We’re Four!

 

Xmas07
Happy birthday to us! Happy birthday to us! Happy fourth birthday to the Wenches, happy birthday to us!

Hi, this is Jo, compiling our special anniversary blog with four helpers. Each of the Wenches has answered the question, "Why historicals?" We hope you'll enjoy the posts, and then answer the question in your own way.

There's a special anniversary gift, of course — a mini-shopping spree at a great internet bookstore called The Book Depository. What's particularly great about this one? It ships free world wide. We do have Wench readers all around the world, and this way the prize is of use to any of you. To fit with our 4th anniversary, the prize is $40 US, which translates into about 28 British pounds. Why do I mention that? Because the main Book Depository site is in the UK, though there is one in the US. American readers might find books at the British site not readily available in the States.

Click here to visit them now.

What do you have to do to win? The details are at the end.

Now on the the Wenches' answers to the question, "Why historicals?"

Susank Susan King: For me, reading fairy tales and then historical fiction as a kid went hand in hand, and then years spent studying history at a graduate level heightened my fascination for history. So writing historicals, when I began writing fiction, seemed like a natural choice.

Queen_Hereafter_King

Something that greatly appeals to me in historicals is the way a good historical can have a rich world-building aspect — we can totally immerse, through that story, in a different time and place and discover new things that don't exist in our own world. And a good historical, for me, always has a hint (or more!) of that fairy tale essence, of romance and adventure in a far away time and place — and yet characters, settings, situations and events might be actual. 

As fiction writers, we're part of a long, long tradition of storytellers and bards who told tales by the fireside–and those old stories were often historicals!

Anneg Anne Gracie: Why historicals? I blame Georgette Heyer. She caught me young (11  years old) and I was hooked for life. The book was These Old Shades,  and it plunged me into an exciting new world and swept me way on the  adventures of Léon, bought for a few coins for the mysterious purposes  of His Grace of Avon, turned into Léonie and taught to be a girl  again, and then— well, you need to read it. I'm not sure I even  noticed it was a historical — for me, the characters and the story were what counted, and the historical setting was just their world, as  Mowgli lived in his world and Anne of Green Gables hers.

I don't understand people who love paranormals but say they don't like  historicals because of "all that history" — as if a historical novel  is some kind of history textbook. And I don't understand those who 
only want to read about men and women of their own nationality, time  and country. Sure, it's fun, but I love to escape to other places, other worlds, other times.

I read all kinds of fiction; fantasy, adventure, mystery, sci-fi and  historicals of all kinds  but whenSharpe2 it came to writing a romance, Heyer  had entwined the Regency era and romance firmly in my mind. I love  everything about the Regency era;  high society —glamor, intrigue and  frivolity, the dark undertow of poverty, the tragedy and heroism of  war, the huge changes wrought by the industrial revolution, the growth  of the British Empire and more. It's such a rich and varied garden to  browse in.

It's perfect for me, because I love to explore the people  who fall through the cracks of change — heroines cast adrift by  circumstance, heroes who've returned changed by war, or who are the  product of broken or dysfunctional families. And speaking of  historical heroes… sigh… what's not to love about larger-than- life, unreconstructed men, raised (they think) to rule? 

When I started writing romance, I connected with a small bunch of  would-be writers who seemed to know everything –all the publishers,  the agents, the rules of writing etc. To my dismay they said, "Don't 
you know the historical is dead? All the historical authors are leaving. If you want to get published, you'll have to write  contemporary." But I loved my Regency-era story so I persevered with  it, and to my surprise and delight I sold it. Apparently the publisher  didn't know the Historical Was Dead — and I wasn't going to tell them.  That was ten years ago, but last year I met a very talented new writer  who tCatchabride16kold me worriedly that she'd just been told the Historical was  Dead and she ought to be writing paranormals… Heh heh. 

As far as I'm concerned, as long as people write fabulous and original  stories, the historical will never die. It's a constantly evolving  subgenre and every year wonderful new writers emerge who take a rich,  well mined vein of history and create something fresh, bright and new-minted from it. And congratulations to the Original Wenches who've done much to ensure the historical will never die.

Andreapickens Cara Elliott: "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways . . . "

My love affair with the genre started when I was a child. I remember the wonderment of reading of T.H. White's The Once And Future King, a book on King Arthur childhood and his schooling with Merlin (shades of Harry Potter) It was sheer magic! Then it was on to swashbuckling adventure like The Three Musketeers, Ivanhoe, and Horatio Hornblower. And as I got a little older, Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre. The list could, of course, go on ad infinitum, but I shall simply say that I was an avid reader long before I was a writer.

When I read, like to be transported into a different world, and a historical setting adds that additional layer of "fantasy" — and I mean that in every good sense of the word!   I want to savor the sights anSurrd sounds and texture of the imagination . . . and somehow, having the story take place in another era helps me slide out of the mundane confines of my daily routine and into that special place.   If I learn a little something about a facet of real history, be it painting or smuggling or what a Regency phaeton and postboy look like, well, that only adds to the enjoyment. 

Now, don't get me wrong, I love a good contemporary story, too. But there is an element of romance to windswept castles and candlelit ballrooms, aswirl in silks and satins, that make my heart go pitter-patter.

Now, why do I write historicals? For exactly the same reasons. Leaving the present for the past seems to let my mind to explore stories and characters with more freedom. Maybe it's because even with all the research we do-the studying of fashion and furnishings, the walking through historic houses and gardens, the tasting of orgeat and spotted dick-we have to create what life felt like, smelled like and sounded like in our own heads.

Every so often, a big debate arises in publishing circles on whether historicals are dead. Dead? Ha! A look in any bookstore will show that they are clearly alive and thriving. And I believe that won't change because they have an appeal that is truly timeless.

Patrice Pat Rice: I was one of those irritating children who always asked Why? Of course, at that age, my concerns were more of the nature of Why do I have to wear dresses and not pants like the boys? But I quickly branched out to Why did the Greeks and Romans have so many gGreek godods and Why are they rioting in Alabama and after being ignored enough, I eventually learned to look up the answers. That's when I learned that you can't understand today or tomorrow unless you understand yesterday. The old adage that history is doomed to repeat itself until we learn from it is painfully true, so I set out to learn from our ancestors.

Mystic-warrior_170s
With that kind of fascination with history, writing historical romance was a given. It's the people and cultures and society of prior periods that interest me more than battles and dates. Romance allows me to explore the past through the eyes of my characters, play with the same issues we have today” Does he love me? How will I feed my children?” and show how society changes from the perspective of my characters. 

And besides writing about history, I get to write about my other passion ”how love changes everything." All is good!  Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

Mary Jo Putney. WhyMjpwench  historicals?  Why oxygen?  I seem to have needed both my whole  life
 Maybe it's genetic.  My father was a history buff, with a particular interest in the American  Civil War.  As a boy, he heard  stories from his grandfather, who served with the Union  at Gettysburg.  As kids, we regularly visited places  like Fort  Ticonderoga (shown below.) I  was the only of my father's offspring who was happy to read the historical  novels he offTiconderogaered, so I cut my teeth on Bruce Lancaster and Kenneth Roberts.  (Georgette Heyer, Norah  Lofts, and Dorothy Dunnett came later.)  

 
As a  reader, I love being taken to other worlds, which covers both historical novels  and my lifelong love of science fiction and fantasy.  Of course, I read just about everything,  but a good historical novel was a particular delight.  Our tastes shape our lives, so it's not  surprising that I ended up with a degree in 18th century British  Literature, norOxford that I engineered an opportunity to live in Oxford, England for  two years. There it is, in misty grandeur. Click on the picture to enlarge.

 
With  all that background, it's hardly surprising that when I mastered word processing  and decided to see if I could write a novel, what came out was a traditioNeverlessthanalady150nal  Regency romance, a la Georgette Heyer.  I loved the language, the settings, the happy endings.  Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it  wasn't long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write  magnificently over the top characters in a way that's very difficult with contemporary settings.  

History also makes it possible to explore interesting  issues right at the source, whether it's  Waterloo or abolition.  And it gives us an excuse to read  fascinating history and visit even more fascinating places.  And deduct part of the costs, even.  <g> 

I  mean, is this a great job or what?!!! 

Nicolacornick Nicola Cornick. Nicola is enjoying a well-deserved holiday.
Confessions of a duchess

If she gets back in time to contribute, it will be added then.

 

Mewench And now here's me, Jo Beverley. After all the excellent pieces above, I could just say, "Hear, hear!" I too had a father who was very interested in history — in this case, English history. His particular hero was Hereward the Wake, leading of the English resistance after the Norman Conquest. That's why he appeared in my first historical romance, Lord of My Heart.

I loved historical fiction from my earliest reading days. After all, most fairytales are historical, aren't they? I adored the traditional costumes for Cinderella, which could be why I now write Georgians. I, too, plunged into adult historical romance at about 11, first with The Scarlet Pimpernel, and then with Georgette Heyer. I, too, studied history at university simply because I loved it.

The whole "historicals are dead" seemed an error to me at the time, so I ignored it, which has worked out very well. Why did it seem wrong? I could see that my books were doing jusTsblgt fine, and the readers I had contact with were as enthusiastic about the books as ever. In addition, however, people have always been hungry for tales of yore, be they of love, adventure, myths, or monsters. I don't think that will ever change.

The favourite periods might change, or the most popular story elements, but fiction set in the past, especially love stories set in the past, will die round about the time the sun does.

Talking about periods, I have no interest in historical fiction set in the recent past because that's too close for the magic of "other times" to work. Anyone else feel like that? I think I can't find the magic in a time inhabited by anyone I've known, and one of my grandmothers was born in 1860. Yes, I do remember her, and a scary remnant of the Victorian era she was too. She probably explains my aversion to that period. So it's back to Regency and earlier for me.

Now it's your turn.

Share your thoughts on "Why historicals?" Why you read them, why you think others read them, and if you're a writer, why you write them. Could historical romance ever die?

On Thursday, May 27th, the Wenches will choose the most interesting comment posts, and we'll be very liberal about it, and then one will be randomly picked to win our prize.

Have fun,

The Word Wenches

430 thoughts on “We’re Four!”

  1. Reading historicals actually helped me in English classes in college! My sister used to give me a hard time about my “girl in the castle” books, and I was delighted to be able to tell her that they have a practical use as well as pure, wonderful entertainment!

    Reply
  2. Reading historicals actually helped me in English classes in college! My sister used to give me a hard time about my “girl in the castle” books, and I was delighted to be able to tell her that they have a practical use as well as pure, wonderful entertainment!

    Reply
  3. Reading historicals actually helped me in English classes in college! My sister used to give me a hard time about my “girl in the castle” books, and I was delighted to be able to tell her that they have a practical use as well as pure, wonderful entertainment!

    Reply
  4. Reading historicals actually helped me in English classes in college! My sister used to give me a hard time about my “girl in the castle” books, and I was delighted to be able to tell her that they have a practical use as well as pure, wonderful entertainment!

    Reply
  5. Reading historicals actually helped me in English classes in college! My sister used to give me a hard time about my “girl in the castle” books, and I was delighted to be able to tell her that they have a practical use as well as pure, wonderful entertainment!

    Reply
  6. Why historicals? For me, first, it is because it takes me away from my every day life of today. Next, it is far enough away from today I can suspend any disbelief as to the accuracy of the way and manner of life. Third, I learn about other times and areas as I want and expect accuracy as to locales and historical personalities. I have become interested enough in certain time periods I have studied those time periods on my own. Last, I love to read. Why should I not read books I find engrossing?

    Reply
  7. Why historicals? For me, first, it is because it takes me away from my every day life of today. Next, it is far enough away from today I can suspend any disbelief as to the accuracy of the way and manner of life. Third, I learn about other times and areas as I want and expect accuracy as to locales and historical personalities. I have become interested enough in certain time periods I have studied those time periods on my own. Last, I love to read. Why should I not read books I find engrossing?

    Reply
  8. Why historicals? For me, first, it is because it takes me away from my every day life of today. Next, it is far enough away from today I can suspend any disbelief as to the accuracy of the way and manner of life. Third, I learn about other times and areas as I want and expect accuracy as to locales and historical personalities. I have become interested enough in certain time periods I have studied those time periods on my own. Last, I love to read. Why should I not read books I find engrossing?

    Reply
  9. Why historicals? For me, first, it is because it takes me away from my every day life of today. Next, it is far enough away from today I can suspend any disbelief as to the accuracy of the way and manner of life. Third, I learn about other times and areas as I want and expect accuracy as to locales and historical personalities. I have become interested enough in certain time periods I have studied those time periods on my own. Last, I love to read. Why should I not read books I find engrossing?

    Reply
  10. Why historicals? For me, first, it is because it takes me away from my every day life of today. Next, it is far enough away from today I can suspend any disbelief as to the accuracy of the way and manner of life. Third, I learn about other times and areas as I want and expect accuracy as to locales and historical personalities. I have become interested enough in certain time periods I have studied those time periods on my own. Last, I love to read. Why should I not read books I find engrossing?

    Reply
  11. Okay, so I tend to love romances in general, regardless of time period…but historicals are some of my favorites! I love the fashion, the balls, lords and ladies, everything about them…My very first romances (back in middle school) were historicals. I read pretty much the entire Sunfire series published by Scholastic. Haha, I didn’t like history in school, but I could tell you about the Oregon Trail, the American Revolution, the Civil War, simply because I devoured those historicals 🙂 There’s just something compelling about reading about a time so distant, but identifying with the characters because regardless of the passage of time, some things remain the same – love, passion, sacrifice, obstacles, and the happily ever after that we all hope to find.

    Reply
  12. Okay, so I tend to love romances in general, regardless of time period…but historicals are some of my favorites! I love the fashion, the balls, lords and ladies, everything about them…My very first romances (back in middle school) were historicals. I read pretty much the entire Sunfire series published by Scholastic. Haha, I didn’t like history in school, but I could tell you about the Oregon Trail, the American Revolution, the Civil War, simply because I devoured those historicals 🙂 There’s just something compelling about reading about a time so distant, but identifying with the characters because regardless of the passage of time, some things remain the same – love, passion, sacrifice, obstacles, and the happily ever after that we all hope to find.

    Reply
  13. Okay, so I tend to love romances in general, regardless of time period…but historicals are some of my favorites! I love the fashion, the balls, lords and ladies, everything about them…My very first romances (back in middle school) were historicals. I read pretty much the entire Sunfire series published by Scholastic. Haha, I didn’t like history in school, but I could tell you about the Oregon Trail, the American Revolution, the Civil War, simply because I devoured those historicals 🙂 There’s just something compelling about reading about a time so distant, but identifying with the characters because regardless of the passage of time, some things remain the same – love, passion, sacrifice, obstacles, and the happily ever after that we all hope to find.

    Reply
  14. Okay, so I tend to love romances in general, regardless of time period…but historicals are some of my favorites! I love the fashion, the balls, lords and ladies, everything about them…My very first romances (back in middle school) were historicals. I read pretty much the entire Sunfire series published by Scholastic. Haha, I didn’t like history in school, but I could tell you about the Oregon Trail, the American Revolution, the Civil War, simply because I devoured those historicals 🙂 There’s just something compelling about reading about a time so distant, but identifying with the characters because regardless of the passage of time, some things remain the same – love, passion, sacrifice, obstacles, and the happily ever after that we all hope to find.

    Reply
  15. Okay, so I tend to love romances in general, regardless of time period…but historicals are some of my favorites! I love the fashion, the balls, lords and ladies, everything about them…My very first romances (back in middle school) were historicals. I read pretty much the entire Sunfire series published by Scholastic. Haha, I didn’t like history in school, but I could tell you about the Oregon Trail, the American Revolution, the Civil War, simply because I devoured those historicals 🙂 There’s just something compelling about reading about a time so distant, but identifying with the characters because regardless of the passage of time, some things remain the same – love, passion, sacrifice, obstacles, and the happily ever after that we all hope to find.

    Reply
  16. I got deeply into Tudor history and historical novels in early High School years. My mother got me into Georgette Heyer and Roberta Gellis at that time or earlier. I also remember reading Jane Eyre in 7th Grade. I also read all of the Horatio Hornblower books then too. Why? I’m not quite sure.

    Reply
  17. I got deeply into Tudor history and historical novels in early High School years. My mother got me into Georgette Heyer and Roberta Gellis at that time or earlier. I also remember reading Jane Eyre in 7th Grade. I also read all of the Horatio Hornblower books then too. Why? I’m not quite sure.

    Reply
  18. I got deeply into Tudor history and historical novels in early High School years. My mother got me into Georgette Heyer and Roberta Gellis at that time or earlier. I also remember reading Jane Eyre in 7th Grade. I also read all of the Horatio Hornblower books then too. Why? I’m not quite sure.

    Reply
  19. I got deeply into Tudor history and historical novels in early High School years. My mother got me into Georgette Heyer and Roberta Gellis at that time or earlier. I also remember reading Jane Eyre in 7th Grade. I also read all of the Horatio Hornblower books then too. Why? I’m not quite sure.

    Reply
  20. I got deeply into Tudor history and historical novels in early High School years. My mother got me into Georgette Heyer and Roberta Gellis at that time or earlier. I also remember reading Jane Eyre in 7th Grade. I also read all of the Horatio Hornblower books then too. Why? I’m not quite sure.

    Reply
  21. I like Historicals. Started reading them as a teenager. Way, way back then Westerns, Revolutionary War and the Civil War books were my favorites. Nowadays, Regency and Georgians are favorites.
    But I’ll read most any period.

    Reply
  22. I like Historicals. Started reading them as a teenager. Way, way back then Westerns, Revolutionary War and the Civil War books were my favorites. Nowadays, Regency and Georgians are favorites.
    But I’ll read most any period.

    Reply
  23. I like Historicals. Started reading them as a teenager. Way, way back then Westerns, Revolutionary War and the Civil War books were my favorites. Nowadays, Regency and Georgians are favorites.
    But I’ll read most any period.

    Reply
  24. I like Historicals. Started reading them as a teenager. Way, way back then Westerns, Revolutionary War and the Civil War books were my favorites. Nowadays, Regency and Georgians are favorites.
    But I’ll read most any period.

    Reply
  25. I like Historicals. Started reading them as a teenager. Way, way back then Westerns, Revolutionary War and the Civil War books were my favorites. Nowadays, Regency and Georgians are favorites.
    But I’ll read most any period.

    Reply
  26. Why historicals for me? Well, since I’m doing a blog crawl this month on “thank your favorite author” and mine is up the 25th. (Anne, you might want to peek) I won’t go into a lot of detail, but I started around 11 as well (must be a magic age) with Menfreya in the Morning. Victoria Holt shaped my romance reading and the ‘gothic novel’ is still my favorite. I do have a couple of other authors I had to thank as well (couldn’t do just one!) but they both either also write historical, or travel through time to historical places, so I just can’t get it out of my system.
    I decided to try and write romance too. Have been for awhile now. As much as I would rather read and write historicals than any other genre, I love my paranormals too so I guess it’s no wonder that I ended up writing Regency werewolves. I get the best of both that way. And the research. Oy! I can get lost in the history for days. :o)
    As a side note: Who doesn’t love Sean Bean as Sharpe? OMGTODIEFOR!
    :o)

    Reply
  27. Why historicals for me? Well, since I’m doing a blog crawl this month on “thank your favorite author” and mine is up the 25th. (Anne, you might want to peek) I won’t go into a lot of detail, but I started around 11 as well (must be a magic age) with Menfreya in the Morning. Victoria Holt shaped my romance reading and the ‘gothic novel’ is still my favorite. I do have a couple of other authors I had to thank as well (couldn’t do just one!) but they both either also write historical, or travel through time to historical places, so I just can’t get it out of my system.
    I decided to try and write romance too. Have been for awhile now. As much as I would rather read and write historicals than any other genre, I love my paranormals too so I guess it’s no wonder that I ended up writing Regency werewolves. I get the best of both that way. And the research. Oy! I can get lost in the history for days. :o)
    As a side note: Who doesn’t love Sean Bean as Sharpe? OMGTODIEFOR!
    :o)

    Reply
  28. Why historicals for me? Well, since I’m doing a blog crawl this month on “thank your favorite author” and mine is up the 25th. (Anne, you might want to peek) I won’t go into a lot of detail, but I started around 11 as well (must be a magic age) with Menfreya in the Morning. Victoria Holt shaped my romance reading and the ‘gothic novel’ is still my favorite. I do have a couple of other authors I had to thank as well (couldn’t do just one!) but they both either also write historical, or travel through time to historical places, so I just can’t get it out of my system.
    I decided to try and write romance too. Have been for awhile now. As much as I would rather read and write historicals than any other genre, I love my paranormals too so I guess it’s no wonder that I ended up writing Regency werewolves. I get the best of both that way. And the research. Oy! I can get lost in the history for days. :o)
    As a side note: Who doesn’t love Sean Bean as Sharpe? OMGTODIEFOR!
    :o)

    Reply
  29. Why historicals for me? Well, since I’m doing a blog crawl this month on “thank your favorite author” and mine is up the 25th. (Anne, you might want to peek) I won’t go into a lot of detail, but I started around 11 as well (must be a magic age) with Menfreya in the Morning. Victoria Holt shaped my romance reading and the ‘gothic novel’ is still my favorite. I do have a couple of other authors I had to thank as well (couldn’t do just one!) but they both either also write historical, or travel through time to historical places, so I just can’t get it out of my system.
    I decided to try and write romance too. Have been for awhile now. As much as I would rather read and write historicals than any other genre, I love my paranormals too so I guess it’s no wonder that I ended up writing Regency werewolves. I get the best of both that way. And the research. Oy! I can get lost in the history for days. :o)
    As a side note: Who doesn’t love Sean Bean as Sharpe? OMGTODIEFOR!
    :o)

    Reply
  30. Why historicals for me? Well, since I’m doing a blog crawl this month on “thank your favorite author” and mine is up the 25th. (Anne, you might want to peek) I won’t go into a lot of detail, but I started around 11 as well (must be a magic age) with Menfreya in the Morning. Victoria Holt shaped my romance reading and the ‘gothic novel’ is still my favorite. I do have a couple of other authors I had to thank as well (couldn’t do just one!) but they both either also write historical, or travel through time to historical places, so I just can’t get it out of my system.
    I decided to try and write romance too. Have been for awhile now. As much as I would rather read and write historicals than any other genre, I love my paranormals too so I guess it’s no wonder that I ended up writing Regency werewolves. I get the best of both that way. And the research. Oy! I can get lost in the history for days. :o)
    As a side note: Who doesn’t love Sean Bean as Sharpe? OMGTODIEFOR!
    :o)

    Reply
  31. Why historicals? As both a reader and a writer, I have to give much of the blame (or credit) to Laura Ingalls Wilder! I read the Little House series to tatters starting from when I was 6 or 7. Laura and her family were vividly alive in my imagination, with lives so different from my own, yet so easy to relate to as well. Like Laura I was a tomboy in a world that favored girly girls, I loved horses, I wondered what lay beyond the next hill, I wanted to be popular at school but wasn’t sure how to go about it, and so on. Seeing how she lived her life made me want to learn even more about what had gone before my time.
    From there I branched out to anything else the library had to offer that was set in the past. By high school that included the Sunfire YA historical romance series and traditional Regencies. The rest is…history.

    Reply
  32. Why historicals? As both a reader and a writer, I have to give much of the blame (or credit) to Laura Ingalls Wilder! I read the Little House series to tatters starting from when I was 6 or 7. Laura and her family were vividly alive in my imagination, with lives so different from my own, yet so easy to relate to as well. Like Laura I was a tomboy in a world that favored girly girls, I loved horses, I wondered what lay beyond the next hill, I wanted to be popular at school but wasn’t sure how to go about it, and so on. Seeing how she lived her life made me want to learn even more about what had gone before my time.
    From there I branched out to anything else the library had to offer that was set in the past. By high school that included the Sunfire YA historical romance series and traditional Regencies. The rest is…history.

    Reply
  33. Why historicals? As both a reader and a writer, I have to give much of the blame (or credit) to Laura Ingalls Wilder! I read the Little House series to tatters starting from when I was 6 or 7. Laura and her family were vividly alive in my imagination, with lives so different from my own, yet so easy to relate to as well. Like Laura I was a tomboy in a world that favored girly girls, I loved horses, I wondered what lay beyond the next hill, I wanted to be popular at school but wasn’t sure how to go about it, and so on. Seeing how she lived her life made me want to learn even more about what had gone before my time.
    From there I branched out to anything else the library had to offer that was set in the past. By high school that included the Sunfire YA historical romance series and traditional Regencies. The rest is…history.

    Reply
  34. Why historicals? As both a reader and a writer, I have to give much of the blame (or credit) to Laura Ingalls Wilder! I read the Little House series to tatters starting from when I was 6 or 7. Laura and her family were vividly alive in my imagination, with lives so different from my own, yet so easy to relate to as well. Like Laura I was a tomboy in a world that favored girly girls, I loved horses, I wondered what lay beyond the next hill, I wanted to be popular at school but wasn’t sure how to go about it, and so on. Seeing how she lived her life made me want to learn even more about what had gone before my time.
    From there I branched out to anything else the library had to offer that was set in the past. By high school that included the Sunfire YA historical romance series and traditional Regencies. The rest is…history.

    Reply
  35. Why historicals? As both a reader and a writer, I have to give much of the blame (or credit) to Laura Ingalls Wilder! I read the Little House series to tatters starting from when I was 6 or 7. Laura and her family were vividly alive in my imagination, with lives so different from my own, yet so easy to relate to as well. Like Laura I was a tomboy in a world that favored girly girls, I loved horses, I wondered what lay beyond the next hill, I wanted to be popular at school but wasn’t sure how to go about it, and so on. Seeing how she lived her life made me want to learn even more about what had gone before my time.
    From there I branched out to anything else the library had to offer that was set in the past. By high school that included the Sunfire YA historical romance series and traditional Regencies. The rest is…history.

    Reply
  36. Reading historicals are what kept me sane while my children were growing up. After spending most of my day with my three positively devine children, I would escape to another place and time when I read a historical romance. For a little while at least my spirit was transported away to a totally different historical period.
    Historicals also were my salvation in First Year French when we had an ogre of a teacher. Luckily for me she asked a question that I was able to answer based upon my reading from medieval novels. The rest of the class was amazed and I just thanked my lucky stars that I loved to read!
    Thanks and happy birthday. Keep on writing. Historicals have been and remain my favorite novel of choice.

    Reply
  37. Reading historicals are what kept me sane while my children were growing up. After spending most of my day with my three positively devine children, I would escape to another place and time when I read a historical romance. For a little while at least my spirit was transported away to a totally different historical period.
    Historicals also were my salvation in First Year French when we had an ogre of a teacher. Luckily for me she asked a question that I was able to answer based upon my reading from medieval novels. The rest of the class was amazed and I just thanked my lucky stars that I loved to read!
    Thanks and happy birthday. Keep on writing. Historicals have been and remain my favorite novel of choice.

    Reply
  38. Reading historicals are what kept me sane while my children were growing up. After spending most of my day with my three positively devine children, I would escape to another place and time when I read a historical romance. For a little while at least my spirit was transported away to a totally different historical period.
    Historicals also were my salvation in First Year French when we had an ogre of a teacher. Luckily for me she asked a question that I was able to answer based upon my reading from medieval novels. The rest of the class was amazed and I just thanked my lucky stars that I loved to read!
    Thanks and happy birthday. Keep on writing. Historicals have been and remain my favorite novel of choice.

    Reply
  39. Reading historicals are what kept me sane while my children were growing up. After spending most of my day with my three positively devine children, I would escape to another place and time when I read a historical romance. For a little while at least my spirit was transported away to a totally different historical period.
    Historicals also were my salvation in First Year French when we had an ogre of a teacher. Luckily for me she asked a question that I was able to answer based upon my reading from medieval novels. The rest of the class was amazed and I just thanked my lucky stars that I loved to read!
    Thanks and happy birthday. Keep on writing. Historicals have been and remain my favorite novel of choice.

    Reply
  40. Reading historicals are what kept me sane while my children were growing up. After spending most of my day with my three positively devine children, I would escape to another place and time when I read a historical romance. For a little while at least my spirit was transported away to a totally different historical period.
    Historicals also were my salvation in First Year French when we had an ogre of a teacher. Luckily for me she asked a question that I was able to answer based upon my reading from medieval novels. The rest of the class was amazed and I just thanked my lucky stars that I loved to read!
    Thanks and happy birthday. Keep on writing. Historicals have been and remain my favorite novel of choice.

    Reply
  41. Historicals are definitely escapism at its best – I love the intensity, the language, culture and the emphasis on traits like honor, gentility, bravery and duty. I really enjoy how much I learn about history too!

    Reply
  42. Historicals are definitely escapism at its best – I love the intensity, the language, culture and the emphasis on traits like honor, gentility, bravery and duty. I really enjoy how much I learn about history too!

    Reply
  43. Historicals are definitely escapism at its best – I love the intensity, the language, culture and the emphasis on traits like honor, gentility, bravery and duty. I really enjoy how much I learn about history too!

    Reply
  44. Historicals are definitely escapism at its best – I love the intensity, the language, culture and the emphasis on traits like honor, gentility, bravery and duty. I really enjoy how much I learn about history too!

    Reply
  45. Historicals are definitely escapism at its best – I love the intensity, the language, culture and the emphasis on traits like honor, gentility, bravery and duty. I really enjoy how much I learn about history too!

    Reply
  46. I love historicals. They take you back in time to an era you can only visit in the pages of a book. For this reason, they will never die. As with everything popularity rises and falls but they will always be there.

    Reply
  47. I love historicals. They take you back in time to an era you can only visit in the pages of a book. For this reason, they will never die. As with everything popularity rises and falls but they will always be there.

    Reply
  48. I love historicals. They take you back in time to an era you can only visit in the pages of a book. For this reason, they will never die. As with everything popularity rises and falls but they will always be there.

