said “Cruise Ships use Airport Exit”. I always though of large cruise ships moving down the highway and trying to exit gracefully to go to the airport. The mind is a wondrous thing.
    I’m reading The Secret Wedding on my Kindle. Great to have it delivered automatically 🙂
    Wishing you best of luck on finding the right place for you.

    Reply
  144. Jo: I have long wanted to visit the Rhododendrons in Essex — is that the garden? shoot, my memory is going.:-) I loved the bit about “Yesterday will return …”. It made me think of a highway sign here in San Diego (now unfortunately replaced). It said “Cruise Ships use Airport Exit”. I always though of large cruise ships moving down the highway and trying to exit gracefully to go to the airport. The mind is a wondrous thing.
    I’m reading The Secret Wedding on my Kindle. Great to have it delivered automatically 🙂
    Wishing you best of luck on finding the right place for you.

    Reply
  145. Jo: I have long wanted to visit the Rhododendrons in Essex — is that the garden? shoot, my memory is going.:-) I loved the bit about “Yesterday will return …”. It made me think of a highway sign here in San Diego (now unfortunately replaced). It said “Cruise Ships use Airport Exit”. I always though of large cruise ships moving down the highway and trying to exit gracefully to go to the airport. The mind is a wondrous thing.
    I’m reading The Secret Wedding on my Kindle. Great to have it delivered automatically 🙂
    Wishing you best of luck on finding the right place for you.

    Reply

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