Happy Christmas!

Anne here, wishing you all a safe and happy Christmas. 
At this time of year, we wenches go into "Christmastide mode" where we take it in turns to post a short message every day through the twelve days of Christmas, starting from today. 

Here in Australia, Christmas Day is coming to a close, while in other parts of the world it's just starting. For many of us, it's been a quiet day, with Lockdown preventing large gatherings of friends and relatives. Still, I hope you manage to have a happy day, regardless.

SnapdragonAs many of you know, I've often presented a Christmas quiz and others about Regency terms and food and games, and one that has often come up is the game of Snapdragon — where you snatch burning raisins from a plate or dish. Here's a fascinating post that not only explores the history of Snapdragon, but tests it for "health and safety." and comes up with a surprising conclusion. 

So that's it from me. Happy Christmas all — see you next year.
XmasCard2020

 

 

65 thoughts on “Happy Christmas!”

  1. A wonderful read, but not really for me; 1 have very, very slow reflexes.
    Always fund to learn about the past. Thanks for the visit.

    Reply
  2. A wonderful read, but not really for me; 1 have very, very slow reflexes.
    Always fund to learn about the past. Thanks for the visit.

    Reply
  3. A wonderful read, but not really for me; 1 have very, very slow reflexes.
    Always fund to learn about the past. Thanks for the visit.

    Reply
  4. A wonderful read, but not really for me; 1 have very, very slow reflexes.
    Always fund to learn about the past. Thanks for the visit.

    Reply
  5. A wonderful read, but not really for me; 1 have very, very slow reflexes.
    Always fund to learn about the past. Thanks for the visit.

    Reply
  6. Merry Christmas, Anne! And Happy Boxing Day! As I read the article about Snapdragon, I had the same question I’ve had each time it’s appeared in a Regency holiday romance: what about sleeves and shawls, and all the other fluttery fabrics? I fear I would have been too timid to play! Thanks for the lovely photograph, too – a perfect flower for Christmas!

    Reply
  7. Merry Christmas, Anne! And Happy Boxing Day! As I read the article about Snapdragon, I had the same question I’ve had each time it’s appeared in a Regency holiday romance: what about sleeves and shawls, and all the other fluttery fabrics? I fear I would have been too timid to play! Thanks for the lovely photograph, too – a perfect flower for Christmas!

    Reply
  8. Merry Christmas, Anne! And Happy Boxing Day! As I read the article about Snapdragon, I had the same question I’ve had each time it’s appeared in a Regency holiday romance: what about sleeves and shawls, and all the other fluttery fabrics? I fear I would have been too timid to play! Thanks for the lovely photograph, too – a perfect flower for Christmas!

    Reply
  9. Merry Christmas, Anne! And Happy Boxing Day! As I read the article about Snapdragon, I had the same question I’ve had each time it’s appeared in a Regency holiday romance: what about sleeves and shawls, and all the other fluttery fabrics? I fear I would have been too timid to play! Thanks for the lovely photograph, too – a perfect flower for Christmas!

    Reply
  10. Merry Christmas, Anne! And Happy Boxing Day! As I read the article about Snapdragon, I had the same question I’ve had each time it’s appeared in a Regency holiday romance: what about sleeves and shawls, and all the other fluttery fabrics? I fear I would have been too timid to play! Thanks for the lovely photograph, too – a perfect flower for Christmas!

    Reply
  11. Thanks Constance. I suspect anyone playing Snapdragon would have their sleeves pushed or rolled well back, and all shawls tucked well out of danger. It strikes me as a game younger folk would play, and possibly more men than women. I’m not sure I’d want to play it, either, though after reading that article, I might.
    Re the flower in my greeting, the red parts are actually the bracts that appear after the small white flowers bloom — you can see two in the photo. I chose it, not just for the gorgeous color, but I thought the small white flower could represent the glint of light at the end of the 2020 tunnel.

    Reply
  12. Thanks Constance. I suspect anyone playing Snapdragon would have their sleeves pushed or rolled well back, and all shawls tucked well out of danger. It strikes me as a game younger folk would play, and possibly more men than women. I’m not sure I’d want to play it, either, though after reading that article, I might.
    Re the flower in my greeting, the red parts are actually the bracts that appear after the small white flowers bloom — you can see two in the photo. I chose it, not just for the gorgeous color, but I thought the small white flower could represent the glint of light at the end of the 2020 tunnel.

    Reply
  13. Thanks Constance. I suspect anyone playing Snapdragon would have their sleeves pushed or rolled well back, and all shawls tucked well out of danger. It strikes me as a game younger folk would play, and possibly more men than women. I’m not sure I’d want to play it, either, though after reading that article, I might.
    Re the flower in my greeting, the red parts are actually the bracts that appear after the small white flowers bloom — you can see two in the photo. I chose it, not just for the gorgeous color, but I thought the small white flower could represent the glint of light at the end of the 2020 tunnel.