    Reply
  49. I love historicals. They take you back in time to an era you can only visit in the pages of a book. For this reason, they will never die. As with everything popularity rises and falls but they will always be there.

    Reply
  50. I love historicals. They take you back in time to an era you can only visit in the pages of a book. For this reason, they will never die. As with everything popularity rises and falls but they will always be there.

    Reply
  51. hmmm….. interesting post! Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it wasn’t long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write magnificently over the top characters in a way that’s very difficult with contemporary settings.

    Reply
  52. hmmm….. interesting post! Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it wasn’t long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write magnificently over the top characters in a way that’s very difficult with contemporary settings.

    Reply
  53. hmmm….. interesting post! Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it wasn’t long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write magnificently over the top characters in a way that’s very difficult with contemporary settings.

    Reply
  54. hmmm….. interesting post! Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it wasn’t long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write magnificently over the top characters in a way that’s very difficult with contemporary settings.

    Reply
  55. hmmm….. interesting post! Since I also loved stories with action and adventure, it wasn’t long until I moved into historical romance, where we can write magnificently over the top characters in a way that’s very difficult with contemporary settings.

    Reply
  56. Happy #4 & Here’s to many more : )
    The fairy tales did it. They were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! Then came Disney. Animated movie magic with a singing fair maiden and her equally vocally gifted handsome prince! Ahhh, then things got juicier…romance books replaced the fairy tales. The fairy godmothers were replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Chilhood whimsy turned into a young girl’s fancy! Then the girl became a young woman, and she was visited by the beneficent “Good Fairy”, also known as Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This “Good Fairy” of romance reads brought color and light, heart and heat, and hope for a true “happily ever after”. Eyes were opened wide, a heart set afire, an imagination ignited, and a soul was touched by beauty.

    Reply
  57. Happy #4 & Here’s to many more : )
    The fairy tales did it. They were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! Then came Disney. Animated movie magic with a singing fair maiden and her equally vocally gifted handsome prince! Ahhh, then things got juicier…romance books replaced the fairy tales. The fairy godmothers were replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Chilhood whimsy turned into a young girl’s fancy! Then the girl became a young woman, and she was visited by the beneficent “Good Fairy”, also known as Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This “Good Fairy” of romance reads brought color and light, heart and heat, and hope for a true “happily ever after”. Eyes were opened wide, a heart set afire, an imagination ignited, and a soul was touched by beauty.

    Reply
  58. Happy #4 & Here’s to many more : )
    The fairy tales did it. They were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! Then came Disney. Animated movie magic with a singing fair maiden and her equally vocally gifted handsome prince! Ahhh, then things got juicier…romance books replaced the fairy tales. The fairy godmothers were replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Chilhood whimsy turned into a young girl’s fancy! Then the girl became a young woman, and she was visited by the beneficent “Good Fairy”, also known as Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This “Good Fairy” of romance reads brought color and light, heart and heat, and hope for a true “happily ever after”. Eyes were opened wide, a heart set afire, an imagination ignited, and a soul was touched by beauty.

    Reply
  59. Happy #4 & Here’s to many more : )
    The fairy tales did it. They were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! Then came Disney. Animated movie magic with a singing fair maiden and her equally vocally gifted handsome prince! Ahhh, then things got juicier…romance books replaced the fairy tales. The fairy godmothers were replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Chilhood whimsy turned into a young girl’s fancy! Then the girl became a young woman, and she was visited by the beneficent “Good Fairy”, also known as Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This “Good Fairy” of romance reads brought color and light, heart and heat, and hope for a true “happily ever after”. Eyes were opened wide, a heart set afire, an imagination ignited, and a soul was touched by beauty.

    Reply
  60. Happy #4 & Here’s to many more : )
    The fairy tales did it. They were the earliest contact that many of us had with the romance and adventure of earlier times. Beautifully illustrated books with wondrous fables of a fair maiden swept away into happiness by a handsome prince! Then came Disney. Animated movie magic with a singing fair maiden and her equally vocally gifted handsome prince! Ahhh, then things got juicier…romance books replaced the fairy tales. The fairy godmothers were replaced by Georgette Heyer, Jane Aiken Hodge, Barbara Cartland and Jane Austen. Chilhood whimsy turned into a young girl’s fancy! Then the girl became a young woman, and she was visited by the beneficent “Good Fairy”, also known as Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. This “Good Fairy” of romance reads brought color and light, heart and heat, and hope for a true “happily ever after”. Eyes were opened wide, a heart set afire, an imagination ignited, and a soul was touched by beauty.

    Reply
  61. Both of my parents are history buffs. Dad was into historical buildings. Mom loved local history and family history. Early on my mom shared her favorite books with me, she introduced me to among others, Victoria Holt and Jean Plaidy, right along side Laura Ingalls Wilder. I became Tudor obsessed when PBS ran The Six Wives of Henry the VIIIth. Then moved on to Louis the 14th with Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique series. In 1976 my parents took my brother and me on a tour of the forts on the Michigan and Canadian shores of the Great Lakes and I read everything I could on the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. I have ancestors who fought on both sides of those wars. Reading historicals lead me to research and learn more about the era I was visiting. So why historicals? They’ve taught me about another time. They feed my love of history. They’ve made me laugh. They’ve made me cry. They’ve made me think. So why not historicals?

    Reply
  62. Both of my parents are history buffs. Dad was into historical buildings. Mom loved local history and family history. Early on my mom shared her favorite books with me, she introduced me to among others, Victoria Holt and Jean Plaidy, right along side Laura Ingalls Wilder. I became Tudor obsessed when PBS ran The Six Wives of Henry the VIIIth. Then moved on to Louis the 14th with Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique series. In 1976 my parents took my brother and me on a tour of the forts on the Michigan and Canadian shores of the Great Lakes and I read everything I could on the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. I have ancestors who fought on both sides of those wars. Reading historicals lead me to research and learn more about the era I was visiting. So why historicals? They’ve taught me about another time. They feed my love of history. They’ve made me laugh. They’ve made me cry. They’ve made me think. So why not historicals?

    Reply
  63. Both of my parents are history buffs. Dad was into historical buildings. Mom loved local history and family history. Early on my mom shared her favorite books with me, she introduced me to among others, Victoria Holt and Jean Plaidy, right along side Laura Ingalls Wilder. I became Tudor obsessed when PBS ran The Six Wives of Henry the VIIIth. Then moved on to Louis the 14th with Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique series. In 1976 my parents took my brother and me on a tour of the forts on the Michigan and Canadian shores of the Great Lakes and I read everything I could on the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. I have ancestors who fought on both sides of those wars. Reading historicals lead me to research and learn more about the era I was visiting. So why historicals? They’ve taught me about another time. They feed my love of history. They’ve made me laugh. They’ve made me cry. They’ve made me think. So why not historicals?

    Reply
  64. Both of my parents are history buffs. Dad was into historical buildings. Mom loved local history and family history. Early on my mom shared her favorite books with me, she introduced me to among others, Victoria Holt and Jean Plaidy, right along side Laura Ingalls Wilder. I became Tudor obsessed when PBS ran The Six Wives of Henry the VIIIth. Then moved on to Louis the 14th with Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique series. In 1976 my parents took my brother and me on a tour of the forts on the Michigan and Canadian shores of the Great Lakes and I read everything I could on the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. I have ancestors who fought on both sides of those wars. Reading historicals lead me to research and learn more about the era I was visiting. So why historicals? They’ve taught me about another time. They feed my love of history. They’ve made me laugh. They’ve made me cry. They’ve made me think. So why not historicals?

    Reply
  65. Both of my parents are history buffs. Dad was into historical buildings. Mom loved local history and family history. Early on my mom shared her favorite books with me, she introduced me to among others, Victoria Holt and Jean Plaidy, right along side Laura Ingalls Wilder. I became Tudor obsessed when PBS ran The Six Wives of Henry the VIIIth. Then moved on to Louis the 14th with Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique series. In 1976 my parents took my brother and me on a tour of the forts on the Michigan and Canadian shores of the Great Lakes and I read everything I could on the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. I have ancestors who fought on both sides of those wars. Reading historicals lead me to research and learn more about the era I was visiting. So why historicals? They’ve taught me about another time. They feed my love of history. They’ve made me laugh. They’ve made me cry. They’ve made me think. So why not historicals?

    Reply
  66. I have always loved historicals since back in the late sixties. When I was 13 I was lucky enough to have a wonderful librarian at my branch of the Philadelphia Library turn me on to Victoria Holt and Georgette Heyer. What a wonderful escape. Books were my safe haven to get away from a verbally abusive step mother. I felt safe in these books. I was the heroine and the hero was my hero who would always take care of me and keep me safe. The English language is so beautiful which is why my favorite books must take place in England or nearabouts. And the beauty of the old fashioned ways. Horse and carriages, no telephones, no cars, no electricity. Beautiful clothing, buttons and ties, no zippers, no velcro. And the love and romance!! I tell my male friends they could be the happiest men in the world in their bedrooms if they would just read one of the Word Wenches’ books. Historicals – the only ones I read. Thank you for being such wonderful writers.

    Reply
  67. I have always loved historicals since back in the late sixties. When I was 13 I was lucky enough to have a wonderful librarian at my branch of the Philadelphia Library turn me on to Victoria Holt and Georgette Heyer. What a wonderful escape. Books were my safe haven to get away from a verbally abusive step mother. I felt safe in these books. I was the heroine and the hero was my hero who would always take care of me and keep me safe. The English language is so beautiful which is why my favorite books must take place in England or nearabouts. And the beauty of the old fashioned ways. Horse and carriages, no telephones, no cars, no electricity. Beautiful clothing, buttons and ties, no zippers, no velcro. And the love and romance!! I tell my male friends they could be the happiest men in the world in their bedrooms if they would just read one of the Word Wenches’ books. Historicals – the only ones I read. Thank you for being such wonderful writers.

    Reply
  68. I have always loved historicals since back in the late sixties. When I was 13 I was lucky enough to have a wonderful librarian at my branch of the Philadelphia Library turn me on to Victoria Holt and Georgette Heyer. What a wonderful escape. Books were my safe haven to get away from a verbally abusive step mother. I felt safe in these books. I was the heroine and the hero was my hero who would always take care of me and keep me safe. The English language is so beautiful which is why my favorite books must take place in England or nearabouts. And the beauty of the old fashioned ways. Horse and carriages, no telephones, no cars, no electricity. Beautiful clothing, buttons and ties, no zippers, no velcro. And the love and romance!! I tell my male friends they could be the happiest men in the world in their bedrooms if they would just read one of the Word Wenches’ books. Historicals – the only ones I read. Thank you for being such wonderful writers.

    Reply
  69. I have always loved historicals since back in the late sixties. When I was 13 I was lucky enough to have a wonderful librarian at my branch of the Philadelphia Library turn me on to Victoria Holt and Georgette Heyer. What a wonderful escape. Books were my safe haven to get away from a verbally abusive step mother. I felt safe in these books. I was the heroine and the hero was my hero who would always take care of me and keep me safe. The English language is so beautiful which is why my favorite books must take place in England or nearabouts. And the beauty of the old fashioned ways. Horse and carriages, no telephones, no cars, no electricity. Beautiful clothing, buttons and ties, no zippers, no velcro. And the love and romance!! I tell my male friends they could be the happiest men in the world in their bedrooms if they would just read one of the Word Wenches’ books. Historicals – the only ones I read. Thank you for being such wonderful writers.

    Reply
  70. I have always loved historicals since back in the late sixties. When I was 13 I was lucky enough to have a wonderful librarian at my branch of the Philadelphia Library turn me on to Victoria Holt and Georgette Heyer. What a wonderful escape. Books were my safe haven to get away from a verbally abusive step mother. I felt safe in these books. I was the heroine and the hero was my hero who would always take care of me and keep me safe. The English language is so beautiful which is why my favorite books must take place in England or nearabouts. And the beauty of the old fashioned ways. Horse and carriages, no telephones, no cars, no electricity. Beautiful clothing, buttons and ties, no zippers, no velcro. And the love and romance!! I tell my male friends they could be the happiest men in the world in their bedrooms if they would just read one of the Word Wenches’ books. Historicals – the only ones I read. Thank you for being such wonderful writers.

    Reply
  71. Why historical for me.I love the charm that a historical brings.I think it shows a magical time . Moonlight carriage rides the cloth’s and ball’s rakes and ladies.Duke’s and Earls all have part of our history.And I love reading there great romance stories.No other gentries carries that same charm to me.

    Reply
  72. Why historical for me.I love the charm that a historical brings.I think it shows a magical time . Moonlight carriage rides the cloth’s and ball’s rakes and ladies.Duke’s and Earls all have part of our history.And I love reading there great romance stories.No other gentries carries that same charm to me.

    Reply
  73. Why historical for me.I love the charm that a historical brings.I think it shows a magical time . Moonlight carriage rides the cloth’s and ball’s rakes and ladies.Duke’s and Earls all have part of our history.And I love reading there great romance stories.No other gentries carries that same charm to me.

    Reply
  74. Why historical for me.I love the charm that a historical brings.I think it shows a magical time . Moonlight carriage rides the cloth’s and ball’s rakes and ladies.Duke’s and Earls all have part of our history.And I love reading there great romance stories.No other gentries carries that same charm to me.

    Reply
  75. Why historical for me.I love the charm that a historical brings.I think it shows a magical time . Moonlight carriage rides the cloth’s and ball’s rakes and ladies.Duke’s and Earls all have part of our history.And I love reading there great romance stories.No other gentries carries that same charm to me.

    Reply
  76. Happy Birthday Wenches!! I am so blessed to have you in my life.
    “Why historicals?” Because, as you have all said, they take me away to places familiar yet unknown. And I get to learn something in the process. Two birds with one stone. A plus in my all-too-busy life. And the good Lord knows I needn’t go on repeating any part of history. I’m much too good at creating my own mistakes.
    Why write them? It’s all Sherrie’s fault. You can ask her. I was happily writing dark fantasy. 🙂 Now, I’m happier writing romance, with a what-if time-travel twist.
    Could historical romance ever die? Not as long as there are good writers like you all. 🙂 For as long as man has wandered this hunk of rock, we’ve been fascinated with “from whence we have come.” A few of the wiser ones even remember to ask “why,” seeking to avoid repeat, as Prof. Pat pointed out. Then there are those of us who view history through the what-if lens. What if the Templar banking system was simply “that good,” because it was a copy of our own, the knowledge garnered by a traveler who visited us? What if Jules Verne’s fanciful submarine wasn’t a fantasy at all, but a road map for those who would build it, gathered from those who already had. But no matter how one chooses to view history—be it a flat line or a circle–we are forever looking back, seeking to discover ourselves and perhaps hoping to find a love we may have lost.
    Keep writing my dear friends. I am because you are.
    Hugs,
    Nina

    Reply
  77. Happy Birthday Wenches!! I am so blessed to have you in my life.
    “Why historicals?” Because, as you have all said, they take me away to places familiar yet unknown. And I get to learn something in the process. Two birds with one stone. A plus in my all-too-busy life. And the good Lord knows I needn’t go on repeating any part of history. I’m much too good at creating my own mistakes.
    Why write them? It’s all Sherrie’s fault. You can ask her. I was happily writing dark fantasy. 🙂 Now, I’m happier writing romance, with a what-if time-travel twist.
    Could historical romance ever die? Not as long as there are good writers like you all. 🙂 For as long as man has wandered this hunk of rock, we’ve been fascinated with “from whence we have come.” A few of the wiser ones even remember to ask “why,” seeking to avoid repeat, as Prof. Pat pointed out. Then there are those of us who view history through the what-if lens. What if the Templar banking system was simply “that good,” because it was a copy of our own, the knowledge garnered by a traveler who visited us? What if Jules Verne’s fanciful submarine wasn’t a fantasy at all, but a road map for those who would build it, gathered from those who already had. But no matter how one chooses to view history—be it a flat line or a circle–we are forever looking back, seeking to discover ourselves and perhaps hoping to find a love we may have lost.
    Keep writing my dear friends. I am because you are.
    Hugs,
    Nina

    Reply
  78. Happy Birthday Wenches!! I am so blessed to have you in my life.
    “Why historicals?” Because, as you have all said, they take me away to places familiar yet unknown. And I get to learn something in the process. Two birds with one stone. A plus in my all-too-busy life. And the good Lord knows I needn’t go on repeating any part of history. I’m much too good at creating my own mistakes.
    Why write them? It’s all Sherrie’s fault. You can ask her. I was happily writing dark fantasy. 🙂 Now, I’m happier writing romance, with a what-if time-travel twist.
    Could historical romance ever die? Not as long as there are good writers like you all. 🙂 For as long as man has wandered this hunk of rock, we’ve been fascinated with “from whence we have come.” A few of the wiser ones even remember to ask “why,” seeking to avoid repeat, as Prof. Pat pointed out. Then there are those of us who view history through the what-if lens. What if the Templar banking system was simply “that good,” because it was a copy of our own, the knowledge garnered by a traveler who visited us? What if Jules Verne’s fanciful submarine wasn’t a fantasy at all, but a road map for those who would build it, gathered from those who already had. But no matter how one chooses to view history—be it a flat line or a circle–we are forever looking back, seeking to discover ourselves and perhaps hoping to find a love we may have lost.
    Keep writing my dear friends. I am because you are.
    Hugs,
    Nina

    Reply
  79. Happy Birthday Wenches!! I am so blessed to have you in my life.
    “Why historicals?” Because, as you have all said, they take me away to places familiar yet unknown. And I get to learn something in the process. Two birds with one stone. A plus in my all-too-busy life. And the good Lord knows I needn’t go on repeating any part of history. I’m much too good at creating my own mistakes.
    Why write them? It’s all Sherrie’s fault. You can ask her. I was happily writing dark fantasy. 🙂 Now, I’m happier writing romance, with a what-if time-travel twist.
    Could historical romance ever die? Not as long as there are good writers like you all. 🙂 For as long as man has wandered this hunk of rock, we’ve been fascinated with “from whence we have come.” A few of the wiser ones even remember to ask “why,” seeking to avoid repeat, as Prof. Pat pointed out. Then there are those of us who view history through the what-if lens. What if the Templar banking system was simply “that good,” because it was a copy of our own, the knowledge garnered by a traveler who visited us? What if Jules Verne’s fanciful submarine wasn’t a fantasy at all, but a road map for those who would build it, gathered from those who already had. But no matter how one chooses to view history—be it a flat line or a circle–we are forever looking back, seeking to discover ourselves and perhaps hoping to find a love we may have lost.
    Keep writing my dear friends. I am because you are.
    Hugs,
    Nina

    Reply
  80. Happy Birthday Wenches!! I am so blessed to have you in my life.
    “Why historicals?” Because, as you have all said, they take me away to places familiar yet unknown. And I get to learn something in the process. Two birds with one stone. A plus in my all-too-busy life. And the good Lord knows I needn’t go on repeating any part of history. I’m much too good at creating my own mistakes.
    Why write them? It’s all Sherrie’s fault. You can ask her. I was happily writing dark fantasy. 🙂 Now, I’m happier writing romance, with a what-if time-travel twist.
    Could historical romance ever die? Not as long as there are good writers like you all. 🙂 For as long as man has wandered this hunk of rock, we’ve been fascinated with “from whence we have come.” A few of the wiser ones even remember to ask “why,” seeking to avoid repeat, as Prof. Pat pointed out. Then there are those of us who view history through the what-if lens. What if the Templar banking system was simply “that good,” because it was a copy of our own, the knowledge garnered by a traveler who visited us? What if Jules Verne’s fanciful submarine wasn’t a fantasy at all, but a road map for those who would build it, gathered from those who already had. But no matter how one chooses to view history—be it a flat line or a circle–we are forever looking back, seeking to discover ourselves and perhaps hoping to find a love we may have lost.
    Keep writing my dear friends. I am because you are.
    Hugs,
    Nina

    Reply
  81. Happy Birthday, I can’t believe that it’s been four years! I too cut my teeth and started my addiction with Georgette Heyer and Victoria Holt adding Kathleen E. Woodiwiss and Daphne DuMaurier and a whole host of others. I absolutely love stepping back in time and immersing myself in the past. Thanks to you all I can indulge this love everyday, so thanks for writing the books I love to read.

    Reply
  82. Happy Birthday, I can’t believe that it’s been four years! I too cut my teeth and started my addiction with Georgette Heyer and Victoria Holt adding Kathleen E. Woodiwiss and Daphne DuMaurier and a whole host of others. I absolutely love stepping back in time and immersing myself in the past. Thanks to you all I can indulge this love everyday, so thanks for writing the books I love to read.

    Reply
  83. Happy Birthday, I can’t believe that it’s been four years! I too cut my teeth and started my addiction with Georgette Heyer and Victoria Holt adding Kathleen E. Woodiwiss and Daphne DuMaurier and a whole host of others. I absolutely love stepping back in time and immersing myself in the past. Thanks to you all I can indulge this love everyday, so thanks for writing the books I love to read.

    Reply
  84. Happy Birthday, I can’t believe that it’s been four years! I too cut my teeth and started my addiction with Georgette Heyer and Victoria Holt adding Kathleen E. Woodiwiss and Daphne DuMaurier and a whole host of others. I absolutely love stepping back in time and immersing myself in the past. Thanks to you all I can indulge this love everyday, so thanks for writing the books I love to read.

    Reply
  85. Happy Birthday, I can’t believe that it’s been four years! I too cut my teeth and started my addiction with Georgette Heyer and Victoria Holt adding Kathleen E. Woodiwiss and Daphne DuMaurier and a whole host of others. I absolutely love stepping back in time and immersing myself in the past. Thanks to you all I can indulge this love everyday, so thanks for writing the books I love to read.

    Reply
  86. My first 2 books of a historical nature were Katherine by Anya Seton and Desiree by I believe by Annemarie Selinko. I was not a big history buff at the time, but oh my did I love John of Gaunt! Then came Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Helen MacInnis.
    I love anything with world building – so long as it does not resemble mine! LOL I had switched to sci-fi/fantasy and came back to historical romance, then on to paranormals and now back to history but I now require suspense in every piece of fiction I read.
    As I tend to get bored easily, and as I average a book a day, I go on “benders” of one type of book for awhile, get tired of that *kind* and move unto another.
    I begin reading history academically starting June 7, so I just might have to write my own some day!

    Reply
  87. My first 2 books of a historical nature were Katherine by Anya Seton and Desiree by I believe by Annemarie Selinko. I was not a big history buff at the time, but oh my did I love John of Gaunt! Then came Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Helen MacInnis.
    I love anything with world building – so long as it does not resemble mine! LOL I had switched to sci-fi/fantasy and came back to historical romance, then on to paranormals and now back to history but I now require suspense in every piece of fiction I read.
    As I tend to get bored easily, and as I average a book a day, I go on “benders” of one type of book for awhile, get tired of that *kind* and move unto another.
    I begin reading history academically starting June 7, so I just might have to write my own some day!

    Reply
  88. My first 2 books of a historical nature were Katherine by Anya Seton and Desiree by I believe by Annemarie Selinko. I was not a big history buff at the time, but oh my did I love John of Gaunt! Then came Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Helen MacInnis.
    I love anything with world building – so long as it does not resemble mine! LOL I had switched to sci-fi/fantasy and came back to historical romance, then on to paranormals and now back to history but I now require suspense in every piece of fiction I read.
    As I tend to get bored easily, and as I average a book a day, I go on “benders” of one type of book for awhile, get tired of that *kind* and move unto another.
    I begin reading history academically starting June 7, so I just might have to write my own some day!

    Reply
  89. My first 2 books of a historical nature were Katherine by Anya Seton and Desiree by I believe by Annemarie Selinko. I was not a big history buff at the time, but oh my did I love John of Gaunt! Then came Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Helen MacInnis.
    I love anything with world building – so long as it does not resemble mine! LOL I had switched to sci-fi/fantasy and came back to historical romance, then on to paranormals and now back to history but I now require suspense in every piece of fiction I read.
    As I tend to get bored easily, and as I average a book a day, I go on “benders” of one type of book for awhile, get tired of that *kind* and move unto another.
    I begin reading history academically starting June 7, so I just might have to write my own some day!

    Reply
  90. My first 2 books of a historical nature were Katherine by Anya Seton and Desiree by I believe by Annemarie Selinko. I was not a big history buff at the time, but oh my did I love John of Gaunt! Then came Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and Helen MacInnis.
    I love anything with world building – so long as it does not resemble mine! LOL I had switched to sci-fi/fantasy and came back to historical romance, then on to paranormals and now back to history but I now require suspense in every piece of fiction I read.
    As I tend to get bored easily, and as I average a book a day, I go on “benders” of one type of book for awhile, get tired of that *kind* and move unto another.
    I begin reading history academically starting June 7, so I just might have to write my own some day!

    Reply
  91. Ah, those Sunfire romances were wonderful! Susannah (Civil War) and Amanda (Oregon Trail) were my favorites. 🙂
    In addition to a history buff father, fairy tales, etc. I love to see heroes and heroines working within the confines of the manners and morals of a particular time and place. We have so few limits in our time and think them all necessary so that we have a hard time imagining how people lived and could be happy without instant everything and free love and infinite choices. I love to see a hero overcome with passion but still man enough to control himself b/c it would ruin the woman he loves if he gave in! 🙂 I love to see those guys tortured and yet still in control of their “baser” natures. 🙂 Nowadays there’s no call for restraint. Restraint has become syonymous with repression but it isn’t really. Anyway… For my money, historicals are here to stay!
    Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

    Reply
  92. Ah, those Sunfire romances were wonderful! Susannah (Civil War) and Amanda (Oregon Trail) were my favorites. 🙂
    In addition to a history buff father, fairy tales, etc. I love to see heroes and heroines working within the confines of the manners and morals of a particular time and place. We have so few limits in our time and think them all necessary so that we have a hard time imagining how people lived and could be happy without instant everything and free love and infinite choices. I love to see a hero overcome with passion but still man enough to control himself b/c it would ruin the woman he loves if he gave in! 🙂 I love to see those guys tortured and yet still in control of their “baser” natures. 🙂 Nowadays there’s no call for restraint. Restraint has become syonymous with repression but it isn’t really. Anyway… For my money, historicals are here to stay!
    Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

    Reply
  93. Ah, those Sunfire romances were wonderful! Susannah (Civil War) and Amanda (Oregon Trail) were my favorites. 🙂
    In addition to a history buff father, fairy tales, etc. I love to see heroes and heroines working within the confines of the manners and morals of a particular time and place. We have so few limits in our time and think them all necessary so that we have a hard time imagining how people lived and could be happy without instant everything and free love and infinite choices. I love to see a hero overcome with passion but still man enough to control himself b/c it would ruin the woman he loves if he gave in! 🙂 I love to see those guys tortured and yet still in control of their “baser” natures. 🙂 Nowadays there’s no call for restraint. Restraint has become syonymous with repression but it isn’t really. Anyway… For my money, historicals are here to stay!
    Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

    Reply
  94. Ah, those Sunfire romances were wonderful! Susannah (Civil War) and Amanda (Oregon Trail) were my favorites. 🙂
    In addition to a history buff father, fairy tales, etc. I love to see heroes and heroines working within the confines of the manners and morals of a particular time and place. We have so few limits in our time and think them all necessary so that we have a hard time imagining how people lived and could be happy without instant everything and free love and infinite choices. I love to see a hero overcome with passion but still man enough to control himself b/c it would ruin the woman he loves if he gave in! 🙂 I love to see those guys tortured and yet still in control of their “baser” natures. 🙂 Nowadays there’s no call for restraint. Restraint has become syonymous with repression but it isn’t really. Anyway… For my money, historicals are here to stay!
    Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

    Reply
  95. Ah, those Sunfire romances were wonderful! Susannah (Civil War) and Amanda (Oregon Trail) were my favorites. 🙂
    In addition to a history buff father, fairy tales, etc. I love to see heroes and heroines working within the confines of the manners and morals of a particular time and place. We have so few limits in our time and think them all necessary so that we have a hard time imagining how people lived and could be happy without instant everything and free love and infinite choices. I love to see a hero overcome with passion but still man enough to control himself b/c it would ruin the woman he loves if he gave in! 🙂 I love to see those guys tortured and yet still in control of their “baser” natures. 🙂 Nowadays there’s no call for restraint. Restraint has become syonymous with repression but it isn’t really. Anyway… For my money, historicals are here to stay!
    Happy Anniversary, Wenches!

