Happy Boxing Day!

Dickens 3Nicola here! I hope everyone has enjoyed a happy and peaceful Christmas Day. In the UK it's Boxing Day, an odd title that has nothing to do with the sport of boxing but lots to do with boxes. (I'm told that Boxing Day isn't celebrated in the US although it is in some other countries. I'm hoping people around the globe can let me know whether it is or not.) The first written mention of "boxing day" comes from Samuel Pepys diaries in 1663: "Thence by coach to my shoemaker's… and gave something to the boys' box against Christmas." The tradition was for patrons to give tradesmen and servants Christmas boxes, usually made of pottery and containing cash or gifts. I Dickens 2 rather like the idea of a pottery box – it's a cut above cardboard, although there are some beautiful cardboard Christmas boxes around.  Five years later, Pepys mentioned boxes again, although he wasn't in quite such a jolly Christmas mood, recording in his diary: "Called up by drums and trumpets; these things and boxes having cost me much money this Christmas."

Christmas boxTo my pleasure I did receive a gift "box" at Christmas; it contains shortbread biscuits and has a picture of a guide dog puppy on the front! What about you – did you receive any Christmas boxes this year? Whether you have been woken by drums or trumpets, or received a lovely china box for Christmas, we wish you a happy boxing day and here are some pictures from Charles Dickens' house to celebrate the festive season!

125 thoughts on “Happy Boxing Day!”

  1. Hope you had a good day Nicola. We call it St Stephen’s Day here and back when we were children we would go from house to house playing instruments, singing, dancing etc. We would get a few coppers or food and drink. The groups doing the rounds would be called The Wren Boys as this was a song everyone would sing. I haven’t seen this happen for years. It’s sad really that all the old traditions are dying out.

    Reply
  2. Hope you had a good day Nicola. We call it St Stephen’s Day here and back when we were children we would go from house to house playing instruments, singing, dancing etc. We would get a few coppers or food and drink. The groups doing the rounds would be called The Wren Boys as this was a song everyone would sing. I haven’t seen this happen for years. It’s sad really that all the old traditions are dying out.

    Reply
  3. Hope you had a good day Nicola. We call it St Stephen’s Day here and back when we were children we would go from house to house playing instruments, singing, dancing etc. We would get a few coppers or food and drink. The groups doing the rounds would be called The Wren Boys as this was a song everyone would sing. I haven’t seen this happen for years. It’s sad really that all the old traditions are dying out.

    Reply
  4. Hope you had a good day Nicola. We call it St Stephen’s Day here and back when we were children we would go from house to house playing instruments, singing, dancing etc. We would get a few coppers or food and drink. The groups doing the rounds would be called The Wren Boys as this was a song everyone would sing. I haven’t seen this happen for years. It’s sad really that all the old traditions are dying out.

    Reply
  5. Hope you had a good day Nicola. We call it St Stephen’s Day here and back when we were children we would go from house to house playing instruments, singing, dancing etc. We would get a few coppers or food and drink. The groups doing the rounds would be called The Wren Boys as this was a song everyone would sing. I haven’t seen this happen for years. It’s sad really that all the old traditions are dying out.

    Reply
  6. We certainly have Boxing Day here in Australia, Nicola, though the giving of boxes doesn’t really happen. Mostly it’s the Boxing Day sales (shopping madness) and cricket, but for most of us it’s relaxing after Christmas Day. The weather is usually warm to hot and a lot of people head for the beach.

    Reply
  7. We certainly have Boxing Day here in Australia, Nicola, though the giving of boxes doesn’t really happen. Mostly it’s the Boxing Day sales (shopping madness) and cricket, but for most of us it’s relaxing after Christmas Day. The weather is usually warm to hot and a lot of people head for the beach.

    Reply
  8. We certainly have Boxing Day here in Australia, Nicola, though the giving of boxes doesn’t really happen. Mostly it’s the Boxing Day sales (shopping madness) and cricket, but for most of us it’s relaxing after Christmas Day. The weather is usually warm to hot and a lot of people head for the beach.

