Happy New Year!

Edith_layton2

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

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No. I haven’t gotten to the white wine yet.
That’s because †he sun isn’t over the yard-arm yet. I don’t have a boat, but that’s when they say drinking usually starts. But what direction must the boat be facing? It is, I think, a silly designation. One drinks when the occasion is right.
And the moon won’t be up until tonight.
It happens to be New Year’s’ Eve for folks of my persuasion – 5769! It commemorates the day that Mankind was created. This year, it falls on … tonight! It ends October 1st.

It’s interesting to have a New Year in September – or October. It’s an olde calendar, so it’s based on lunar cycles. That’s half the fun – never knowing just when the new year will appear.

I also have a New Year to celebrate at midnight, December 31st. This year it will welcome the arrival of 2009. It arrives on the same day every year because it’s based on a solar calendar.

So I celebrate both.
One New Year is for assessing your past year, admitting your mistakes and thanking the Creator for letting you make it so far, even so.
It’s also for asking for forgiveness, remembering old friends, repenting your sins and mistakes, praying a lot for mercy and courage, and vowing to do better in the new year.
And it’s a time for blowing horns, and dancing and drinking.

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The same thing happens at the Jewish New Year too, except it goes on for days, and you repent and fast for a day, and then eat a lot the rest of the time.
And blow horns and dance and drink.

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But one New Year comes when the world here on the East Coast of the U. S. of A. is usually barren and frozen. And the other comes at harvest time.
Both make sense in their timing.

Lots of things start in the autumn. The seeds and fruit that ripen and fall in the autumn go into the ground to wait for spring. Even as things seem to be dying, there will be a rebirth. And many things are brewing under the snow in the winter around here, sleeping until spring. Even as the world seems forsaken by life, it will be reborn. So both holidays celebrate Hope. And both new years’ observances are for celebrating life, being grateful for it, and noting the passage of Time.

So what’s the link betwixt a new year and Fiction?

The world of Fiction defies Time. The world of Historical Fiction lets a reader and writer travel through Time. And the world of Historical Romance allows both reader and writer to revise truth, ignore Time, and create a happier world that exists outside of Time. That’s the lure of it, the core of it, and the joy of it. At least it is for me.

And so just as I celebrate two new years, I realize that I can’t predict what will happen to me or thee in either one, and am forced to contemplate the fact that we are all at the mercy of cosmic forces we can’t fully understand. That’s why I write fiction. And I ‘ll bet that’s why you read it too.

Is it?

So I wish you a gladsome, joyous new year, filled with promise and hope, and the joys of health, wealth, joy and Fiction, whichever one or two or three new years you celebrate.

Wine

…..

L’Shana Tovah!
Happy New Year!

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95 thoughts on “Happy New Year!”

  1. For us teachers, the real new year always begins on the first day of school- August 14 this year. It, too, celebrates hope- and has the same unpredictible forces as the other new year’s days. I never know whether the year will bring joy or despair- whether I will accomplish my goals, or flounder helplessly in the grip of a power I can’t contain. There are always new joys and sorrows, new challenges and triumphs. Each class is a true new beginning- that is the greatest thing about teaching!

    Reply
  2. For us teachers, the real new year always begins on the first day of school- August 14 this year. It, too, celebrates hope- and has the same unpredictible forces as the other new year’s days. I never know whether the year will bring joy or despair- whether I will accomplish my goals, or flounder helplessly in the grip of a power I can’t contain. There are always new joys and sorrows, new challenges and triumphs. Each class is a true new beginning- that is the greatest thing about teaching!

    Reply
  3. For us teachers, the real new year always begins on the first day of school- August 14 this year. It, too, celebrates hope- and has the same unpredictible forces as the other new year’s days. I never know whether the year will bring joy or despair- whether I will accomplish my goals, or flounder helplessly in the grip of a power I can’t contain. There are always new joys and sorrows, new challenges and triumphs. Each class is a true new beginning- that is the greatest thing about teaching!

    Reply
  4. For us teachers, the real new year always begins on the first day of school- August 14 this year. It, too, celebrates hope- and has the same unpredictible forces as the other new year’s days. I never know whether the year will bring joy or despair- whether I will accomplish my goals, or flounder helplessly in the grip of a power I can’t contain. There are always new joys and sorrows, new challenges and triumphs. Each class is a true new beginning- that is the greatest thing about teaching!