    Reply
  96. Why historicals for me is the question? As a child I would see my mother always reading. Her favorite author was Victoria Holt and Mary Balogh. When she would finish reading one of the books I would retrieve it and begin reading it. Of course they did not have the sex scenes the romance novels have now. I am intrigued by the depth of the history,places, era, the attire both men and women had to wear and the romance.The adventure,the self-discipline, and proper etiquette. When the hero and the heroine first feel the jolt of emotions which they can’t even explain and understand why they feel the way they do towards each other. How they had to control there emotions. The lovers spats. How the man states he doesn’t understand why she infuriates him. The mystery of it all. The first glances of love in there eyes.How the impossible is possible when it comes to love for one another.The escape of everyday life into a world the authors are able to transport us into. They let us keep on believing in love,passion, courage and romance. As stated by author Cathy Maxwell, spends hours in front of her computer pondering the question, “Why do people fall in love?” It remains for her the mystery of life and the secret to happiness.
    Those bloody blasted rakes..Like the authors say a reformed rake is the best lover and husband of all… thank you to all the wonderful authors and writers for the wonderful stories you bring us. I wish you all the best…

    Reply
  97. Why historicals for me is the question? As a child I would see my mother always reading. Her favorite author was Victoria Holt and Mary Balogh. When she would finish reading one of the books I would retrieve it and begin reading it. Of course they did not have the sex scenes the romance novels have now. I am intrigued by the depth of the history,places, era, the attire both men and women had to wear and the romance.The adventure,the self-discipline, and proper etiquette. When the hero and the heroine first feel the jolt of emotions which they can’t even explain and understand why they feel the way they do towards each other. How they had to control there emotions. The lovers spats. How the man states he doesn’t understand why she infuriates him. The mystery of it all. The first glances of love in there eyes.How the impossible is possible when it comes to love for one another.The escape of everyday life into a world the authors are able to transport us into. They let us keep on believing in love,passion, courage and romance. As stated by author Cathy Maxwell, spends hours in front of her computer pondering the question, “Why do people fall in love?” It remains for her the mystery of life and the secret to happiness.
    Those bloody blasted rakes..Like the authors say a reformed rake is the best lover and husband of all… thank you to all the wonderful authors and writers for the wonderful stories you bring us. I wish you all the best…

    Reply
  98. Why historicals for me is the question? As a child I would see my mother always reading. Her favorite author was Victoria Holt and Mary Balogh. When she would finish reading one of the books I would retrieve it and begin reading it. Of course they did not have the sex scenes the romance novels have now. I am intrigued by the depth of the history,places, era, the attire both men and women had to wear and the romance.The adventure,the self-discipline, and proper etiquette. When the hero and the heroine first feel the jolt of emotions which they can’t even explain and understand why they feel the way they do towards each other. How they had to control there emotions. The lovers spats. How the man states he doesn’t understand why she infuriates him. The mystery of it all. The first glances of love in there eyes.How the impossible is possible when it comes to love for one another.The escape of everyday life into a world the authors are able to transport us into. They let us keep on believing in love,passion, courage and romance. As stated by author Cathy Maxwell, spends hours in front of her computer pondering the question, “Why do people fall in love?” It remains for her the mystery of life and the secret to happiness.
    Those bloody blasted rakes..Like the authors say a reformed rake is the best lover and husband of all… thank you to all the wonderful authors and writers for the wonderful stories you bring us. I wish you all the best…

    Reply
  99. Why historicals for me is the question? As a child I would see my mother always reading. Her favorite author was Victoria Holt and Mary Balogh. When she would finish reading one of the books I would retrieve it and begin reading it. Of course they did not have the sex scenes the romance novels have now. I am intrigued by the depth of the history,places, era, the attire both men and women had to wear and the romance.The adventure,the self-discipline, and proper etiquette. When the hero and the heroine first feel the jolt of emotions which they can’t even explain and understand why they feel the way they do towards each other. How they had to control there emotions. The lovers spats. How the man states he doesn’t understand why she infuriates him. The mystery of it all. The first glances of love in there eyes.How the impossible is possible when it comes to love for one another.The escape of everyday life into a world the authors are able to transport us into. They let us keep on believing in love,passion, courage and romance. As stated by author Cathy Maxwell, spends hours in front of her computer pondering the question, “Why do people fall in love?” It remains for her the mystery of life and the secret to happiness.
    Those bloody blasted rakes..Like the authors say a reformed rake is the best lover and husband of all… thank you to all the wonderful authors and writers for the wonderful stories you bring us. I wish you all the best…

    Reply
  100. Why historicals for me is the question? As a child I would see my mother always reading. Her favorite author was Victoria Holt and Mary Balogh. When she would finish reading one of the books I would retrieve it and begin reading it. Of course they did not have the sex scenes the romance novels have now. I am intrigued by the depth of the history,places, era, the attire both men and women had to wear and the romance.The adventure,the self-discipline, and proper etiquette. When the hero and the heroine first feel the jolt of emotions which they can’t even explain and understand why they feel the way they do towards each other. How they had to control there emotions. The lovers spats. How the man states he doesn’t understand why she infuriates him. The mystery of it all. The first glances of love in there eyes.How the impossible is possible when it comes to love for one another.The escape of everyday life into a world the authors are able to transport us into. They let us keep on believing in love,passion, courage and romance. As stated by author Cathy Maxwell, spends hours in front of her computer pondering the question, “Why do people fall in love?” It remains for her the mystery of life and the secret to happiness.
    Those bloody blasted rakes..Like the authors say a reformed rake is the best lover and husband of all… thank you to all the wonderful authors and writers for the wonderful stories you bring us. I wish you all the best…

    Reply
  101. My love of historicals was fostered by a teacher, I had for 4 years and started with Oregon history out of the Oregon Blue book. Have loved it since then.
    Georgette Heyer, Victoria Holt,are two I started with. Read Biographies, am currently reading about past presidents. The Revolutionary War Period, Napoleon, Charles II, Elizabeth I. Medieval and Regency periods are favorites. I read most genres but history is the favorite.

    Reply
  102. My love of historicals was fostered by a teacher, I had for 4 years and started with Oregon history out of the Oregon Blue book. Have loved it since then.
    Georgette Heyer, Victoria Holt,are two I started with. Read Biographies, am currently reading about past presidents. The Revolutionary War Period, Napoleon, Charles II, Elizabeth I. Medieval and Regency periods are favorites. I read most genres but history is the favorite.

    Reply
  103. My love of historicals was fostered by a teacher, I had for 4 years and started with Oregon history out of the Oregon Blue book. Have loved it since then.
    Georgette Heyer, Victoria Holt,are two I started with. Read Biographies, am currently reading about past presidents. The Revolutionary War Period, Napoleon, Charles II, Elizabeth I. Medieval and Regency periods are favorites. I read most genres but history is the favorite.

    Reply
  104. My love of historicals was fostered by a teacher, I had for 4 years and started with Oregon history out of the Oregon Blue book. Have loved it since then.
    Georgette Heyer, Victoria Holt,are two I started with. Read Biographies, am currently reading about past presidents. The Revolutionary War Period, Napoleon, Charles II, Elizabeth I. Medieval and Regency periods are favorites. I read most genres but history is the favorite.

    Reply
  105. My love of historicals was fostered by a teacher, I had for 4 years and started with Oregon history out of the Oregon Blue book. Have loved it since then.
    Georgette Heyer, Victoria Holt,are two I started with. Read Biographies, am currently reading about past presidents. The Revolutionary War Period, Napoleon, Charles II, Elizabeth I. Medieval and Regency periods are favorites. I read most genres but history is the favorite.

    Reply
  106. Ever since i started reading historicals, I’ve learned to put a name to what I’m feeling…love, hate, frustration, despair, joy, lust, hunger, fear, defiance, hope. No other type of story has so many emotions sandwiched between lovely landscapes and beautiful dresses like a historical. i love getting wrapped up in them!

    Reply
  107. Ever since i started reading historicals, I’ve learned to put a name to what I’m feeling…love, hate, frustration, despair, joy, lust, hunger, fear, defiance, hope. No other type of story has so many emotions sandwiched between lovely landscapes and beautiful dresses like a historical. i love getting wrapped up in them!

    Reply
  108. Ever since i started reading historicals, I’ve learned to put a name to what I’m feeling…love, hate, frustration, despair, joy, lust, hunger, fear, defiance, hope. No other type of story has so many emotions sandwiched between lovely landscapes and beautiful dresses like a historical. i love getting wrapped up in them!

    Reply
  109. Ever since i started reading historicals, I’ve learned to put a name to what I’m feeling…love, hate, frustration, despair, joy, lust, hunger, fear, defiance, hope. No other type of story has so many emotions sandwiched between lovely landscapes and beautiful dresses like a historical. i love getting wrapped up in them!

    Reply
  110. Ever since i started reading historicals, I’ve learned to put a name to what I’m feeling…love, hate, frustration, despair, joy, lust, hunger, fear, defiance, hope. No other type of story has so many emotions sandwiched between lovely landscapes and beautiful dresses like a historical. i love getting wrapped up in them!

    Reply
  111. I’m gonna i admit that i’m kindda new with Historical. the first Historical author’s book that i read was Nicola Cornick’s 🙂
    it was slow for me to read at first, because that was my first time. but then after i finished her book, i do really like to read more historical romance books !
    when i read historical romance books, they can take me to the journey of History that so amazing.

    Reply
  112. I’m gonna i admit that i’m kindda new with Historical. the first Historical author’s book that i read was Nicola Cornick’s 🙂
    it was slow for me to read at first, because that was my first time. but then after i finished her book, i do really like to read more historical romance books !
    when i read historical romance books, they can take me to the journey of History that so amazing.

    Reply
  113. I’m gonna i admit that i’m kindda new with Historical. the first Historical author’s book that i read was Nicola Cornick’s 🙂
    it was slow for me to read at first, because that was my first time. but then after i finished her book, i do really like to read more historical romance books !
    when i read historical romance books, they can take me to the journey of History that so amazing.

    Reply
  114. I’m gonna i admit that i’m kindda new with Historical. the first Historical author’s book that i read was Nicola Cornick’s 🙂
    it was slow for me to read at first, because that was my first time. but then after i finished her book, i do really like to read more historical romance books !
    when i read historical romance books, they can take me to the journey of History that so amazing.

    Reply
  115. I’m gonna i admit that i’m kindda new with Historical. the first Historical author’s book that i read was Nicola Cornick’s 🙂
    it was slow for me to read at first, because that was my first time. but then after i finished her book, i do really like to read more historical romance books !
    when i read historical romance books, they can take me to the journey of History that so amazing.

    Reply
  116. Oddly historical romances helped me with american history classes. My 8th grade history teacher all but gave up on me until she saw me carting around a Cassie Edwards romance. She asked me if I enjoyed them, I said I devoured romances like they were sweet tarts. A few days later she brought in a stack of books for me to read, all with post-its sticking out at odd pages.
    She said to me “Read these, on the pages with post-its go to your textbook and then read the textbook version of the events.” She then handed me a packet and told me to complete it. It helped a lot. I still wasn’t keen on American history, but I was able to be more responsive in class and my grade went from a low C to a high A within weeks.
    My favorite historical romances will remain traditional Regencies, like what Heyer wrote. I have a bunch of slightly more recent authors–Sandra Heath, Jeanne Savery, Meg Lynn Roberts–but I always turn to my Regencies to comfort me. I prefer the years 1805 to 1825 or so, but I’ve read as far back as 1550 and as ‘new’ as 1935.
    They feel so different from my life–my mom is in the military and my dad is a retail manager. They’re divorced as well. Reading Historical though…well I can pretend what it would be like to worry about changing four or five times a day, or sleeping until noon and it would be considered early to rise. Traveling taking days instead of hours. Trying to decipher the hidden meaning behind a hand gesture or smile. It all sounds more romantic then it was I’m sure.

    Reply
  117. Oddly historical romances helped me with american history classes. My 8th grade history teacher all but gave up on me until she saw me carting around a Cassie Edwards romance. She asked me if I enjoyed them, I said I devoured romances like they were sweet tarts. A few days later she brought in a stack of books for me to read, all with post-its sticking out at odd pages.
    She said to me “Read these, on the pages with post-its go to your textbook and then read the textbook version of the events.” She then handed me a packet and told me to complete it. It helped a lot. I still wasn’t keen on American history, but I was able to be more responsive in class and my grade went from a low C to a high A within weeks.
    My favorite historical romances will remain traditional Regencies, like what Heyer wrote. I have a bunch of slightly more recent authors–Sandra Heath, Jeanne Savery, Meg Lynn Roberts–but I always turn to my Regencies to comfort me. I prefer the years 1805 to 1825 or so, but I’ve read as far back as 1550 and as ‘new’ as 1935.
    They feel so different from my life–my mom is in the military and my dad is a retail manager. They’re divorced as well. Reading Historical though…well I can pretend what it would be like to worry about changing four or five times a day, or sleeping until noon and it would be considered early to rise. Traveling taking days instead of hours. Trying to decipher the hidden meaning behind a hand gesture or smile. It all sounds more romantic then it was I’m sure.

    Reply
  118. Oddly historical romances helped me with american history classes. My 8th grade history teacher all but gave up on me until she saw me carting around a Cassie Edwards romance. She asked me if I enjoyed them, I said I devoured romances like they were sweet tarts. A few days later she brought in a stack of books for me to read, all with post-its sticking out at odd pages.
    She said to me “Read these, on the pages with post-its go to your textbook and then read the textbook version of the events.” She then handed me a packet and told me to complete it. It helped a lot. I still wasn’t keen on American history, but I was able to be more responsive in class and my grade went from a low C to a high A within weeks.
    My favorite historical romances will remain traditional Regencies, like what Heyer wrote. I have a bunch of slightly more recent authors–Sandra Heath, Jeanne Savery, Meg Lynn Roberts–but I always turn to my Regencies to comfort me. I prefer the years 1805 to 1825 or so, but I’ve read as far back as 1550 and as ‘new’ as 1935.
    They feel so different from my life–my mom is in the military and my dad is a retail manager. They’re divorced as well. Reading Historical though…well I can pretend what it would be like to worry about changing four or five times a day, or sleeping until noon and it would be considered early to rise. Traveling taking days instead of hours. Trying to decipher the hidden meaning behind a hand gesture or smile. It all sounds more romantic then it was I’m sure.

    Reply
  119. Oddly historical romances helped me with american history classes. My 8th grade history teacher all but gave up on me until she saw me carting around a Cassie Edwards romance. She asked me if I enjoyed them, I said I devoured romances like they were sweet tarts. A few days later she brought in a stack of books for me to read, all with post-its sticking out at odd pages.
    She said to me “Read these, on the pages with post-its go to your textbook and then read the textbook version of the events.” She then handed me a packet and told me to complete it. It helped a lot. I still wasn’t keen on American history, but I was able to be more responsive in class and my grade went from a low C to a high A within weeks.
    My favorite historical romances will remain traditional Regencies, like what Heyer wrote. I have a bunch of slightly more recent authors–Sandra Heath, Jeanne Savery, Meg Lynn Roberts–but I always turn to my Regencies to comfort me. I prefer the years 1805 to 1825 or so, but I’ve read as far back as 1550 and as ‘new’ as 1935.
    They feel so different from my life–my mom is in the military and my dad is a retail manager. They’re divorced as well. Reading Historical though…well I can pretend what it would be like to worry about changing four or five times a day, or sleeping until noon and it would be considered early to rise. Traveling taking days instead of hours. Trying to decipher the hidden meaning behind a hand gesture or smile. It all sounds more romantic then it was I’m sure.

    Reply
  120. Oddly historical romances helped me with american history classes. My 8th grade history teacher all but gave up on me until she saw me carting around a Cassie Edwards romance. She asked me if I enjoyed them, I said I devoured romances like they were sweet tarts. A few days later she brought in a stack of books for me to read, all with post-its sticking out at odd pages.
    She said to me “Read these, on the pages with post-its go to your textbook and then read the textbook version of the events.” She then handed me a packet and told me to complete it. It helped a lot. I still wasn’t keen on American history, but I was able to be more responsive in class and my grade went from a low C to a high A within weeks.
    My favorite historical romances will remain traditional Regencies, like what Heyer wrote. I have a bunch of slightly more recent authors–Sandra Heath, Jeanne Savery, Meg Lynn Roberts–but I always turn to my Regencies to comfort me. I prefer the years 1805 to 1825 or so, but I’ve read as far back as 1550 and as ‘new’ as 1935.
    They feel so different from my life–my mom is in the military and my dad is a retail manager. They’re divorced as well. Reading Historical though…well I can pretend what it would be like to worry about changing four or five times a day, or sleeping until noon and it would be considered early to rise. Traveling taking days instead of hours. Trying to decipher the hidden meaning behind a hand gesture or smile. It all sounds more romantic then it was I’m sure.

    Reply
  121. I grew up with Margaret Evans Price’s Myth’s and Enchantment Tales. Before I could read I drank in the pictures: fiery gods, willowy nymphs in tunics with flowing hair. I was a kid with a pixie cut, glasses, and two missing front teeth. But I became those willowy nymphs. I needed to feel like a willowy nymph.
    It got even better when I could actually read the stories that went with the pictures!
    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge1.php?image=myths_and_enchantments4.jpg&username=childhoodpages&aid=531716021
    Later, I discovered Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and others. And I wasn’t just Psyche or Andromeda anymore. I was a governess in a castle, and a sassy saloon girl, and a debutante, despite the cat-eye glasses and short hair.
    And then a terrible thing happened! Middle school, high school, college, and The Classics. Don’t get me wrong, they were great books and I learned a lot. But I wouldn’t have picked up Lord of the Flies or Heart of Darkness out of choice. And somehow, in those school classes, it became impressed upon me that The Classics Were the Only Books Worth Reading.
    And I forgot what it felt like to be a nymph or a saloon girl.
    Life, good life, continued, with marriage and kids and a reading urge filled by newspapers and magazine articles.
    And then, after watching Timothy Dalton, I mean Rochester, plead with Jane Eyre not to leave him, I had to read the book. I discovered Mr. Darcy way too late in life. Why had I never found Jane Austen’s books before? And, hey? Aren’t they classics? I should say so!
    I’ve had a lot of reading to catch up on. And there are a lot of modern authors (Word Wenches included) that I consider classic. You go, girls!
    Side benefit: I’m an avid genealogist, and there is nothing I like better than to find my ancestors and have a living, breathing model of life that makes them more than a name on a page for me. I understand who they are and who I am as part of their legacy; historicals have given that to me.
    I’m reading a historical right now. And my good life is even better!

    Reply
  122. I grew up with Margaret Evans Price’s Myth’s and Enchantment Tales. Before I could read I drank in the pictures: fiery gods, willowy nymphs in tunics with flowing hair. I was a kid with a pixie cut, glasses, and two missing front teeth. But I became those willowy nymphs. I needed to feel like a willowy nymph.
    It got even better when I could actually read the stories that went with the pictures!
    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge1.php?image=myths_and_enchantments4.jpg&username=childhoodpages&aid=531716021
    Later, I discovered Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and others. And I wasn’t just Psyche or Andromeda anymore. I was a governess in a castle, and a sassy saloon girl, and a debutante, despite the cat-eye glasses and short hair.
    And then a terrible thing happened! Middle school, high school, college, and The Classics. Don’t get me wrong, they were great books and I learned a lot. But I wouldn’t have picked up Lord of the Flies or Heart of Darkness out of choice. And somehow, in those school classes, it became impressed upon me that The Classics Were the Only Books Worth Reading.
    And I forgot what it felt like to be a nymph or a saloon girl.
    Life, good life, continued, with marriage and kids and a reading urge filled by newspapers and magazine articles.
    And then, after watching Timothy Dalton, I mean Rochester, plead with Jane Eyre not to leave him, I had to read the book. I discovered Mr. Darcy way too late in life. Why had I never found Jane Austen’s books before? And, hey? Aren’t they classics? I should say so!
    I’ve had a lot of reading to catch up on. And there are a lot of modern authors (Word Wenches included) that I consider classic. You go, girls!
    Side benefit: I’m an avid genealogist, and there is nothing I like better than to find my ancestors and have a living, breathing model of life that makes them more than a name on a page for me. I understand who they are and who I am as part of their legacy; historicals have given that to me.
    I’m reading a historical right now. And my good life is even better!

    Reply
  123. I grew up with Margaret Evans Price’s Myth’s and Enchantment Tales. Before I could read I drank in the pictures: fiery gods, willowy nymphs in tunics with flowing hair. I was a kid with a pixie cut, glasses, and two missing front teeth. But I became those willowy nymphs. I needed to feel like a willowy nymph.
    It got even better when I could actually read the stories that went with the pictures!
    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge1.php?image=myths_and_enchantments4.jpg&username=childhoodpages&aid=531716021
    Later, I discovered Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and others. And I wasn’t just Psyche or Andromeda anymore. I was a governess in a castle, and a sassy saloon girl, and a debutante, despite the cat-eye glasses and short hair.
    And then a terrible thing happened! Middle school, high school, college, and The Classics. Don’t get me wrong, they were great books and I learned a lot. But I wouldn’t have picked up Lord of the Flies or Heart of Darkness out of choice. And somehow, in those school classes, it became impressed upon me that The Classics Were the Only Books Worth Reading.
    And I forgot what it felt like to be a nymph or a saloon girl.
    Life, good life, continued, with marriage and kids and a reading urge filled by newspapers and magazine articles.
    And then, after watching Timothy Dalton, I mean Rochester, plead with Jane Eyre not to leave him, I had to read the book. I discovered Mr. Darcy way too late in life. Why had I never found Jane Austen’s books before? And, hey? Aren’t they classics? I should say so!
    I’ve had a lot of reading to catch up on. And there are a lot of modern authors (Word Wenches included) that I consider classic. You go, girls!
    Side benefit: I’m an avid genealogist, and there is nothing I like better than to find my ancestors and have a living, breathing model of life that makes them more than a name on a page for me. I understand who they are and who I am as part of their legacy; historicals have given that to me.
    I’m reading a historical right now. And my good life is even better!

    Reply
  124. I grew up with Margaret Evans Price’s Myth’s and Enchantment Tales. Before I could read I drank in the pictures: fiery gods, willowy nymphs in tunics with flowing hair. I was a kid with a pixie cut, glasses, and two missing front teeth. But I became those willowy nymphs. I needed to feel like a willowy nymph.
    It got even better when I could actually read the stories that went with the pictures!
    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge1.php?image=myths_and_enchantments4.jpg&username=childhoodpages&aid=531716021
    Later, I discovered Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and others. And I wasn’t just Psyche or Andromeda anymore. I was a governess in a castle, and a sassy saloon girl, and a debutante, despite the cat-eye glasses and short hair.
    And then a terrible thing happened! Middle school, high school, college, and The Classics. Don’t get me wrong, they were great books and I learned a lot. But I wouldn’t have picked up Lord of the Flies or Heart of Darkness out of choice. And somehow, in those school classes, it became impressed upon me that The Classics Were the Only Books Worth Reading.
    And I forgot what it felt like to be a nymph or a saloon girl.
    Life, good life, continued, with marriage and kids and a reading urge filled by newspapers and magazine articles.
    And then, after watching Timothy Dalton, I mean Rochester, plead with Jane Eyre not to leave him, I had to read the book. I discovered Mr. Darcy way too late in life. Why had I never found Jane Austen’s books before? And, hey? Aren’t they classics? I should say so!
    I’ve had a lot of reading to catch up on. And there are a lot of modern authors (Word Wenches included) that I consider classic. You go, girls!
    Side benefit: I’m an avid genealogist, and there is nothing I like better than to find my ancestors and have a living, breathing model of life that makes them more than a name on a page for me. I understand who they are and who I am as part of their legacy; historicals have given that to me.
    I’m reading a historical right now. And my good life is even better!

    Reply
  125. I grew up with Margaret Evans Price’s Myth’s and Enchantment Tales. Before I could read I drank in the pictures: fiery gods, willowy nymphs in tunics with flowing hair. I was a kid with a pixie cut, glasses, and two missing front teeth. But I became those willowy nymphs. I needed to feel like a willowy nymph.
    It got even better when I could actually read the stories that went with the pictures!
    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge1.php?image=myths_and_enchantments4.jpg&username=childhoodpages&aid=531716021
    Later, I discovered Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, and others. And I wasn’t just Psyche or Andromeda anymore. I was a governess in a castle, and a sassy saloon girl, and a debutante, despite the cat-eye glasses and short hair.
    And then a terrible thing happened! Middle school, high school, college, and The Classics. Don’t get me wrong, they were great books and I learned a lot. But I wouldn’t have picked up Lord of the Flies or Heart of Darkness out of choice. And somehow, in those school classes, it became impressed upon me that The Classics Were the Only Books Worth Reading.
    And I forgot what it felt like to be a nymph or a saloon girl.
    Life, good life, continued, with marriage and kids and a reading urge filled by newspapers and magazine articles.
    And then, after watching Timothy Dalton, I mean Rochester, plead with Jane Eyre not to leave him, I had to read the book. I discovered Mr. Darcy way too late in life. Why had I never found Jane Austen’s books before? And, hey? Aren’t they classics? I should say so!
    I’ve had a lot of reading to catch up on. And there are a lot of modern authors (Word Wenches included) that I consider classic. You go, girls!
    Side benefit: I’m an avid genealogist, and there is nothing I like better than to find my ancestors and have a living, breathing model of life that makes them more than a name on a page for me. I understand who they are and who I am as part of their legacy; historicals have given that to me.
    I’m reading a historical right now. And my good life is even better!

    Reply
  126. Happy Fourth Anniversary!
    I came late to reading historicals. I’ve always been interested in history, especially British history, but read mainly non-fiction until my 40’s. I started reading historicals after my friend recommended I read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I loved it!
    That got me interested in authors like Loretta Chase, Laura Kinsale, Jo Beverly, Nicola Cornick, Mary Balogh, Elizabeth Boyle and so many more. Right now I’m reading Mary Jo Putney’s Never Less Than a Lady.

    Reply
  127. Happy Fourth Anniversary!
    I came late to reading historicals. I’ve always been interested in history, especially British history, but read mainly non-fiction until my 40’s. I started reading historicals after my friend recommended I read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I loved it!
    That got me interested in authors like Loretta Chase, Laura Kinsale, Jo Beverly, Nicola Cornick, Mary Balogh, Elizabeth Boyle and so many more. Right now I’m reading Mary Jo Putney’s Never Less Than a Lady.

    Reply
  128. Happy Fourth Anniversary!
    I came late to reading historicals. I’ve always been interested in history, especially British history, but read mainly non-fiction until my 40’s. I started reading historicals after my friend recommended I read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I loved it!
    That got me interested in authors like Loretta Chase, Laura Kinsale, Jo Beverly, Nicola Cornick, Mary Balogh, Elizabeth Boyle and so many more. Right now I’m reading Mary Jo Putney’s Never Less Than a Lady.

    Reply
  129. Happy Fourth Anniversary!
    I came late to reading historicals. I’ve always been interested in history, especially British history, but read mainly non-fiction until my 40’s. I started reading historicals after my friend recommended I read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I loved it!
    That got me interested in authors like Loretta Chase, Laura Kinsale, Jo Beverly, Nicola Cornick, Mary Balogh, Elizabeth Boyle and so many more. Right now I’m reading Mary Jo Putney’s Never Less Than a Lady.

    Reply
  130. Happy Fourth Anniversary!
    I came late to reading historicals. I’ve always been interested in history, especially British history, but read mainly non-fiction until my 40’s. I started reading historicals after my friend recommended I read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I loved it!
    That got me interested in authors like Loretta Chase, Laura Kinsale, Jo Beverly, Nicola Cornick, Mary Balogh, Elizabeth Boyle and so many more. Right now I’m reading Mary Jo Putney’s Never Less Than a Lady.

    Reply
  131. Well, the writers have given most of the reasons why historicals are the books for me. I guess our mothers had other things to do that did not involve much reading, especially of historical novels. So it was my father, too, whose books I “borrowed” to feed my habit.
    I started a little later than the others here, at about 13, because my father’s study was off limits to us kids, and I was the oldest. After we moved to a larger house at that age, my father became more ready to share his books with me. My most vivid memories were of THE BLACK ROSE by Thomas B. Costain about an English student adventurer who travels east to China with his friend Tristram. I was fascinated by this world of long ago and the lands that were so different from the ones I knew: Germany and Canada.
    The other was DAWN’S EARLY LICHT by Elswyth Thane about Williamsburg. Both books nourished in me the desire to learn as much as I could about history and to see as many historic and foreign places as I could manage. A few years later came Georgette Heyer, other male historical fiction writers, Anya Seton and other women.
    I wanted to major in history two but I had a terrible professor for one of my courses in my sophomore year and decided on French instead. But I never stopped reading historical non-fiction and novels. And the love of other places never waned as I lived in France and Germany, saw Roman remnants in both countries and explored castles, churches and streets in Italy, Spain and Britain.
    It seems to me that after the “historical is dead” slogan, it has shown itself to be ever more popular as exemplified by the writings of the writers at this site.
    Bravo, many thanks, and please, keep holding the flame high.

    Reply
  132. Well, the writers have given most of the reasons why historicals are the books for me. I guess our mothers had other things to do that did not involve much reading, especially of historical novels. So it was my father, too, whose books I “borrowed” to feed my habit.
    I started a little later than the others here, at about 13, because my father’s study was off limits to us kids, and I was the oldest. After we moved to a larger house at that age, my father became more ready to share his books with me. My most vivid memories were of THE BLACK ROSE by Thomas B. Costain about an English student adventurer who travels east to China with his friend Tristram. I was fascinated by this world of long ago and the lands that were so different from the ones I knew: Germany and Canada.
    The other was DAWN’S EARLY LICHT by Elswyth Thane about Williamsburg. Both books nourished in me the desire to learn as much as I could about history and to see as many historic and foreign places as I could manage. A few years later came Georgette Heyer, other male historical fiction writers, Anya Seton and other women.
    I wanted to major in history two but I had a terrible professor for one of my courses in my sophomore year and decided on French instead. But I never stopped reading historical non-fiction and novels. And the love of other places never waned as I lived in France and Germany, saw Roman remnants in both countries and explored castles, churches and streets in Italy, Spain and Britain.
    It seems to me that after the “historical is dead” slogan, it has shown itself to be ever more popular as exemplified by the writings of the writers at this site.
    Bravo, many thanks, and please, keep holding the flame high.

    Reply
  133. Well, the writers have given most of the reasons why historicals are the books for me. I guess our mothers had other things to do that did not involve much reading, especially of historical novels. So it was my father, too, whose books I “borrowed” to feed my habit.
    I started a little later than the others here, at about 13, because my father’s study was off limits to us kids, and I was the oldest. After we moved to a larger house at that age, my father became more ready to share his books with me. My most vivid memories were of THE BLACK ROSE by Thomas B. Costain about an English student adventurer who travels east to China with his friend Tristram. I was fascinated by this world of long ago and the lands that were so different from the ones I knew: Germany and Canada.
    The other was DAWN’S EARLY LICHT by Elswyth Thane about Williamsburg. Both books nourished in me the desire to learn as much as I could about history and to see as many historic and foreign places as I could manage. A few years later came Georgette Heyer, other male historical fiction writers, Anya Seton and other women.
    I wanted to major in history two but I had a terrible professor for one of my courses in my sophomore year and decided on French instead. But I never stopped reading historical non-fiction and novels. And the love of other places never waned as I lived in France and Germany, saw Roman remnants in both countries and explored castles, churches and streets in Italy, Spain and Britain.
    It seems to me that after the “historical is dead” slogan, it has shown itself to be ever more popular as exemplified by the writings of the writers at this site.
    Bravo, many thanks, and please, keep holding the flame high.