    Reply
  9. We certainly have Boxing Day here in Australia, Nicola, though the giving of boxes doesn’t really happen. Mostly it’s the Boxing Day sales (shopping madness) and cricket, but for most of us it’s relaxing after Christmas Day. The weather is usually warm to hot and a lot of people head for the beach.

    Reply
  10. We certainly have Boxing Day here in Australia, Nicola, though the giving of boxes doesn’t really happen. Mostly it’s the Boxing Day sales (shopping madness) and cricket, but for most of us it’s relaxing after Christmas Day. The weather is usually warm to hot and a lot of people head for the beach.

    Reply
  11. In the US, no Boxing day. But there is the mad crazy after Christmas sales. Which I abstain from thank you very much. The older I get, the less the wild sales are worth it.

    Reply
  12. In the US, no Boxing day. But there is the mad crazy after Christmas sales. Which I abstain from thank you very much. The older I get, the less the wild sales are worth it.

    Reply
  13. In the US, no Boxing day. But there is the mad crazy after Christmas sales. Which I abstain from thank you very much. The older I get, the less the wild sales are worth it.

    Reply
  14. In the US, no Boxing day. But there is the mad crazy after Christmas sales. Which I abstain from thank you very much. The older I get, the less the wild sales are worth it.

    Reply
  15. In the US, no Boxing day. But there is the mad crazy after Christmas sales. Which I abstain from thank you very much. The older I get, the less the wild sales are worth it.

    Reply
  16. Boxing Day to me here in LA means taking all the gifts I have received out of their boxes and putting them where they go. My wallet is fat with gift cards and my closet has a cozy robe and some nifty new sweaters hanging in it. It also means clearing no-longer-needed winter clothes out of my closet and taking them to a charity drop. Start the new year with good karma 🙂

    Reply
  17. Boxing Day to me here in LA means taking all the gifts I have received out of their boxes and putting them where they go. My wallet is fat with gift cards and my closet has a cozy robe and some nifty new sweaters hanging in it. It also means clearing no-longer-needed winter clothes out of my closet and taking them to a charity drop. Start the new year with good karma 🙂

    Reply
  18. Boxing Day to me here in LA means taking all the gifts I have received out of their boxes and putting them where they go. My wallet is fat with gift cards and my closet has a cozy robe and some nifty new sweaters hanging in it. It also means clearing no-longer-needed winter clothes out of my closet and taking them to a charity drop. Start the new year with good karma 🙂

    Reply
  19. Boxing Day to me here in LA means taking all the gifts I have received out of their boxes and putting them where they go. My wallet is fat with gift cards and my closet has a cozy robe and some nifty new sweaters hanging in it. It also means clearing no-longer-needed winter clothes out of my closet and taking them to a charity drop. Start the new year with good karma 🙂

    Reply
  20. Boxing Day to me here in LA means taking all the gifts I have received out of their boxes and putting them where they go. My wallet is fat with gift cards and my closet has a cozy robe and some nifty new sweaters hanging in it. It also means clearing no-longer-needed winter clothes out of my closet and taking them to a charity drop. Start the new year with good karma 🙂

    Reply
  21. Back in the day, it was common to give small gifts (before Christmas) to folks who performed services for you – the mailman, the milkman (yes I’m that old), your beautician, etc. I think that has pretty much fallen be the wayside.
    Before Christmas there are many organizations, both large and small, that collect donations for food and children’s presents to be given to the poor. I’ve not seen anything special after Christmas that happens though.

    Reply
  22. Back in the day, it was common to give small gifts (before Christmas) to folks who performed services for you – the mailman, the milkman (yes I’m that old), your beautician, etc. I think that has pretty much fallen be the wayside.
    Before Christmas there are many organizations, both large and small, that collect donations for food and children’s presents to be given to the poor. I’ve not seen anything special after Christmas that happens though.

    Reply
  23. Back in the day, it was common to give small gifts (before Christmas) to folks who performed services for you – the mailman, the milkman (yes I’m that old), your beautician, etc. I think that has pretty much fallen be the wayside.
    Before Christmas there are many organizations, both large and small, that collect donations for food and children’s presents to be given to the poor. I’ve not seen anything special after Christmas that happens though.

