Happy anniversary to me….!

Charlieatversailles
Here's Charlie, hanging out with a putto in Versailles. 🙂
 
Perhaps the title for this blog should be "happy anniversary to the Earl of Wraybourne and Jane Sandiford," the hero and heroine of my first book, Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed. It's rather a clunky title, isn't it? Should I change it for the trade paperback reissue next year, do you think? Yes, the remaining trad Regencies are going to be reissued. 🙂Lwbhcov

As LWB came out late in 1988, this is my twentieth anniversary as a published author. Not knowing at all what to expect back then, I was stunned when Melinda Helfer, reviewer for a sister publication of Romantic Times (and what was it? Anyone remember? Was it actually Rave Reviews? ) gave it a total rave of a review, ending with "the sky's the limit for this extraordinary talent." Wow. I really think by that she both inspired and terrified me, and whatever I've achieved since is due in part to her, because how could I not try to live up to even a part of her prediction? Alas, Melinda died quite a few years ago now, and is sorely missed as a reviewer. I have no doubt she's looking down from the great library in the sky, expecting the best of her authors.

Now, I'm the author of 33 published novels, and the last one at last made the in-paper NYT list, reaching #10. I'm trying, Melinda, I'm trying!

BTW, the paperback of LWB had one of my worst ever covers. The hardcover wasn't great, with that strange Lolita chick on it. (The pale strip on the left is because my archival copy has faded a bit with the light.) This was my first pictorial cover and I was eager to see what an artist would make of my characters. It boggles my mind that anyone chose that guy to pose for this! I call him Igor.Lwbpb

I've been asked a few times about the differences between then and now, and they're immense. I won't go into the changes in the genre, but they are continuous, of course, because romantic fiction changes as society changes, as women change. But look at technology.

I know I wouldn't have become a novelist without the word processor. I'd never learned to type, and thus was slow and error prone. The whole business of carbons and erasing errors was bad enough over a few pages, never mind hundreds. Also, my writing style is messy. Though I start at the beginning and keep going until I get to the end, in the process, I go back and insert, delete, rewrite. I remember the trouble this gave me even with early computers.Joncomp

We had PET computers from the early days. The first was a 4 K. Can you imagine? It used a cassette tape for data storage. We also had Commodore 64s and a VIC 20, but I think I wrote on a 32 K, with the larger floppy disks of not great density. The picture is our eldest son playing a game on one of them. It could even be that 4K.

I couldn't even get a chapter on one of those disks, so I'd save 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 etc. But then I'd change something in 1:2 and create disk 1:22 and 1:23. You can see how this went. In theory, in printing, the computer could go in sequence through the files, but I always screwed up somewhere and a chunk or chunks would be missing.

And then there were the dot matrix printers that editors hated, and which took a whole day to print out a book, after which someone had to tear off all the feeder strips. I remember borrowing a better dot matrix printer to print out the first submission copy of Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed. It didn't get published at that time 1984, but whoever you were, dear lady, thank you!

And, of course, there was no internet for ordinary people, and certainly no World Wide Web. Extraordinary to think of now.
Alsfredge
 
Enough of nostalgia — though feel free to share your stories from antediluvian writing technology. And just to tie things up, there's my 2008 book. Georgian not Regency. Sexy not sweet. And a lot more copies out than the 1500 copies printed of that first hardcover. 🙂

Here's my celebratory anniversary challenge.

Which hero of mine would you most like to spend an evening with? What you do with the time is completely up to you and him! Say why. Argue your case. In addition, pick one hero from any other Wench book on the same basis — the hero you'd most like to spend an evening with.

I will pick a winner from among those who chose the most popular hero from one of my books. That person will get a copy of the book, if they don't already have it (and if I have one spare) plus a $20 Cdn gift certificate to the Amazon branch of her or his choice. I thought of making it $20 US, as most of you probably are from the US, but what the heck. I'm Canadian. But I'll give you the equivalent in local currency. It's only a bit less than $20 US. 🙂

I will also pick two other winners from all the people who comment and they will get a book of their choice.

I know this is a bit complicated, so I'll lay it out in another way.
1. Decide which hero from my books you'd most like to spend an evening with. Post a comment saying who that is and also saying why. The name alone won't count.

2. Also, consider the books by other Wenches. Include in your comment one Wenchly hero you'd also like to spend an evening with. Two names, two reasons.

At midnight, Pacific Time, on Thursday 25th November, I'll pick the three winners.
First I'll tally the posts to decide which of my heroes is the winner.
Then I'll write the name of each person who chose him on a piece of paper.
Then I'll draw a name. That'll be the grand prize winner.

Then, from everyone who posted a comment, I'll pick two more winners of books.

Have fun. Feel free to argue among yourselves and try to get people to choose your favorite. I'll sort out the final decisions by each of you.Hof

And happy Thanksgiving to all here who are American! As you know, we celebrate Thanksgiving earlier in Canada, but as far as I'm concerned that just gives us two chances to celebrate the good things about our lives, and one of those for me is the wonderful 20 years as an author and the readers who make it all happen.

Looking over those years, here's an official RWA photo of the Hall of Fame, alongside the other members, Cheryl Zach, Eileen Dreyer, and Nora Roberts. Julie Garwood wasn't present. I became a member in 1994 after winning 3 RITAs in the Regency category, but they didn't decide to give us RITA statues for Hof F until 1996, when this photo was taken.

Lastly, a special gift to the historically interested. I've uploaded images of parts of a Poole's Gentlemen's Pocket Memorandum  from 1819. This was acquired and scanned by Anne Woodley, who kindly gave me permission to share it. I hope it's readable. If not, feel free to save the images and enlarge them. If that doesn't work, let me know and I'll find another way to upload them. The Shutterfly blog is simple, however, and I'll be uploading more pics. The Baronial Hall, BTW, is the apartment I'm currently enjoying as we're between houses. And yes, we do have deer wandering by!

All best wishes,

Jo 🙂

165 thoughts on “Happy anniversary to me….!”

  1. As it happens, I have one of those 1,500 Walker hardbacks of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed, thanks to some forgotten Ebay dealer in library discards. It’s right next to The Stanforth Secrets. I liked both enough to make sure I had a copy that wouldn’t turn brown and fall apart. My favorite of yours is probably still Christmas Angel.
    The truth is, I wouldn’t want to spend an evening with any of your heroes – they scare me to death, most of them. I like them kept safely where they are, between the pages of a book 🙂

    Reply
  2. As it happens, I have one of those 1,500 Walker hardbacks of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed, thanks to some forgotten Ebay dealer in library discards. It’s right next to The Stanforth Secrets. I liked both enough to make sure I had a copy that wouldn’t turn brown and fall apart. My favorite of yours is probably still Christmas Angel.
    The truth is, I wouldn’t want to spend an evening with any of your heroes – they scare me to death, most of them. I like them kept safely where they are, between the pages of a book 🙂

    Reply
  3. As it happens, I have one of those 1,500 Walker hardbacks of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed, thanks to some forgotten Ebay dealer in library discards. It’s right next to The Stanforth Secrets. I liked both enough to make sure I had a copy that wouldn’t turn brown and fall apart. My favorite of yours is probably still Christmas Angel.
    The truth is, I wouldn’t want to spend an evening with any of your heroes – they scare me to death, most of them. I like them kept safely where they are, between the pages of a book 🙂