    Reply
  134. Well, the writers have given most of the reasons why historicals are the books for me. I guess our mothers had other things to do that did not involve much reading, especially of historical novels. So it was my father, too, whose books I “borrowed” to feed my habit.
    I started a little later than the others here, at about 13, because my father’s study was off limits to us kids, and I was the oldest. After we moved to a larger house at that age, my father became more ready to share his books with me. My most vivid memories were of THE BLACK ROSE by Thomas B. Costain about an English student adventurer who travels east to China with his friend Tristram. I was fascinated by this world of long ago and the lands that were so different from the ones I knew: Germany and Canada.
    The other was DAWN’S EARLY LICHT by Elswyth Thane about Williamsburg. Both books nourished in me the desire to learn as much as I could about history and to see as many historic and foreign places as I could manage. A few years later came Georgette Heyer, other male historical fiction writers, Anya Seton and other women.
    I wanted to major in history two but I had a terrible professor for one of my courses in my sophomore year and decided on French instead. But I never stopped reading historical non-fiction and novels. And the love of other places never waned as I lived in France and Germany, saw Roman remnants in both countries and explored castles, churches and streets in Italy, Spain and Britain.
    It seems to me that after the “historical is dead” slogan, it has shown itself to be ever more popular as exemplified by the writings of the writers at this site.
    Bravo, many thanks, and please, keep holding the flame high.

    Reply
  135. Well, the writers have given most of the reasons why historicals are the books for me. I guess our mothers had other things to do that did not involve much reading, especially of historical novels. So it was my father, too, whose books I “borrowed” to feed my habit.
    I started a little later than the others here, at about 13, because my father’s study was off limits to us kids, and I was the oldest. After we moved to a larger house at that age, my father became more ready to share his books with me. My most vivid memories were of THE BLACK ROSE by Thomas B. Costain about an English student adventurer who travels east to China with his friend Tristram. I was fascinated by this world of long ago and the lands that were so different from the ones I knew: Germany and Canada.
    The other was DAWN’S EARLY LICHT by Elswyth Thane about Williamsburg. Both books nourished in me the desire to learn as much as I could about history and to see as many historic and foreign places as I could manage. A few years later came Georgette Heyer, other male historical fiction writers, Anya Seton and other women.
    I wanted to major in history two but I had a terrible professor for one of my courses in my sophomore year and decided on French instead. But I never stopped reading historical non-fiction and novels. And the love of other places never waned as I lived in France and Germany, saw Roman remnants in both countries and explored castles, churches and streets in Italy, Spain and Britain.
    It seems to me that after the “historical is dead” slogan, it has shown itself to be ever more popular as exemplified by the writings of the writers at this site.
    Bravo, many thanks, and please, keep holding the flame high.

    Reply
  136. My very first romance was a historical romance, I actually still have the book. I was about 7/8 years old and fell head over heels for Barbara Cartland…her work opened a doorway into a whole another world. Twenty years later, I’m as addicted to reading romances as I was in the very beginning. I loved the stoic hero with the fragile heroine…the turbulent and tumultous story settings…a more interesting fairy tale if you will.
    The other aspect to my fascination with the genre has to do with my love of history…I even pursued my love for history in university…the traditions, customs and structure of society. I find it all enthralling. There is just so much material already pre-existing that can be beautifully woven into a story. It really gives you a chance to step back into a time period that otherwise we’d never be able to glimpse…regardless of movies that may be made…my imagination is so much more vivid when I read a book so a historical is literally a time travel trip.

    Reply
  137. My very first romance was a historical romance, I actually still have the book. I was about 7/8 years old and fell head over heels for Barbara Cartland…her work opened a doorway into a whole another world. Twenty years later, I’m as addicted to reading romances as I was in the very beginning. I loved the stoic hero with the fragile heroine…the turbulent and tumultous story settings…a more interesting fairy tale if you will.
    The other aspect to my fascination with the genre has to do with my love of history…I even pursued my love for history in university…the traditions, customs and structure of society. I find it all enthralling. There is just so much material already pre-existing that can be beautifully woven into a story. It really gives you a chance to step back into a time period that otherwise we’d never be able to glimpse…regardless of movies that may be made…my imagination is so much more vivid when I read a book so a historical is literally a time travel trip.

    Reply
  138. My very first romance was a historical romance, I actually still have the book. I was about 7/8 years old and fell head over heels for Barbara Cartland…her work opened a doorway into a whole another world. Twenty years later, I’m as addicted to reading romances as I was in the very beginning. I loved the stoic hero with the fragile heroine…the turbulent and tumultous story settings…a more interesting fairy tale if you will.
    The other aspect to my fascination with the genre has to do with my love of history…I even pursued my love for history in university…the traditions, customs and structure of society. I find it all enthralling. There is just so much material already pre-existing that can be beautifully woven into a story. It really gives you a chance to step back into a time period that otherwise we’d never be able to glimpse…regardless of movies that may be made…my imagination is so much more vivid when I read a book so a historical is literally a time travel trip.

    Reply
  139. My very first romance was a historical romance, I actually still have the book. I was about 7/8 years old and fell head over heels for Barbara Cartland…her work opened a doorway into a whole another world. Twenty years later, I’m as addicted to reading romances as I was in the very beginning. I loved the stoic hero with the fragile heroine…the turbulent and tumultous story settings…a more interesting fairy tale if you will.
    The other aspect to my fascination with the genre has to do with my love of history…I even pursued my love for history in university…the traditions, customs and structure of society. I find it all enthralling. There is just so much material already pre-existing that can be beautifully woven into a story. It really gives you a chance to step back into a time period that otherwise we’d never be able to glimpse…regardless of movies that may be made…my imagination is so much more vivid when I read a book so a historical is literally a time travel trip.

    Reply
  140. My very first romance was a historical romance, I actually still have the book. I was about 7/8 years old and fell head over heels for Barbara Cartland…her work opened a doorway into a whole another world. Twenty years later, I’m as addicted to reading romances as I was in the very beginning. I loved the stoic hero with the fragile heroine…the turbulent and tumultous story settings…a more interesting fairy tale if you will.
    The other aspect to my fascination with the genre has to do with my love of history…I even pursued my love for history in university…the traditions, customs and structure of society. I find it all enthralling. There is just so much material already pre-existing that can be beautifully woven into a story. It really gives you a chance to step back into a time period that otherwise we’d never be able to glimpse…regardless of movies that may be made…my imagination is so much more vivid when I read a book so a historical is literally a time travel trip.

    Reply
  141. I didn’t read much historical fiction as a child, but did love watching Westerns and historical adventure series on TV. In an attempt to recapture those escapist thrills, in my late teens/early twenties I started reading John Jakes’ “Kent Family Chronicles” and an embarrassingly large number of pulp Westerns. Around the same time to Winston Graham’s “Poldark” novels, were added the historical romances of Constance Heaven and Georgette Heyer, the lush epics of M M Kaye, and the swashbucklers of Rafael Sabatini and Frank Yerby. But it was the “Lymond Chronicles” of Dorothy Dunnett that came to encompass all the elements I love in historical fiction, and although I have since read many fine books in a variety of sub-genres, none have surpassed hers.
    So, why historicals? They are an enjoyable escape from the concerns of the present. But at best, can also inform about history, from the viewpoint of individuals experiencing it. While human nature may not have changed, our expectations, concepts of morality, honour and duty, and the conditions in which lives are lived and lost, have changed enormously. Seeing how lives were or might have been lived in the past, and making my own comparisons to life now, makes historical fiction endlessly fascinating. Plus, in historical romance, you can fall in lust with the tortured / roguish / noble / dashing / (insert other adjective) hero. Long may they reign!

    Reply
  142. I didn’t read much historical fiction as a child, but did love watching Westerns and historical adventure series on TV. In an attempt to recapture those escapist thrills, in my late teens/early twenties I started reading John Jakes’ “Kent Family Chronicles” and an embarrassingly large number of pulp Westerns. Around the same time to Winston Graham’s “Poldark” novels, were added the historical romances of Constance Heaven and Georgette Heyer, the lush epics of M M Kaye, and the swashbucklers of Rafael Sabatini and Frank Yerby. But it was the “Lymond Chronicles” of Dorothy Dunnett that came to encompass all the elements I love in historical fiction, and although I have since read many fine books in a variety of sub-genres, none have surpassed hers.
    So, why historicals? They are an enjoyable escape from the concerns of the present. But at best, can also inform about history, from the viewpoint of individuals experiencing it. While human nature may not have changed, our expectations, concepts of morality, honour and duty, and the conditions in which lives are lived and lost, have changed enormously. Seeing how lives were or might have been lived in the past, and making my own comparisons to life now, makes historical fiction endlessly fascinating. Plus, in historical romance, you can fall in lust with the tortured / roguish / noble / dashing / (insert other adjective) hero. Long may they reign!

    Reply
  143. I didn’t read much historical fiction as a child, but did love watching Westerns and historical adventure series on TV. In an attempt to recapture those escapist thrills, in my late teens/early twenties I started reading John Jakes’ “Kent Family Chronicles” and an embarrassingly large number of pulp Westerns. Around the same time to Winston Graham’s “Poldark” novels, were added the historical romances of Constance Heaven and Georgette Heyer, the lush epics of M M Kaye, and the swashbucklers of Rafael Sabatini and Frank Yerby. But it was the “Lymond Chronicles” of Dorothy Dunnett that came to encompass all the elements I love in historical fiction, and although I have since read many fine books in a variety of sub-genres, none have surpassed hers.
    So, why historicals? They are an enjoyable escape from the concerns of the present. But at best, can also inform about history, from the viewpoint of individuals experiencing it. While human nature may not have changed, our expectations, concepts of morality, honour and duty, and the conditions in which lives are lived and lost, have changed enormously. Seeing how lives were or might have been lived in the past, and making my own comparisons to life now, makes historical fiction endlessly fascinating. Plus, in historical romance, you can fall in lust with the tortured / roguish / noble / dashing / (insert other adjective) hero. Long may they reign!

    Reply
  144. I didn’t read much historical fiction as a child, but did love watching Westerns and historical adventure series on TV. In an attempt to recapture those escapist thrills, in my late teens/early twenties I started reading John Jakes’ “Kent Family Chronicles” and an embarrassingly large number of pulp Westerns. Around the same time to Winston Graham’s “Poldark” novels, were added the historical romances of Constance Heaven and Georgette Heyer, the lush epics of M M Kaye, and the swashbucklers of Rafael Sabatini and Frank Yerby. But it was the “Lymond Chronicles” of Dorothy Dunnett that came to encompass all the elements I love in historical fiction, and although I have since read many fine books in a variety of sub-genres, none have surpassed hers.
    So, why historicals? They are an enjoyable escape from the concerns of the present. But at best, can also inform about history, from the viewpoint of individuals experiencing it. While human nature may not have changed, our expectations, concepts of morality, honour and duty, and the conditions in which lives are lived and lost, have changed enormously. Seeing how lives were or might have been lived in the past, and making my own comparisons to life now, makes historical fiction endlessly fascinating. Plus, in historical romance, you can fall in lust with the tortured / roguish / noble / dashing / (insert other adjective) hero. Long may they reign!

    Reply
  145. I didn’t read much historical fiction as a child, but did love watching Westerns and historical adventure series on TV. In an attempt to recapture those escapist thrills, in my late teens/early twenties I started reading John Jakes’ “Kent Family Chronicles” and an embarrassingly large number of pulp Westerns. Around the same time to Winston Graham’s “Poldark” novels, were added the historical romances of Constance Heaven and Georgette Heyer, the lush epics of M M Kaye, and the swashbucklers of Rafael Sabatini and Frank Yerby. But it was the “Lymond Chronicles” of Dorothy Dunnett that came to encompass all the elements I love in historical fiction, and although I have since read many fine books in a variety of sub-genres, none have surpassed hers.
    So, why historicals? They are an enjoyable escape from the concerns of the present. But at best, can also inform about history, from the viewpoint of individuals experiencing it. While human nature may not have changed, our expectations, concepts of morality, honour and duty, and the conditions in which lives are lived and lost, have changed enormously. Seeing how lives were or might have been lived in the past, and making my own comparisons to life now, makes historical fiction endlessly fascinating. Plus, in historical romance, you can fall in lust with the tortured / roguish / noble / dashing / (insert other adjective) hero. Long may they reign!

    Reply
  146. Jo here. Great comments, everyone. If I had time, I’d try to pull the responses together to make a pattern of the way we came to historicals, and the particular pleasures we find there. Fascinating reading.
    Jo

    Reply
  147. Jo here. Great comments, everyone. If I had time, I’d try to pull the responses together to make a pattern of the way we came to historicals, and the particular pleasures we find there. Fascinating reading.
    Jo

    Reply
  148. Jo here. Great comments, everyone. If I had time, I’d try to pull the responses together to make a pattern of the way we came to historicals, and the particular pleasures we find there. Fascinating reading.
    Jo

    Reply
  149. Jo here. Great comments, everyone. If I had time, I’d try to pull the responses together to make a pattern of the way we came to historicals, and the particular pleasures we find there. Fascinating reading.
    Jo

    Reply
  150. Jo here. Great comments, everyone. If I had time, I’d try to pull the responses together to make a pattern of the way we came to historicals, and the particular pleasures we find there. Fascinating reading.
    Jo

    Reply
  151. Happy Birthday Wenches!
    The first historical book I read was at primary school, about grade 4 (I think) and we all had to read Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The White Company”. I remember it being hard going, especially at our age (about 8 years) but we had a wonderful teacher who used the book to not only get us reading but also teach history. In a small country town in outback New South Wales, I believe he was a very courageous teacher as well. From there I went on to read Heyer, and Orczy, Violet Needham, and others that were around then, both for adults and children. And I was hooked. On Historicals. Nothing better than curling up with a good book that allowed me to dream and believe that I could be like those characters about which I read. It was wonderful. And now, 50 years plus later I still like a good Historical. And you wenches please keep writing and entertaining me and others for years to come.

    Reply
  152. Happy Birthday Wenches!
    The first historical book I read was at primary school, about grade 4 (I think) and we all had to read Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The White Company”. I remember it being hard going, especially at our age (about 8 years) but we had a wonderful teacher who used the book to not only get us reading but also teach history. In a small country town in outback New South Wales, I believe he was a very courageous teacher as well. From there I went on to read Heyer, and Orczy, Violet Needham, and others that were around then, both for adults and children. And I was hooked. On Historicals. Nothing better than curling up with a good book that allowed me to dream and believe that I could be like those characters about which I read. It was wonderful. And now, 50 years plus later I still like a good Historical. And you wenches please keep writing and entertaining me and others for years to come.

    Reply
  153. Happy Birthday Wenches!
    The first historical book I read was at primary school, about grade 4 (I think) and we all had to read Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The White Company”. I remember it being hard going, especially at our age (about 8 years) but we had a wonderful teacher who used the book to not only get us reading but also teach history. In a small country town in outback New South Wales, I believe he was a very courageous teacher as well. From there I went on to read Heyer, and Orczy, Violet Needham, and others that were around then, both for adults and children. And I was hooked. On Historicals. Nothing better than curling up with a good book that allowed me to dream and believe that I could be like those characters about which I read. It was wonderful. And now, 50 years plus later I still like a good Historical. And you wenches please keep writing and entertaining me and others for years to come.

    Reply
  154. Happy Birthday Wenches!
    The first historical book I read was at primary school, about grade 4 (I think) and we all had to read Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The White Company”. I remember it being hard going, especially at our age (about 8 years) but we had a wonderful teacher who used the book to not only get us reading but also teach history. In a small country town in outback New South Wales, I believe he was a very courageous teacher as well. From there I went on to read Heyer, and Orczy, Violet Needham, and others that were around then, both for adults and children. And I was hooked. On Historicals. Nothing better than curling up with a good book that allowed me to dream and believe that I could be like those characters about which I read. It was wonderful. And now, 50 years plus later I still like a good Historical. And you wenches please keep writing and entertaining me and others for years to come.

    Reply
  155. Happy Birthday Wenches!
    The first historical book I read was at primary school, about grade 4 (I think) and we all had to read Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The White Company”. I remember it being hard going, especially at our age (about 8 years) but we had a wonderful teacher who used the book to not only get us reading but also teach history. In a small country town in outback New South Wales, I believe he was a very courageous teacher as well. From there I went on to read Heyer, and Orczy, Violet Needham, and others that were around then, both for adults and children. And I was hooked. On Historicals. Nothing better than curling up with a good book that allowed me to dream and believe that I could be like those characters about which I read. It was wonderful. And now, 50 years plus later I still like a good Historical. And you wenches please keep writing and entertaining me and others for years to come.

    Reply
  156. Jo, and all the Wenches, thank you for such a fascinating anniversary post and I am thrilled to be back from my holiday in time to add my comments on this special occasion!
    Historicals have felt the right “fit” for me all my life, both to read and write and it’s fabulous to see here how many people have commented on how they have come to historicals and what they enjoy about them. On my recent holiday/research trip I went to Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. The first historical I ever read (even before Heyer!) was called “Bess” and was a fictional account of the life of Bess of Hardwick, that shrewd, fascinating woman who started out as the daughter of a poor gentry family and ended up as one of the richest and most powerful aristocrats in Tudor England. That’s one of the many reasons I love historicals – as a way in to discovering such a rich historical background and such wonderful characters.
    I’m very proud to be a part of the Wenches and enjoy so much the comments on our blog. Happy Anniversary one and all!

    Reply
  157. Jo, and all the Wenches, thank you for such a fascinating anniversary post and I am thrilled to be back from my holiday in time to add my comments on this special occasion!
    Historicals have felt the right “fit” for me all my life, both to read and write and it’s fabulous to see here how many people have commented on how they have come to historicals and what they enjoy about them. On my recent holiday/research trip I went to Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. The first historical I ever read (even before Heyer!) was called “Bess” and was a fictional account of the life of Bess of Hardwick, that shrewd, fascinating woman who started out as the daughter of a poor gentry family and ended up as one of the richest and most powerful aristocrats in Tudor England. That’s one of the many reasons I love historicals – as a way in to discovering such a rich historical background and such wonderful characters.
    I’m very proud to be a part of the Wenches and enjoy so much the comments on our blog. Happy Anniversary one and all!

    Reply
  158. Jo, and all the Wenches, thank you for such a fascinating anniversary post and I am thrilled to be back from my holiday in time to add my comments on this special occasion!
    Historicals have felt the right “fit” for me all my life, both to read and write and it’s fabulous to see here how many people have commented on how they have come to historicals and what they enjoy about them. On my recent holiday/research trip I went to Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. The first historical I ever read (even before Heyer!) was called “Bess” and was a fictional account of the life of Bess of Hardwick, that shrewd, fascinating woman who started out as the daughter of a poor gentry family and ended up as one of the richest and most powerful aristocrats in Tudor England. That’s one of the many reasons I love historicals – as a way in to discovering such a rich historical background and such wonderful characters.
    I’m very proud to be a part of the Wenches and enjoy so much the comments on our blog. Happy Anniversary one and all!

    Reply
  159. Jo, and all the Wenches, thank you for such a fascinating anniversary post and I am thrilled to be back from my holiday in time to add my comments on this special occasion!
    Historicals have felt the right “fit” for me all my life, both to read and write and it’s fabulous to see here how many people have commented on how they have come to historicals and what they enjoy about them. On my recent holiday/research trip I went to Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. The first historical I ever read (even before Heyer!) was called “Bess” and was a fictional account of the life of Bess of Hardwick, that shrewd, fascinating woman who started out as the daughter of a poor gentry family and ended up as one of the richest and most powerful aristocrats in Tudor England. That’s one of the many reasons I love historicals – as a way in to discovering such a rich historical background and such wonderful characters.
    I’m very proud to be a part of the Wenches and enjoy so much the comments on our blog. Happy Anniversary one and all!

    Reply
  160. Jo, and all the Wenches, thank you for such a fascinating anniversary post and I am thrilled to be back from my holiday in time to add my comments on this special occasion!
    Historicals have felt the right “fit” for me all my life, both to read and write and it’s fabulous to see here how many people have commented on how they have come to historicals and what they enjoy about them. On my recent holiday/research trip I went to Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. The first historical I ever read (even before Heyer!) was called “Bess” and was a fictional account of the life of Bess of Hardwick, that shrewd, fascinating woman who started out as the daughter of a poor gentry family and ended up as one of the richest and most powerful aristocrats in Tudor England. That’s one of the many reasons I love historicals – as a way in to discovering such a rich historical background and such wonderful characters.
    I’m very proud to be a part of the Wenches and enjoy so much the comments on our blog. Happy Anniversary one and all!

    Reply
  161. What a fabulous way to start my day! Just the thought of kids still in school learning to love history from reading historicals makes my heart happy. May the flame carry on!

    Reply
  162. What a fabulous way to start my day! Just the thought of kids still in school learning to love history from reading historicals makes my heart happy. May the flame carry on!

    Reply
  163. What a fabulous way to start my day! Just the thought of kids still in school learning to love history from reading historicals makes my heart happy. May the flame carry on!

    Reply
  164. What a fabulous way to start my day! Just the thought of kids still in school learning to love history from reading historicals makes my heart happy. May the flame carry on!

    Reply
  165. What a fabulous way to start my day! Just the thought of kids still in school learning to love history from reading historicals makes my heart happy. May the flame carry on!

    Reply
  166. Congrats on four years. I’m glad I found you.
    I am currently reading Cara Elliott’s To Sin With A Scoundrel. It is a great way to escape the everyday grind.

    Reply
  167. Congrats on four years. I’m glad I found you.
    I am currently reading Cara Elliott’s To Sin With A Scoundrel. It is a great way to escape the everyday grind.

    Reply
  168. Congrats on four years. I’m glad I found you.
    I am currently reading Cara Elliott’s To Sin With A Scoundrel. It is a great way to escape the everyday grind.

    Reply
  169. Congrats on four years. I’m glad I found you.
    I am currently reading Cara Elliott’s To Sin With A Scoundrel. It is a great way to escape the everyday grind.

    Reply
  170. Congrats on four years. I’m glad I found you.
    I am currently reading Cara Elliott’s To Sin With A Scoundrel. It is a great way to escape the everyday grind.

    Reply
  171. Why historical? Because real life is either boring or miserable, and there may not be a happy ending.
    I read some historical fiction, but not too much, because it doesn’t necessarily end happily. I want that guaranteed HEA and romance delivers.
    As for Regency, this era speaks to me the way no other era does–close enough to be recognizable, but far enough in the past for fantasy.
    Everyone and their sister blogs nowadays, and so do I. Here’s my paean to Regency romance: http://lindabanche.blogspot.com/2010/01/i-write-regency.html

    Reply
  172. Why historical? Because real life is either boring or miserable, and there may not be a happy ending.
    I read some historical fiction, but not too much, because it doesn’t necessarily end happily. I want that guaranteed HEA and romance delivers.
    As for Regency, this era speaks to me the way no other era does–close enough to be recognizable, but far enough in the past for fantasy.
    Everyone and their sister blogs nowadays, and so do I. Here’s my paean to Regency romance: http://lindabanche.blogspot.com/2010/01/i-write-regency.html

    Reply
  173. Why historical? Because real life is either boring or miserable, and there may not be a happy ending.
    I read some historical fiction, but not too much, because it doesn’t necessarily end happily. I want that guaranteed HEA and romance delivers.
    As for Regency, this era speaks to me the way no other era does–close enough to be recognizable, but far enough in the past for fantasy.
    Everyone and their sister blogs nowadays, and so do I. Here’s my paean to Regency romance: http://lindabanche.blogspot.com/2010/01/i-write-regency.html

    Reply
  174. Why historical? Because real life is either boring or miserable, and there may not be a happy ending.
    I read some historical fiction, but not too much, because it doesn’t necessarily end happily. I want that guaranteed HEA and romance delivers.
    As for Regency, this era speaks to me the way no other era does–close enough to be recognizable, but far enough in the past for fantasy.
    Everyone and their sister blogs nowadays, and so do I. Here’s my paean to Regency romance: http://lindabanche.blogspot.com/2010/01/i-write-regency.html

    Reply
  175. Why historical? Because real life is either boring or miserable, and there may not be a happy ending.
    I read some historical fiction, but not too much, because it doesn’t necessarily end happily. I want that guaranteed HEA and romance delivers.
    As for Regency, this era speaks to me the way no other era does–close enough to be recognizable, but far enough in the past for fantasy.
    Everyone and their sister blogs nowadays, and so do I. Here’s my paean to Regency romance: http://lindabanche.blogspot.com/2010/01/i-write-regency.html

    Reply
  176. Happy Birthday, Wenches. Long may you type!
    Ditto to everything you all said. Historical romance speaks to my heart in a way contemporary cannot. It sweeps me away to another time and place and provides that ultimate escape.

    Reply
  177. Happy Birthday, Wenches. Long may you type!
    Ditto to everything you all said. Historical romance speaks to my heart in a way contemporary cannot. It sweeps me away to another time and place and provides that ultimate escape.

    Reply
  178. Happy Birthday, Wenches. Long may you type!
    Ditto to everything you all said. Historical romance speaks to my heart in a way contemporary cannot. It sweeps me away to another time and place and provides that ultimate escape.

    Reply
  179. Happy Birthday, Wenches. Long may you type!
    Ditto to everything you all said. Historical romance speaks to my heart in a way contemporary cannot. It sweeps me away to another time and place and provides that ultimate escape.

    Reply
  180. Happy Birthday, Wenches. Long may you type!
    Ditto to everything you all said. Historical romance speaks to my heart in a way contemporary cannot. It sweeps me away to another time and place and provides that ultimate escape.

    Reply
  181. I’m not sure I could say exactly why I love historicals. While I do read a little bit of everything – there is something magical about a historical novel, especially a romance, that transports you back into another time. (I have also learned a lot about both historical events and peoples lives in a way you can’t find in many history text books.)
    As others have said, part of my love may stem from parents for whom summer vacation meant trips to old houses, battlefields, and even a cemetary or two. I also fell in love with historical novels as a child starting with books like Rifles for Waitie, Where the Red Fern Grows, the Secret Garden and The witch of Blackbird Pond. When I discovered LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Louisa May Alcott I don’t think I picked up a contemporary novel for years.
    I only came to be addicted to historical romance, though, after a summer in the library reading all of Dorthey Dunnett’s books and stumbling across a copy of One Perfect Rose when I was left at a loss as to what to read next. By the end of book I had fallen in love with Stephen Kenyon and all his adventures w/ Rosalind’s theatre company.
    In a quest to find more books I discovered a whole new world of fiction and some fabulous authors – including all the wenches. Now my problem when I end a book isn’t finding something else to read but trying to decide which one to read next.
    Happy Anniversary and I look forward to more wonderful blogs and books from all of you.

    Reply
  182. I’m not sure I could say exactly why I love historicals. While I do read a little bit of everything – there is something magical about a historical novel, especially a romance, that transports you back into another time. (I have also learned a lot about both historical events and peoples lives in a way you can’t find in many history text books.)
    As others have said, part of my love may stem from parents for whom summer vacation meant trips to old houses, battlefields, and even a cemetary or two. I also fell in love with historical novels as a child starting with books like Rifles for Waitie, Where the Red Fern Grows, the Secret Garden and The witch of Blackbird Pond. When I discovered LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Louisa May Alcott I don’t think I picked up a contemporary novel for years.
    I only came to be addicted to historical romance, though, after a summer in the library reading all of Dorthey Dunnett’s books and stumbling across a copy of One Perfect Rose when I was left at a loss as to what to read next. By the end of book I had fallen in love with Stephen Kenyon and all his adventures w/ Rosalind’s theatre company.
    In a quest to find more books I discovered a whole new world of fiction and some fabulous authors – including all the wenches. Now my problem when I end a book isn’t finding something else to read but trying to decide which one to read next.
    Happy Anniversary and I look forward to more wonderful blogs and books from all of you.

    Reply
  183. I’m not sure I could say exactly why I love historicals. While I do read a little bit of everything – there is something magical about a historical novel, especially a romance, that transports you back into another time. (I have also learned a lot about both historical events and peoples lives in a way you can’t find in many history text books.)
    As others have said, part of my love may stem from parents for whom summer vacation meant trips to old houses, battlefields, and even a cemetary or two. I also fell in love with historical novels as a child starting with books like Rifles for Waitie, Where the Red Fern Grows, the Secret Garden and The witch of Blackbird Pond. When I discovered LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Louisa May Alcott I don’t think I picked up a contemporary novel for years.
    I only came to be addicted to historical romance, though, after a summer in the library reading all of Dorthey Dunnett’s books and stumbling across a copy of One Perfect Rose when I was left at a loss as to what to read next. By the end of book I had fallen in love with Stephen Kenyon and all his adventures w/ Rosalind’s theatre company.
    In a quest to find more books I discovered a whole new world of fiction and some fabulous authors – including all the wenches. Now my problem when I end a book isn’t finding something else to read but trying to decide which one to read next.
    Happy Anniversary and I look forward to more wonderful blogs and books from all of you.