    Reply
  24. Back in the day, it was common to give small gifts (before Christmas) to folks who performed services for you – the mailman, the milkman (yes I’m that old), your beautician, etc. I think that has pretty much fallen be the wayside.
    Before Christmas there are many organizations, both large and small, that collect donations for food and children’s presents to be given to the poor. I’ve not seen anything special after Christmas that happens though.

    Reply
  25. Back in the day, it was common to give small gifts (before Christmas) to folks who performed services for you – the mailman, the milkman (yes I’m that old), your beautician, etc. I think that has pretty much fallen be the wayside.
    Before Christmas there are many organizations, both large and small, that collect donations for food and children’s presents to be given to the poor. I’ve not seen anything special after Christmas that happens though.

    Reply
  26. Ah, no Boxing Day in the US! So interesting which traditions occur in different countries! We too have the mad sales although apparently this year it wasn’t so mad because everyone did Black Friday instead. I guess that’s a “new” tradition!”

    Reply
  27. Ah, no Boxing Day in the US! So interesting which traditions occur in different countries! We too have the mad sales although apparently this year it wasn’t so mad because everyone did Black Friday instead. I guess that’s a “new” tradition!”

    Reply
  28. Ah, no Boxing Day in the US! So interesting which traditions occur in different countries! We too have the mad sales although apparently this year it wasn’t so mad because everyone did Black Friday instead. I guess that’s a “new” tradition!”

    Reply
  29. Ah, no Boxing Day in the US! So interesting which traditions occur in different countries! We too have the mad sales although apparently this year it wasn’t so mad because everyone did Black Friday instead. I guess that’s a “new” tradition!”

    Reply
  30. Ah, no Boxing Day in the US! So interesting which traditions occur in different countries! We too have the mad sales although apparently this year it wasn’t so mad because everyone did Black Friday instead. I guess that’s a “new” tradition!”

    Reply
  31. Our neighbours still leave boxes of biscuits for the postman and the refuse collectors, which I think is a very nice recognition of the service they provide to the neighbourhood. I suppose that’s the last remnants of those traditions.

    Reply
  32. Our neighbours still leave boxes of biscuits for the postman and the refuse collectors, which I think is a very nice recognition of the service they provide to the neighbourhood. I suppose that’s the last remnants of those traditions.

    Reply
  33. Our neighbours still leave boxes of biscuits for the postman and the refuse collectors, which I think is a very nice recognition of the service they provide to the neighbourhood. I suppose that’s the last remnants of those traditions.

    Reply
  34. Our neighbours still leave boxes of biscuits for the postman and the refuse collectors, which I think is a very nice recognition of the service they provide to the neighbourhood. I suppose that’s the last remnants of those traditions.

    Reply
  35. Our neighbours still leave boxes of biscuits for the postman and the refuse collectors, which I think is a very nice recognition of the service they provide to the neighbourhood. I suppose that’s the last remnants of those traditions.

    Reply
  36. Meanwhile, my sister, who lives in Queensland and thinks it’s cold if she has to put on a cardigan, is in Scotland, and gleefully posting photos of snow.
    We love what we can’t have

    Reply
  37. Meanwhile, my sister, who lives in Queensland and thinks it’s cold if she has to put on a cardigan, is in Scotland, and gleefully posting photos of snow.
    We love what we can’t have

    Reply
  38. Meanwhile, my sister, who lives in Queensland and thinks it’s cold if she has to put on a cardigan, is in Scotland, and gleefully posting photos of snow.
    We love what we can’t have

    Reply
  39. Meanwhile, my sister, who lives in Queensland and thinks it’s cold if she has to put on a cardigan, is in Scotland, and gleefully posting photos of snow.
    We love what we can’t have

    Reply
  40. Meanwhile, my sister, who lives in Queensland and thinks it’s cold if she has to put on a cardigan, is in Scotland, and gleefully posting photos of snow.
    We love what we can’t have

    Reply
  41. If you consider tins to be boxes, then I receive at least one nearly every year. My family knows I collect (smallish) tins and usually pack a gift in one or one in a gift. One of my nieces (Knowing I like Altoids) keeps an eye open for unusual Altoids tins, either by shape, size, or flavor . . . the ginger ones were the most interesting.