    Reply
  14. Thanks Constance. I suspect anyone playing Snapdragon would have their sleeves pushed or rolled well back, and all shawls tucked well out of danger. It strikes me as a game younger folk would play, and possibly more men than women. I’m not sure I’d want to play it, either, though after reading that article, I might.
    Re the flower in my greeting, the red parts are actually the bracts that appear after the small white flowers bloom — you can see two in the photo. I chose it, not just for the gorgeous color, but I thought the small white flower could represent the glint of light at the end of the 2020 tunnel.

    Reply
  15. Thanks Constance. I suspect anyone playing Snapdragon would have their sleeves pushed or rolled well back, and all shawls tucked well out of danger. It strikes me as a game younger folk would play, and possibly more men than women. I’m not sure I’d want to play it, either, though after reading that article, I might.
    Re the flower in my greeting, the red parts are actually the bracts that appear after the small white flowers bloom — you can see two in the photo. I chose it, not just for the gorgeous color, but I thought the small white flower could represent the glint of light at the end of the 2020 tunnel.

    Reply
  16. Now I think the flower even more beautiful! I had wondered about the white blossoms when I first saw your post. I think I must ask my husband, who has been able to successfully grow plants from my southern US homeplace here in New England, to see if he can make an Australian plant happy here too. Flowers have been a source of much joy this past year, when I’ve had more time to focus on them, and I agree that they give us hope, as well as reminding us of the resilience of nature that Andrea wrote about in today’s post.

    Reply
  17. Now I think the flower even more beautiful! I had wondered about the white blossoms when I first saw your post. I think I must ask my husband, who has been able to successfully grow plants from my southern US homeplace here in New England, to see if he can make an Australian plant happy here too. Flowers have been a source of much joy this past year, when I’ve had more time to focus on them, and I agree that they give us hope, as well as reminding us of the resilience of nature that Andrea wrote about in today’s post.

    Reply
  18. Now I think the flower even more beautiful! I had wondered about the white blossoms when I first saw your post. I think I must ask my husband, who has been able to successfully grow plants from my southern US homeplace here in New England, to see if he can make an Australian plant happy here too. Flowers have been a source of much joy this past year, when I’ve had more time to focus on them, and I agree that they give us hope, as well as reminding us of the resilience of nature that Andrea wrote about in today’s post.

    Reply
  19. Now I think the flower even more beautiful! I had wondered about the white blossoms when I first saw your post. I think I must ask my husband, who has been able to successfully grow plants from my southern US homeplace here in New England, to see if he can make an Australian plant happy here too. Flowers have been a source of much joy this past year, when I’ve had more time to focus on them, and I agree that they give us hope, as well as reminding us of the resilience of nature that Andrea wrote about in today’s post.

    Reply
  20. Now I think the flower even more beautiful! I had wondered about the white blossoms when I first saw your post. I think I must ask my husband, who has been able to successfully grow plants from my southern US homeplace here in New England, to see if he can make an Australian plant happy here too. Flowers have been a source of much joy this past year, when I’ve had more time to focus on them, and I agree that they give us hope, as well as reminding us of the resilience of nature that Andrea wrote about in today’s post.

    Reply
  21. Constance New England winters might be a bit too bitter for it (but I’m only guessing.) It’s a native of NSW where the climate is fairly mild and warm — no snow, for instance. One site said this: “It can be tender to heavier frosts while young, but can survive these if given some protection, and can then thrive in cold places like Canberra most successfully. Grows to around 6 metres tall and 3 metres wide eventually, but it responds well to pruning and can be shaped to size.”
    Canberra (our capital city) is inland and near the mountains and they often have severe frosts in winter, and baking hot weather in summer.
    More info here:
    https://www.bhg.com.au/christmas-bush
    and here
    https://www.flowerpower.com.au/garden-advice/gardening/new-south-wales-christmas-bush/
    Best of luck with it

    Reply
  22. Constance New England winters might be a bit too bitter for it (but I’m only guessing.) It’s a native of NSW where the climate is fairly mild and warm — no snow, for instance. One site said this: “It can be tender to heavier frosts while young, but can survive these if given some protection, and can then thrive in cold places like Canberra most successfully. Grows to around 6 metres tall and 3 metres wide eventually, but it responds well to pruning and can be shaped to size.”
    Canberra (our capital city) is inland and near the mountains and they often have severe frosts in winter, and baking hot weather in summer.
    More info here:
    https://www.bhg.com.au/christmas-bush
    and here
    https://www.flowerpower.com.au/garden-advice/gardening/new-south-wales-christmas-bush/
    Best of luck with it