    Reply
  184. I’m not sure I could say exactly why I love historicals. While I do read a little bit of everything – there is something magical about a historical novel, especially a romance, that transports you back into another time. (I have also learned a lot about both historical events and peoples lives in a way you can’t find in many history text books.)
    As others have said, part of my love may stem from parents for whom summer vacation meant trips to old houses, battlefields, and even a cemetary or two. I also fell in love with historical novels as a child starting with books like Rifles for Waitie, Where the Red Fern Grows, the Secret Garden and The witch of Blackbird Pond. When I discovered LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Louisa May Alcott I don’t think I picked up a contemporary novel for years.
    I only came to be addicted to historical romance, though, after a summer in the library reading all of Dorthey Dunnett’s books and stumbling across a copy of One Perfect Rose when I was left at a loss as to what to read next. By the end of book I had fallen in love with Stephen Kenyon and all his adventures w/ Rosalind’s theatre company.
    In a quest to find more books I discovered a whole new world of fiction and some fabulous authors – including all the wenches. Now my problem when I end a book isn’t finding something else to read but trying to decide which one to read next.
    Happy Anniversary and I look forward to more wonderful blogs and books from all of you.

    Reply
  185. I’m not sure I could say exactly why I love historicals. While I do read a little bit of everything – there is something magical about a historical novel, especially a romance, that transports you back into another time. (I have also learned a lot about both historical events and peoples lives in a way you can’t find in many history text books.)
    As others have said, part of my love may stem from parents for whom summer vacation meant trips to old houses, battlefields, and even a cemetary or two. I also fell in love with historical novels as a child starting with books like Rifles for Waitie, Where the Red Fern Grows, the Secret Garden and The witch of Blackbird Pond. When I discovered LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Louisa May Alcott I don’t think I picked up a contemporary novel for years.
    I only came to be addicted to historical romance, though, after a summer in the library reading all of Dorthey Dunnett’s books and stumbling across a copy of One Perfect Rose when I was left at a loss as to what to read next. By the end of book I had fallen in love with Stephen Kenyon and all his adventures w/ Rosalind’s theatre company.
    In a quest to find more books I discovered a whole new world of fiction and some fabulous authors – including all the wenches. Now my problem when I end a book isn’t finding something else to read but trying to decide which one to read next.
    Happy Anniversary and I look forward to more wonderful blogs and books from all of you.

    Reply
  186. What better inspiration could any historical writer ask for than to begin the day by reading these comments! It’s a joy to see that so many people share our passion! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your experiences (and thanks, Denise, for the lovely words on “Scoundrel” I now have a big smile on my face as I plunge into my current WIP.)

    Reply
  187. What better inspiration could any historical writer ask for than to begin the day by reading these comments! It’s a joy to see that so many people share our passion! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your experiences (and thanks, Denise, for the lovely words on “Scoundrel” I now have a big smile on my face as I plunge into my current WIP.)

    Reply
  188. What better inspiration could any historical writer ask for than to begin the day by reading these comments! It’s a joy to see that so many people share our passion! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your experiences (and thanks, Denise, for the lovely words on “Scoundrel” I now have a big smile on my face as I plunge into my current WIP.)

    Reply
  189. What better inspiration could any historical writer ask for than to begin the day by reading these comments! It’s a joy to see that so many people share our passion! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your experiences (and thanks, Denise, for the lovely words on “Scoundrel” I now have a big smile on my face as I plunge into my current WIP.)

    Reply
  190. What better inspiration could any historical writer ask for than to begin the day by reading these comments! It’s a joy to see that so many people share our passion! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your experiences (and thanks, Denise, for the lovely words on “Scoundrel” I now have a big smile on my face as I plunge into my current WIP.)

    Reply
  191. Why Historicals? At a time when ‘anything goes’ with regard to flirtations, escapades, and sex, many of us long for a time when the rules of society planted women firmly on a pedestal, whether they wanted it or not. Historical fiction allows us as readers and writers to manipulate around those societal rules or conform to them, whichever we want (it’s fiction!). We are able to live the lives we would have wanted in a time we wish we could return to; maybe not permanently. 😉 Personally, the Regency has so many aspects that I love – the fashions, the slow pace of life, the easy flirtations and sparring between men and women that didn’t mean anything (why does it have to mean something now? It’s so distressing!), the balls and routs, even the lives of the servants fascinate me. What did they do? Were they all truly as immoral and drunk as described in many books? Historical fiction’s secondary characters actually force me to use my imagination. Secondary characters in modern novels are too easy.
    I’m currently rereading Frederica by the great Heyer. It’s wonderful to read that many of you were also inspired by her.

    Reply
  192. Why Historicals? At a time when ‘anything goes’ with regard to flirtations, escapades, and sex, many of us long for a time when the rules of society planted women firmly on a pedestal, whether they wanted it or not. Historical fiction allows us as readers and writers to manipulate around those societal rules or conform to them, whichever we want (it’s fiction!). We are able to live the lives we would have wanted in a time we wish we could return to; maybe not permanently. 😉 Personally, the Regency has so many aspects that I love – the fashions, the slow pace of life, the easy flirtations and sparring between men and women that didn’t mean anything (why does it have to mean something now? It’s so distressing!), the balls and routs, even the lives of the servants fascinate me. What did they do? Were they all truly as immoral and drunk as described in many books? Historical fiction’s secondary characters actually force me to use my imagination. Secondary characters in modern novels are too easy.
    I’m currently rereading Frederica by the great Heyer. It’s wonderful to read that many of you were also inspired by her.

    Reply
  193. Why Historicals? At a time when ‘anything goes’ with regard to flirtations, escapades, and sex, many of us long for a time when the rules of society planted women firmly on a pedestal, whether they wanted it or not. Historical fiction allows us as readers and writers to manipulate around those societal rules or conform to them, whichever we want (it’s fiction!). We are able to live the lives we would have wanted in a time we wish we could return to; maybe not permanently. 😉 Personally, the Regency has so many aspects that I love – the fashions, the slow pace of life, the easy flirtations and sparring between men and women that didn’t mean anything (why does it have to mean something now? It’s so distressing!), the balls and routs, even the lives of the servants fascinate me. What did they do? Were they all truly as immoral and drunk as described in many books? Historical fiction’s secondary characters actually force me to use my imagination. Secondary characters in modern novels are too easy.
    I’m currently rereading Frederica by the great Heyer. It’s wonderful to read that many of you were also inspired by her.

    Reply
  194. Why Historicals? At a time when ‘anything goes’ with regard to flirtations, escapades, and sex, many of us long for a time when the rules of society planted women firmly on a pedestal, whether they wanted it or not. Historical fiction allows us as readers and writers to manipulate around those societal rules or conform to them, whichever we want (it’s fiction!). We are able to live the lives we would have wanted in a time we wish we could return to; maybe not permanently. 😉 Personally, the Regency has so many aspects that I love – the fashions, the slow pace of life, the easy flirtations and sparring between men and women that didn’t mean anything (why does it have to mean something now? It’s so distressing!), the balls and routs, even the lives of the servants fascinate me. What did they do? Were they all truly as immoral and drunk as described in many books? Historical fiction’s secondary characters actually force me to use my imagination. Secondary characters in modern novels are too easy.
    I’m currently rereading Frederica by the great Heyer. It’s wonderful to read that many of you were also inspired by her.

    Reply
  195. Why Historicals? At a time when ‘anything goes’ with regard to flirtations, escapades, and sex, many of us long for a time when the rules of society planted women firmly on a pedestal, whether they wanted it or not. Historical fiction allows us as readers and writers to manipulate around those societal rules or conform to them, whichever we want (it’s fiction!). We are able to live the lives we would have wanted in a time we wish we could return to; maybe not permanently. 😉 Personally, the Regency has so many aspects that I love – the fashions, the slow pace of life, the easy flirtations and sparring between men and women that didn’t mean anything (why does it have to mean something now? It’s so distressing!), the balls and routs, even the lives of the servants fascinate me. What did they do? Were they all truly as immoral and drunk as described in many books? Historical fiction’s secondary characters actually force me to use my imagination. Secondary characters in modern novels are too easy.
    I’m currently rereading Frederica by the great Heyer. It’s wonderful to read that many of you were also inspired by her.

    Reply
  196. I too was introduced to romances via Georgette Heyer. My grandmother lent me These Old Shades and I was hooked (though I love the sequel Devil’s Cub even more). From then on, the Georgian and Regency periods have been my romance “home”.
    I found the Word Wenches through Jo Beverley and have thoroughly enjoyed the historical information and introductions to new authors found here. Happy 4th!

    Reply
  197. I too was introduced to romances via Georgette Heyer. My grandmother lent me These Old Shades and I was hooked (though I love the sequel Devil’s Cub even more). From then on, the Georgian and Regency periods have been my romance “home”.
    I found the Word Wenches through Jo Beverley and have thoroughly enjoyed the historical information and introductions to new authors found here. Happy 4th!

    Reply
  198. I too was introduced to romances via Georgette Heyer. My grandmother lent me These Old Shades and I was hooked (though I love the sequel Devil’s Cub even more). From then on, the Georgian and Regency periods have been my romance “home”.
    I found the Word Wenches through Jo Beverley and have thoroughly enjoyed the historical information and introductions to new authors found here. Happy 4th!

    Reply
  199. I too was introduced to romances via Georgette Heyer. My grandmother lent me These Old Shades and I was hooked (though I love the sequel Devil’s Cub even more). From then on, the Georgian and Regency periods have been my romance “home”.
    I found the Word Wenches through Jo Beverley and have thoroughly enjoyed the historical information and introductions to new authors found here. Happy 4th!

    Reply
  200. I too was introduced to romances via Georgette Heyer. My grandmother lent me These Old Shades and I was hooked (though I love the sequel Devil’s Cub even more). From then on, the Georgian and Regency periods have been my romance “home”.
    I found the Word Wenches through Jo Beverley and have thoroughly enjoyed the historical information and introductions to new authors found here. Happy 4th!

    Reply
  201. As a child, my absolute favorite story was Peter Pan. I wished I could be transported to that magical land of the never-never. I was the youngest of four siblings, and there was a large age gap between the other and myself. While my sisters were out dancing, I was discovering Nancy Drew.
    I first discovered historical romance after reading a wonderful book called Mavreen, but Claire Lorrimer, and after that I was hooked. This was about the same time I discovered a love of all things Irish, and along with romance, I devoured all the myth and legend and romance of the country that, when I finally visited last summer, I realized was the true “home of my heart.”
    Why historicals? Like a lot of us, I hated history in school. Growing up in Quebec, Canada, it seemed the only history we were taught was about the fur trade! But when I discovered Ireland and its history (through romances!), or France or England and other countries, it became interesting. I’d always wanted to travel, and what better way to do so than travelling not only to another place, but another time as well? I believe that’s one very good reason the historical will never die.
    And I certainly hope it won’t, because that’s the only kind of book I want to write! I’m lucky, because my publisher, Highland Press, takes pride in making sure the history in our books is accurate, yet never takes away from a good story. That, I think, is the secret to the success of the historical romance.
    Happy 4th birthday, Wenches, and may you see many more!

    Reply
  202. As a child, my absolute favorite story was Peter Pan. I wished I could be transported to that magical land of the never-never. I was the youngest of four siblings, and there was a large age gap between the other and myself. While my sisters were out dancing, I was discovering Nancy Drew.
    I first discovered historical romance after reading a wonderful book called Mavreen, but Claire Lorrimer, and after that I was hooked. This was about the same time I discovered a love of all things Irish, and along with romance, I devoured all the myth and legend and romance of the country that, when I finally visited last summer, I realized was the true “home of my heart.”
    Why historicals? Like a lot of us, I hated history in school. Growing up in Quebec, Canada, it seemed the only history we were taught was about the fur trade! But when I discovered Ireland and its history (through romances!), or France or England and other countries, it became interesting. I’d always wanted to travel, and what better way to do so than travelling not only to another place, but another time as well? I believe that’s one very good reason the historical will never die.
    And I certainly hope it won’t, because that’s the only kind of book I want to write! I’m lucky, because my publisher, Highland Press, takes pride in making sure the history in our books is accurate, yet never takes away from a good story. That, I think, is the secret to the success of the historical romance.
    Happy 4th birthday, Wenches, and may you see many more!

    Reply
  203. As a child, my absolute favorite story was Peter Pan. I wished I could be transported to that magical land of the never-never. I was the youngest of four siblings, and there was a large age gap between the other and myself. While my sisters were out dancing, I was discovering Nancy Drew.
    I first discovered historical romance after reading a wonderful book called Mavreen, but Claire Lorrimer, and after that I was hooked. This was about the same time I discovered a love of all things Irish, and along with romance, I devoured all the myth and legend and romance of the country that, when I finally visited last summer, I realized was the true “home of my heart.”
    Why historicals? Like a lot of us, I hated history in school. Growing up in Quebec, Canada, it seemed the only history we were taught was about the fur trade! But when I discovered Ireland and its history (through romances!), or France or England and other countries, it became interesting. I’d always wanted to travel, and what better way to do so than travelling not only to another place, but another time as well? I believe that’s one very good reason the historical will never die.
    And I certainly hope it won’t, because that’s the only kind of book I want to write! I’m lucky, because my publisher, Highland Press, takes pride in making sure the history in our books is accurate, yet never takes away from a good story. That, I think, is the secret to the success of the historical romance.
    Happy 4th birthday, Wenches, and may you see many more!

    Reply
  204. As a child, my absolute favorite story was Peter Pan. I wished I could be transported to that magical land of the never-never. I was the youngest of four siblings, and there was a large age gap between the other and myself. While my sisters were out dancing, I was discovering Nancy Drew.
    I first discovered historical romance after reading a wonderful book called Mavreen, but Claire Lorrimer, and after that I was hooked. This was about the same time I discovered a love of all things Irish, and along with romance, I devoured all the myth and legend and romance of the country that, when I finally visited last summer, I realized was the true “home of my heart.”
    Why historicals? Like a lot of us, I hated history in school. Growing up in Quebec, Canada, it seemed the only history we were taught was about the fur trade! But when I discovered Ireland and its history (through romances!), or France or England and other countries, it became interesting. I’d always wanted to travel, and what better way to do so than travelling not only to another place, but another time as well? I believe that’s one very good reason the historical will never die.
    And I certainly hope it won’t, because that’s the only kind of book I want to write! I’m lucky, because my publisher, Highland Press, takes pride in making sure the history in our books is accurate, yet never takes away from a good story. That, I think, is the secret to the success of the historical romance.
    Happy 4th birthday, Wenches, and may you see many more!

    Reply
  205. As a child, my absolute favorite story was Peter Pan. I wished I could be transported to that magical land of the never-never. I was the youngest of four siblings, and there was a large age gap between the other and myself. While my sisters were out dancing, I was discovering Nancy Drew.
    I first discovered historical romance after reading a wonderful book called Mavreen, but Claire Lorrimer, and after that I was hooked. This was about the same time I discovered a love of all things Irish, and along with romance, I devoured all the myth and legend and romance of the country that, when I finally visited last summer, I realized was the true “home of my heart.”
    Why historicals? Like a lot of us, I hated history in school. Growing up in Quebec, Canada, it seemed the only history we were taught was about the fur trade! But when I discovered Ireland and its history (through romances!), or France or England and other countries, it became interesting. I’d always wanted to travel, and what better way to do so than travelling not only to another place, but another time as well? I believe that’s one very good reason the historical will never die.
    And I certainly hope it won’t, because that’s the only kind of book I want to write! I’m lucky, because my publisher, Highland Press, takes pride in making sure the history in our books is accurate, yet never takes away from a good story. That, I think, is the secret to the success of the historical romance.
    Happy 4th birthday, Wenches, and may you see many more!

    Reply
  206. I just found Word Wenches so I am sorry I missed the first four years although I know all of you from having read your novels in the past(and present and I am sure, future). Historicals answer a need for me to lose myself in a place far from my real life, but one that I could imagine myself living in. I often daydream about my own actions (as I am washing, ironing, vacuuming and a million other mindless tasks)as if I were the heroine in an historical story, so the best ones allow me to slip into their world as if I really were a Regency lady whirling around the floor in a deliciously scandalous waltz with a rake. So, Word Wenches, many good wishes and hopes for all the great books you will write in the future. Thank you.

    Reply
  207. I just found Word Wenches so I am sorry I missed the first four years although I know all of you from having read your novels in the past(and present and I am sure, future). Historicals answer a need for me to lose myself in a place far from my real life, but one that I could imagine myself living in. I often daydream about my own actions (as I am washing, ironing, vacuuming and a million other mindless tasks)as if I were the heroine in an historical story, so the best ones allow me to slip into their world as if I really were a Regency lady whirling around the floor in a deliciously scandalous waltz with a rake. So, Word Wenches, many good wishes and hopes for all the great books you will write in the future. Thank you.

    Reply
  208. I just found Word Wenches so I am sorry I missed the first four years although I know all of you from having read your novels in the past(and present and I am sure, future). Historicals answer a need for me to lose myself in a place far from my real life, but one that I could imagine myself living in. I often daydream about my own actions (as I am washing, ironing, vacuuming and a million other mindless tasks)as if I were the heroine in an historical story, so the best ones allow me to slip into their world as if I really were a Regency lady whirling around the floor in a deliciously scandalous waltz with a rake. So, Word Wenches, many good wishes and hopes for all the great books you will write in the future. Thank you.

    Reply
  209. I just found Word Wenches so I am sorry I missed the first four years although I know all of you from having read your novels in the past(and present and I am sure, future). Historicals answer a need for me to lose myself in a place far from my real life, but one that I could imagine myself living in. I often daydream about my own actions (as I am washing, ironing, vacuuming and a million other mindless tasks)as if I were the heroine in an historical story, so the best ones allow me to slip into their world as if I really were a Regency lady whirling around the floor in a deliciously scandalous waltz with a rake. So, Word Wenches, many good wishes and hopes for all the great books you will write in the future. Thank you.

    Reply
  210. I just found Word Wenches so I am sorry I missed the first four years although I know all of you from having read your novels in the past(and present and I am sure, future). Historicals answer a need for me to lose myself in a place far from my real life, but one that I could imagine myself living in. I often daydream about my own actions (as I am washing, ironing, vacuuming and a million other mindless tasks)as if I were the heroine in an historical story, so the best ones allow me to slip into their world as if I really were a Regency lady whirling around the floor in a deliciously scandalous waltz with a rake. So, Word Wenches, many good wishes and hopes for all the great books you will write in the future. Thank you.

    Reply
  211. Why historicals? Historicals allow you to escape to a different time and place where you can attend grand social events, live in a castle/keep, ride in a coach/phaeton, wear beautiful gowns and fall in love with a dashing hero. What more could we ask for in a romance?

    Reply
  212. Why historicals? Historicals allow you to escape to a different time and place where you can attend grand social events, live in a castle/keep, ride in a coach/phaeton, wear beautiful gowns and fall in love with a dashing hero. What more could we ask for in a romance?

    Reply
  213. Why historicals? Historicals allow you to escape to a different time and place where you can attend grand social events, live in a castle/keep, ride in a coach/phaeton, wear beautiful gowns and fall in love with a dashing hero. What more could we ask for in a romance?

    Reply
  214. Why historicals? Historicals allow you to escape to a different time and place where you can attend grand social events, live in a castle/keep, ride in a coach/phaeton, wear beautiful gowns and fall in love with a dashing hero. What more could we ask for in a romance?

    Reply
  215. Why historicals? Historicals allow you to escape to a different time and place where you can attend grand social events, live in a castle/keep, ride in a coach/phaeton, wear beautiful gowns and fall in love with a dashing hero. What more could we ask for in a romance?

    Reply
  216. Who needs paranormals when history in itself is magic?
    Like so many here, I fell in love with history young and never looked back. My dad would take me to the Old French Fort on Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY (which is now a living history museum) and I would imagine myself in another world.
    All my reading material was historical; I read every biography in the kids’ seciton of the library and eschewed Nancy Drew and that nurse series (Beverley Barton?). I wanted magic, and I found it in history.
    Keep writing historicals, Ladies. As long as there are so many of us who love them, they’ll never die. Thank you for all the historical fun, adventure, romance and magic you have given us. And thank you for the 4 years of the Wenches!

    Reply
  217. Who needs paranormals when history in itself is magic?
    Like so many here, I fell in love with history young and never looked back. My dad would take me to the Old French Fort on Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY (which is now a living history museum) and I would imagine myself in another world.
    All my reading material was historical; I read every biography in the kids’ seciton of the library and eschewed Nancy Drew and that nurse series (Beverley Barton?). I wanted magic, and I found it in history.
    Keep writing historicals, Ladies. As long as there are so many of us who love them, they’ll never die. Thank you for all the historical fun, adventure, romance and magic you have given us. And thank you for the 4 years of the Wenches!

    Reply
  218. Who needs paranormals when history in itself is magic?
    Like so many here, I fell in love with history young and never looked back. My dad would take me to the Old French Fort on Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY (which is now a living history museum) and I would imagine myself in another world.
    All my reading material was historical; I read every biography in the kids’ seciton of the library and eschewed Nancy Drew and that nurse series (Beverley Barton?). I wanted magic, and I found it in history.
    Keep writing historicals, Ladies. As long as there are so many of us who love them, they’ll never die. Thank you for all the historical fun, adventure, romance and magic you have given us. And thank you for the 4 years of the Wenches!

    Reply
  219. Who needs paranormals when history in itself is magic?
    Like so many here, I fell in love with history young and never looked back. My dad would take me to the Old French Fort on Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY (which is now a living history museum) and I would imagine myself in another world.
    All my reading material was historical; I read every biography in the kids’ seciton of the library and eschewed Nancy Drew and that nurse series (Beverley Barton?). I wanted magic, and I found it in history.
    Keep writing historicals, Ladies. As long as there are so many of us who love them, they’ll never die. Thank you for all the historical fun, adventure, romance and magic you have given us. And thank you for the 4 years of the Wenches!

    Reply
  220. Who needs paranormals when history in itself is magic?
    Like so many here, I fell in love with history young and never looked back. My dad would take me to the Old French Fort on Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY (which is now a living history museum) and I would imagine myself in another world.
    All my reading material was historical; I read every biography in the kids’ seciton of the library and eschewed Nancy Drew and that nurse series (Beverley Barton?). I wanted magic, and I found it in history.
    Keep writing historicals, Ladies. As long as there are so many of us who love them, they’ll never die. Thank you for all the historical fun, adventure, romance and magic you have given us. And thank you for the 4 years of the Wenches!

    Reply
  221. I’ve always loved historicals, from a child reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books along with all the fairy tales I could get my hands on. History fascinates me, I want to know why things happened the way they did, and well-written historical novels feed that passion.
    Thank you all for not believing that the historical is dead and for providing me with many hours of entertainment.

    Reply
  222. I’ve always loved historicals, from a child reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books along with all the fairy tales I could get my hands on. History fascinates me, I want to know why things happened the way they did, and well-written historical novels feed that passion.
    Thank you all for not believing that the historical is dead and for providing me with many hours of entertainment.

    Reply
  223. I’ve always loved historicals, from a child reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books along with all the fairy tales I could get my hands on. History fascinates me, I want to know why things happened the way they did, and well-written historical novels feed that passion.
    Thank you all for not believing that the historical is dead and for providing me with many hours of entertainment.

    Reply
  224. I’ve always loved historicals, from a child reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books along with all the fairy tales I could get my hands on. History fascinates me, I want to know why things happened the way they did, and well-written historical novels feed that passion.
    Thank you all for not believing that the historical is dead and for providing me with many hours of entertainment.

    Reply
  225. I’ve always loved historicals, from a child reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books along with all the fairy tales I could get my hands on. History fascinates me, I want to know why things happened the way they did, and well-written historical novels feed that passion.
    Thank you all for not believing that the historical is dead and for providing me with many hours of entertainment.

    Reply
  226. I have always been an avid reader, but didn’t get into the Romance genre until my freshman year at the University of Texas. I remember my mother trading romance novels with her best friend even as a small child. They loved Jude Deveraux and between the two of them owned every book she ever wrote. I remember being a little lonely and my mom sending me My Lady Notorious by Jo Beverly. Since then I’ve been hooked. Jo Beverly till this day remains my utmost favorite. My fiance makes fun of me for getting giddy everytime a new or reissued books come out and my desire to own it and read it as soon as possible. There is something wonderful about transporting to a period in the past that has come alive on paper, to live the lives as the characters lived them, to get involved and hope for the best, and then to get to the end and feel the world has been set right. Nothing makes you feel giddier or happier inside than that happy feeling at the end when love triumph. I live in the contemporary and so don’t particularly care to read about it. I love history and so love how each writer and character takes what was in the past and makes it the present. I’m a beginning writer myself and love the historical because though it is in the past, it is so much of why today is the way it is. Also, because it is the past it is open for some interpretation which leaves room for an endless variety of stories and characters. The historical will never die because there will always be the desire to escape, to imagine, to believe.

    Reply
  227. I have always been an avid reader, but didn’t get into the Romance genre until my freshman year at the University of Texas. I remember my mother trading romance novels with her best friend even as a small child. They loved Jude Deveraux and between the two of them owned every book she ever wrote. I remember being a little lonely and my mom sending me My Lady Notorious by Jo Beverly. Since then I’ve been hooked. Jo Beverly till this day remains my utmost favorite. My fiance makes fun of me for getting giddy everytime a new or reissued books come out and my desire to own it and read it as soon as possible. There is something wonderful about transporting to a period in the past that has come alive on paper, to live the lives as the characters lived them, to get involved and hope for the best, and then to get to the end and feel the world has been set right. Nothing makes you feel giddier or happier inside than that happy feeling at the end when love triumph. I live in the contemporary and so don’t particularly care to read about it. I love history and so love how each writer and character takes what was in the past and makes it the present. I’m a beginning writer myself and love the historical because though it is in the past, it is so much of why today is the way it is. Also, because it is the past it is open for some interpretation which leaves room for an endless variety of stories and characters. The historical will never die because there will always be the desire to escape, to imagine, to believe.

    Reply
  228. I have always been an avid reader, but didn’t get into the Romance genre until my freshman year at the University of Texas. I remember my mother trading romance novels with her best friend even as a small child. They loved Jude Deveraux and between the two of them owned every book she ever wrote. I remember being a little lonely and my mom sending me My Lady Notorious by Jo Beverly. Since then I’ve been hooked. Jo Beverly till this day remains my utmost favorite. My fiance makes fun of me for getting giddy everytime a new or reissued books come out and my desire to own it and read it as soon as possible. There is something wonderful about transporting to a period in the past that has come alive on paper, to live the lives as the characters lived them, to get involved and hope for the best, and then to get to the end and feel the world has been set right. Nothing makes you feel giddier or happier inside than that happy feeling at the end when love triumph. I live in the contemporary and so don’t particularly care to read about it. I love history and so love how each writer and character takes what was in the past and makes it the present. I’m a beginning writer myself and love the historical because though it is in the past, it is so much of why today is the way it is. Also, because it is the past it is open for some interpretation which leaves room for an endless variety of stories and characters. The historical will never die because there will always be the desire to escape, to imagine, to believe.

    Reply
  229. I have always been an avid reader, but didn’t get into the Romance genre until my freshman year at the University of Texas. I remember my mother trading romance novels with her best friend even as a small child. They loved Jude Deveraux and between the two of them owned every book she ever wrote. I remember being a little lonely and my mom sending me My Lady Notorious by Jo Beverly. Since then I’ve been hooked. Jo Beverly till this day remains my utmost favorite. My fiance makes fun of me for getting giddy everytime a new or reissued books come out and my desire to own it and read it as soon as possible. There is something wonderful about transporting to a period in the past that has come alive on paper, to live the lives as the characters lived them, to get involved and hope for the best, and then to get to the end and feel the world has been set right. Nothing makes you feel giddier or happier inside than that happy feeling at the end when love triumph. I live in the contemporary and so don’t particularly care to read about it. I love history and so love how each writer and character takes what was in the past and makes it the present. I’m a beginning writer myself and love the historical because though it is in the past, it is so much of why today is the way it is. Also, because it is the past it is open for some interpretation which leaves room for an endless variety of stories and characters. The historical will never die because there will always be the desire to escape, to imagine, to believe.

    Reply
  230. I have always been an avid reader, but didn’t get into the Romance genre until my freshman year at the University of Texas. I remember my mother trading romance novels with her best friend even as a small child. They loved Jude Deveraux and between the two of them owned every book she ever wrote. I remember being a little lonely and my mom sending me My Lady Notorious by Jo Beverly. Since then I’ve been hooked. Jo Beverly till this day remains my utmost favorite. My fiance makes fun of me for getting giddy everytime a new or reissued books come out and my desire to own it and read it as soon as possible. There is something wonderful about transporting to a period in the past that has come alive on paper, to live the lives as the characters lived them, to get involved and hope for the best, and then to get to the end and feel the world has been set right. Nothing makes you feel giddier or happier inside than that happy feeling at the end when love triumph. I live in the contemporary and so don’t particularly care to read about it. I love history and so love how each writer and character takes what was in the past and makes it the present. I’m a beginning writer myself and love the historical because though it is in the past, it is so much of why today is the way it is. Also, because it is the past it is open for some interpretation which leaves room for an endless variety of stories and characters. The historical will never die because there will always be the desire to escape, to imagine, to believe.

    Reply
  231. I used to be one of those who turned their nose up at historical romance novels. However this all changed when I accidentally bought Stephanie Laurens ‘A Perfect Lover’. Well after reading that I had to go back and read all the Cynstar books and have read every other book written by Stephanie Laurens. I then began to discover other authors including Jo Beverely and Mary Jo Putney and I continue to discover other authors. In fact I credit my love of historicals for getting me interested in history again. Since I started reading them I have completed a degree in History and I am now studying for an MA in History!! Thank you historicals, you have changed my life!!

    Reply
  232. I used to be one of those who turned their nose up at historical romance novels. However this all changed when I accidentally bought Stephanie Laurens ‘A Perfect Lover’. Well after reading that I had to go back and read all the Cynstar books and have read every other book written by Stephanie Laurens. I then began to discover other authors including Jo Beverely and Mary Jo Putney and I continue to discover other authors. In fact I credit my love of historicals for getting me interested in history again. Since I started reading them I have completed a degree in History and I am now studying for an MA in History!! Thank you historicals, you have changed my life!!