    Reply
  5. For us teachers, the real new year always begins on the first day of school- August 14 this year. It, too, celebrates hope- and has the same unpredictible forces as the other new year’s days. I never know whether the year will bring joy or despair- whether I will accomplish my goals, or flounder helplessly in the grip of a power I can’t contain. There are always new joys and sorrows, new challenges and triumphs. Each class is a true new beginning- that is the greatest thing about teaching!

    Reply
  6. Edith, I love New Year’s Day, because it’s like getting out of bed in the morning: a new year (or day) is ahead of you, full of promise for the future. I find that immensely exciting!
    The New Year is a time for reflection on the past, certainly, but more importantly it is a time for looking toward the future, for turning over a new leaf, for anticipating eagerly all that life has to offer. It’s a time for starting new projects, learning new things, reading new books!

    Reply
  7. Edith, I love New Year’s Day, because it’s like getting out of bed in the morning: a new year (or day) is ahead of you, full of promise for the future. I find that immensely exciting!
    The New Year is a time for reflection on the past, certainly, but more importantly it is a time for looking toward the future, for turning over a new leaf, for anticipating eagerly all that life has to offer. It’s a time for starting new projects, learning new things, reading new books!

    Reply
  8. Edith, I love New Year’s Day, because it’s like getting out of bed in the morning: a new year (or day) is ahead of you, full of promise for the future. I find that immensely exciting!
    The New Year is a time for reflection on the past, certainly, but more importantly it is a time for looking toward the future, for turning over a new leaf, for anticipating eagerly all that life has to offer. It’s a time for starting new projects, learning new things, reading new books!

    Reply
  9. Edith, I love New Year’s Day, because it’s like getting out of bed in the morning: a new year (or day) is ahead of you, full of promise for the future. I find that immensely exciting!
    The New Year is a time for reflection on the past, certainly, but more importantly it is a time for looking toward the future, for turning over a new leaf, for anticipating eagerly all that life has to offer. It’s a time for starting new projects, learning new things, reading new books!

    Reply
  10. Edith, I love New Year’s Day, because it’s like getting out of bed in the morning: a new year (or day) is ahead of you, full of promise for the future. I find that immensely exciting!
    The New Year is a time for reflection on the past, certainly, but more importantly it is a time for looking toward the future, for turning over a new leaf, for anticipating eagerly all that life has to offer. It’s a time for starting new projects, learning new things, reading new books!

    Reply
  11. And a Happy New Year to you and your family, Edith!
    Let’s see, we have the Common Era New Year January 1st, the Jewish New Year in autumn, and isn’t Chinese New Year usually early spring? We need another New Year’s celebration to fall in the summer!
    Mary Jo, thinking we need to space out our celebrations

    Reply
  12. And a Happy New Year to you and your family, Edith!
    Let’s see, we have the Common Era New Year January 1st, the Jewish New Year in autumn, and isn’t Chinese New Year usually early spring? We need another New Year’s celebration to fall in the summer!
    Mary Jo, thinking we need to space out our celebrations

    Reply
  13. And a Happy New Year to you and your family, Edith!
    Let’s see, we have the Common Era New Year January 1st, the Jewish New Year in autumn, and isn’t Chinese New Year usually early spring? We need another New Year’s celebration to fall in the summer!
    Mary Jo, thinking we need to space out our celebrations

    Reply
  14. And a Happy New Year to you and your family, Edith!
    Let’s see, we have the Common Era New Year January 1st, the Jewish New Year in autumn, and isn’t Chinese New Year usually early spring? We need another New Year’s celebration to fall in the summer!
    Mary Jo, thinking we need to space out our celebrations

    Reply
  15. And a Happy New Year to you and your family, Edith!
    Let’s see, we have the Common Era New Year January 1st, the Jewish New Year in autumn, and isn’t Chinese New Year usually early spring? We need another New Year’s celebration to fall in the summer!
    Mary Jo, thinking we need to space out our celebrations

    Reply
  16. I’m all for having New Years throughout the year…Time for reflections, feasting and the tip of the glass.
    I can be immersed in reading and loose all contact with the world around myself…that is what I like about books!

    Reply
  17. I’m all for having New Years throughout the year…Time for reflections, feasting and the tip of the glass.
    I can be immersed in reading and loose all contact with the world around myself…that is what I like about books!

    Reply
  18. I’m all for having New Years throughout the year…Time for reflections, feasting and the tip of the glass.
    I can be immersed in reading and loose all contact with the world around myself…that is what I like about books!

