Happy Victoria Day, Canada

Word Wenches has created a monster. I promise, I won’t be posting this much normally, but having mentioned Victoria Day below, I can’t leave it at that.
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I’ve copied this from the tourism site of Victoria, British Columbia, but this is a national holiday, not a local one*.

“Victoria Day is celebrated in Canada on a Monday on or prior to May 24th. It is the official celebration of the birthdays of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II. Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India, was born on May 24th, 1819. She ascended the throne after the death of her uncle George IV, in 1837, when she was only 18. She ruled until her death in 1901, when her son Edward VII became king of England.

Victoria Day was established as a holiday in Canada West (now Ontario) in 1845, and became a national holiday in 1901. Before Victoria Day became a national holiday, people celebrated Empire Day, beginning in the 1890’s as Victoria approached her Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The City of Victoria celebrates its namesake with an annual Victoria Day parade. The Victoria Day Parade is one of the largest parades in the Pacific Northwest and features floats and marching bands from across British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. Afterwards, family picnics or afternoon teas are common.”

Unfortunately, after a week of glorious weather, it’s absolutely chucking it down here.

*When we came to Canada in 1976, we were living in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Just after we’d arrived, the papers were full of plans for Natal Day. Now I was befuddled as to why Halifax should be making such a fuss about a small part of South Africa.

I quote from Wikipedia.
“KwaZulu-Natal, often referred to as “KZN”, is a province of South Africa. Prior to 1994 the territory now known as KwaZulu-Natal was made up of the province of Natal and the Bantustan of KwaZulu. Early on the region was called Natalia and later named the Natal Colony. It is called the garden province and is the home of the Zulu nation. It extends from the borders with Swaziland and Mozambique to the Eastern Cape in the south. Inland it is bound by the Kingdom of Lesotho, and the Free State and Mpumalanga provinces.”
Read the whole article here.

It was, of course, the birthday celebration of Halifax and adjointing Dartmouth. A good time was had by all.

That’s one of the joys of language, isn’t it? Nuance and expectation can change everything.

Jo, who really is going to work now, holiday or no holiday.

12 thoughts on “Happy Victoria Day, Canada”

  1. Happy Victoria Day to Jo and all Canadians out there! I got a good laugh out of Natal Day. I’d’ve probably thought the same thing: “yes, it’s a commonwealth, but why is Canada celebrating a particular South African province?” Words are wonderful–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. Happy Victoria Day to Jo and all Canadians out there! I got a good laugh out of Natal Day. I’d’ve probably thought the same thing: “yes, it’s a commonwealth, but why is Canada celebrating a particular South African province?” Words are wonderful–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. Happy Victoria Day to Jo and all Canadians out there! I got a good laugh out of Natal Day. I’d’ve probably thought the same thing: “yes, it’s a commonwealth, but why is Canada celebrating a particular South African province?” Words are wonderful–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. Ah, I had to think about that one. Didn’t quite make the connection with Natal day and Birthday until the second read. Should have, though. I’ve had four rounds of pre-natal care so it should have clicked. Hmm… maybe that’s WHY it didn’t.

    Reply
  5. Ah, I had to think about that one. Didn’t quite make the connection with Natal day and Birthday until the second read. Should have, though. I’ve had four rounds of pre-natal care so it should have clicked. Hmm… maybe that’s WHY it didn’t.

    Reply
  6. Ah, I had to think about that one. Didn’t quite make the connection with Natal day and Birthday until the second read. Should have, though. I’ve had four rounds of pre-natal care so it should have clicked. Hmm… maybe that’s WHY it didn’t.

    Reply
  7. Yeah, in my part of Canada, it wasn’t raining but it was cold with lows hovering around freezing and highs about 40. I live in another place with a famous British name: London, ON, about half-way between Detroit and Toronto. The southernmost point in the country is not far from her at Pelee but you wouldn’t have thought that for the last week or so. Temperatures are supposed to be on their way up later today with a high of close to 80 sometime this week. I know some US areas are very similar to ours. It’s usually just a little warmer across Lake Erie from us in Cleveland or west in Detroit.
    I read books by most of you so I’m glad I finally found this blog. As you see, I’m a verbose commenter. But since I live alone and don’t get out much and nobody I know loves books and history as much as I do, I need to “talk” to people who love books. I see I’ve finally found Susan King again. When did you acquire a pseudonym? Must check into that. I’m still short one of your King books.
    The only one I haven’t read is Miranda/Susan. But I’ve been eyeing the Sarah Churchill book. I’m definitely a history buff and started reading historical novels rather than romances.
    I really enjoyed your bit on health and childbirth. I wish I could have seen Dürer’s picture more clearly. He’s always been one of my favorites and I visited the museum devoted mostly to his work in Nürnberg while I lived in Germany.
    Anyway, goodnight for now. It’s 0310 EST for me. Have a good day writing, everybody and it’s really nice to see you back, Loretta. I don’t know if I’ve totally caught up with all your books but I know I have at least 2 of the latest. My move in November threw all kinds of monkey-wrenches at me and my books. So I’m not sure what I have.