    Reply
  233. I used to be one of those who turned their nose up at historical romance novels. However this all changed when I accidentally bought Stephanie Laurens ‘A Perfect Lover’. Well after reading that I had to go back and read all the Cynstar books and have read every other book written by Stephanie Laurens. I then began to discover other authors including Jo Beverely and Mary Jo Putney and I continue to discover other authors. In fact I credit my love of historicals for getting me interested in history again. Since I started reading them I have completed a degree in History and I am now studying for an MA in History!! Thank you historicals, you have changed my life!!

    Reply
  234. I used to be one of those who turned their nose up at historical romance novels. However this all changed when I accidentally bought Stephanie Laurens ‘A Perfect Lover’. Well after reading that I had to go back and read all the Cynstar books and have read every other book written by Stephanie Laurens. I then began to discover other authors including Jo Beverely and Mary Jo Putney and I continue to discover other authors. In fact I credit my love of historicals for getting me interested in history again. Since I started reading them I have completed a degree in History and I am now studying for an MA in History!! Thank you historicals, you have changed my life!!

    Reply
  235. I used to be one of those who turned their nose up at historical romance novels. However this all changed when I accidentally bought Stephanie Laurens ‘A Perfect Lover’. Well after reading that I had to go back and read all the Cynstar books and have read every other book written by Stephanie Laurens. I then began to discover other authors including Jo Beverely and Mary Jo Putney and I continue to discover other authors. In fact I credit my love of historicals for getting me interested in history again. Since I started reading them I have completed a degree in History and I am now studying for an MA in History!! Thank you historicals, you have changed my life!!

    Reply
  236. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, all of my favorite “girl books,” the ones I read and reread with alacrity were historicals, at least from my perspective. Louisa May Alcott’s books, L. M. Montgomery’s Anne, and Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy books were all far removed in time and place from a 20th-century Georgia girl. I come from a story-telling people rooted in a story-telling region, and I loved family history as well. Stories of my maternal grandfather’s grandfather, a gunsmith who grew wealthy during the War Between the States and was left with a trunk filled with worthless Confederate money afterwards, of my grandmother’s grandmother, a healer and a herbalist, and of my paternal grandfather’s grandfather who came to America as a teenager with only his older brother as companion—these were my favorites.
    I started reading Austen and the Brontes before I entered my teens. The books of Elswyth Thane and Georgette Heyer were not far behind. Even the contemporary romances of Emilie Loring and Grace Livingston Hill that were my introduction to romance fiction seemed historical from my vantage point. The Georgian/Regency romances of Patricia Veryan and Clare Darcy were natural extensions of my reading. I started reading Jo, Mary Jo, and Mary Balogh with their early books, and now I can’t imagine a week without at least one historical romance in my reading mix.
    I am immensely grateful to the Wenches and other favorite authors for insuring that my TBR stack is always filled with historical romances that fill me with delight. Happy 4th Birthday!

    Reply
  237. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, all of my favorite “girl books,” the ones I read and reread with alacrity were historicals, at least from my perspective. Louisa May Alcott’s books, L. M. Montgomery’s Anne, and Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy books were all far removed in time and place from a 20th-century Georgia girl. I come from a story-telling people rooted in a story-telling region, and I loved family history as well. Stories of my maternal grandfather’s grandfather, a gunsmith who grew wealthy during the War Between the States and was left with a trunk filled with worthless Confederate money afterwards, of my grandmother’s grandmother, a healer and a herbalist, and of my paternal grandfather’s grandfather who came to America as a teenager with only his older brother as companion—these were my favorites.
    I started reading Austen and the Brontes before I entered my teens. The books of Elswyth Thane and Georgette Heyer were not far behind. Even the contemporary romances of Emilie Loring and Grace Livingston Hill that were my introduction to romance fiction seemed historical from my vantage point. The Georgian/Regency romances of Patricia Veryan and Clare Darcy were natural extensions of my reading. I started reading Jo, Mary Jo, and Mary Balogh with their early books, and now I can’t imagine a week without at least one historical romance in my reading mix.
    I am immensely grateful to the Wenches and other favorite authors for insuring that my TBR stack is always filled with historical romances that fill me with delight. Happy 4th Birthday!

    Reply
  238. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, all of my favorite “girl books,” the ones I read and reread with alacrity were historicals, at least from my perspective. Louisa May Alcott’s books, L. M. Montgomery’s Anne, and Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy books were all far removed in time and place from a 20th-century Georgia girl. I come from a story-telling people rooted in a story-telling region, and I loved family history as well. Stories of my maternal grandfather’s grandfather, a gunsmith who grew wealthy during the War Between the States and was left with a trunk filled with worthless Confederate money afterwards, of my grandmother’s grandmother, a healer and a herbalist, and of my paternal grandfather’s grandfather who came to America as a teenager with only his older brother as companion—these were my favorites.
    I started reading Austen and the Brontes before I entered my teens. The books of Elswyth Thane and Georgette Heyer were not far behind. Even the contemporary romances of Emilie Loring and Grace Livingston Hill that were my introduction to romance fiction seemed historical from my vantage point. The Georgian/Regency romances of Patricia Veryan and Clare Darcy were natural extensions of my reading. I started reading Jo, Mary Jo, and Mary Balogh with their early books, and now I can’t imagine a week without at least one historical romance in my reading mix.
    I am immensely grateful to the Wenches and other favorite authors for insuring that my TBR stack is always filled with historical romances that fill me with delight. Happy 4th Birthday!

    Reply
  239. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, all of my favorite “girl books,” the ones I read and reread with alacrity were historicals, at least from my perspective. Louisa May Alcott’s books, L. M. Montgomery’s Anne, and Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy books were all far removed in time and place from a 20th-century Georgia girl. I come from a story-telling people rooted in a story-telling region, and I loved family history as well. Stories of my maternal grandfather’s grandfather, a gunsmith who grew wealthy during the War Between the States and was left with a trunk filled with worthless Confederate money afterwards, of my grandmother’s grandmother, a healer and a herbalist, and of my paternal grandfather’s grandfather who came to America as a teenager with only his older brother as companion—these were my favorites.
    I started reading Austen and the Brontes before I entered my teens. The books of Elswyth Thane and Georgette Heyer were not far behind. Even the contemporary romances of Emilie Loring and Grace Livingston Hill that were my introduction to romance fiction seemed historical from my vantage point. The Georgian/Regency romances of Patricia Veryan and Clare Darcy were natural extensions of my reading. I started reading Jo, Mary Jo, and Mary Balogh with their early books, and now I can’t imagine a week without at least one historical romance in my reading mix.
    I am immensely grateful to the Wenches and other favorite authors for insuring that my TBR stack is always filled with historical romances that fill me with delight. Happy 4th Birthday!

    Reply
  240. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, all of my favorite “girl books,” the ones I read and reread with alacrity were historicals, at least from my perspective. Louisa May Alcott’s books, L. M. Montgomery’s Anne, and Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy books were all far removed in time and place from a 20th-century Georgia girl. I come from a story-telling people rooted in a story-telling region, and I loved family history as well. Stories of my maternal grandfather’s grandfather, a gunsmith who grew wealthy during the War Between the States and was left with a trunk filled with worthless Confederate money afterwards, of my grandmother’s grandmother, a healer and a herbalist, and of my paternal grandfather’s grandfather who came to America as a teenager with only his older brother as companion—these were my favorites.
    I started reading Austen and the Brontes before I entered my teens. The books of Elswyth Thane and Georgette Heyer were not far behind. Even the contemporary romances of Emilie Loring and Grace Livingston Hill that were my introduction to romance fiction seemed historical from my vantage point. The Georgian/Regency romances of Patricia Veryan and Clare Darcy were natural extensions of my reading. I started reading Jo, Mary Jo, and Mary Balogh with their early books, and now I can’t imagine a week without at least one historical romance in my reading mix.
    I am immensely grateful to the Wenches and other favorite authors for insuring that my TBR stack is always filled with historical romances that fill me with delight. Happy 4th Birthday!

    Reply
  241. I come from a family of readers. My summer vacations involved a trip to the library once a week — for 7 books. My addiction to Regency began when my husband died and I needed something to keep my mind occupied but didn’t require deep thought. My sister (10 years older) had stacks of Regencies available. I never lost the taste for them. I probably shouldn’t admit it, but I went on to historicals (i.e., long, involved, sexy) when the Regencies began to dry up, but “trads” will always be my first choice.

    Reply
  242. I come from a family of readers. My summer vacations involved a trip to the library once a week — for 7 books. My addiction to Regency began when my husband died and I needed something to keep my mind occupied but didn’t require deep thought. My sister (10 years older) had stacks of Regencies available. I never lost the taste for them. I probably shouldn’t admit it, but I went on to historicals (i.e., long, involved, sexy) when the Regencies began to dry up, but “trads” will always be my first choice.

    Reply
  243. I come from a family of readers. My summer vacations involved a trip to the library once a week — for 7 books. My addiction to Regency began when my husband died and I needed something to keep my mind occupied but didn’t require deep thought. My sister (10 years older) had stacks of Regencies available. I never lost the taste for them. I probably shouldn’t admit it, but I went on to historicals (i.e., long, involved, sexy) when the Regencies began to dry up, but “trads” will always be my first choice.

    Reply
  244. I come from a family of readers. My summer vacations involved a trip to the library once a week — for 7 books. My addiction to Regency began when my husband died and I needed something to keep my mind occupied but didn’t require deep thought. My sister (10 years older) had stacks of Regencies available. I never lost the taste for them. I probably shouldn’t admit it, but I went on to historicals (i.e., long, involved, sexy) when the Regencies began to dry up, but “trads” will always be my first choice.

    Reply
  245. I come from a family of readers. My summer vacations involved a trip to the library once a week — for 7 books. My addiction to Regency began when my husband died and I needed something to keep my mind occupied but didn’t require deep thought. My sister (10 years older) had stacks of Regencies available. I never lost the taste for them. I probably shouldn’t admit it, but I went on to historicals (i.e., long, involved, sexy) when the Regencies began to dry up, but “trads” will always be my first choice.

    Reply
  246. I started reading historical romances with Georgette Heyer, Barbara Cartland and Victoria Holt. I enjoy novels with rich descriptions, intense emotions and beautiful love stories.

    Reply
  247. I started reading historical romances with Georgette Heyer, Barbara Cartland and Victoria Holt. I enjoy novels with rich descriptions, intense emotions and beautiful love stories.

    Reply
  248. I started reading historical romances with Georgette Heyer, Barbara Cartland and Victoria Holt. I enjoy novels with rich descriptions, intense emotions and beautiful love stories.

    Reply
  249. I started reading historical romances with Georgette Heyer, Barbara Cartland and Victoria Holt. I enjoy novels with rich descriptions, intense emotions and beautiful love stories.

    Reply
  250. I started reading historical romances with Georgette Heyer, Barbara Cartland and Victoria Holt. I enjoy novels with rich descriptions, intense emotions and beautiful love stories.

    Reply
  251. Today is Queen Victoria’s and my birthdays. So I am one of her Princesses!. So, why not historical novels! Being a history major and a romantic I love the blending of the two into my favorite past time, reading. Besides, as I read about Napoleon or King George, or the Regent, I remember those facts I had forgotten so many years ago.
    Then too, when someone asks what I’m reading I just smile and say”a history of Regency England.” They are so impressed !!

    Reply
  252. Today is Queen Victoria’s and my birthdays. So I am one of her Princesses!. So, why not historical novels! Being a history major and a romantic I love the blending of the two into my favorite past time, reading. Besides, as I read about Napoleon or King George, or the Regent, I remember those facts I had forgotten so many years ago.
    Then too, when someone asks what I’m reading I just smile and say”a history of Regency England.” They are so impressed !!

    Reply
  253. Today is Queen Victoria’s and my birthdays. So I am one of her Princesses!. So, why not historical novels! Being a history major and a romantic I love the blending of the two into my favorite past time, reading. Besides, as I read about Napoleon or King George, or the Regent, I remember those facts I had forgotten so many years ago.
    Then too, when someone asks what I’m reading I just smile and say”a history of Regency England.” They are so impressed !!

    Reply
  254. Today is Queen Victoria’s and my birthdays. So I am one of her Princesses!. So, why not historical novels! Being a history major and a romantic I love the blending of the two into my favorite past time, reading. Besides, as I read about Napoleon or King George, or the Regent, I remember those facts I had forgotten so many years ago.
    Then too, when someone asks what I’m reading I just smile and say”a history of Regency England.” They are so impressed !!

    Reply
  255. Today is Queen Victoria’s and my birthdays. So I am one of her Princesses!. So, why not historical novels! Being a history major and a romantic I love the blending of the two into my favorite past time, reading. Besides, as I read about Napoleon or King George, or the Regent, I remember those facts I had forgotten so many years ago.
    Then too, when someone asks what I’m reading I just smile and say”a history of Regency England.” They are so impressed !!

    Reply
  256. I agree wholeheartedly with what has been said already. I grew with my mother reading greek myths, fairytales and eventually The Lord of the Rings, Pride and Prejudice, and The Three Musketeers to me before bed and anytime we could squeeze in during the day as well. But I think the sticking point for me was the year I turned 12. My family (all eight of us) took a year off and traveled around the U.S. and Canada in our motorhome, being home schooled and visiting every historical site we could. By the time we reached D.C. I was a History fanatic, and distant places, times and events have held thrall over my life ever since. I love hearing the stories of the brave men and women who came before me, but even more I love reading about the everyday Joe/Jane, who struggling to survive becomes a hero/heroine in their own right because they did just that: survive.
    Why Historic Romance? Why not? It combines the one thing that drives everyone in this life to discover: Love; with my own personal passion: History. So what could be better?
    I get teased a lot because I have such a hard time reading and writing anything set in modern day (I count modern as being from 1900 and up) and I think the reason I do is because I live in the now, where technology, the cares of each day and all the little annoyances that sometimes make this life such a trial to live through can all be taken away when I pick up a book or pen. So why would I want to read one set in the here and now if I am trying to escape?
    And on a final note, I love it because it is just that, a fictional fantasy of romantic love and history. Looking through the pages of the book to the Regency era with rose colored glasses, a sigh escapes me when that wonderful, enigmatic hero falls head over heals with his perfect counterpart.

    Reply
  257. I agree wholeheartedly with what has been said already. I grew with my mother reading greek myths, fairytales and eventually The Lord of the Rings, Pride and Prejudice, and The Three Musketeers to me before bed and anytime we could squeeze in during the day as well. But I think the sticking point for me was the year I turned 12. My family (all eight of us) took a year off and traveled around the U.S. and Canada in our motorhome, being home schooled and visiting every historical site we could. By the time we reached D.C. I was a History fanatic, and distant places, times and events have held thrall over my life ever since. I love hearing the stories of the brave men and women who came before me, but even more I love reading about the everyday Joe/Jane, who struggling to survive becomes a hero/heroine in their own right because they did just that: survive.
    Why Historic Romance? Why not? It combines the one thing that drives everyone in this life to discover: Love; with my own personal passion: History. So what could be better?
    I get teased a lot because I have such a hard time reading and writing anything set in modern day (I count modern as being from 1900 and up) and I think the reason I do is because I live in the now, where technology, the cares of each day and all the little annoyances that sometimes make this life such a trial to live through can all be taken away when I pick up a book or pen. So why would I want to read one set in the here and now if I am trying to escape?
    And on a final note, I love it because it is just that, a fictional fantasy of romantic love and history. Looking through the pages of the book to the Regency era with rose colored glasses, a sigh escapes me when that wonderful, enigmatic hero falls head over heals with his perfect counterpart.

    Reply
  258. I agree wholeheartedly with what has been said already. I grew with my mother reading greek myths, fairytales and eventually The Lord of the Rings, Pride and Prejudice, and The Three Musketeers to me before bed and anytime we could squeeze in during the day as well. But I think the sticking point for me was the year I turned 12. My family (all eight of us) took a year off and traveled around the U.S. and Canada in our motorhome, being home schooled and visiting every historical site we could. By the time we reached D.C. I was a History fanatic, and distant places, times and events have held thrall over my life ever since. I love hearing the stories of the brave men and women who came before me, but even more I love reading about the everyday Joe/Jane, who struggling to survive becomes a hero/heroine in their own right because they did just that: survive.
    Why Historic Romance? Why not? It combines the one thing that drives everyone in this life to discover: Love; with my own personal passion: History. So what could be better?
    I get teased a lot because I have such a hard time reading and writing anything set in modern day (I count modern as being from 1900 and up) and I think the reason I do is because I live in the now, where technology, the cares of each day and all the little annoyances that sometimes make this life such a trial to live through can all be taken away when I pick up a book or pen. So why would I want to read one set in the here and now if I am trying to escape?
    And on a final note, I love it because it is just that, a fictional fantasy of romantic love and history. Looking through the pages of the book to the Regency era with rose colored glasses, a sigh escapes me when that wonderful, enigmatic hero falls head over heals with his perfect counterpart.

    Reply
  259. I agree wholeheartedly with what has been said already. I grew with my mother reading greek myths, fairytales and eventually The Lord of the Rings, Pride and Prejudice, and The Three Musketeers to me before bed and anytime we could squeeze in during the day as well. But I think the sticking point for me was the year I turned 12. My family (all eight of us) took a year off and traveled around the U.S. and Canada in our motorhome, being home schooled and visiting every historical site we could. By the time we reached D.C. I was a History fanatic, and distant places, times and events have held thrall over my life ever since. I love hearing the stories of the brave men and women who came before me, but even more I love reading about the everyday Joe/Jane, who struggling to survive becomes a hero/heroine in their own right because they did just that: survive.
    Why Historic Romance? Why not? It combines the one thing that drives everyone in this life to discover: Love; with my own personal passion: History. So what could be better?
    I get teased a lot because I have such a hard time reading and writing anything set in modern day (I count modern as being from 1900 and up) and I think the reason I do is because I live in the now, where technology, the cares of each day and all the little annoyances that sometimes make this life such a trial to live through can all be taken away when I pick up a book or pen. So why would I want to read one set in the here and now if I am trying to escape?
    And on a final note, I love it because it is just that, a fictional fantasy of romantic love and history. Looking through the pages of the book to the Regency era with rose colored glasses, a sigh escapes me when that wonderful, enigmatic hero falls head over heals with his perfect counterpart.

    Reply
  260. I agree wholeheartedly with what has been said already. I grew with my mother reading greek myths, fairytales and eventually The Lord of the Rings, Pride and Prejudice, and The Three Musketeers to me before bed and anytime we could squeeze in during the day as well. But I think the sticking point for me was the year I turned 12. My family (all eight of us) took a year off and traveled around the U.S. and Canada in our motorhome, being home schooled and visiting every historical site we could. By the time we reached D.C. I was a History fanatic, and distant places, times and events have held thrall over my life ever since. I love hearing the stories of the brave men and women who came before me, but even more I love reading about the everyday Joe/Jane, who struggling to survive becomes a hero/heroine in their own right because they did just that: survive.
    Why Historic Romance? Why not? It combines the one thing that drives everyone in this life to discover: Love; with my own personal passion: History. So what could be better?
    I get teased a lot because I have such a hard time reading and writing anything set in modern day (I count modern as being from 1900 and up) and I think the reason I do is because I live in the now, where technology, the cares of each day and all the little annoyances that sometimes make this life such a trial to live through can all be taken away when I pick up a book or pen. So why would I want to read one set in the here and now if I am trying to escape?
    And on a final note, I love it because it is just that, a fictional fantasy of romantic love and history. Looking through the pages of the book to the Regency era with rose colored glasses, a sigh escapes me when that wonderful, enigmatic hero falls head over heals with his perfect counterpart.

    Reply
  261. Why historicals for me? First, I love history of all sort, and while I am reading my historical romance books, I always write down things of interest to look up on the web. And when I do, I find most, if not all authors, do much research on their books. This I do admire and respect.
    I love historical romance’s, for the innocent’s of that time. In today’s world, I feel much innocense is a thing of the past, so I devour it. I embrace the heartfelt love of the romance, the true love and sensual pleasures of the Hero and Heroin’s. And most of all, the happy endings, for in real life, it’s a very rare reality.
    I sometimes live my life precariously through your books!!!!!!

    Reply
  262. Why historicals for me? First, I love history of all sort, and while I am reading my historical romance books, I always write down things of interest to look up on the web. And when I do, I find most, if not all authors, do much research on their books. This I do admire and respect.
    I love historical romance’s, for the innocent’s of that time. In today’s world, I feel much innocense is a thing of the past, so I devour it. I embrace the heartfelt love of the romance, the true love and sensual pleasures of the Hero and Heroin’s. And most of all, the happy endings, for in real life, it’s a very rare reality.
    I sometimes live my life precariously through your books!!!!!!

    Reply
  263. Why historicals for me? First, I love history of all sort, and while I am reading my historical romance books, I always write down things of interest to look up on the web. And when I do, I find most, if not all authors, do much research on their books. This I do admire and respect.
    I love historical romance’s, for the innocent’s of that time. In today’s world, I feel much innocense is a thing of the past, so I devour it. I embrace the heartfelt love of the romance, the true love and sensual pleasures of the Hero and Heroin’s. And most of all, the happy endings, for in real life, it’s a very rare reality.
    I sometimes live my life precariously through your books!!!!!!

    Reply
  264. Why historicals for me? First, I love history of all sort, and while I am reading my historical romance books, I always write down things of interest to look up on the web. And when I do, I find most, if not all authors, do much research on their books. This I do admire and respect.
    I love historical romance’s, for the innocent’s of that time. In today’s world, I feel much innocense is a thing of the past, so I devour it. I embrace the heartfelt love of the romance, the true love and sensual pleasures of the Hero and Heroin’s. And most of all, the happy endings, for in real life, it’s a very rare reality.
    I sometimes live my life precariously through your books!!!!!!

    Reply
  265. Why historicals for me? First, I love history of all sort, and while I am reading my historical romance books, I always write down things of interest to look up on the web. And when I do, I find most, if not all authors, do much research on their books. This I do admire and respect.
    I love historical romance’s, for the innocent’s of that time. In today’s world, I feel much innocense is a thing of the past, so I devour it. I embrace the heartfelt love of the romance, the true love and sensual pleasures of the Hero and Heroin’s. And most of all, the happy endings, for in real life, it’s a very rare reality.
    I sometimes live my life precariously through your books!!!!!!

    Reply
  266. Why historicals? Because I love history. It’s my Dad’s fault. He’s a historian and a book obsessed. My mom also contributed to my problem. She read romances. I found them. Now I read romances. I also write them. I love writing it because of the research. ROFL! I know…that makes me a geek, but I love reading the texts to pull the story together. I am not sure how good I am at it yet, but I enjoy it and that is really all that matters.

    Reply
  267. Why historicals? Because I love history. It’s my Dad’s fault. He’s a historian and a book obsessed. My mom also contributed to my problem. She read romances. I found them. Now I read romances. I also write them. I love writing it because of the research. ROFL! I know…that makes me a geek, but I love reading the texts to pull the story together. I am not sure how good I am at it yet, but I enjoy it and that is really all that matters.

    Reply
  268. Why historicals? Because I love history. It’s my Dad’s fault. He’s a historian and a book obsessed. My mom also contributed to my problem. She read romances. I found them. Now I read romances. I also write them. I love writing it because of the research. ROFL! I know…that makes me a geek, but I love reading the texts to pull the story together. I am not sure how good I am at it yet, but I enjoy it and that is really all that matters.

    Reply
  269. Why historicals? Because I love history. It’s my Dad’s fault. He’s a historian and a book obsessed. My mom also contributed to my problem. She read romances. I found them. Now I read romances. I also write them. I love writing it because of the research. ROFL! I know…that makes me a geek, but I love reading the texts to pull the story together. I am not sure how good I am at it yet, but I enjoy it and that is really all that matters.

    Reply
  270. Why historicals? Because I love history. It’s my Dad’s fault. He’s a historian and a book obsessed. My mom also contributed to my problem. She read romances. I found them. Now I read romances. I also write them. I love writing it because of the research. ROFL! I know…that makes me a geek, but I love reading the texts to pull the story together. I am not sure how good I am at it yet, but I enjoy it and that is really all that matters.

    Reply
  271. When I was eight I discovered the library in the village I grew up in and spent hours there falling in love with biographies of great women. I can remember being awed by Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart as well as every Queen of England. I guess it’s not a far stretch to realize my love of historicals now. Reading historicals entriched a trip I was able to take to England and Scotland. My husband has read every book on Stonehenge but was surpised by what I had learned of it and the surrounding area by reading historical novels. Historicals have not only enriched my life but also have given me an insignt into my relatives lives who came to this country as early as the founding of Jamestown thru those who came after World War II.

    Reply
  272. When I was eight I discovered the library in the village I grew up in and spent hours there falling in love with biographies of great women. I can remember being awed by Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart as well as every Queen of England. I guess it’s not a far stretch to realize my love of historicals now. Reading historicals entriched a trip I was able to take to England and Scotland. My husband has read every book on Stonehenge but was surpised by what I had learned of it and the surrounding area by reading historical novels. Historicals have not only enriched my life but also have given me an insignt into my relatives lives who came to this country as early as the founding of Jamestown thru those who came after World War II.

    Reply
  273. When I was eight I discovered the library in the village I grew up in and spent hours there falling in love with biographies of great women. I can remember being awed by Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart as well as every Queen of England. I guess it’s not a far stretch to realize my love of historicals now. Reading historicals entriched a trip I was able to take to England and Scotland. My husband has read every book on Stonehenge but was surpised by what I had learned of it and the surrounding area by reading historical novels. Historicals have not only enriched my life but also have given me an insignt into my relatives lives who came to this country as early as the founding of Jamestown thru those who came after World War II.

    Reply
  274. When I was eight I discovered the library in the village I grew up in and spent hours there falling in love with biographies of great women. I can remember being awed by Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart as well as every Queen of England. I guess it’s not a far stretch to realize my love of historicals now. Reading historicals entriched a trip I was able to take to England and Scotland. My husband has read every book on Stonehenge but was surpised by what I had learned of it and the surrounding area by reading historical novels. Historicals have not only enriched my life but also have given me an insignt into my relatives lives who came to this country as early as the founding of Jamestown thru those who came after World War II.

    Reply
  275. When I was eight I discovered the library in the village I grew up in and spent hours there falling in love with biographies of great women. I can remember being awed by Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart as well as every Queen of England. I guess it’s not a far stretch to realize my love of historicals now. Reading historicals entriched a trip I was able to take to England and Scotland. My husband has read every book on Stonehenge but was surpised by what I had learned of it and the surrounding area by reading historical novels. Historicals have not only enriched my life but also have given me an insignt into my relatives lives who came to this country as early as the founding of Jamestown thru those who came after World War II.

    Reply
  276. Mazeltov to the word wenches!!
    Why historicals? Where do I begin? Childhood? As far back ads I can remember I had a fondness for dressing up and renaming myself with that of a favorite character from a historical novel. I was “Alice” for several months, but there were other names as well. I never could decide which March sister I was. I was a girly-girl like Meg, loved to write and put on plays like Jo, had scarlet fever like Beth, and was blonde and liked to draw like Amy.
    I was secretly convinced that I had been born in the wrong era. What else could explain (as I grew into teen-hood and beyon, and began performing in plays) my absolute comfort in corsets and petticoats and elaborate wigs? Although I began to read at an early age and devoured everything set in an earlier era, I first channeled my historical passions (professionally speaking) to the world of the Theatre, performing in countless works of the classics from Euripedes to Shakespeare, Shaw, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Goldsmith, Wilde, Coward (should I shut up now?). When I hit a certain milestone age in my life I founded a professional nonprofit theatre company in NYC called Survivor Productions (long story behind that one). Our mission: to produce neglected classics of the 19th c. English stage, and contemporary plays with their roots in 19th c. English literature (with a bit of leeway on either side of 1800 and 1900). That led to writing a couple of adaptations of my own, notably bringing Ivanhoe and The Prisoner of Zenda to the boards.
    As an audience member, give me a boots ‘n’ breeches bonnet drama any day. I’m a complete sucker for costume dramas (even though I am now capable of criticizing the hell out of them because I’ve researched the era myself). And yes, if Sean Bean is in it (or Alan Rickman), it’s a must-see.
    A couple of years after I stopped producing and performing with Survivor, I began to write, and the first novel I put my pen (okay, keyboard) to was a historical set on the Eastern End of Long Island just after the denouement of the American Revolution (that has yet to see the light of day; could it be because it remains in a desk drawer, unfinished?)
    In any event, I was now stepping back a few years from the general era covered by my theatre company, into a new artistic genre, and channeling my passion for the 18th century.
    Eventually my historical fiction was published (under the pen name Amanda Elyot) as I continue to write women’s fiction (set in the here and now) under my own name.
    The best escape for me is a well researched historical novel. There is something about inhabiting a character from another era as a writer and as a reader (historicals are my hands-down favorite genre as a reader and I seem to want to read absolutely EVERYTHING coming out!) that fills my mind and soul like nothing else, except perhaps a 1995 Cristal.