    Reply
  42. If you consider tins to be boxes, then I receive at least one nearly every year. My family knows I collect (smallish) tins and usually pack a gift in one or one in a gift. One of my nieces (Knowing I like Altoids) keeps an eye open for unusual Altoids tins, either by shape, size, or flavor . . . the ginger ones were the most interesting.

    Reply
  43. If you consider tins to be boxes, then I receive at least one nearly every year. My family knows I collect (smallish) tins and usually pack a gift in one or one in a gift. One of my nieces (Knowing I like Altoids) keeps an eye open for unusual Altoids tins, either by shape, size, or flavor . . . the ginger ones were the most interesting.

    Reply
  44. If you consider tins to be boxes, then I receive at least one nearly every year. My family knows I collect (smallish) tins and usually pack a gift in one or one in a gift. One of my nieces (Knowing I like Altoids) keeps an eye open for unusual Altoids tins, either by shape, size, or flavor . . . the ginger ones were the most interesting.

    Reply
  45. If you consider tins to be boxes, then I receive at least one nearly every year. My family knows I collect (smallish) tins and usually pack a gift in one or one in a gift. One of my nieces (Knowing I like Altoids) keeps an eye open for unusual Altoids tins, either by shape, size, or flavor . . . the ginger ones were the most interesting.

    Reply
  46. Boxing Day in Canada is like Black Friday in the US. Personally, I avoid it like the plague! But I do enjoy ha ing an extra day at home to spend with my family. In our house it’s the day my son opens the toys he unwrapped on Christmas morning. It’s quiet and peaceful and the closest I get to the stores is if I forgot that my family needed to set past Christmas Day and I need to go grocery shopping (like I did this year!). Surprisingly, the grocery store was absolutely dead but the stock people were busy refilling shelves. I like that we didn’t need to hurry back to work the day after Christmas (except the poor retail clerks….I remember those days all too well) and could just enjoy each our own family unit without the rush of Christmas Day with all the glorious bustle of extended family.

    Reply
  47. Boxing Day in Canada is like Black Friday in the US. Personally, I avoid it like the plague! But I do enjoy ha ing an extra day at home to spend with my family. In our house it’s the day my son opens the toys he unwrapped on Christmas morning. It’s quiet and peaceful and the closest I get to the stores is if I forgot that my family needed to set past Christmas Day and I need to go grocery shopping (like I did this year!). Surprisingly, the grocery store was absolutely dead but the stock people were busy refilling shelves. I like that we didn’t need to hurry back to work the day after Christmas (except the poor retail clerks….I remember those days all too well) and could just enjoy each our own family unit without the rush of Christmas Day with all the glorious bustle of extended family.

    Reply
  48. Boxing Day in Canada is like Black Friday in the US. Personally, I avoid it like the plague! But I do enjoy ha ing an extra day at home to spend with my family. In our house it’s the day my son opens the toys he unwrapped on Christmas morning. It’s quiet and peaceful and the closest I get to the stores is if I forgot that my family needed to set past Christmas Day and I need to go grocery shopping (like I did this year!). Surprisingly, the grocery store was absolutely dead but the stock people were busy refilling shelves. I like that we didn’t need to hurry back to work the day after Christmas (except the poor retail clerks….I remember those days all too well) and could just enjoy each our own family unit without the rush of Christmas Day with all the glorious bustle of extended family.

    Reply
  49. Boxing Day in Canada is like Black Friday in the US. Personally, I avoid it like the plague! But I do enjoy ha ing an extra day at home to spend with my family. In our house it’s the day my son opens the toys he unwrapped on Christmas morning. It’s quiet and peaceful and the closest I get to the stores is if I forgot that my family needed to set past Christmas Day and I need to go grocery shopping (like I did this year!). Surprisingly, the grocery store was absolutely dead but the stock people were busy refilling shelves. I like that we didn’t need to hurry back to work the day after Christmas (except the poor retail clerks….I remember those days all too well) and could just enjoy each our own family unit without the rush of Christmas Day with all the glorious bustle of extended family.