    Reply
  4. As it happens, I have one of those 1,500 Walker hardbacks of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed, thanks to some forgotten Ebay dealer in library discards. It’s right next to The Stanforth Secrets. I liked both enough to make sure I had a copy that wouldn’t turn brown and fall apart. My favorite of yours is probably still Christmas Angel.
    The truth is, I wouldn’t want to spend an evening with any of your heroes – they scare me to death, most of them. I like them kept safely where they are, between the pages of a book 🙂

    Reply
  5. As it happens, I have one of those 1,500 Walker hardbacks of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed, thanks to some forgotten Ebay dealer in library discards. It’s right next to The Stanforth Secrets. I liked both enough to make sure I had a copy that wouldn’t turn brown and fall apart. My favorite of yours is probably still Christmas Angel.
    The truth is, I wouldn’t want to spend an evening with any of your heroes – they scare me to death, most of them. I like them kept safely where they are, between the pages of a book 🙂

    Reply
  6. Firstly Jo congrats on reaching this milestone sounds like it has been lots of fun, I am very sorry to say that I as yet haven’t met any of your heros although I have two of your books on the TBR pile My Lady Notorious and The Dragons Bride that I have moved up the pile and am looking forward to meeting the heros.
    A hero from one of Anne Gracie’s books I would love to spend an evening with is Harry Morant from His Captive Lady. Harry is tough on the outside but one very special hero on the inside he is someone you could hold onto and feel so loved by and he is also strong you gotta love him.
    Again congrats Jo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  7. Firstly Jo congrats on reaching this milestone sounds like it has been lots of fun, I am very sorry to say that I as yet haven’t met any of your heros although I have two of your books on the TBR pile My Lady Notorious and The Dragons Bride that I have moved up the pile and am looking forward to meeting the heros.
    A hero from one of Anne Gracie’s books I would love to spend an evening with is Harry Morant from His Captive Lady. Harry is tough on the outside but one very special hero on the inside he is someone you could hold onto and feel so loved by and he is also strong you gotta love him.
    Again congrats Jo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  8. Firstly Jo congrats on reaching this milestone sounds like it has been lots of fun, I am very sorry to say that I as yet haven’t met any of your heros although I have two of your books on the TBR pile My Lady Notorious and The Dragons Bride that I have moved up the pile and am looking forward to meeting the heros.
    A hero from one of Anne Gracie’s books I would love to spend an evening with is Harry Morant from His Captive Lady. Harry is tough on the outside but one very special hero on the inside he is someone you could hold onto and feel so loved by and he is also strong you gotta love him.
    Again congrats Jo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  9. Firstly Jo congrats on reaching this milestone sounds like it has been lots of fun, I am very sorry to say that I as yet haven’t met any of your heros although I have two of your books on the TBR pile My Lady Notorious and The Dragons Bride that I have moved up the pile and am looking forward to meeting the heros.
    A hero from one of Anne Gracie’s books I would love to spend an evening with is Harry Morant from His Captive Lady. Harry is tough on the outside but one very special hero on the inside he is someone you could hold onto and feel so loved by and he is also strong you gotta love him.
    Again congrats Jo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  10. Firstly Jo congrats on reaching this milestone sounds like it has been lots of fun, I am very sorry to say that I as yet haven’t met any of your heros although I have two of your books on the TBR pile My Lady Notorious and The Dragons Bride that I have moved up the pile and am looking forward to meeting the heros.
    A hero from one of Anne Gracie’s books I would love to spend an evening with is Harry Morant from His Captive Lady. Harry is tough on the outside but one very special hero on the inside he is someone you could hold onto and feel so loved by and he is also strong you gotta love him.
    Again congrats Jo
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  11. Congratulations, Jo! What an incredible achievement.
    Dare, Dare, Dare. I am such a sucker for tortured heroes, and that book just swept me away. One night with me and he’d kick his habit–or more likely overdose to escape my obsession with him, LOL. Love him. Love you too!

    Reply
  12. Congratulations, Jo! What an incredible achievement.
    Dare, Dare, Dare. I am such a sucker for tortured heroes, and that book just swept me away. One night with me and he’d kick his habit–or more likely overdose to escape my obsession with him, LOL. Love him. Love you too!

    Reply
  13. Congratulations, Jo! What an incredible achievement.
    Dare, Dare, Dare. I am such a sucker for tortured heroes, and that book just swept me away. One night with me and he’d kick his habit–or more likely overdose to escape my obsession with him, LOL. Love him. Love you too!

    Reply
  14. Congratulations, Jo! What an incredible achievement.
    Dare, Dare, Dare. I am such a sucker for tortured heroes, and that book just swept me away. One night with me and he’d kick his habit–or more likely overdose to escape my obsession with him, LOL. Love him. Love you too!

    Reply
  15. Congratulations, Jo! What an incredible achievement.
    Dare, Dare, Dare. I am such a sucker for tortured heroes, and that book just swept me away. One night with me and he’d kick his habit–or more likely overdose to escape my obsession with him, LOL. Love him. Love you too!

    Reply
  16. I agree with Janice. Most of your heroes are pretty intimidating, and I wouldn’t want to spend time with them, either. I did like Francis in “Forbidden”, Tristan in “St. Raven”, Stephen in “Skylark” and Race in “Hazard” and I like Hal. Wow, I guess I like more of your heroes than I thought.
    I would like you to collect Hal and Blanche’s story all in one book.
    As for the other Wenches, I adore all of Sarah Gabriel’s Scottish heroes. I like Alec in “Keeping Kate” because he does what’s right, not just what he’s told to do.
    I also adore all of Anne Gracie’s heroes, but I like Sebastian best of all–he’s been kicked around so much, but he made something of himself by his own efforts and he’s still a decent guy. Second is Harry from “His Captive Lady” another decent guy who’s been kicked around.
    I like Loretta’s heroes, although those guys have a harder edge. I like Rupert in Mr. Impossible, although Alistair is a close second, then Benedict–how can a man survive being called “Lord Perfect”?
    I love Mary Jo’s heroes, but I think Michael in “Shattered Rainbows” is my favorite. I also like Robin in “Angel Rogue”, especially since he lost Maggie in “Petals In the Storm”. I loved the Signet Christmas story “The Christmas Cuckoo” and the hero, Jack.
    I’m new to Pat Rice, but I like both the “Mystic” series heroes. It’s a toss-up between the two.
    As for Susan/Miranda Jarrett, I like the hero in “The Silver Lord”, which I think is the title from a story in a Harlequin Christmas anthology a few years, back–the same one that had Anne’s “Virtuous Widow” in it. Where’s the next Miranda Jarrett? The last I saw was last year’s Christmas story.
    And as for Edith, I liked best Christian in “Return of the Earl”, Amyas in “Alas, My Love” (and he’s a blond, I love blonds!) and Viscount Wycoff in “The Challenge”.
    Whew, I got carried away. Sorry. I read all the books you ladies write. Keep them coming!