    Reply
  277. Mazeltov to the word wenches!!
    Why historicals? Where do I begin? Childhood? As far back ads I can remember I had a fondness for dressing up and renaming myself with that of a favorite character from a historical novel. I was “Alice” for several months, but there were other names as well. I never could decide which March sister I was. I was a girly-girl like Meg, loved to write and put on plays like Jo, had scarlet fever like Beth, and was blonde and liked to draw like Amy.
    I was secretly convinced that I had been born in the wrong era. What else could explain (as I grew into teen-hood and beyon, and began performing in plays) my absolute comfort in corsets and petticoats and elaborate wigs? Although I began to read at an early age and devoured everything set in an earlier era, I first channeled my historical passions (professionally speaking) to the world of the Theatre, performing in countless works of the classics from Euripedes to Shakespeare, Shaw, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Goldsmith, Wilde, Coward (should I shut up now?). When I hit a certain milestone age in my life I founded a professional nonprofit theatre company in NYC called Survivor Productions (long story behind that one). Our mission: to produce neglected classics of the 19th c. English stage, and contemporary plays with their roots in 19th c. English literature (with a bit of leeway on either side of 1800 and 1900). That led to writing a couple of adaptations of my own, notably bringing Ivanhoe and The Prisoner of Zenda to the boards.
    As an audience member, give me a boots ‘n’ breeches bonnet drama any day. I’m a complete sucker for costume dramas (even though I am now capable of criticizing the hell out of them because I’ve researched the era myself). And yes, if Sean Bean is in it (or Alan Rickman), it’s a must-see.
    A couple of years after I stopped producing and performing with Survivor, I began to write, and the first novel I put my pen (okay, keyboard) to was a historical set on the Eastern End of Long Island just after the denouement of the American Revolution (that has yet to see the light of day; could it be because it remains in a desk drawer, unfinished?)
    In any event, I was now stepping back a few years from the general era covered by my theatre company, into a new artistic genre, and channeling my passion for the 18th century.
    Eventually my historical fiction was published (under the pen name Amanda Elyot) as I continue to write women’s fiction (set in the here and now) under my own name.
    The best escape for me is a well researched historical novel. There is something about inhabiting a character from another era as a writer and as a reader (historicals are my hands-down favorite genre as a reader and I seem to want to read absolutely EVERYTHING coming out!) that fills my mind and soul like nothing else, except perhaps a 1995 Cristal.

    Reply
  278. Mazeltov to the word wenches!!
    Why historicals? Where do I begin? Childhood? As far back ads I can remember I had a fondness for dressing up and renaming myself with that of a favorite character from a historical novel. I was “Alice” for several months, but there were other names as well. I never could decide which March sister I was. I was a girly-girl like Meg, loved to write and put on plays like Jo, had scarlet fever like Beth, and was blonde and liked to draw like Amy.
    I was secretly convinced that I had been born in the wrong era. What else could explain (as I grew into teen-hood and beyon, and began performing in plays) my absolute comfort in corsets and petticoats and elaborate wigs? Although I began to read at an early age and devoured everything set in an earlier era, I first channeled my historical passions (professionally speaking) to the world of the Theatre, performing in countless works of the classics from Euripedes to Shakespeare, Shaw, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Goldsmith, Wilde, Coward (should I shut up now?). When I hit a certain milestone age in my life I founded a professional nonprofit theatre company in NYC called Survivor Productions (long story behind that one). Our mission: to produce neglected classics of the 19th c. English stage, and contemporary plays with their roots in 19th c. English literature (with a bit of leeway on either side of 1800 and 1900). That led to writing a couple of adaptations of my own, notably bringing Ivanhoe and The Prisoner of Zenda to the boards.
    As an audience member, give me a boots ‘n’ breeches bonnet drama any day. I’m a complete sucker for costume dramas (even though I am now capable of criticizing the hell out of them because I’ve researched the era myself). And yes, if Sean Bean is in it (or Alan Rickman), it’s a must-see.
    A couple of years after I stopped producing and performing with Survivor, I began to write, and the first novel I put my pen (okay, keyboard) to was a historical set on the Eastern End of Long Island just after the denouement of the American Revolution (that has yet to see the light of day; could it be because it remains in a desk drawer, unfinished?)
    In any event, I was now stepping back a few years from the general era covered by my theatre company, into a new artistic genre, and channeling my passion for the 18th century.
    Eventually my historical fiction was published (under the pen name Amanda Elyot) as I continue to write women’s fiction (set in the here and now) under my own name.
    The best escape for me is a well researched historical novel. There is something about inhabiting a character from another era as a writer and as a reader (historicals are my hands-down favorite genre as a reader and I seem to want to read absolutely EVERYTHING coming out!) that fills my mind and soul like nothing else, except perhaps a 1995 Cristal.

    Reply
  279. Mazeltov to the word wenches!!
    Why historicals? Where do I begin? Childhood? As far back ads I can remember I had a fondness for dressing up and renaming myself with that of a favorite character from a historical novel. I was “Alice” for several months, but there were other names as well. I never could decide which March sister I was. I was a girly-girl like Meg, loved to write and put on plays like Jo, had scarlet fever like Beth, and was blonde and liked to draw like Amy.
    I was secretly convinced that I had been born in the wrong era. What else could explain (as I grew into teen-hood and beyon, and began performing in plays) my absolute comfort in corsets and petticoats and elaborate wigs? Although I began to read at an early age and devoured everything set in an earlier era, I first channeled my historical passions (professionally speaking) to the world of the Theatre, performing in countless works of the classics from Euripedes to Shakespeare, Shaw, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Goldsmith, Wilde, Coward (should I shut up now?). When I hit a certain milestone age in my life I founded a professional nonprofit theatre company in NYC called Survivor Productions (long story behind that one). Our mission: to produce neglected classics of the 19th c. English stage, and contemporary plays with their roots in 19th c. English literature (with a bit of leeway on either side of 1800 and 1900). That led to writing a couple of adaptations of my own, notably bringing Ivanhoe and The Prisoner of Zenda to the boards.
    As an audience member, give me a boots ‘n’ breeches bonnet drama any day. I’m a complete sucker for costume dramas (even though I am now capable of criticizing the hell out of them because I’ve researched the era myself). And yes, if Sean Bean is in it (or Alan Rickman), it’s a must-see.
    A couple of years after I stopped producing and performing with Survivor, I began to write, and the first novel I put my pen (okay, keyboard) to was a historical set on the Eastern End of Long Island just after the denouement of the American Revolution (that has yet to see the light of day; could it be because it remains in a desk drawer, unfinished?)
    In any event, I was now stepping back a few years from the general era covered by my theatre company, into a new artistic genre, and channeling my passion for the 18th century.
    Eventually my historical fiction was published (under the pen name Amanda Elyot) as I continue to write women’s fiction (set in the here and now) under my own name.
    The best escape for me is a well researched historical novel. There is something about inhabiting a character from another era as a writer and as a reader (historicals are my hands-down favorite genre as a reader and I seem to want to read absolutely EVERYTHING coming out!) that fills my mind and soul like nothing else, except perhaps a 1995 Cristal.

    Reply
  280. Mazeltov to the word wenches!!
    Why historicals? Where do I begin? Childhood? As far back ads I can remember I had a fondness for dressing up and renaming myself with that of a favorite character from a historical novel. I was “Alice” for several months, but there were other names as well. I never could decide which March sister I was. I was a girly-girl like Meg, loved to write and put on plays like Jo, had scarlet fever like Beth, and was blonde and liked to draw like Amy.
    I was secretly convinced that I had been born in the wrong era. What else could explain (as I grew into teen-hood and beyon, and began performing in plays) my absolute comfort in corsets and petticoats and elaborate wigs? Although I began to read at an early age and devoured everything set in an earlier era, I first channeled my historical passions (professionally speaking) to the world of the Theatre, performing in countless works of the classics from Euripedes to Shakespeare, Shaw, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Goldsmith, Wilde, Coward (should I shut up now?). When I hit a certain milestone age in my life I founded a professional nonprofit theatre company in NYC called Survivor Productions (long story behind that one). Our mission: to produce neglected classics of the 19th c. English stage, and contemporary plays with their roots in 19th c. English literature (with a bit of leeway on either side of 1800 and 1900). That led to writing a couple of adaptations of my own, notably bringing Ivanhoe and The Prisoner of Zenda to the boards.
    As an audience member, give me a boots ‘n’ breeches bonnet drama any day. I’m a complete sucker for costume dramas (even though I am now capable of criticizing the hell out of them because I’ve researched the era myself). And yes, if Sean Bean is in it (or Alan Rickman), it’s a must-see.
    A couple of years after I stopped producing and performing with Survivor, I began to write, and the first novel I put my pen (okay, keyboard) to was a historical set on the Eastern End of Long Island just after the denouement of the American Revolution (that has yet to see the light of day; could it be because it remains in a desk drawer, unfinished?)
    In any event, I was now stepping back a few years from the general era covered by my theatre company, into a new artistic genre, and channeling my passion for the 18th century.
    Eventually my historical fiction was published (under the pen name Amanda Elyot) as I continue to write women’s fiction (set in the here and now) under my own name.
    The best escape for me is a well researched historical novel. There is something about inhabiting a character from another era as a writer and as a reader (historicals are my hands-down favorite genre as a reader and I seem to want to read absolutely EVERYTHING coming out!) that fills my mind and soul like nothing else, except perhaps a 1995 Cristal.

    Reply
  281. Happy 4th Birthday.
    Old Hollywood costume dramas began my love of historicals. Robert Taylor and Stewart Grainger swash-buckling in black and white film, led on to reading ‘Lorna Doone’, Georgette Heyer, and ‘Wuthering Heights’.
    Writing, I prefer the 18th/19th Century when life was changing, and I find every avenue of research turns up exciting snippets of information triggering ideas.
    As long as there are good writers, and readers to appreciate them, historicals will never die.

    Reply
  282. Happy 4th Birthday.
    Old Hollywood costume dramas began my love of historicals. Robert Taylor and Stewart Grainger swash-buckling in black and white film, led on to reading ‘Lorna Doone’, Georgette Heyer, and ‘Wuthering Heights’.
    Writing, I prefer the 18th/19th Century when life was changing, and I find every avenue of research turns up exciting snippets of information triggering ideas.
    As long as there are good writers, and readers to appreciate them, historicals will never die.

    Reply
  283. Happy 4th Birthday.
    Old Hollywood costume dramas began my love of historicals. Robert Taylor and Stewart Grainger swash-buckling in black and white film, led on to reading ‘Lorna Doone’, Georgette Heyer, and ‘Wuthering Heights’.
    Writing, I prefer the 18th/19th Century when life was changing, and I find every avenue of research turns up exciting snippets of information triggering ideas.
    As long as there are good writers, and readers to appreciate them, historicals will never die.

    Reply
  284. Happy 4th Birthday.
    Old Hollywood costume dramas began my love of historicals. Robert Taylor and Stewart Grainger swash-buckling in black and white film, led on to reading ‘Lorna Doone’, Georgette Heyer, and ‘Wuthering Heights’.
    Writing, I prefer the 18th/19th Century when life was changing, and I find every avenue of research turns up exciting snippets of information triggering ideas.
    As long as there are good writers, and readers to appreciate them, historicals will never die.

    Reply
  285. Happy 4th Birthday.
    Old Hollywood costume dramas began my love of historicals. Robert Taylor and Stewart Grainger swash-buckling in black and white film, led on to reading ‘Lorna Doone’, Georgette Heyer, and ‘Wuthering Heights’.
    Writing, I prefer the 18th/19th Century when life was changing, and I find every avenue of research turns up exciting snippets of information triggering ideas.
    As long as there are good writers, and readers to appreciate them, historicals will never die.

    Reply
  286. Happy 4th Birthday, Wenches. Historicals were my first introduction to romance and I still read them to this day. After reading Julie Garwood’s “The Prize” I went to look up the Norman Invasion in the encyclopedia. Historical romance has definitely fueled my love of history, too.

    Reply
  287. Happy Birthday and thanks for all the fun — on this blog and in your books. I love historicals because I love to learn and I remember history better if it’s attached to people, not to dates and battle descriptions. I enjoy time travel and am continually grateful to be of this period with hot and cold running bathrooms, lovely kitchens, and the ability to take the time to read of another period. Again, thank you.

    Reply
  288. Happy 4th Birthday, Wenches. Historicals were my first introduction to romance and I still read them to this day. After reading Julie Garwood’s “The Prize” I went to look up the Norman Invasion in the encyclopedia. Historical romance has definitely fueled my love of history, too.

    Reply
  289. Happy Birthday and thanks for all the fun — on this blog and in your books. I love historicals because I love to learn and I remember history better if it’s attached to people, not to dates and battle descriptions. I enjoy time travel and am continually grateful to be of this period with hot and cold running bathrooms, lovely kitchens, and the ability to take the time to read of another period. Again, thank you.

    Reply
  290. Happy 4th Birthday, Wenches. Historicals were my first introduction to romance and I still read them to this day. After reading Julie Garwood’s “The Prize” I went to look up the Norman Invasion in the encyclopedia. Historical romance has definitely fueled my love of history, too.

    Reply
  291. Happy Birthday and thanks for all the fun — on this blog and in your books. I love historicals because I love to learn and I remember history better if it’s attached to people, not to dates and battle descriptions. I enjoy time travel and am continually grateful to be of this period with hot and cold running bathrooms, lovely kitchens, and the ability to take the time to read of another period. Again, thank you.

    Reply
  292. Happy 4th Birthday, Wenches. Historicals were my first introduction to romance and I still read them to this day. After reading Julie Garwood’s “The Prize” I went to look up the Norman Invasion in the encyclopedia. Historical romance has definitely fueled my love of history, too.

    Reply
  293. Happy Birthday and thanks for all the fun — on this blog and in your books. I love historicals because I love to learn and I remember history better if it’s attached to people, not to dates and battle descriptions. I enjoy time travel and am continually grateful to be of this period with hot and cold running bathrooms, lovely kitchens, and the ability to take the time to read of another period. Again, thank you.

    Reply
  294. Happy 4th Birthday, Wenches. Historicals were my first introduction to romance and I still read them to this day. After reading Julie Garwood’s “The Prize” I went to look up the Norman Invasion in the encyclopedia. Historical romance has definitely fueled my love of history, too.

    Reply
  295. Happy Birthday and thanks for all the fun — on this blog and in your books. I love historicals because I love to learn and I remember history better if it’s attached to people, not to dates and battle descriptions. I enjoy time travel and am continually grateful to be of this period with hot and cold running bathrooms, lovely kitchens, and the ability to take the time to read of another period. Again, thank you.

    Reply
  296. Historicals give me the experience of other places and past times without my having to expend a lot of mental energy in imagining an entirely different world. The stories are rooted in human nature in a place with rules I can understand, but without the baggage of today’s issues. I suppose in that respect they are simpler, but more interesting.

    Reply
  297. Historicals give me the experience of other places and past times without my having to expend a lot of mental energy in imagining an entirely different world. The stories are rooted in human nature in a place with rules I can understand, but without the baggage of today’s issues. I suppose in that respect they are simpler, but more interesting.

    Reply
  298. Historicals give me the experience of other places and past times without my having to expend a lot of mental energy in imagining an entirely different world. The stories are rooted in human nature in a place with rules I can understand, but without the baggage of today’s issues. I suppose in that respect they are simpler, but more interesting.

    Reply
  299. Historicals give me the experience of other places and past times without my having to expend a lot of mental energy in imagining an entirely different world. The stories are rooted in human nature in a place with rules I can understand, but without the baggage of today’s issues. I suppose in that respect they are simpler, but more interesting.

    Reply
  300. Historicals give me the experience of other places and past times without my having to expend a lot of mental energy in imagining an entirely different world. The stories are rooted in human nature in a place with rules I can understand, but without the baggage of today’s issues. I suppose in that respect they are simpler, but more interesting.

    Reply
  301. What a fabulous anniversary gift for the Wenches — dozens of lovely comments that show how very much we all have in common: a deep and devoted love of historical fiction. It’s fascinating to read through these posts to learn how we all got hooked not only on history but historical fiction, too.
    The Wenches are grateful to be celebrating our fourth year in the blogiverse, and grateful for the encouragement of so many readers, whether you discovered us years ago or just found us. Nice to see so many familiar names as well as new ones!
    Good luck in the drawing!
    Susan

    Reply
  302. What a fabulous anniversary gift for the Wenches — dozens of lovely comments that show how very much we all have in common: a deep and devoted love of historical fiction. It’s fascinating to read through these posts to learn how we all got hooked not only on history but historical fiction, too.
    The Wenches are grateful to be celebrating our fourth year in the blogiverse, and grateful for the encouragement of so many readers, whether you discovered us years ago or just found us. Nice to see so many familiar names as well as new ones!
    Good luck in the drawing!
    Susan

    Reply
  303. What a fabulous anniversary gift for the Wenches — dozens of lovely comments that show how very much we all have in common: a deep and devoted love of historical fiction. It’s fascinating to read through these posts to learn how we all got hooked not only on history but historical fiction, too.
    The Wenches are grateful to be celebrating our fourth year in the blogiverse, and grateful for the encouragement of so many readers, whether you discovered us years ago or just found us. Nice to see so many familiar names as well as new ones!
    Good luck in the drawing!
    Susan

    Reply
  304. What a fabulous anniversary gift for the Wenches — dozens of lovely comments that show how very much we all have in common: a deep and devoted love of historical fiction. It’s fascinating to read through these posts to learn how we all got hooked not only on history but historical fiction, too.
    The Wenches are grateful to be celebrating our fourth year in the blogiverse, and grateful for the encouragement of so many readers, whether you discovered us years ago or just found us. Nice to see so many familiar names as well as new ones!
    Good luck in the drawing!
    Susan

    Reply
  305. What a fabulous anniversary gift for the Wenches — dozens of lovely comments that show how very much we all have in common: a deep and devoted love of historical fiction. It’s fascinating to read through these posts to learn how we all got hooked not only on history but historical fiction, too.
    The Wenches are grateful to be celebrating our fourth year in the blogiverse, and grateful for the encouragement of so many readers, whether you discovered us years ago or just found us. Nice to see so many familiar names as well as new ones!
    Good luck in the drawing!
    Susan

    Reply
  306. I read Rosemary Sutcliff as a child before getting hooked on Georgette Heyer, and have loved historicals ever since. I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason I like paranormal and fantasy — because it’s distanced from our contemporary world. I don’t read many historicals about the 20th century because it’s too close to the present — in fact, it doesn’t even feel like history to me — but I’m enjoying the recent upsurge in books about the Victorian era. I write both contemporary paranormals and Regencies, but I’d *love* to try a medieval — I guess because in my mind the more distant past is painted in vivid, irresistible colors. Which, if one is being realistic, is probably largely fantasy, but it’s compelling all the same.

    Reply
  307. I read Rosemary Sutcliff as a child before getting hooked on Georgette Heyer, and have loved historicals ever since. I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason I like paranormal and fantasy — because it’s distanced from our contemporary world. I don’t read many historicals about the 20th century because it’s too close to the present — in fact, it doesn’t even feel like history to me — but I’m enjoying the recent upsurge in books about the Victorian era. I write both contemporary paranormals and Regencies, but I’d *love* to try a medieval — I guess because in my mind the more distant past is painted in vivid, irresistible colors. Which, if one is being realistic, is probably largely fantasy, but it’s compelling all the same.

    Reply
  308. I read Rosemary Sutcliff as a child before getting hooked on Georgette Heyer, and have loved historicals ever since. I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason I like paranormal and fantasy — because it’s distanced from our contemporary world. I don’t read many historicals about the 20th century because it’s too close to the present — in fact, it doesn’t even feel like history to me — but I’m enjoying the recent upsurge in books about the Victorian era. I write both contemporary paranormals and Regencies, but I’d *love* to try a medieval — I guess because in my mind the more distant past is painted in vivid, irresistible colors. Which, if one is being realistic, is probably largely fantasy, but it’s compelling all the same.

    Reply
  309. I read Rosemary Sutcliff as a child before getting hooked on Georgette Heyer, and have loved historicals ever since. I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason I like paranormal and fantasy — because it’s distanced from our contemporary world. I don’t read many historicals about the 20th century because it’s too close to the present — in fact, it doesn’t even feel like history to me — but I’m enjoying the recent upsurge in books about the Victorian era. I write both contemporary paranormals and Regencies, but I’d *love* to try a medieval — I guess because in my mind the more distant past is painted in vivid, irresistible colors. Which, if one is being realistic, is probably largely fantasy, but it’s compelling all the same.

    Reply
  310. I read Rosemary Sutcliff as a child before getting hooked on Georgette Heyer, and have loved historicals ever since. I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason I like paranormal and fantasy — because it’s distanced from our contemporary world. I don’t read many historicals about the 20th century because it’s too close to the present — in fact, it doesn’t even feel like history to me — but I’m enjoying the recent upsurge in books about the Victorian era. I write both contemporary paranormals and Regencies, but I’d *love* to try a medieval — I guess because in my mind the more distant past is painted in vivid, irresistible colors. Which, if one is being realistic, is probably largely fantasy, but it’s compelling all the same.

    Reply
  311. I like to read to escape my present reality. I read historicals because they take me away to another time and place. I’m also less likely to disbelieve what’s going on. If I’m reading contemporary, sometimes I think “oh s/he wouldn’t do that in this day and age.” That pulls me out of the story a bit.

    Reply
  312. I like to read to escape my present reality. I read historicals because they take me away to another time and place. I’m also less likely to disbelieve what’s going on. If I’m reading contemporary, sometimes I think “oh s/he wouldn’t do that in this day and age.” That pulls me out of the story a bit.

    Reply
  313. I like to read to escape my present reality. I read historicals because they take me away to another time and place. I’m also less likely to disbelieve what’s going on. If I’m reading contemporary, sometimes I think “oh s/he wouldn’t do that in this day and age.” That pulls me out of the story a bit.

    Reply
  314. I like to read to escape my present reality. I read historicals because they take me away to another time and place. I’m also less likely to disbelieve what’s going on. If I’m reading contemporary, sometimes I think “oh s/he wouldn’t do that in this day and age.” That pulls me out of the story a bit.

    Reply
  315. I like to read to escape my present reality. I read historicals because they take me away to another time and place. I’m also less likely to disbelieve what’s going on. If I’m reading contemporary, sometimes I think “oh s/he wouldn’t do that in this day and age.” That pulls me out of the story a bit.

    Reply
  316. I enjoy historical romances as they enable me to escape for a few hours to another time & place, are full of love & romance (duhh) & have that wonderful happy ever after at the end. It’s fantasy, wonder, dreams and endless possibilities all packaged with the pages between the covers. Simply put — what’s not to enjoy.

    Reply
  317. I enjoy historical romances as they enable me to escape for a few hours to another time & place, are full of love & romance (duhh) & have that wonderful happy ever after at the end. It’s fantasy, wonder, dreams and endless possibilities all packaged with the pages between the covers. Simply put — what’s not to enjoy.

    Reply
  318. I enjoy historical romances as they enable me to escape for a few hours to another time & place, are full of love & romance (duhh) & have that wonderful happy ever after at the end. It’s fantasy, wonder, dreams and endless possibilities all packaged with the pages between the covers. Simply put — what’s not to enjoy.

    Reply
  319. I enjoy historical romances as they enable me to escape for a few hours to another time & place, are full of love & romance (duhh) & have that wonderful happy ever after at the end. It’s fantasy, wonder, dreams and endless possibilities all packaged with the pages between the covers. Simply put — what’s not to enjoy.

    Reply
  320. I enjoy historical romances as they enable me to escape for a few hours to another time & place, are full of love & romance (duhh) & have that wonderful happy ever after at the end. It’s fantasy, wonder, dreams and endless possibilities all packaged with the pages between the covers. Simply put — what’s not to enjoy.

    Reply
  321. Why historicals? It’s the writing. I have always liked English writers, and a certain flow and sound to the sentences they write. I won’t read novels with short sentences. The writing of historical romance seems to give permission to contemporary writers to write in the style of Jane Austin, while in many contemporary novels the language seems to me to be cut short,and unnecessarily abrupt.
    I don’t read contemporary romances much, or paranormal unless they are written by one of the wenches. My husband once asked me if all romance novels take place in Regency England. I said no– only almost all the ones I read.
    I, like others who have posted, read Jane Austen, and swashbucklers like Scaramouche and The Scarlet Pimpernel in elementary school, so there may be other influences that have helped me love historical novels, but certainly the use of language has first place.
    Merry

    Reply
  322. Why historicals? It’s the writing. I have always liked English writers, and a certain flow and sound to the sentences they write. I won’t read novels with short sentences. The writing of historical romance seems to give permission to contemporary writers to write in the style of Jane Austin, while in many contemporary novels the language seems to me to be cut short,and unnecessarily abrupt.
    I don’t read contemporary romances much, or paranormal unless they are written by one of the wenches. My husband once asked me if all romance novels take place in Regency England. I said no– only almost all the ones I read.
    I, like others who have posted, read Jane Austen, and swashbucklers like Scaramouche and The Scarlet Pimpernel in elementary school, so there may be other influences that have helped me love historical novels, but certainly the use of language has first place.
    Merry

    Reply
  323. Why historicals? It’s the writing. I have always liked English writers, and a certain flow and sound to the sentences they write. I won’t read novels with short sentences. The writing of historical romance seems to give permission to contemporary writers to write in the style of Jane Austin, while in many contemporary novels the language seems to me to be cut short,and unnecessarily abrupt.
    I don’t read contemporary romances much, or paranormal unless they are written by one of the wenches. My husband once asked me if all romance novels take place in Regency England. I said no– only almost all the ones I read.
    I, like others who have posted, read Jane Austen, and swashbucklers like Scaramouche and The Scarlet Pimpernel in elementary school, so there may be other influences that have helped me love historical novels, but certainly the use of language has first place.
    Merry

    Reply
  324. Why historicals? It’s the writing. I have always liked English writers, and a certain flow and sound to the sentences they write. I won’t read novels with short sentences. The writing of historical romance seems to give permission to contemporary writers to write in the style of Jane Austin, while in many contemporary novels the language seems to me to be cut short,and unnecessarily abrupt.
    I don’t read contemporary romances much, or paranormal unless they are written by one of the wenches. My husband once asked me if all romance novels take place in Regency England. I said no– only almost all the ones I read.
    I, like others who have posted, read Jane Austen, and swashbucklers like Scaramouche and The Scarlet Pimpernel in elementary school, so there may be other influences that have helped me love historical novels, but certainly the use of language has first place.
    Merry

    Reply
  325. Why historicals? It’s the writing. I have always liked English writers, and a certain flow and sound to the sentences they write. I won’t read novels with short sentences. The writing of historical romance seems to give permission to contemporary writers to write in the style of Jane Austin, while in many contemporary novels the language seems to me to be cut short,and unnecessarily abrupt.
    I don’t read contemporary romances much, or paranormal unless they are written by one of the wenches. My husband once asked me if all romance novels take place in Regency England. I said no– only almost all the ones I read.
    I, like others who have posted, read Jane Austen, and swashbucklers like Scaramouche and The Scarlet Pimpernel in elementary school, so there may be other influences that have helped me love historical novels, but certainly the use of language has first place.
    Merry

    Reply
  326. I’m just like Anne Gracie. My mum had all the Gerogette Heyer books when I was growing up (and I have them all now). They were the first historical romance books i ever read and I haven’t looked back since. Now I can’t stop reading them but I don’t call it a vice, I call it devine!

    Reply
  327. I’m just like Anne Gracie. My mum had all the Gerogette Heyer books when I was growing up (and I have them all now). They were the first historical romance books i ever read and I haven’t looked back since. Now I can’t stop reading them but I don’t call it a vice, I call it devine!

    Reply
  328. I’m just like Anne Gracie. My mum had all the Gerogette Heyer books when I was growing up (and I have them all now). They were the first historical romance books i ever read and I haven’t looked back since. Now I can’t stop reading them but I don’t call it a vice, I call it devine!

    Reply
  329. I’m just like Anne Gracie. My mum had all the Gerogette Heyer books when I was growing up (and I have them all now). They were the first historical romance books i ever read and I haven’t looked back since. Now I can’t stop reading them but I don’t call it a vice, I call it devine!

    Reply
  330. I’m just like Anne Gracie. My mum had all the Gerogette Heyer books when I was growing up (and I have them all now). They were the first historical romance books i ever read and I haven’t looked back since. Now I can’t stop reading them but I don’t call it a vice, I call it devine!

    Reply
  331. I prefer historicals about real people and events. My students find it exciting to discern fact from fiction.
    enyl(at)inbox(dot)com

    Reply
  332. I prefer historicals about real people and events. My students find it exciting to discern fact from fiction.
    enyl(at)inbox(dot)com

    Reply
  333. I prefer historicals about real people and events. My students find it exciting to discern fact from fiction.
    enyl(at)inbox(dot)com

    Reply
  334. I prefer historicals about real people and events. My students find it exciting to discern fact from fiction.
    enyl(at)inbox(dot)com

    Reply
  335. I prefer historicals about real people and events. My students find it exciting to discern fact from fiction.
    enyl(at)inbox(dot)com

    Reply
  336. Mary Jo, You are the first person I’ve heard say they read Kenneth Roberts. Fort Ticonderoga is a big favorite of ours and we go whenever we can. We have had a couple of night time experiences there that truly did take us back several hundred years.
    When you can visit a site and feel its history as a tangible thing, it is very special. We have been lucky enough to find many of those. To be able to write books that transport us back to those times and others in the past is a gift. I read historical because I am interested in history and I want to know more about it. Well researched books bring that past to life for me. They let me experience life as people did in that time period. I get to hear, feel, taste and smell what life was like. A well written book will let me feel the joy, terror, anger, anguish, and heartbreak with them. It brings into focus those facts we learned in history class. It gives them a face, a place, a heart, and a soul. The author can put you aboard that ship in the middle of battle, strand you in the snow with the Donner Party, have you fighting for your life in a battle against Napoleon’s forces, or attending a ball in one of the elegant homes of the Ton. What is not to like about historical fiction? It has it all: intrigue, adventure, danger, humor, heartbreak, and romance. I firmly believe it will be around for a long, long time.

    Reply
  337. Mary Jo, You are the first person I’ve heard say they read Kenneth Roberts. Fort Ticonderoga is a big favorite of ours and we go whenever we can. We have had a couple of night time experiences there that truly did take us back several hundred years.
    When you can visit a site and feel its history as a tangible thing, it is very special. We have been lucky enough to find many of those. To be able to write books that transport us back to those times and others in the past is a gift. I read historical because I am interested in history and I want to know more about it. Well researched books bring that past to life for me. They let me experience life as people did in that time period. I get to hear, feel, taste and smell what life was like. A well written book will let me feel the joy, terror, anger, anguish, and heartbreak with them. It brings into focus those facts we learned in history class. It gives them a face, a place, a heart, and a soul. The author can put you aboard that ship in the middle of battle, strand you in the snow with the Donner Party, have you fighting for your life in a battle against Napoleon’s forces, or attending a ball in one of the elegant homes of the Ton. What is not to like about historical fiction? It has it all: intrigue, adventure, danger, humor, heartbreak, and romance. I firmly believe it will be around for a long, long time.