    Reply
  50. Boxing Day in Canada is like Black Friday in the US. Personally, I avoid it like the plague! But I do enjoy ha ing an extra day at home to spend with my family. In our house it’s the day my son opens the toys he unwrapped on Christmas morning. It’s quiet and peaceful and the closest I get to the stores is if I forgot that my family needed to set past Christmas Day and I need to go grocery shopping (like I did this year!). Surprisingly, the grocery store was absolutely dead but the stock people were busy refilling shelves. I like that we didn’t need to hurry back to work the day after Christmas (except the poor retail clerks….I remember those days all too well) and could just enjoy each our own family unit without the rush of Christmas Day with all the glorious bustle of extended family.

    Reply
  51. Boxing Day. St Stephen’s Day. My daughter’s birthday. There’s plenty of presents, boxes, singing, food and drinks. She’s 16 this year. We had a lovely time with family and relations.

    Reply
  52. Boxing Day. St Stephen’s Day. My daughter’s birthday. There’s plenty of presents, boxes, singing, food and drinks. She’s 16 this year. We had a lovely time with family and relations.

    Reply
  53. Boxing Day. St Stephen’s Day. My daughter’s birthday. There’s plenty of presents, boxes, singing, food and drinks. She’s 16 this year. We had a lovely time with family and relations.

    Reply
  54. Boxing Day. St Stephen’s Day. My daughter’s birthday. There’s plenty of presents, boxes, singing, food and drinks. She’s 16 this year. We had a lovely time with family and relations.

    Reply
  55. Boxing Day. St Stephen’s Day. My daughter’s birthday. There’s plenty of presents, boxes, singing, food and drinks. She’s 16 this year. We had a lovely time with family and relations.

    Reply
  56. I’m in Canada too and we have Boxing Day. But poor hubby had to work at 6:00am at a huge discount retail store. I got to stay home. It’s a statutory day off. At hubby’s work you have to be hospitalized and show proof to justify not showing up for work!! I kissed him goodbye and rolled over and went back to sleep. Our Boxing Day tradition was Christmas Day was for immediate family and Boxing Day was for extended family. So we’d get and give presents on both days. This year was different and we did everything on Christmas Day.

    Reply
  57. I’m in Canada too and we have Boxing Day. But poor hubby had to work at 6:00am at a huge discount retail store. I got to stay home. It’s a statutory day off. At hubby’s work you have to be hospitalized and show proof to justify not showing up for work!! I kissed him goodbye and rolled over and went back to sleep. Our Boxing Day tradition was Christmas Day was for immediate family and Boxing Day was for extended family. So we’d get and give presents on both days. This year was different and we did everything on Christmas Day.

    Reply
  58. I’m in Canada too and we have Boxing Day. But poor hubby had to work at 6:00am at a huge discount retail store. I got to stay home. It’s a statutory day off. At hubby’s work you have to be hospitalized and show proof to justify not showing up for work!! I kissed him goodbye and rolled over and went back to sleep. Our Boxing Day tradition was Christmas Day was for immediate family and Boxing Day was for extended family. So we’d get and give presents on both days. This year was different and we did everything on Christmas Day.

    Reply
  59. I’m in Canada too and we have Boxing Day. But poor hubby had to work at 6:00am at a huge discount retail store. I got to stay home. It’s a statutory day off. At hubby’s work you have to be hospitalized and show proof to justify not showing up for work!! I kissed him goodbye and rolled over and went back to sleep. Our Boxing Day tradition was Christmas Day was for immediate family and Boxing Day was for extended family. So we’d get and give presents on both days. This year was different and we did everything on Christmas Day.

    Reply
  60. I’m in Canada too and we have Boxing Day. But poor hubby had to work at 6:00am at a huge discount retail store. I got to stay home. It’s a statutory day off. At hubby’s work you have to be hospitalized and show proof to justify not showing up for work!! I kissed him goodbye and rolled over and went back to sleep. Our Boxing Day tradition was Christmas Day was for immediate family and Boxing Day was for extended family. So we’d get and give presents on both days. This year was different and we did everything on Christmas Day.