    Reply
  17. I agree with Janice. Most of your heroes are pretty intimidating, and I wouldn’t want to spend time with them, either. I did like Francis in “Forbidden”, Tristan in “St. Raven”, Stephen in “Skylark” and Race in “Hazard” and I like Hal. Wow, I guess I like more of your heroes than I thought.
    I would like you to collect Hal and Blanche’s story all in one book.
    As for the other Wenches, I adore all of Sarah Gabriel’s Scottish heroes. I like Alec in “Keeping Kate” because he does what’s right, not just what he’s told to do.
    I also adore all of Anne Gracie’s heroes, but I like Sebastian best of all–he’s been kicked around so much, but he made something of himself by his own efforts and he’s still a decent guy. Second is Harry from “His Captive Lady” another decent guy who’s been kicked around.
    I like Loretta’s heroes, although those guys have a harder edge. I like Rupert in Mr. Impossible, although Alistair is a close second, then Benedict–how can a man survive being called “Lord Perfect”?
    I love Mary Jo’s heroes, but I think Michael in “Shattered Rainbows” is my favorite. I also like Robin in “Angel Rogue”, especially since he lost Maggie in “Petals In the Storm”. I loved the Signet Christmas story “The Christmas Cuckoo” and the hero, Jack.
    I’m new to Pat Rice, but I like both the “Mystic” series heroes. It’s a toss-up between the two.
    As for Susan/Miranda Jarrett, I like the hero in “The Silver Lord”, which I think is the title from a story in a Harlequin Christmas anthology a few years, back–the same one that had Anne’s “Virtuous Widow” in it. Where’s the next Miranda Jarrett? The last I saw was last year’s Christmas story.
    And as for Edith, I liked best Christian in “Return of the Earl”, Amyas in “Alas, My Love” (and he’s a blond, I love blonds!) and Viscount Wycoff in “The Challenge”.
    Whew, I got carried away. Sorry. I read all the books you ladies write. Keep them coming!

    Reply
  18. I agree with Janice. Most of your heroes are pretty intimidating, and I wouldn’t want to spend time with them, either. I did like Francis in “Forbidden”, Tristan in “St. Raven”, Stephen in “Skylark” and Race in “Hazard” and I like Hal. Wow, I guess I like more of your heroes than I thought.
    I would like you to collect Hal and Blanche’s story all in one book.
    As for the other Wenches, I adore all of Sarah Gabriel’s Scottish heroes. I like Alec in “Keeping Kate” because he does what’s right, not just what he’s told to do.
    I also adore all of Anne Gracie’s heroes, but I like Sebastian best of all–he’s been kicked around so much, but he made something of himself by his own efforts and he’s still a decent guy. Second is Harry from “His Captive Lady” another decent guy who’s been kicked around.
    I like Loretta’s heroes, although those guys have a harder edge. I like Rupert in Mr. Impossible, although Alistair is a close second, then Benedict–how can a man survive being called “Lord Perfect”?
    I love Mary Jo’s heroes, but I think Michael in “Shattered Rainbows” is my favorite. I also like Robin in “Angel Rogue”, especially since he lost Maggie in “Petals In the Storm”. I loved the Signet Christmas story “The Christmas Cuckoo” and the hero, Jack.
    I’m new to Pat Rice, but I like both the “Mystic” series heroes. It’s a toss-up between the two.
    As for Susan/Miranda Jarrett, I like the hero in “The Silver Lord”, which I think is the title from a story in a Harlequin Christmas anthology a few years, back–the same one that had Anne’s “Virtuous Widow” in it. Where’s the next Miranda Jarrett? The last I saw was last year’s Christmas story.
    And as for Edith, I liked best Christian in “Return of the Earl”, Amyas in “Alas, My Love” (and he’s a blond, I love blonds!) and Viscount Wycoff in “The Challenge”.
    Whew, I got carried away. Sorry. I read all the books you ladies write. Keep them coming!

    Reply
  19. I agree with Janice. Most of your heroes are pretty intimidating, and I wouldn’t want to spend time with them, either. I did like Francis in “Forbidden”, Tristan in “St. Raven”, Stephen in “Skylark” and Race in “Hazard” and I like Hal. Wow, I guess I like more of your heroes than I thought.
    I would like you to collect Hal and Blanche’s story all in one book.
    As for the other Wenches, I adore all of Sarah Gabriel’s Scottish heroes. I like Alec in “Keeping Kate” because he does what’s right, not just what he’s told to do.
    I also adore all of Anne Gracie’s heroes, but I like Sebastian best of all–he’s been kicked around so much, but he made something of himself by his own efforts and he’s still a decent guy. Second is Harry from “His Captive Lady” another decent guy who’s been kicked around.
    I like Loretta’s heroes, although those guys have a harder edge. I like Rupert in Mr. Impossible, although Alistair is a close second, then Benedict–how can a man survive being called “Lord Perfect”?
    I love Mary Jo’s heroes, but I think Michael in “Shattered Rainbows” is my favorite. I also like Robin in “Angel Rogue”, especially since he lost Maggie in “Petals In the Storm”. I loved the Signet Christmas story “The Christmas Cuckoo” and the hero, Jack.
    I’m new to Pat Rice, but I like both the “Mystic” series heroes. It’s a toss-up between the two.
    As for Susan/Miranda Jarrett, I like the hero in “The Silver Lord”, which I think is the title from a story in a Harlequin Christmas anthology a few years, back–the same one that had Anne’s “Virtuous Widow” in it. Where’s the next Miranda Jarrett? The last I saw was last year’s Christmas story.
    And as for Edith, I liked best Christian in “Return of the Earl”, Amyas in “Alas, My Love” (and he’s a blond, I love blonds!) and Viscount Wycoff in “The Challenge”.
    Whew, I got carried away. Sorry. I read all the books you ladies write. Keep them coming!

    Reply
  20. I agree with Janice. Most of your heroes are pretty intimidating, and I wouldn’t want to spend time with them, either. I did like Francis in “Forbidden”, Tristan in “St. Raven”, Stephen in “Skylark” and Race in “Hazard” and I like Hal. Wow, I guess I like more of your heroes than I thought.
    I would like you to collect Hal and Blanche’s story all in one book.
    As for the other Wenches, I adore all of Sarah Gabriel’s Scottish heroes. I like Alec in “Keeping Kate” because he does what’s right, not just what he’s told to do.
    I also adore all of Anne Gracie’s heroes, but I like Sebastian best of all–he’s been kicked around so much, but he made something of himself by his own efforts and he’s still a decent guy. Second is Harry from “His Captive Lady” another decent guy who’s been kicked around.
    I like Loretta’s heroes, although those guys have a harder edge. I like Rupert in Mr. Impossible, although Alistair is a close second, then Benedict–how can a man survive being called “Lord Perfect”?
    I love Mary Jo’s heroes, but I think Michael in “Shattered Rainbows” is my favorite. I also like Robin in “Angel Rogue”, especially since he lost Maggie in “Petals In the Storm”. I loved the Signet Christmas story “The Christmas Cuckoo” and the hero, Jack.
    I’m new to Pat Rice, but I like both the “Mystic” series heroes. It’s a toss-up between the two.
    As for Susan/Miranda Jarrett, I like the hero in “The Silver Lord”, which I think is the title from a story in a Harlequin Christmas anthology a few years, back–the same one that had Anne’s “Virtuous Widow” in it. Where’s the next Miranda Jarrett? The last I saw was last year’s Christmas story.
    And as for Edith, I liked best Christian in “Return of the Earl”, Amyas in “Alas, My Love” (and he’s a blond, I love blonds!) and Viscount Wycoff in “The Challenge”.
    Whew, I got carried away. Sorry. I read all the books you ladies write. Keep them coming!