    Reply
  338. Mary Jo, You are the first person I’ve heard say they read Kenneth Roberts. Fort Ticonderoga is a big favorite of ours and we go whenever we can. We have had a couple of night time experiences there that truly did take us back several hundred years.
    When you can visit a site and feel its history as a tangible thing, it is very special. We have been lucky enough to find many of those. To be able to write books that transport us back to those times and others in the past is a gift. I read historical because I am interested in history and I want to know more about it. Well researched books bring that past to life for me. They let me experience life as people did in that time period. I get to hear, feel, taste and smell what life was like. A well written book will let me feel the joy, terror, anger, anguish, and heartbreak with them. It brings into focus those facts we learned in history class. It gives them a face, a place, a heart, and a soul. The author can put you aboard that ship in the middle of battle, strand you in the snow with the Donner Party, have you fighting for your life in a battle against Napoleon’s forces, or attending a ball in one of the elegant homes of the Ton. What is not to like about historical fiction? It has it all: intrigue, adventure, danger, humor, heartbreak, and romance. I firmly believe it will be around for a long, long time.

    Reply
  339. Mary Jo, You are the first person I’ve heard say they read Kenneth Roberts. Fort Ticonderoga is a big favorite of ours and we go whenever we can. We have had a couple of night time experiences there that truly did take us back several hundred years.
    When you can visit a site and feel its history as a tangible thing, it is very special. We have been lucky enough to find many of those. To be able to write books that transport us back to those times and others in the past is a gift. I read historical because I am interested in history and I want to know more about it. Well researched books bring that past to life for me. They let me experience life as people did in that time period. I get to hear, feel, taste and smell what life was like. A well written book will let me feel the joy, terror, anger, anguish, and heartbreak with them. It brings into focus those facts we learned in history class. It gives them a face, a place, a heart, and a soul. The author can put you aboard that ship in the middle of battle, strand you in the snow with the Donner Party, have you fighting for your life in a battle against Napoleon’s forces, or attending a ball in one of the elegant homes of the Ton. What is not to like about historical fiction? It has it all: intrigue, adventure, danger, humor, heartbreak, and romance. I firmly believe it will be around for a long, long time.

    Reply
  340. Mary Jo, You are the first person I’ve heard say they read Kenneth Roberts. Fort Ticonderoga is a big favorite of ours and we go whenever we can. We have had a couple of night time experiences there that truly did take us back several hundred years.
    When you can visit a site and feel its history as a tangible thing, it is very special. We have been lucky enough to find many of those. To be able to write books that transport us back to those times and others in the past is a gift. I read historical because I am interested in history and I want to know more about it. Well researched books bring that past to life for me. They let me experience life as people did in that time period. I get to hear, feel, taste and smell what life was like. A well written book will let me feel the joy, terror, anger, anguish, and heartbreak with them. It brings into focus those facts we learned in history class. It gives them a face, a place, a heart, and a soul. The author can put you aboard that ship in the middle of battle, strand you in the snow with the Donner Party, have you fighting for your life in a battle against Napoleon’s forces, or attending a ball in one of the elegant homes of the Ton. What is not to like about historical fiction? It has it all: intrigue, adventure, danger, humor, heartbreak, and romance. I firmly believe it will be around for a long, long time.

    Reply
  341. Happy 4th Birthday Wenches. You ladies write some of the best stuff on the market these days!
    History has always been my favorite subject so I guess it was a natural thing to begin reading historical romances and believe it or not the first historical romance I picked up was ‘Gone with the Wind’ in 1960 when I was 16. And the rest, as they say, is history. Back then, there weren’t a lot of historical romances on the market so if I wanted to read, it was contemp. Now, I’m not knocking contemps, but my heart is with history. I remember reading ‘Sacajawea’ and having my Rand-McNally road atlas next to me so I could follow the Lewis & Clark route on the map while I was reading the book. My kids laughed at me for that…who else do you know that refers to a road map while reading a book? Did I mention Geography was also a favorite subject?
    It really wasn’t until the mid-70’s that historicals started hitting the market big time. And then they were mainly set in American from the Revolution through the Civil War and the American West. Not too many set in the Victorian era unless it was a western and it was hard to find a book set in England in the time periods I was interested in such as Georgian, Regency & Victorian. They were rare ducks back then. Some of my favorite authors at the time were Valerie Sherwood, Patricia Matthews and Rosemary Rogers, and many more. I have to hang my head here and say I’ve never read Georgette Heyer or (running for cover behind a chair) Jane Austen.
    Now it’s hard to find a Historical set in America. Funny how things progress. Today I have this huge library of books just waiting to be read and they are all Regency or Victorian with a few Georgian thrown in for good measure. And by a lot of books I mean 1000+ according to my last spreadsheet count! Did I mention that I am addicted to buying books? Wave a bookstore gift card in front of my face is like waving a red flag at a bull! Guess I’d better get to reading. Pray with me ladies: “Dear God, Please keep me alive long enough to finish reading all the books in my TBR pile.”

    Reply
  342. Happy 4th Birthday Wenches. You ladies write some of the best stuff on the market these days!
    History has always been my favorite subject so I guess it was a natural thing to begin reading historical romances and believe it or not the first historical romance I picked up was ‘Gone with the Wind’ in 1960 when I was 16. And the rest, as they say, is history. Back then, there weren’t a lot of historical romances on the market so if I wanted to read, it was contemp. Now, I’m not knocking contemps, but my heart is with history. I remember reading ‘Sacajawea’ and having my Rand-McNally road atlas next to me so I could follow the Lewis & Clark route on the map while I was reading the book. My kids laughed at me for that…who else do you know that refers to a road map while reading a book? Did I mention Geography was also a favorite subject?
    It really wasn’t until the mid-70’s that historicals started hitting the market big time. And then they were mainly set in American from the Revolution through the Civil War and the American West. Not too many set in the Victorian era unless it was a western and it was hard to find a book set in England in the time periods I was interested in such as Georgian, Regency & Victorian. They were rare ducks back then. Some of my favorite authors at the time were Valerie Sherwood, Patricia Matthews and Rosemary Rogers, and many more. I have to hang my head here and say I’ve never read Georgette Heyer or (running for cover behind a chair) Jane Austen.
    Now it’s hard to find a Historical set in America. Funny how things progress. Today I have this huge library of books just waiting to be read and they are all Regency or Victorian with a few Georgian thrown in for good measure. And by a lot of books I mean 1000+ according to my last spreadsheet count! Did I mention that I am addicted to buying books? Wave a bookstore gift card in front of my face is like waving a red flag at a bull! Guess I’d better get to reading. Pray with me ladies: “Dear God, Please keep me alive long enough to finish reading all the books in my TBR pile.”

    Reply
  343. Happy 4th Birthday Wenches. You ladies write some of the best stuff on the market these days!
    History has always been my favorite subject so I guess it was a natural thing to begin reading historical romances and believe it or not the first historical romance I picked up was ‘Gone with the Wind’ in 1960 when I was 16. And the rest, as they say, is history. Back then, there weren’t a lot of historical romances on the market so if I wanted to read, it was contemp. Now, I’m not knocking contemps, but my heart is with history. I remember reading ‘Sacajawea’ and having my Rand-McNally road atlas next to me so I could follow the Lewis & Clark route on the map while I was reading the book. My kids laughed at me for that…who else do you know that refers to a road map while reading a book? Did I mention Geography was also a favorite subject?
    It really wasn’t until the mid-70’s that historicals started hitting the market big time. And then they were mainly set in American from the Revolution through the Civil War and the American West. Not too many set in the Victorian era unless it was a western and it was hard to find a book set in England in the time periods I was interested in such as Georgian, Regency & Victorian. They were rare ducks back then. Some of my favorite authors at the time were Valerie Sherwood, Patricia Matthews and Rosemary Rogers, and many more. I have to hang my head here and say I’ve never read Georgette Heyer or (running for cover behind a chair) Jane Austen.
    Now it’s hard to find a Historical set in America. Funny how things progress. Today I have this huge library of books just waiting to be read and they are all Regency or Victorian with a few Georgian thrown in for good measure. And by a lot of books I mean 1000+ according to my last spreadsheet count! Did I mention that I am addicted to buying books? Wave a bookstore gift card in front of my face is like waving a red flag at a bull! Guess I’d better get to reading. Pray with me ladies: “Dear God, Please keep me alive long enough to finish reading all the books in my TBR pile.”

    Reply
  344. Happy 4th Birthday Wenches. You ladies write some of the best stuff on the market these days!
    History has always been my favorite subject so I guess it was a natural thing to begin reading historical romances and believe it or not the first historical romance I picked up was ‘Gone with the Wind’ in 1960 when I was 16. And the rest, as they say, is history. Back then, there weren’t a lot of historical romances on the market so if I wanted to read, it was contemp. Now, I’m not knocking contemps, but my heart is with history. I remember reading ‘Sacajawea’ and having my Rand-McNally road atlas next to me so I could follow the Lewis & Clark route on the map while I was reading the book. My kids laughed at me for that…who else do you know that refers to a road map while reading a book? Did I mention Geography was also a favorite subject?
    It really wasn’t until the mid-70’s that historicals started hitting the market big time. And then they were mainly set in American from the Revolution through the Civil War and the American West. Not too many set in the Victorian era unless it was a western and it was hard to find a book set in England in the time periods I was interested in such as Georgian, Regency & Victorian. They were rare ducks back then. Some of my favorite authors at the time were Valerie Sherwood, Patricia Matthews and Rosemary Rogers, and many more. I have to hang my head here and say I’ve never read Georgette Heyer or (running for cover behind a chair) Jane Austen.
    Now it’s hard to find a Historical set in America. Funny how things progress. Today I have this huge library of books just waiting to be read and they are all Regency or Victorian with a few Georgian thrown in for good measure. And by a lot of books I mean 1000+ according to my last spreadsheet count! Did I mention that I am addicted to buying books? Wave a bookstore gift card in front of my face is like waving a red flag at a bull! Guess I’d better get to reading. Pray with me ladies: “Dear God, Please keep me alive long enough to finish reading all the books in my TBR pile.”

    Reply
  345. Happy 4th Birthday Wenches. You ladies write some of the best stuff on the market these days!
    History has always been my favorite subject so I guess it was a natural thing to begin reading historical romances and believe it or not the first historical romance I picked up was ‘Gone with the Wind’ in 1960 when I was 16. And the rest, as they say, is history. Back then, there weren’t a lot of historical romances on the market so if I wanted to read, it was contemp. Now, I’m not knocking contemps, but my heart is with history. I remember reading ‘Sacajawea’ and having my Rand-McNally road atlas next to me so I could follow the Lewis & Clark route on the map while I was reading the book. My kids laughed at me for that…who else do you know that refers to a road map while reading a book? Did I mention Geography was also a favorite subject?
    It really wasn’t until the mid-70’s that historicals started hitting the market big time. And then they were mainly set in American from the Revolution through the Civil War and the American West. Not too many set in the Victorian era unless it was a western and it was hard to find a book set in England in the time periods I was interested in such as Georgian, Regency & Victorian. They were rare ducks back then. Some of my favorite authors at the time were Valerie Sherwood, Patricia Matthews and Rosemary Rogers, and many more. I have to hang my head here and say I’ve never read Georgette Heyer or (running for cover behind a chair) Jane Austen.
    Now it’s hard to find a Historical set in America. Funny how things progress. Today I have this huge library of books just waiting to be read and they are all Regency or Victorian with a few Georgian thrown in for good measure. And by a lot of books I mean 1000+ according to my last spreadsheet count! Did I mention that I am addicted to buying books? Wave a bookstore gift card in front of my face is like waving a red flag at a bull! Guess I’d better get to reading. Pray with me ladies: “Dear God, Please keep me alive long enough to finish reading all the books in my TBR pile.”

    Reply
  346. Historical is a genre that I really enjoy mainly because it’s a way of time travel. How else can you live medievally or learn about the Napoleonic War? All the history I know I’ve learned through reading historicals and I’m proud of it. History is not dry and is not just a collection of events and facts, it’s the people who shape and live and work.

    Reply
  347. Historical is a genre that I really enjoy mainly because it’s a way of time travel. How else can you live medievally or learn about the Napoleonic War? All the history I know I’ve learned through reading historicals and I’m proud of it. History is not dry and is not just a collection of events and facts, it’s the people who shape and live and work.

    Reply
  348. Historical is a genre that I really enjoy mainly because it’s a way of time travel. How else can you live medievally or learn about the Napoleonic War? All the history I know I’ve learned through reading historicals and I’m proud of it. History is not dry and is not just a collection of events and facts, it’s the people who shape and live and work.

    Reply
  349. Historical is a genre that I really enjoy mainly because it’s a way of time travel. How else can you live medievally or learn about the Napoleonic War? All the history I know I’ve learned through reading historicals and I’m proud of it. History is not dry and is not just a collection of events and facts, it’s the people who shape and live and work.

    Reply
  350. Historical is a genre that I really enjoy mainly because it’s a way of time travel. How else can you live medievally or learn about the Napoleonic War? All the history I know I’ve learned through reading historicals and I’m proud of it. History is not dry and is not just a collection of events and facts, it’s the people who shape and live and work.

    Reply
  351. From MJP:
    LibraryPat, how cool that you’re a Ticonderoga fan! I only visited there once, and I was probably in elementary school, but I remember it vividly–the stone, the forest and the lake, pictures in the museum area. One was a picture of the Green Mountain boys, and another was a white woman being scalped by Indians (a real person, and IIRC, she survived.)
    The Daniel Day-Lewis version of LAST OF THE MOHICANS really captured that sense of wildness and forest that you were probably tuning into on those night time experiences. I need to go back to Ft. Ti one of these days! (As a kid, I had trouble pronouncing the whole name.)
    Kenneth Roberts was more of a guy writer–lots of war and action. Maybe that’s where I got some of my taste for action books.
    Thanks to all of you who’ve come to help us celebrate out fourth anniversary. In blogworld terms, we’re downright elderly. *G*

    Reply
  352. From MJP:
    LibraryPat, how cool that you’re a Ticonderoga fan! I only visited there once, and I was probably in elementary school, but I remember it vividly–the stone, the forest and the lake, pictures in the museum area. One was a picture of the Green Mountain boys, and another was a white woman being scalped by Indians (a real person, and IIRC, she survived.)
    The Daniel Day-Lewis version of LAST OF THE MOHICANS really captured that sense of wildness and forest that you were probably tuning into on those night time experiences. I need to go back to Ft. Ti one of these days! (As a kid, I had trouble pronouncing the whole name.)
    Kenneth Roberts was more of a guy writer–lots of war and action. Maybe that’s where I got some of my taste for action books.
    Thanks to all of you who’ve come to help us celebrate out fourth anniversary. In blogworld terms, we’re downright elderly. *G*

    Reply
  353. From MJP:
    LibraryPat, how cool that you’re a Ticonderoga fan! I only visited there once, and I was probably in elementary school, but I remember it vividly–the stone, the forest and the lake, pictures in the museum area. One was a picture of the Green Mountain boys, and another was a white woman being scalped by Indians (a real person, and IIRC, she survived.)
    The Daniel Day-Lewis version of LAST OF THE MOHICANS really captured that sense of wildness and forest that you were probably tuning into on those night time experiences. I need to go back to Ft. Ti one of these days! (As a kid, I had trouble pronouncing the whole name.)
    Kenneth Roberts was more of a guy writer–lots of war and action. Maybe that’s where I got some of my taste for action books.
    Thanks to all of you who’ve come to help us celebrate out fourth anniversary. In blogworld terms, we’re downright elderly. *G*

    Reply
  354. From MJP:
    LibraryPat, how cool that you’re a Ticonderoga fan! I only visited there once, and I was probably in elementary school, but I remember it vividly–the stone, the forest and the lake, pictures in the museum area. One was a picture of the Green Mountain boys, and another was a white woman being scalped by Indians (a real person, and IIRC, she survived.)
    The Daniel Day-Lewis version of LAST OF THE MOHICANS really captured that sense of wildness and forest that you were probably tuning into on those night time experiences. I need to go back to Ft. Ti one of these days! (As a kid, I had trouble pronouncing the whole name.)
    Kenneth Roberts was more of a guy writer–lots of war and action. Maybe that’s where I got some of my taste for action books.
    Thanks to all of you who’ve come to help us celebrate out fourth anniversary. In blogworld terms, we’re downright elderly. *G*

    Reply
  355. From MJP:
    LibraryPat, how cool that you’re a Ticonderoga fan! I only visited there once, and I was probably in elementary school, but I remember it vividly–the stone, the forest and the lake, pictures in the museum area. One was a picture of the Green Mountain boys, and another was a white woman being scalped by Indians (a real person, and IIRC, she survived.)
    The Daniel Day-Lewis version of LAST OF THE MOHICANS really captured that sense of wildness and forest that you were probably tuning into on those night time experiences. I need to go back to Ft. Ti one of these days! (As a kid, I had trouble pronouncing the whole name.)
    Kenneth Roberts was more of a guy writer–lots of war and action. Maybe that’s where I got some of my taste for action books.
    Thanks to all of you who’ve come to help us celebrate out fourth anniversary. In blogworld terms, we’re downright elderly. *G*

    Reply
  356. Oh, I have to chime in on the Ticonderoga thing — I’ve been there many times (just last summer in fact, and planning it again this summer) — I was born and raised near Lake George. So my first intro to history was the fascinating local history that I grew up with in school and at home — tales of the French and Indian Wars and frequent visits to forts and local museums.
    I loved Last of the Mohicans, being passionately familiar with so much in the movie (we drove past the site of the famous massacre all the time when I was a kid and would shiver when our parents would tell us the bloody history of the place). Too bad the movie wasn’t actually filmed up there, but it was absolutely evocative all the same.
    I’ve read Kenneth Roberts too – must come with the territory. 😉
    Susan

    Reply
  357. Oh, I have to chime in on the Ticonderoga thing — I’ve been there many times (just last summer in fact, and planning it again this summer) — I was born and raised near Lake George. So my first intro to history was the fascinating local history that I grew up with in school and at home — tales of the French and Indian Wars and frequent visits to forts and local museums.
    I loved Last of the Mohicans, being passionately familiar with so much in the movie (we drove past the site of the famous massacre all the time when I was a kid and would shiver when our parents would tell us the bloody history of the place). Too bad the movie wasn’t actually filmed up there, but it was absolutely evocative all the same.
    I’ve read Kenneth Roberts too – must come with the territory. 😉
    Susan

    Reply
  358. Oh, I have to chime in on the Ticonderoga thing — I’ve been there many times (just last summer in fact, and planning it again this summer) — I was born and raised near Lake George. So my first intro to history was the fascinating local history that I grew up with in school and at home — tales of the French and Indian Wars and frequent visits to forts and local museums.
    I loved Last of the Mohicans, being passionately familiar with so much in the movie (we drove past the site of the famous massacre all the time when I was a kid and would shiver when our parents would tell us the bloody history of the place). Too bad the movie wasn’t actually filmed up there, but it was absolutely evocative all the same.
    I’ve read Kenneth Roberts too – must come with the territory. 😉
    Susan

    Reply
  359. Oh, I have to chime in on the Ticonderoga thing — I’ve been there many times (just last summer in fact, and planning it again this summer) — I was born and raised near Lake George. So my first intro to history was the fascinating local history that I grew up with in school and at home — tales of the French and Indian Wars and frequent visits to forts and local museums.
    I loved Last of the Mohicans, being passionately familiar with so much in the movie (we drove past the site of the famous massacre all the time when I was a kid and would shiver when our parents would tell us the bloody history of the place). Too bad the movie wasn’t actually filmed up there, but it was absolutely evocative all the same.
    I’ve read Kenneth Roberts too – must come with the territory. 😉
    Susan

    Reply
  360. Oh, I have to chime in on the Ticonderoga thing — I’ve been there many times (just last summer in fact, and planning it again this summer) — I was born and raised near Lake George. So my first intro to history was the fascinating local history that I grew up with in school and at home — tales of the French and Indian Wars and frequent visits to forts and local museums.
    I loved Last of the Mohicans, being passionately familiar with so much in the movie (we drove past the site of the famous massacre all the time when I was a kid and would shiver when our parents would tell us the bloody history of the place). Too bad the movie wasn’t actually filmed up there, but it was absolutely evocative all the same.
    I’ve read Kenneth Roberts too – must come with the territory. 😉
    Susan

    Reply
  361. Hi, Having favorites among all the authors on this subject it’s a no brainer. I can’t stand this period. It has no magic, no romance and no style. My fav is Regency era but nearly all are and improvement on today. For that matter I fear for my granchildren’s future.
    Thank you all for many happy hours away from my here and now.

    Reply
  362. Hi, Having favorites among all the authors on this subject it’s a no brainer. I can’t stand this period. It has no magic, no romance and no style. My fav is Regency era but nearly all are and improvement on today. For that matter I fear for my granchildren’s future.
    Thank you all for many happy hours away from my here and now.

    Reply
  363. Hi, Having favorites among all the authors on this subject it’s a no brainer. I can’t stand this period. It has no magic, no romance and no style. My fav is Regency era but nearly all are and improvement on today. For that matter I fear for my granchildren’s future.
    Thank you all for many happy hours away from my here and now.

    Reply
  364. Hi, Having favorites among all the authors on this subject it’s a no brainer. I can’t stand this period. It has no magic, no romance and no style. My fav is Regency era but nearly all are and improvement on today. For that matter I fear for my granchildren’s future.
    Thank you all for many happy hours away from my here and now.

    Reply
  365. Hi, Having favorites among all the authors on this subject it’s a no brainer. I can’t stand this period. It has no magic, no romance and no style. My fav is Regency era but nearly all are and improvement on today. For that matter I fear for my granchildren’s future.
    Thank you all for many happy hours away from my here and now.

    Reply
  366. I don’t remember not knowing how to read – Mom said at age 3 I took the book she was reading and told her I’d rather read it myself! So I worked my way thru Fairy Tales to YA books (Sword in the Stone, Robin Hood, etc) at the NY Public Library local branch.
    Eventually, I started collecting Science Fiction – perfect escape literature – and now have a fab collection (anyone know a library that wants it?). As I reached puberty I dove into history – specially of Britain – so I read Jane Austin, Emily Bronte, Georgette Heyer, among others. I read all the Plantagenet histories and eventually picked up Dunnett’s Queens Play and never looked back.
    Frankly, I was never interested in ‘bodice rippers’ per se, but found some contemporary romance authors fun (Susan Elizabeth Phillips). What I’ve discovered is that the current crop of historical romances are intelligent stories about adults dealing with universal human themes – love, sex, family, human rights, medical crises etc. Mix them with doses of erotica and what’s not to love?
    I’m having fun finding new authors and following their series thru my public library and inter-library loans – can you tell I have an MLS degree?
    I admire authors who can set the historical context, make me love the protagenists and deliver emotional journeys that take me out of my real life. Keep on truckin ladies.

    Reply
  367. I don’t remember not knowing how to read – Mom said at age 3 I took the book she was reading and told her I’d rather read it myself! So I worked my way thru Fairy Tales to YA books (Sword in the Stone, Robin Hood, etc) at the NY Public Library local branch.
    Eventually, I started collecting Science Fiction – perfect escape literature – and now have a fab collection (anyone know a library that wants it?). As I reached puberty I dove into history – specially of Britain – so I read Jane Austin, Emily Bronte, Georgette Heyer, among others. I read all the Plantagenet histories and eventually picked up Dunnett’s Queens Play and never looked back.
    Frankly, I was never interested in ‘bodice rippers’ per se, but found some contemporary romance authors fun (Susan Elizabeth Phillips). What I’ve discovered is that the current crop of historical romances are intelligent stories about adults dealing with universal human themes – love, sex, family, human rights, medical crises etc. Mix them with doses of erotica and what’s not to love?
    I’m having fun finding new authors and following their series thru my public library and inter-library loans – can you tell I have an MLS degree?
    I admire authors who can set the historical context, make me love the protagenists and deliver emotional journeys that take me out of my real life. Keep on truckin ladies.

    Reply
  368. I don’t remember not knowing how to read – Mom said at age 3 I took the book she was reading and told her I’d rather read it myself! So I worked my way thru Fairy Tales to YA books (Sword in the Stone, Robin Hood, etc) at the NY Public Library local branch.
    Eventually, I started collecting Science Fiction – perfect escape literature – and now have a fab collection (anyone know a library that wants it?). As I reached puberty I dove into history – specially of Britain – so I read Jane Austin, Emily Bronte, Georgette Heyer, among others. I read all the Plantagenet histories and eventually picked up Dunnett’s Queens Play and never looked back.
    Frankly, I was never interested in ‘bodice rippers’ per se, but found some contemporary romance authors fun (Susan Elizabeth Phillips). What I’ve discovered is that the current crop of historical romances are intelligent stories about adults dealing with universal human themes – love, sex, family, human rights, medical crises etc. Mix them with doses of erotica and what’s not to love?
    I’m having fun finding new authors and following their series thru my public library and inter-library loans – can you tell I have an MLS degree?
    I admire authors who can set the historical context, make me love the protagenists and deliver emotional journeys that take me out of my real life. Keep on truckin ladies.

    Reply
  369. I don’t remember not knowing how to read – Mom said at age 3 I took the book she was reading and told her I’d rather read it myself! So I worked my way thru Fairy Tales to YA books (Sword in the Stone, Robin Hood, etc) at the NY Public Library local branch.
    Eventually, I started collecting Science Fiction – perfect escape literature – and now have a fab collection (anyone know a library that wants it?). As I reached puberty I dove into history – specially of Britain – so I read Jane Austin, Emily Bronte, Georgette Heyer, among others. I read all the Plantagenet histories and eventually picked up Dunnett’s Queens Play and never looked back.
    Frankly, I was never interested in ‘bodice rippers’ per se, but found some contemporary romance authors fun (Susan Elizabeth Phillips). What I’ve discovered is that the current crop of historical romances are intelligent stories about adults dealing with universal human themes – love, sex, family, human rights, medical crises etc. Mix them with doses of erotica and what’s not to love?
    I’m having fun finding new authors and following their series thru my public library and inter-library loans – can you tell I have an MLS degree?
    I admire authors who can set the historical context, make me love the protagenists and deliver emotional journeys that take me out of my real life. Keep on truckin ladies.

    Reply
  370. I don’t remember not knowing how to read – Mom said at age 3 I took the book she was reading and told her I’d rather read it myself! So I worked my way thru Fairy Tales to YA books (Sword in the Stone, Robin Hood, etc) at the NY Public Library local branch.
    Eventually, I started collecting Science Fiction – perfect escape literature – and now have a fab collection (anyone know a library that wants it?). As I reached puberty I dove into history – specially of Britain – so I read Jane Austin, Emily Bronte, Georgette Heyer, among others. I read all the Plantagenet histories and eventually picked up Dunnett’s Queens Play and never looked back.
    Frankly, I was never interested in ‘bodice rippers’ per se, but found some contemporary romance authors fun (Susan Elizabeth Phillips). What I’ve discovered is that the current crop of historical romances are intelligent stories about adults dealing with universal human themes – love, sex, family, human rights, medical crises etc. Mix them with doses of erotica and what’s not to love?
    I’m having fun finding new authors and following their series thru my public library and inter-library loans – can you tell I have an MLS degree?
    I admire authors who can set the historical context, make me love the protagenists and deliver emotional journeys that take me out of my real life. Keep on truckin ladies.

    Reply
  371. Why Historicals? Well, as much as I have hope, I don’t imagine anyone will invent a time machine anytime soon. So Historicals are the closest I’m going to get to the beautiful time where women wore stunning dresses and and danced, actually *danced*, with their partners. Its one of my favorite pastimes, to get swept into the marvelous and lush world of a Historical Romance. I doubt it ever will, but I sincerely hope it never fades away.

    Reply
  372. Why Historicals? Well, as much as I have hope, I don’t imagine anyone will invent a time machine anytime soon. So Historicals are the closest I’m going to get to the beautiful time where women wore stunning dresses and and danced, actually *danced*, with their partners. Its one of my favorite pastimes, to get swept into the marvelous and lush world of a Historical Romance. I doubt it ever will, but I sincerely hope it never fades away.

    Reply
  373. Why Historicals? Well, as much as I have hope, I don’t imagine anyone will invent a time machine anytime soon. So Historicals are the closest I’m going to get to the beautiful time where women wore stunning dresses and and danced, actually *danced*, with their partners. Its one of my favorite pastimes, to get swept into the marvelous and lush world of a Historical Romance. I doubt it ever will, but I sincerely hope it never fades away.

    Reply
  374. Why Historicals? Well, as much as I have hope, I don’t imagine anyone will invent a time machine anytime soon. So Historicals are the closest I’m going to get to the beautiful time where women wore stunning dresses and and danced, actually *danced*, with their partners. Its one of my favorite pastimes, to get swept into the marvelous and lush world of a Historical Romance. I doubt it ever will, but I sincerely hope it never fades away.

    Reply
  375. Why Historicals? Well, as much as I have hope, I don’t imagine anyone will invent a time machine anytime soon. So Historicals are the closest I’m going to get to the beautiful time where women wore stunning dresses and and danced, actually *danced*, with their partners. Its one of my favorite pastimes, to get swept into the marvelous and lush world of a Historical Romance. I doubt it ever will, but I sincerely hope it never fades away.

    Reply
  376. Oh, I’d forgotten all those Clara Barton and other biographies from elementary school! I devoured those. So maybe I was born to read history.
    Waving hi at Leslie!