    Reply
  61. What a great thing to collect, Claire, and I love that your family pack gifts in them! That really is lovely. Your comment has reminded me that somewhere I have a book about antique tins. I must dig that book out.

    Reply
  62. What a great thing to collect, Claire, and I love that your family pack gifts in them! That really is lovely. Your comment has reminded me that somewhere I have a book about antique tins. I must dig that book out.

    Reply
  63. What a great thing to collect, Claire, and I love that your family pack gifts in them! That really is lovely. Your comment has reminded me that somewhere I have a book about antique tins. I must dig that book out.

    Reply
  64. What a great thing to collect, Claire, and I love that your family pack gifts in them! That really is lovely. Your comment has reminded me that somewhere I have a book about antique tins. I must dig that book out.

    Reply
  65. What a great thing to collect, Claire, and I love that your family pack gifts in them! That really is lovely. Your comment has reminded me that somewhere I have a book about antique tins. I must dig that book out.

    Reply
  66. Hi Jana. Yes, I do feel for people who are working all through Christmas and don’t have the chance to spend time with family and friends. Like you I avoid the sales at this time of year. All those crowds and frantic buying doesn’t feel very peaceful to me but I realise buying a bargain is a high point for some! When I was a child it was thought very exciting to go to the Boxing Day sales but I don’t think it was quite so busy in those days!

    Reply
  67. Hi Jana. Yes, I do feel for people who are working all through Christmas and don’t have the chance to spend time with family and friends. Like you I avoid the sales at this time of year. All those crowds and frantic buying doesn’t feel very peaceful to me but I realise buying a bargain is a high point for some! When I was a child it was thought very exciting to go to the Boxing Day sales but I don’t think it was quite so busy in those days!

    Reply
  68. Hi Jana. Yes, I do feel for people who are working all through Christmas and don’t have the chance to spend time with family and friends. Like you I avoid the sales at this time of year. All those crowds and frantic buying doesn’t feel very peaceful to me but I realise buying a bargain is a high point for some! When I was a child it was thought very exciting to go to the Boxing Day sales but I don’t think it was quite so busy in those days!

    Reply
  69. Hi Jana. Yes, I do feel for people who are working all through Christmas and don’t have the chance to spend time with family and friends. Like you I avoid the sales at this time of year. All those crowds and frantic buying doesn’t feel very peaceful to me but I realise buying a bargain is a high point for some! When I was a child it was thought very exciting to go to the Boxing Day sales but I don’t think it was quite so busy in those days!

    Reply
  70. Hi Jana. Yes, I do feel for people who are working all through Christmas and don’t have the chance to spend time with family and friends. Like you I avoid the sales at this time of year. All those crowds and frantic buying doesn’t feel very peaceful to me but I realise buying a bargain is a high point for some! When I was a child it was thought very exciting to go to the Boxing Day sales but I don’t think it was quite so busy in those days!

    Reply
  71. Yikes, Karen, I hope he survived the sales and the early start and that you had a nice time when he got back from work! It’s not holiday for everyone is it. Always interesting to see things from a different perspective!

    Reply
  72. Yikes, Karen, I hope he survived the sales and the early start and that you had a nice time when he got back from work! It’s not holiday for everyone is it. Always interesting to see things from a different perspective!

    Reply
  73. Yikes, Karen, I hope he survived the sales and the early start and that you had a nice time when he got back from work! It’s not holiday for everyone is it. Always interesting to see things from a different perspective!

    Reply
  74. Yikes, Karen, I hope he survived the sales and the early start and that you had a nice time when he got back from work! It’s not holiday for everyone is it. Always interesting to see things from a different perspective!

    Reply
  75. Yikes, Karen, I hope he survived the sales and the early start and that you had a nice time when he got back from work! It’s not holiday for everyone is it. Always interesting to see things from a different perspective!