    Reply
  8. Yeah, in my part of Canada, it wasn’t raining but it was cold with lows hovering around freezing and highs about 40. I live in another place with a famous British name: London, ON, about half-way between Detroit and Toronto. The southernmost point in the country is not far from her at Pelee but you wouldn’t have thought that for the last week or so. Temperatures are supposed to be on their way up later today with a high of close to 80 sometime this week. I know some US areas are very similar to ours. It’s usually just a little warmer across Lake Erie from us in Cleveland or west in Detroit.
    I read books by most of you so I’m glad I finally found this blog. As you see, I’m a verbose commenter. But since I live alone and don’t get out much and nobody I know loves books and history as much as I do, I need to “talk” to people who love books. I see I’ve finally found Susan King again. When did you acquire a pseudonym? Must check into that. I’m still short one of your King books.
    The only one I haven’t read is Miranda/Susan. But I’ve been eyeing the Sarah Churchill book. I’m definitely a history buff and started reading historical novels rather than romances.
    I really enjoyed your bit on health and childbirth. I wish I could have seen Dürer’s picture more clearly. He’s always been one of my favorites and I visited the museum devoted mostly to his work in Nürnberg while I lived in Germany.
    Anyway, goodnight for now. It’s 0310 EST for me. Have a good day writing, everybody and it’s really nice to see you back, Loretta. I don’t know if I’ve totally caught up with all your books but I know I have at least 2 of the latest. My move in November threw all kinds of monkey-wrenches at me and my books. So I’m not sure what I have.

    Reply
  9. Yeah, in my part of Canada, it wasn’t raining but it was cold with lows hovering around freezing and highs about 40. I live in another place with a famous British name: London, ON, about half-way between Detroit and Toronto. The southernmost point in the country is not far from her at Pelee but you wouldn’t have thought that for the last week or so. Temperatures are supposed to be on their way up later today with a high of close to 80 sometime this week. I know some US areas are very similar to ours. It’s usually just a little warmer across Lake Erie from us in Cleveland or west in Detroit.
    I read books by most of you so I’m glad I finally found this blog. As you see, I’m a verbose commenter. But since I live alone and don’t get out much and nobody I know loves books and history as much as I do, I need to “talk” to people who love books. I see I’ve finally found Susan King again. When did you acquire a pseudonym? Must check into that. I’m still short one of your King books.
    The only one I haven’t read is Miranda/Susan. But I’ve been eyeing the Sarah Churchill book. I’m definitely a history buff and started reading historical novels rather than romances.
    I really enjoyed your bit on health and childbirth. I wish I could have seen Dürer’s picture more clearly. He’s always been one of my favorites and I visited the museum devoted mostly to his work in Nürnberg while I lived in Germany.
    Anyway, goodnight for now. It’s 0310 EST for me. Have a good day writing, everybody and it’s really nice to see you back, Loretta. I don’t know if I’ve totally caught up with all your books but I know I have at least 2 of the latest. My move in November threw all kinds of monkey-wrenches at me and my books. So I’m not sure what I have.

    Reply
  10. “She ascended the throne after the death of her uncle George IV, in 1837, when she was only 18.”
    Oh, is this an alternate universe, where George IV outlived his younger brother who never got to be William IV? 🙂
    As I’m sure we all know, even if the tourism site for Victoria, BC doesn’t, the Prince Regent who became George IV died in 1830, and his younger brother (former Duke of Clarence) became William IV. William IV did indeed die in 1837.
    Andrew

    Reply
  11. “She ascended the throne after the death of her uncle George IV, in 1837, when she was only 18.”
    Oh, is this an alternate universe, where George IV outlived his younger brother who never got to be William IV? 🙂
    As I’m sure we all know, even if the tourism site for Victoria, BC doesn’t, the Prince Regent who became George IV died in 1830, and his younger brother (former Duke of Clarence) became William IV. William IV did indeed die in 1837.
    Andrew

    Reply
  12. “She ascended the throne after the death of her uncle George IV, in 1837, when she was only 18.”
    Oh, is this an alternate universe, where George IV outlived his younger brother who never got to be William IV? 🙂
    As I’m sure we all know, even if the tourism site for Victoria, BC doesn’t, the Prince Regent who became George IV died in 1830, and his younger brother (former Duke of Clarence) became William IV. William IV did indeed die in 1837.
    Andrew

    Reply

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