    Reply
  23. Constance New England winters might be a bit too bitter for it (but I’m only guessing.) It’s a native of NSW where the climate is fairly mild and warm — no snow, for instance. One site said this: “It can be tender to heavier frosts while young, but can survive these if given some protection, and can then thrive in cold places like Canberra most successfully. Grows to around 6 metres tall and 3 metres wide eventually, but it responds well to pruning and can be shaped to size.”
    Canberra (our capital city) is inland and near the mountains and they often have severe frosts in winter, and baking hot weather in summer.
    More info here:
    https://www.bhg.com.au/christmas-bush
    and here
    https://www.flowerpower.com.au/garden-advice/gardening/new-south-wales-christmas-bush/
    Best of luck with it

    Reply
  24. Constance New England winters might be a bit too bitter for it (but I’m only guessing.) It’s a native of NSW where the climate is fairly mild and warm — no snow, for instance. One site said this: “It can be tender to heavier frosts while young, but can survive these if given some protection, and can then thrive in cold places like Canberra most successfully. Grows to around 6 metres tall and 3 metres wide eventually, but it responds well to pruning and can be shaped to size.”
    Canberra (our capital city) is inland and near the mountains and they often have severe frosts in winter, and baking hot weather in summer.
    More info here:
    https://www.bhg.com.au/christmas-bush
    and here
    https://www.flowerpower.com.au/garden-advice/gardening/new-south-wales-christmas-bush/
    Best of luck with it

    Reply
  25. Constance New England winters might be a bit too bitter for it (but I’m only guessing.) It’s a native of NSW where the climate is fairly mild and warm — no snow, for instance. One site said this: “It can be tender to heavier frosts while young, but can survive these if given some protection, and can then thrive in cold places like Canberra most successfully. Grows to around 6 metres tall and 3 metres wide eventually, but it responds well to pruning and can be shaped to size.”
    Canberra (our capital city) is inland and near the mountains and they often have severe frosts in winter, and baking hot weather in summer.
    More info here:
    https://www.bhg.com.au/christmas-bush
    and here
    https://www.flowerpower.com.au/garden-advice/gardening/new-south-wales-christmas-bush/
    Best of luck with it

    Reply
  26. Thanks very much for the information and the links, Anne. My husband is already on the hunt and found 2 nurseries in California that offer “Christmas Bush” or “Festival Bush”. Of course, he also reminded me that it would be blooming in June here, not in December! I must admit that hadn’t occurred to me…. He has been successful in getting camellias and crape myrtle to grow outdoors here, and he’s willing to try Christmas Bush. If it works, I shall send you photographs. Thanks again, and a very Happy New Year to you!

    Reply
  27. Thanks very much for the information and the links, Anne. My husband is already on the hunt and found 2 nurseries in California that offer “Christmas Bush” or “Festival Bush”. Of course, he also reminded me that it would be blooming in June here, not in December! I must admit that hadn’t occurred to me…. He has been successful in getting camellias and crape myrtle to grow outdoors here, and he’s willing to try Christmas Bush. If it works, I shall send you photographs. Thanks again, and a very Happy New Year to you!

    Reply
  28. Thanks very much for the information and the links, Anne. My husband is already on the hunt and found 2 nurseries in California that offer “Christmas Bush” or “Festival Bush”. Of course, he also reminded me that it would be blooming in June here, not in December! I must admit that hadn’t occurred to me…. He has been successful in getting camellias and crape myrtle to grow outdoors here, and he’s willing to try Christmas Bush. If it works, I shall send you photographs. Thanks again, and a very Happy New Year to you!

    Reply
  29. Thanks very much for the information and the links, Anne. My husband is already on the hunt and found 2 nurseries in California that offer “Christmas Bush” or “Festival Bush”. Of course, he also reminded me that it would be blooming in June here, not in December! I must admit that hadn’t occurred to me…. He has been successful in getting camellias and crape myrtle to grow outdoors here, and he’s willing to try Christmas Bush. If it works, I shall send you photographs. Thanks again, and a very Happy New Year to you!

    Reply
  30. Thanks very much for the information and the links, Anne. My husband is already on the hunt and found 2 nurseries in California that offer “Christmas Bush” or “Festival Bush”. Of course, he also reminded me that it would be blooming in June here, not in December! I must admit that hadn’t occurred to me…. He has been successful in getting camellias and crape myrtle to grow outdoors here, and he’s willing to try Christmas Bush. If it works, I shall send you photographs. Thanks again, and a very Happy New Year to you!

    Reply

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