    Reply
  76. Hi Nicola
    Here in the US we do not do Boxing Day but my mom sent me a box (little early) full of wonderful homemade black walnut chocolates. The box origanally contained shorbread biscuts and is a metal box that had pictures from London (bus, phone box, changing of the guard and big ben with the flag) I guess she sent it because I am her English child. (Born in Oxford many years ago) Love it now I just need to turn it into a cross stitch pattern. Hope you had a Happy Christmas and Have a wonderful new year

    Reply
  77. Hi Nicola
    Here in the US we do not do Boxing Day but my mom sent me a box (little early) full of wonderful homemade black walnut chocolates. The box origanally contained shorbread biscuts and is a metal box that had pictures from London (bus, phone box, changing of the guard and big ben with the flag) I guess she sent it because I am her English child. (Born in Oxford many years ago) Love it now I just need to turn it into a cross stitch pattern. Hope you had a Happy Christmas and Have a wonderful new year

    Reply
  78. Hi Nicola
    Here in the US we do not do Boxing Day but my mom sent me a box (little early) full of wonderful homemade black walnut chocolates. The box origanally contained shorbread biscuts and is a metal box that had pictures from London (bus, phone box, changing of the guard and big ben with the flag) I guess she sent it because I am her English child. (Born in Oxford many years ago) Love it now I just need to turn it into a cross stitch pattern. Hope you had a Happy Christmas and Have a wonderful new year

    Reply
  79. Hi Nicola
    Here in the US we do not do Boxing Day but my mom sent me a box (little early) full of wonderful homemade black walnut chocolates. The box origanally contained shorbread biscuts and is a metal box that had pictures from London (bus, phone box, changing of the guard and big ben with the flag) I guess she sent it because I am her English child. (Born in Oxford many years ago) Love it now I just need to turn it into a cross stitch pattern. Hope you had a Happy Christmas and Have a wonderful new year

    Reply
  80. Hi Nicola
    Here in the US we do not do Boxing Day but my mom sent me a box (little early) full of wonderful homemade black walnut chocolates. The box origanally contained shorbread biscuts and is a metal box that had pictures from London (bus, phone box, changing of the guard and big ben with the flag) I guess she sent it because I am her English child. (Born in Oxford many years ago) Love it now I just need to turn it into a cross stitch pattern. Hope you had a Happy Christmas and Have a wonderful new year

    Reply
  81. Hi Wendy! I;d never heard of black walnut chocolates but they sound scrumptious! What a great idea to turn the picture on the tin into a cross stitch pattern too. A very Happy New year to you!

    Reply
  82. Hi Wendy! I;d never heard of black walnut chocolates but they sound scrumptious! What a great idea to turn the picture on the tin into a cross stitch pattern too. A very Happy New year to you!

    Reply
  83. Hi Wendy! I;d never heard of black walnut chocolates but they sound scrumptious! What a great idea to turn the picture on the tin into a cross stitch pattern too. A very Happy New year to you!

    Reply
  84. Hi Wendy! I;d never heard of black walnut chocolates but they sound scrumptious! What a great idea to turn the picture on the tin into a cross stitch pattern too. A very Happy New year to you!

    Reply
  85. Hi Wendy! I;d never heard of black walnut chocolates but they sound scrumptious! What a great idea to turn the picture on the tin into a cross stitch pattern too. A very Happy New year to you!

    Reply
  86. Hi !
    Sorry to answer so late, I had saved the post to read it later… Which means now !
    In France, we don’t celebrate Boxing day as such. Still, the 26th of December is a bank holiday in Eastern France (Alsace-Moselle, where the old “Concordat” Napoleonic law still prevails for religious matters, because this area was occupied by Germany in 1905 when the “Separation of State and Church” law was adopted in France). It’s a bank holiday because of the Saint Etienne, St Stephen’s day.
    But we do have a tradition more or less matching Christmas boxes : it’s the Ă©trennes. It’s traditionnel, at the beginning of the New Year, to offer something to people providing services to you : the building caretaker if you’re living in a flat, the postman, the house cleaner if you have one, the nanny/teacher of your kids, …
    It can be chocolates, a bottle of wine, small presents or, more usually, some money, depending of the job. For instance, as a Primary school teacher, I usually receive a few chocolate boxes as “Ă©trennes” for the New Year (which I accept gratefully, whereas I’d definitely have to refuse money 🙂 )