    Reply
  19. I’m all for having New Years throughout the year…Time for reflections, feasting and the tip of the glass.
    I can be immersed in reading and loose all contact with the world around myself…that is what I like about books!

    Reply
  20. I’m all for having New Years throughout the year…Time for reflections, feasting and the tip of the glass.
    I can be immersed in reading and loose all contact with the world around myself…that is what I like about books!

    Reply
  21. Best wishes, Edith.
    In my faith community, New Year’s always falls on the spring equinox, March 21. And yes, it is kind of fun to have more than one new year’s holiday to celebrate!

    Reply
  22. Best wishes, Edith.
    In my faith community, New Year’s always falls on the spring equinox, March 21. And yes, it is kind of fun to have more than one new year’s holiday to celebrate!

    Reply
  23. Best wishes, Edith.
    In my faith community, New Year’s always falls on the spring equinox, March 21. And yes, it is kind of fun to have more than one new year’s holiday to celebrate!

    Reply
  24. Best wishes, Edith.
    In my faith community, New Year’s always falls on the spring equinox, March 21. And yes, it is kind of fun to have more than one new year’s holiday to celebrate!

    Reply
  25. Best wishes, Edith.
    In my faith community, New Year’s always falls on the spring equinox, March 21. And yes, it is kind of fun to have more than one new year’s holiday to celebrate!

    Reply
  26. Happy New Year!
    My aunt called to say Ramadan (sp?) is almost over and she was making treats for the festivities tomorrow – we’re a motley crew of mixed faiths, find one we don’t have and someone will convert or marry in. I think, personally, it’s just for the food!

    Reply
  27. Happy New Year!
    My aunt called to say Ramadan (sp?) is almost over and she was making treats for the festivities tomorrow – we’re a motley crew of mixed faiths, find one we don’t have and someone will convert or marry in. I think, personally, it’s just for the food!

    Reply
  28. Happy New Year!
    My aunt called to say Ramadan (sp?) is almost over and she was making treats for the festivities tomorrow – we’re a motley crew of mixed faiths, find one we don’t have and someone will convert or marry in. I think, personally, it’s just for the food!

    Reply
  29. Happy New Year!
    My aunt called to say Ramadan (sp?) is almost over and she was making treats for the festivities tomorrow – we’re a motley crew of mixed faiths, find one we don’t have and someone will convert or marry in. I think, personally, it’s just for the food!

    Reply
  30. Happy New Year!
    My aunt called to say Ramadan (sp?) is almost over and she was making treats for the festivities tomorrow – we’re a motley crew of mixed faiths, find one we don’t have and someone will convert or marry in. I think, personally, it’s just for the food!

    Reply
  31. A bit late, but l’shanah tovah to all! True story–a Muslim friend of mine told me that the imam at her mosque told the congregation at Friday prayers last week, that Eid al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan, would start on September 30. (Eid cannot begin until the imam sees the new moon.) When someone asked the imam how he knew it would be September 30, the imam replied, “Because that’s when Rosh Hashanah begins!”

    Reply
  32. A bit late, but l’shanah tovah to all! True story–a Muslim friend of mine told me that the imam at her mosque told the congregation at Friday prayers last week, that Eid al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan, would start on September 30. (Eid cannot begin until the imam sees the new moon.) When someone asked the imam how he knew it would be September 30, the imam replied, “Because that’s when Rosh Hashanah begins!”

    Reply
  33. A bit late, but l’shanah tovah to all! True story–a Muslim friend of mine told me that the imam at her mosque told the congregation at Friday prayers last week, that Eid al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan, would start on September 30. (Eid cannot begin until the imam sees the new moon.) When someone asked the imam how he knew it would be September 30, the imam replied, “Because that’s when Rosh Hashanah begins!”

    Reply
  34. A bit late, but l’shanah tovah to all! True story–a Muslim friend of mine told me that the imam at her mosque told the congregation at Friday prayers last week, that Eid al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan, would start on September 30. (Eid cannot begin until the imam sees the new moon.) When someone asked the imam how he knew it would be September 30, the imam replied, “Because that’s when Rosh Hashanah begins!”

    Reply
  35. A bit late, but l’shanah tovah to all! True story–a Muslim friend of mine told me that the imam at her mosque told the congregation at Friday prayers last week, that Eid al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan, would start on September 30. (Eid cannot begin until the imam sees the new moon.) When someone asked the imam how he knew it would be September 30, the imam replied, “Because that’s when Rosh Hashanah begins!”

    Reply

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