    Reply
  21. 20 years of great stories and authorly progress! Well done, Jo.
    I never had a computer as primitive as your earlys, but I’m another who owes her career to computer word processing. My old Leading Edge would generally require four 5 1/4 floppies per book. Five if the book was long.
    Don’t put me in the drawing, of course, since I’m a Wench and have all your books anyhow, but if choosing one of your heroes–I’d go for Darien, who is nicely tortured. 🙂
    Among my own heroes, Lord Robin Andreville woould probably be the fave, since he has a sense of humor that won’t quit.
    Here’s to 20 years more of bestsellers!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  22. 20 years of great stories and authorly progress! Well done, Jo.
    I never had a computer as primitive as your earlys, but I’m another who owes her career to computer word processing. My old Leading Edge would generally require four 5 1/4 floppies per book. Five if the book was long.
    Don’t put me in the drawing, of course, since I’m a Wench and have all your books anyhow, but if choosing one of your heroes–I’d go for Darien, who is nicely tortured. 🙂
    Among my own heroes, Lord Robin Andreville woould probably be the fave, since he has a sense of humor that won’t quit.
    Here’s to 20 years more of bestsellers!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  23. 20 years of great stories and authorly progress! Well done, Jo.
    I never had a computer as primitive as your earlys, but I’m another who owes her career to computer word processing. My old Leading Edge would generally require four 5 1/4 floppies per book. Five if the book was long.
    Don’t put me in the drawing, of course, since I’m a Wench and have all your books anyhow, but if choosing one of your heroes–I’d go for Darien, who is nicely tortured. 🙂
    Among my own heroes, Lord Robin Andreville woould probably be the fave, since he has a sense of humor that won’t quit.
    Here’s to 20 years more of bestsellers!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  24. 20 years of great stories and authorly progress! Well done, Jo.
    I never had a computer as primitive as your earlys, but I’m another who owes her career to computer word processing. My old Leading Edge would generally require four 5 1/4 floppies per book. Five if the book was long.
    Don’t put me in the drawing, of course, since I’m a Wench and have all your books anyhow, but if choosing one of your heroes–I’d go for Darien, who is nicely tortured. 🙂
    Among my own heroes, Lord Robin Andreville woould probably be the fave, since he has a sense of humor that won’t quit.
    Here’s to 20 years more of bestsellers!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  25. 20 years of great stories and authorly progress! Well done, Jo.
    I never had a computer as primitive as your earlys, but I’m another who owes her career to computer word processing. My old Leading Edge would generally require four 5 1/4 floppies per book. Five if the book was long.
    Don’t put me in the drawing, of course, since I’m a Wench and have all your books anyhow, but if choosing one of your heroes–I’d go for Darien, who is nicely tortured. 🙂
    Among my own heroes, Lord Robin Andreville woould probably be the fave, since he has a sense of humor that won’t quit.
    Here’s to 20 years more of bestsellers!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  26. Congratulations Jo and Happy Anniversary!
    From you books I would pick Robin from A Lady’s Secret. You have many wonderful heroes but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable spending time with all of them but Robin with his wit and humor looks to be a lot of fun.
    From another wench I would pick Darius Carsington from Not Quite a Lady by Loretta. I thought he was wonderful because of his compassion and sympathy.

    Reply
  27. Congratulations Jo and Happy Anniversary!
    From you books I would pick Robin from A Lady’s Secret. You have many wonderful heroes but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable spending time with all of them but Robin with his wit and humor looks to be a lot of fun.
    From another wench I would pick Darius Carsington from Not Quite a Lady by Loretta. I thought he was wonderful because of his compassion and sympathy.

    Reply
  28. Congratulations Jo and Happy Anniversary!
    From you books I would pick Robin from A Lady’s Secret. You have many wonderful heroes but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable spending time with all of them but Robin with his wit and humor looks to be a lot of fun.
    From another wench I would pick Darius Carsington from Not Quite a Lady by Loretta. I thought he was wonderful because of his compassion and sympathy.

    Reply
  29. Congratulations Jo and Happy Anniversary!
    From you books I would pick Robin from A Lady’s Secret. You have many wonderful heroes but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable spending time with all of them but Robin with his wit and humor looks to be a lot of fun.
    From another wench I would pick Darius Carsington from Not Quite a Lady by Loretta. I thought he was wonderful because of his compassion and sympathy.

    Reply
  30. Congratulations Jo and Happy Anniversary!
    From you books I would pick Robin from A Lady’s Secret. You have many wonderful heroes but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable spending time with all of them but Robin with his wit and humor looks to be a lot of fun.
    From another wench I would pick Darius Carsington from Not Quite a Lady by Loretta. I thought he was wonderful because of his compassion and sympathy.

    Reply
  31. I can’t believe I’m the first to write this, but I would choose Rothgar. No contest. Can you imagine how interesting and intellecutally stimulating the evening would be? You’d certainly be “alive” that night. And, he’s hot, which would add a great edge to the whole thing. Rothgar.
    For Mary Jo’s heroes, again, it would be no contest. Lord Robin. I love Lord Robin. I think Maggie was a fool. Lord Robin is not in-your-face alpha, but he’s so sexy still. He’s smart, capable, funny, self-effacing – just marvelous.
    For Loretta’s heroes, I’d try to be as cool as Jessica and take on Dain or go with the hero of Lord Perfect. I “get/understand” people like that more.
    For Miranda, I’d certainly go with one of her sea captains, most likely a Sparhawk, but how would I ever choose just one?
    For Patricia Rice, I’d go way back to an old western – I think it was Denim and Lace.
    For Edith, I still have a soft spot for The Cad.

    Reply
  32. I can’t believe I’m the first to write this, but I would choose Rothgar. No contest. Can you imagine how interesting and intellecutally stimulating the evening would be? You’d certainly be “alive” that night. And, he’s hot, which would add a great edge to the whole thing. Rothgar.
    For Mary Jo’s heroes, again, it would be no contest. Lord Robin. I love Lord Robin. I think Maggie was a fool. Lord Robin is not in-your-face alpha, but he’s so sexy still. He’s smart, capable, funny, self-effacing – just marvelous.
    For Loretta’s heroes, I’d try to be as cool as Jessica and take on Dain or go with the hero of Lord Perfect. I “get/understand” people like that more.
    For Miranda, I’d certainly go with one of her sea captains, most likely a Sparhawk, but how would I ever choose just one?
    For Patricia Rice, I’d go way back to an old western – I think it was Denim and Lace.
    For Edith, I still have a soft spot for The Cad.

    Reply
  33. I can’t believe I’m the first to write this, but I would choose Rothgar. No contest. Can you imagine how interesting and intellecutally stimulating the evening would be? You’d certainly be “alive” that night. And, he’s hot, which would add a great edge to the whole thing. Rothgar.
    For Mary Jo’s heroes, again, it would be no contest. Lord Robin. I love Lord Robin. I think Maggie was a fool. Lord Robin is not in-your-face alpha, but he’s so sexy still. He’s smart, capable, funny, self-effacing – just marvelous.
    For Loretta’s heroes, I’d try to be as cool as Jessica and take on Dain or go with the hero of Lord Perfect. I “get/understand” people like that more.
    For Miranda, I’d certainly go with one of her sea captains, most likely a Sparhawk, but how would I ever choose just one?
    For Patricia Rice, I’d go way back to an old western – I think it was Denim and Lace.
    For Edith, I still have a soft spot for The Cad.