    Reply
  87. Hi !
    Sorry to answer so late, I had saved the post to read it later… Which means now !
    In France, we don’t celebrate Boxing day as such. Still, the 26th of December is a bank holiday in Eastern France (Alsace-Moselle, where the old “Concordat” Napoleonic law still prevails for religious matters, because this area was occupied by Germany in 1905 when the “Separation of State and Church” law was adopted in France). It’s a bank holiday because of the Saint Etienne, St Stephen’s day.
    But we do have a tradition more or less matching Christmas boxes : it’s the Ă©trennes. It’s traditionnel, at the beginning of the New Year, to offer something to people providing services to you : the building caretaker if you’re living in a flat, the postman, the house cleaner if you have one, the nanny/teacher of your kids, …
    It can be chocolates, a bottle of wine, small presents or, more usually, some money, depending of the job. For instance, as a Primary school teacher, I usually receive a few chocolate boxes as “Ă©trennes” for the New Year (which I accept gratefully, whereas I’d definitely have to refuse money 🙂 )

    Reply
  88. Hi !
    Sorry to answer so late, I had saved the post to read it later… Which means now !
    In France, we don’t celebrate Boxing day as such. Still, the 26th of December is a bank holiday in Eastern France (Alsace-Moselle, where the old “Concordat” Napoleonic law still prevails for religious matters, because this area was occupied by Germany in 1905 when the “Separation of State and Church” law was adopted in France). It’s a bank holiday because of the Saint Etienne, St Stephen’s day.
    But we do have a tradition more or less matching Christmas boxes : it’s the Ă©trennes. It’s traditionnel, at the beginning of the New Year, to offer something to people providing services to you : the building caretaker if you’re living in a flat, the postman, the house cleaner if you have one, the nanny/teacher of your kids, …
    It can be chocolates, a bottle of wine, small presents or, more usually, some money, depending of the job. For instance, as a Primary school teacher, I usually receive a few chocolate boxes as “Ă©trennes” for the New Year (which I accept gratefully, whereas I’d definitely have to refuse money 🙂 )

    Reply
  89. Hi !
    Sorry to answer so late, I had saved the post to read it later… Which means now !
    In France, we don’t celebrate Boxing day as such. Still, the 26th of December is a bank holiday in Eastern France (Alsace-Moselle, where the old “Concordat” Napoleonic law still prevails for religious matters, because this area was occupied by Germany in 1905 when the “Separation of State and Church” law was adopted in France). It’s a bank holiday because of the Saint Etienne, St Stephen’s day.
    But we do have a tradition more or less matching Christmas boxes : it’s the Ă©trennes. It’s traditionnel, at the beginning of the New Year, to offer something to people providing services to you : the building caretaker if you’re living in a flat, the postman, the house cleaner if you have one, the nanny/teacher of your kids, …
    It can be chocolates, a bottle of wine, small presents or, more usually, some money, depending of the job. For instance, as a Primary school teacher, I usually receive a few chocolate boxes as “Ă©trennes” for the New Year (which I accept gratefully, whereas I’d definitely have to refuse money 🙂 )

    Reply
  90. Hi !
    Sorry to answer so late, I had saved the post to read it later… Which means now !
    In France, we don’t celebrate Boxing day as such. Still, the 26th of December is a bank holiday in Eastern France (Alsace-Moselle, where the old “Concordat” Napoleonic law still prevails for religious matters, because this area was occupied by Germany in 1905 when the “Separation of State and Church” law was adopted in France). It’s a bank holiday because of the Saint Etienne, St Stephen’s day.
    But we do have a tradition more or less matching Christmas boxes : it’s the Ă©trennes. It’s traditionnel, at the beginning of the New Year, to offer something to people providing services to you : the building caretaker if you’re living in a flat, the postman, the house cleaner if you have one, the nanny/teacher of your kids, …
    It can be chocolates, a bottle of wine, small presents or, more usually, some money, depending of the job. For instance, as a Primary school teacher, I usually receive a few chocolate boxes as “Ă©trennes” for the New Year (which I accept gratefully, whereas I’d definitely have to refuse money 🙂 )

    Reply

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