    Reply
  34. I can’t believe I’m the first to write this, but I would choose Rothgar. No contest. Can you imagine how interesting and intellecutally stimulating the evening would be? You’d certainly be “alive” that night. And, he’s hot, which would add a great edge to the whole thing. Rothgar.
    For Mary Jo’s heroes, again, it would be no contest. Lord Robin. I love Lord Robin. I think Maggie was a fool. Lord Robin is not in-your-face alpha, but he’s so sexy still. He’s smart, capable, funny, self-effacing – just marvelous.
    For Loretta’s heroes, I’d try to be as cool as Jessica and take on Dain or go with the hero of Lord Perfect. I “get/understand” people like that more.
    For Miranda, I’d certainly go with one of her sea captains, most likely a Sparhawk, but how would I ever choose just one?
    For Patricia Rice, I’d go way back to an old western – I think it was Denim and Lace.
    For Edith, I still have a soft spot for The Cad.

    Reply
  35. I can’t believe I’m the first to write this, but I would choose Rothgar. No contest. Can you imagine how interesting and intellecutally stimulating the evening would be? You’d certainly be “alive” that night. And, he’s hot, which would add a great edge to the whole thing. Rothgar.
    For Mary Jo’s heroes, again, it would be no contest. Lord Robin. I love Lord Robin. I think Maggie was a fool. Lord Robin is not in-your-face alpha, but he’s so sexy still. He’s smart, capable, funny, self-effacing – just marvelous.
    For Loretta’s heroes, I’d try to be as cool as Jessica and take on Dain or go with the hero of Lord Perfect. I “get/understand” people like that more.
    For Miranda, I’d certainly go with one of her sea captains, most likely a Sparhawk, but how would I ever choose just one?
    For Patricia Rice, I’d go way back to an old western – I think it was Denim and Lace.
    For Edith, I still have a soft spot for The Cad.

    Reply
  36. p.s.
    I’m not sure if he’s a “hero”, but I could never turn down the opportunity to meet Macbeth.
    For Anne Gracie, I’d choose Gideon from the Perfect Rake.

    Reply
  37. p.s.
    I’m not sure if he’s a “hero”, but I could never turn down the opportunity to meet Macbeth.
    For Anne Gracie, I’d choose Gideon from the Perfect Rake.

    Reply
  38. p.s.
    I’m not sure if he’s a “hero”, but I could never turn down the opportunity to meet Macbeth.
    For Anne Gracie, I’d choose Gideon from the Perfect Rake.

    Reply
  39. p.s.
    I’m not sure if he’s a “hero”, but I could never turn down the opportunity to meet Macbeth.
    For Anne Gracie, I’d choose Gideon from the Perfect Rake.

    Reply
  40. p.s.
    I’m not sure if he’s a “hero”, but I could never turn down the opportunity to meet Macbeth.
    For Anne Gracie, I’d choose Gideon from the Perfect Rake.

    Reply
  41. Congratulations on your anniversary. I’m like Janice, your heroes are to much for a mortal person like me. I have a feeling that I’d be really intimidated by them, although I wouldn’t mind stalking Rothgar from across the room. I’d also like to be in the same room with Reginald Davenport from Mary Jo’s “The Rake”, I think he’d be fun. You know you posed an interesting thought, almost all romance heroes are really strong (in so many ways) and I’m not sure how we readers would react to them if they were in our living room.

    Reply
  42. Congratulations on your anniversary. I’m like Janice, your heroes are to much for a mortal person like me. I have a feeling that I’d be really intimidated by them, although I wouldn’t mind stalking Rothgar from across the room. I’d also like to be in the same room with Reginald Davenport from Mary Jo’s “The Rake”, I think he’d be fun. You know you posed an interesting thought, almost all romance heroes are really strong (in so many ways) and I’m not sure how we readers would react to them if they were in our living room.

    Reply
  43. Congratulations on your anniversary. I’m like Janice, your heroes are to much for a mortal person like me. I have a feeling that I’d be really intimidated by them, although I wouldn’t mind stalking Rothgar from across the room. I’d also like to be in the same room with Reginald Davenport from Mary Jo’s “The Rake”, I think he’d be fun. You know you posed an interesting thought, almost all romance heroes are really strong (in so many ways) and I’m not sure how we readers would react to them if they were in our living room.

    Reply
  44. Congratulations on your anniversary. I’m like Janice, your heroes are to much for a mortal person like me. I have a feeling that I’d be really intimidated by them, although I wouldn’t mind stalking Rothgar from across the room. I’d also like to be in the same room with Reginald Davenport from Mary Jo’s “The Rake”, I think he’d be fun. You know you posed an interesting thought, almost all romance heroes are really strong (in so many ways) and I’m not sure how we readers would react to them if they were in our living room.

    Reply
  45. Congratulations on your anniversary. I’m like Janice, your heroes are to much for a mortal person like me. I have a feeling that I’d be really intimidated by them, although I wouldn’t mind stalking Rothgar from across the room. I’d also like to be in the same room with Reginald Davenport from Mary Jo’s “The Rake”, I think he’d be fun. You know you posed an interesting thought, almost all romance heroes are really strong (in so many ways) and I’m not sure how we readers would react to them if they were in our living room.

    Reply
  46. Happy Anniversary, Jo! 🙂
    From your book To Rescue a Rogue, I would want to spend time with Dare. I picture him full of joy and appreciation after beating his addiction. I think his joy and rediscovered love of life couldn’t help being contagious. Who could resist wanting to be around someone like that?
    As for another Wenchly hero, I would choose Loretta’s James Cordier from Your Scandalous Ways. He is smart and witty. His colorful life would have given him great stories. I would love to sit there and listen to his stories and stare at his gorgeous face.

    Reply
  47. Happy Anniversary, Jo! 🙂
    From your book To Rescue a Rogue, I would want to spend time with Dare. I picture him full of joy and appreciation after beating his addiction. I think his joy and rediscovered love of life couldn’t help being contagious. Who could resist wanting to be around someone like that?
    As for another Wenchly hero, I would choose Loretta’s James Cordier from Your Scandalous Ways. He is smart and witty. His colorful life would have given him great stories. I would love to sit there and listen to his stories and stare at his gorgeous face.

    Reply
  48. Happy Anniversary, Jo! 🙂
    From your book To Rescue a Rogue, I would want to spend time with Dare. I picture him full of joy and appreciation after beating his addiction. I think his joy and rediscovered love of life couldn’t help being contagious. Who could resist wanting to be around someone like that?
    As for another Wenchly hero, I would choose Loretta’s James Cordier from Your Scandalous Ways. He is smart and witty. His colorful life would have given him great stories. I would love to sit there and listen to his stories and stare at his gorgeous face.

    Reply
  49. Happy Anniversary, Jo! 🙂
    From your book To Rescue a Rogue, I would want to spend time with Dare. I picture him full of joy and appreciation after beating his addiction. I think his joy and rediscovered love of life couldn’t help being contagious. Who could resist wanting to be around someone like that?
    As for another Wenchly hero, I would choose Loretta’s James Cordier from Your Scandalous Ways. He is smart and witty. His colorful life would have given him great stories. I would love to sit there and listen to his stories and stare at his gorgeous face.

    Reply
  50. Happy Anniversary, Jo! 🙂
    From your book To Rescue a Rogue, I would want to spend time with Dare. I picture him full of joy and appreciation after beating his addiction. I think his joy and rediscovered love of life couldn’t help being contagious. Who could resist wanting to be around someone like that?
    As for another Wenchly hero, I would choose Loretta’s James Cordier from Your Scandalous Ways. He is smart and witty. His colorful life would have given him great stories. I would love to sit there and listen to his stories and stare at his gorgeous face.

    Reply
  51. One of my favorite Beverley heroes is an early one: Lord Saxonhurst of “Forbidden Magic”. I’d say it’s because he’s so “bonny and blithe and good and gay” if the last word didn’t have a different contemporary meaning. He truly is charming and nice and quite, quite funny. I love his collection of strays, both human and pets. His staff, which adores him, decorates his room with ugly items for him to throw when he’s out of temper. They adore him precisely because they know he will never use that temper against them.
    I also loved Nicholas from MJP’s “Thunder and Roses”. We are told in book after book that the hero is sex-on-a-stick, but all too often that is mere telling. Nicholas, on the other hand, takes one’s breath away. He turns a simple kiss a day into an entire arsenal of seduction.
    Alistair from Loretta Chase’s “Miss Wonderful” is himself pretty wonderful. How can you not feel immediate sympathy when the book opens with his father’s list of his “Episodes of Stupidity”. I definitely fell in love with him later in the book, when he is ill and Mirabel scolds him for exerting the energy to be charming, and he replies “I am not exerting myself. Wit and charm come naturally to me.” He’s so unaffected and sweet and even insecure, yet he manages to find unsuspected strength and courage when Mirabel is threatened.
    Gideon from Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake” is another hero I’d like to meet. He’s witty and charming (I definitely detect a theme here) and I love that he’s so completely gobsmacked by his heroine.

    Reply
  52. One of my favorite Beverley heroes is an early one: Lord Saxonhurst of “Forbidden Magic”. I’d say it’s because he’s so “bonny and blithe and good and gay” if the last word didn’t have a different contemporary meaning. He truly is charming and nice and quite, quite funny. I love his collection of strays, both human and pets. His staff, which adores him, decorates his room with ugly items for him to throw when he’s out of temper. They adore him precisely because they know he will never use that temper against them.
    I also loved Nicholas from MJP’s “Thunder and Roses”. We are told in book after book that the hero is sex-on-a-stick, but all too often that is mere telling. Nicholas, on the other hand, takes one’s breath away. He turns a simple kiss a day into an entire arsenal of seduction.
    Alistair from Loretta Chase’s “Miss Wonderful” is himself pretty wonderful. How can you not feel immediate sympathy when the book opens with his father’s list of his “Episodes of Stupidity”. I definitely fell in love with him later in the book, when he is ill and Mirabel scolds him for exerting the energy to be charming, and he replies “I am not exerting myself. Wit and charm come naturally to me.” He’s so unaffected and sweet and even insecure, yet he manages to find unsuspected strength and courage when Mirabel is threatened.
    Gideon from Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake” is another hero I’d like to meet. He’s witty and charming (I definitely detect a theme here) and I love that he’s so completely gobsmacked by his heroine.

    Reply
  53. One of my favorite Beverley heroes is an early one: Lord Saxonhurst of “Forbidden Magic”. I’d say it’s because he’s so “bonny and blithe and good and gay” if the last word didn’t have a different contemporary meaning. He truly is charming and nice and quite, quite funny. I love his collection of strays, both human and pets. His staff, which adores him, decorates his room with ugly items for him to throw when he’s out of temper. They adore him precisely because they know he will never use that temper against them.
    I also loved Nicholas from MJP’s “Thunder and Roses”. We are told in book after book that the hero is sex-on-a-stick, but all too often that is mere telling. Nicholas, on the other hand, takes one’s breath away. He turns a simple kiss a day into an entire arsenal of seduction.
    Alistair from Loretta Chase’s “Miss Wonderful” is himself pretty wonderful. How can you not feel immediate sympathy when the book opens with his father’s list of his “Episodes of Stupidity”. I definitely fell in love with him later in the book, when he is ill and Mirabel scolds him for exerting the energy to be charming, and he replies “I am not exerting myself. Wit and charm come naturally to me.” He’s so unaffected and sweet and even insecure, yet he manages to find unsuspected strength and courage when Mirabel is threatened.
    Gideon from Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake” is another hero I’d like to meet. He’s witty and charming (I definitely detect a theme here) and I love that he’s so completely gobsmacked by his heroine.

    Reply
  54. One of my favorite Beverley heroes is an early one: Lord Saxonhurst of “Forbidden Magic”. I’d say it’s because he’s so “bonny and blithe and good and gay” if the last word didn’t have a different contemporary meaning. He truly is charming and nice and quite, quite funny. I love his collection of strays, both human and pets. His staff, which adores him, decorates his room with ugly items for him to throw when he’s out of temper. They adore him precisely because they know he will never use that temper against them.
    I also loved Nicholas from MJP’s “Thunder and Roses”. We are told in book after book that the hero is sex-on-a-stick, but all too often that is mere telling. Nicholas, on the other hand, takes one’s breath away. He turns a simple kiss a day into an entire arsenal of seduction.
    Alistair from Loretta Chase’s “Miss Wonderful” is himself pretty wonderful. How can you not feel immediate sympathy when the book opens with his father’s list of his “Episodes of Stupidity”. I definitely fell in love with him later in the book, when he is ill and Mirabel scolds him for exerting the energy to be charming, and he replies “I am not exerting myself. Wit and charm come naturally to me.” He’s so unaffected and sweet and even insecure, yet he manages to find unsuspected strength and courage when Mirabel is threatened.
    Gideon from Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake” is another hero I’d like to meet. He’s witty and charming (I definitely detect a theme here) and I love that he’s so completely gobsmacked by his heroine.

    Reply
  55. One of my favorite Beverley heroes is an early one: Lord Saxonhurst of “Forbidden Magic”. I’d say it’s because he’s so “bonny and blithe and good and gay” if the last word didn’t have a different contemporary meaning. He truly is charming and nice and quite, quite funny. I love his collection of strays, both human and pets. His staff, which adores him, decorates his room with ugly items for him to throw when he’s out of temper. They adore him precisely because they know he will never use that temper against them.
    I also loved Nicholas from MJP’s “Thunder and Roses”. We are told in book after book that the hero is sex-on-a-stick, but all too often that is mere telling. Nicholas, on the other hand, takes one’s breath away. He turns a simple kiss a day into an entire arsenal of seduction.
    Alistair from Loretta Chase’s “Miss Wonderful” is himself pretty wonderful. How can you not feel immediate sympathy when the book opens with his father’s list of his “Episodes of Stupidity”. I definitely fell in love with him later in the book, when he is ill and Mirabel scolds him for exerting the energy to be charming, and he replies “I am not exerting myself. Wit and charm come naturally to me.” He’s so unaffected and sweet and even insecure, yet he manages to find unsuspected strength and courage when Mirabel is threatened.
    Gideon from Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake” is another hero I’d like to meet. He’s witty and charming (I definitely detect a theme here) and I love that he’s so completely gobsmacked by his heroine.

    Reply
  56. Ah, Rothgar, no question. We’d have so much to talk about – we’re both seen as scary, we’re both prone to protect our family, we were both terrified to pass our genes along, what others see as manipulation we just see as calculating the probable outcome based on the personalities involved and moving in front of the pack to arrive there first. What couldn’t we talk about? (And talk is all I’d be doing, since I’ve my own novel worthy hero.)
    And the other hero from a WW is just as simple and no surprise to anyone who’s paid attention – Tristam from Edith’s The Fire Flower. While Gideon does his level best to sort things out without a Regency Land quick solution, he’s there to support Mary, to point out the flaws in so many plans, to help where he can despite what he may think or feel about their actions, and insert the occasional dose of realism. Plus, he’s charming. With the two of them (and their time periods) how could we not have a legendary dinner conversation between like minds on diverse subjects?
    Certainly, it wouldn’t bore me – and when bored, well, I devise my own entertainments. Sometimes it’s not pretty.

    Reply
  57. Ah, Rothgar, no question. We’d have so much to talk about – we’re both seen as scary, we’re both prone to protect our family, we were both terrified to pass our genes along, what others see as manipulation we just see as calculating the probable outcome based on the personalities involved and moving in front of the pack to arrive there first. What couldn’t we talk about? (And talk is all I’d be doing, since I’ve my own novel worthy hero.)
    And the other hero from a WW is just as simple and no surprise to anyone who’s paid attention – Tristam from Edith’s The Fire Flower. While Gideon does his level best to sort things out without a Regency Land quick solution, he’s there to support Mary, to point out the flaws in so many plans, to help where he can despite what he may think or feel about their actions, and insert the occasional dose of realism. Plus, he’s charming. With the two of them (and their time periods) how could we not have a legendary dinner conversation between like minds on diverse subjects?
    Certainly, it wouldn’t bore me – and when bored, well, I devise my own entertainments. Sometimes it’s not pretty.

    Reply
  58. Ah, Rothgar, no question. We’d have so much to talk about – we’re both seen as scary, we’re both prone to protect our family, we were both terrified to pass our genes along, what others see as manipulation we just see as calculating the probable outcome based on the personalities involved and moving in front of the pack to arrive there first. What couldn’t we talk about? (And talk is all I’d be doing, since I’ve my own novel worthy hero.)
    And the other hero from a WW is just as simple and no surprise to anyone who’s paid attention – Tristam from Edith’s The Fire Flower. While Gideon does his level best to sort things out without a Regency Land quick solution, he’s there to support Mary, to point out the flaws in so many plans, to help where he can despite what he may think or feel about their actions, and insert the occasional dose of realism. Plus, he’s charming. With the two of them (and their time periods) how could we not have a legendary dinner conversation between like minds on diverse subjects?
    Certainly, it wouldn’t bore me – and when bored, well, I devise my own entertainments. Sometimes it’s not pretty.

    Reply
  59. Ah, Rothgar, no question. We’d have so much to talk about – we’re both seen as scary, we’re both prone to protect our family, we were both terrified to pass our genes along, what others see as manipulation we just see as calculating the probable outcome based on the personalities involved and moving in front of the pack to arrive there first. What couldn’t we talk about? (And talk is all I’d be doing, since I’ve my own novel worthy hero.)
    And the other hero from a WW is just as simple and no surprise to anyone who’s paid attention – Tristam from Edith’s The Fire Flower. While Gideon does his level best to sort things out without a Regency Land quick solution, he’s there to support Mary, to point out the flaws in so many plans, to help where he can despite what he may think or feel about their actions, and insert the occasional dose of realism. Plus, he’s charming. With the two of them (and their time periods) how could we not have a legendary dinner conversation between like minds on diverse subjects?
    Certainly, it wouldn’t bore me – and when bored, well, I devise my own entertainments. Sometimes it’s not pretty.

    Reply
  60. Ah, Rothgar, no question. We’d have so much to talk about – we’re both seen as scary, we’re both prone to protect our family, we were both terrified to pass our genes along, what others see as manipulation we just see as calculating the probable outcome based on the personalities involved and moving in front of the pack to arrive there first. What couldn’t we talk about? (And talk is all I’d be doing, since I’ve my own novel worthy hero.)
    And the other hero from a WW is just as simple and no surprise to anyone who’s paid attention – Tristam from Edith’s The Fire Flower. While Gideon does his level best to sort things out without a Regency Land quick solution, he’s there to support Mary, to point out the flaws in so many plans, to help where he can despite what he may think or feel about their actions, and insert the occasional dose of realism. Plus, he’s charming. With the two of them (and their time periods) how could we not have a legendary dinner conversation between like minds on diverse subjects?
    Certainly, it wouldn’t bore me – and when bored, well, I devise my own entertainments. Sometimes it’s not pretty.

    Reply
  61. Congratulations! Ms Jo.
    You are a writer!
    Believe I would pick Lady Mara St. Bride from ” To Rescue a Rogue. She has the fortitude and ability to help Dare recover from his addiction.
    I especially enjoy your “Author’s Notes” at the end of your books.
    Any of excellent writer Anne Gracie’s heriones would be my pick. I enjoy her books.

    Reply
  62. Congratulations! Ms Jo.
    You are a writer!
    Believe I would pick Lady Mara St. Bride from ” To Rescue a Rogue. She has the fortitude and ability to help Dare recover from his addiction.
    I especially enjoy your “Author’s Notes” at the end of your books.
    Any of excellent writer Anne Gracie’s heriones would be my pick. I enjoy her books.

    Reply
  63. Congratulations! Ms Jo.
    You are a writer!
    Believe I would pick Lady Mara St. Bride from ” To Rescue a Rogue. She has the fortitude and ability to help Dare recover from his addiction.
    I especially enjoy your “Author’s Notes” at the end of your books.
    Any of excellent writer Anne Gracie’s heriones would be my pick. I enjoy her books.

    Reply
  64. Congratulations! Ms Jo.
    You are a writer!
    Believe I would pick Lady Mara St. Bride from ” To Rescue a Rogue. She has the fortitude and ability to help Dare recover from his addiction.
    I especially enjoy your “Author’s Notes” at the end of your books.
    Any of excellent writer Anne Gracie’s heriones would be my pick. I enjoy her books.

    Reply
  65. Congratulations! Ms Jo.
    You are a writer!
    Believe I would pick Lady Mara St. Bride from ” To Rescue a Rogue. She has the fortitude and ability to help Dare recover from his addiction.
    I especially enjoy your “Author’s Notes” at the end of your books.
    Any of excellent writer Anne Gracie’s heriones would be my pick. I enjoy her books.

    Reply
  66. Congrats on such a successful career as an author Jo.
    For me, it’s a tossup – Rothgar, so protective and dangerous and all that intellect, things would sure be interesting. Then there’s Dare, so tortured, yet so much inner strength to persevere and fight to overcome that demon.

    Reply
  67. Congrats on such a successful career as an author Jo.
    For me, it’s a tossup – Rothgar, so protective and dangerous and all that intellect, things would sure be interesting. Then there’s Dare, so tortured, yet so much inner strength to persevere and fight to overcome that demon.

    Reply
  68. Congrats on such a successful career as an author Jo.
    For me, it’s a tossup – Rothgar, so protective and dangerous and all that intellect, things would sure be interesting. Then there’s Dare, so tortured, yet so much inner strength to persevere and fight to overcome that demon.

    Reply
  69. Congrats on such a successful career as an author Jo.
    For me, it’s a tossup – Rothgar, so protective and dangerous and all that intellect, things would sure be interesting. Then there’s Dare, so tortured, yet so much inner strength to persevere and fight to overcome that demon.

    Reply
  70. Congrats on such a successful career as an author Jo.
    For me, it’s a tossup – Rothgar, so protective and dangerous and all that intellect, things would sure be interesting. Then there’s Dare, so tortured, yet so much inner strength to persevere and fight to overcome that demon.

    Reply
  71. I first discovered your books while in high school and they, along with a lot of early Loretta Chase books, were some of the first romance novels I ever read.
    It’s hard to choose, but I have to go with Rothgar, too. His intelligence and aura of danger only made the glimmers of vulnerability all the more delicious.
    As for Loretta Chase heroes, my favorite is really a tie between Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels and Lord Rand of the Viscount Vagabond. Dain just makes me want to hug him. And Rand’s antics made me smile.

    Reply
  72. I first discovered your books while in high school and they, along with a lot of early Loretta Chase books, were some of the first romance novels I ever read.
    It’s hard to choose, but I have to go with Rothgar, too. His intelligence and aura of danger only made the glimmers of vulnerability all the more delicious.
    As for Loretta Chase heroes, my favorite is really a tie between Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels and Lord Rand of the Viscount Vagabond. Dain just makes me want to hug him. And Rand’s antics made me smile.

    Reply
  73. I first discovered your books while in high school and they, along with a lot of early Loretta Chase books, were some of the first romance novels I ever read.
    It’s hard to choose, but I have to go with Rothgar, too. His intelligence and aura of danger only made the glimmers of vulnerability all the more delicious.
    As for Loretta Chase heroes, my favorite is really a tie between Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels and Lord Rand of the Viscount Vagabond. Dain just makes me want to hug him. And Rand’s antics made me smile.

    Reply
  74. I first discovered your books while in high school and they, along with a lot of early Loretta Chase books, were some of the first romance novels I ever read.
    It’s hard to choose, but I have to go with Rothgar, too. His intelligence and aura of danger only made the glimmers of vulnerability all the more delicious.
    As for Loretta Chase heroes, my favorite is really a tie between Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels and Lord Rand of the Viscount Vagabond. Dain just makes me want to hug him. And Rand’s antics made me smile.

    Reply
  75. I first discovered your books while in high school and they, along with a lot of early Loretta Chase books, were some of the first romance novels I ever read.
    It’s hard to choose, but I have to go with Rothgar, too. His intelligence and aura of danger only made the glimmers of vulnerability all the more delicious.
    As for Loretta Chase heroes, my favorite is really a tie between Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels and Lord Rand of the Viscount Vagabond. Dain just makes me want to hug him. And Rand’s antics made me smile.

    Reply
  76. Why, it’s a tossup between Race de Vere and Nicholas Delaney. Nicholas was so good to Eleanor in their arranged marriage once -he could be himself and tell her the truth.
    Race was just such a nice man. I’ve read “Hazard” several times because I fell in love with him.
    I’d love to spend an evening with either of these men. 🙂
    elainec
    p.s. I’m so happy to know I can have my own copies of your early books. My local library has them and last spring I found them and read them. They were very good. I had to fight the urge to flinch them and pay the fines. I didn’t, but I was tempted. Your talent was apparent even then and it’s been a pleasure to read your books.

    Reply
  77. Why, it’s a tossup between Race de Vere and Nicholas Delaney. Nicholas was so good to Eleanor in their arranged marriage once -he could be himself and tell her the truth.
    Race was just such a nice man. I’ve read “Hazard” several times because I fell in love with him.
    I’d love to spend an evening with either of these men. 🙂
    elainec
    p.s. I’m so happy to know I can have my own copies of your early books. My local library has them and last spring I found them and read them. They were very good. I had to fight the urge to flinch them and pay the fines. I didn’t, but I was tempted. Your talent was apparent even then and it’s been a pleasure to read your books.

    Reply
  78. Why, it’s a tossup between Race de Vere and Nicholas Delaney. Nicholas was so good to Eleanor in their arranged marriage once -he could be himself and tell her the truth.
    Race was just such a nice man. I’ve read “Hazard” several times because I fell in love with him.
    I’d love to spend an evening with either of these men. 🙂
    elainec
    p.s. I’m so happy to know I can have my own copies of your early books. My local library has them and last spring I found them and read them. They were very good. I had to fight the urge to flinch them and pay the fines. I didn’t, but I was tempted. Your talent was apparent even then and it’s been a pleasure to read your books.

    Reply
  79. Why, it’s a tossup between Race de Vere and Nicholas Delaney. Nicholas was so good to Eleanor in their arranged marriage once -he could be himself and tell her the truth.
    Race was just such a nice man. I’ve read “Hazard” several times because I fell in love with him.
    I’d love to spend an evening with either of these men. 🙂
    elainec
    p.s. I’m so happy to know I can have my own copies of your early books. My local library has them and last spring I found them and read them. They were very good. I had to fight the urge to flinch them and pay the fines. I didn’t, but I was tempted. Your talent was apparent even then and it’s been a pleasure to read your books.

    Reply
  80. Why, it’s a tossup between Race de Vere and Nicholas Delaney. Nicholas was so good to Eleanor in their arranged marriage once -he could be himself and tell her the truth.
    Race was just such a nice man. I’ve read “Hazard” several times because I fell in love with him.
    I’d love to spend an evening with either of these men. 🙂
    elainec
    p.s. I’m so happy to know I can have my own copies of your early books. My local library has them and last spring I found them and read them. They were very good. I had to fight the urge to flinch them and pay the fines. I didn’t, but I was tempted. Your talent was apparent even then and it’s been a pleasure to read your books.

    Reply
  81. Lots of interesting comments. Thank you. We seem to be narrowing down and though I haven’t tallied, I’d say Rothgar and Dare are the leaders. Interesting when they’re very different characters, wouldn’t you say?
    Anyone want to speculate on what they have in common? Or do they simply appeal to different readers/
    I know many of you who are American will be away from your computers and with family and friends for most of today, but if you’re reading, I hope it’s going wonderfully. And if any family stresses emerge, a smile can be magic!
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  82. Lots of interesting comments. Thank you. We seem to be narrowing down and though I haven’t tallied, I’d say Rothgar and Dare are the leaders. Interesting when they’re very different characters, wouldn’t you say?
    Anyone want to speculate on what they have in common? Or do they simply appeal to different readers/
    I know many of you who are American will be away from your computers and with family and friends for most of today, but if you’re reading, I hope it’s going wonderfully. And if any family stresses emerge, a smile can be magic!
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  83. Lots of interesting comments. Thank you. We seem to be narrowing down and though I haven’t tallied, I’d say Rothgar and Dare are the leaders. Interesting when they’re very different characters, wouldn’t you say?
    Anyone want to speculate on what they have in common? Or do they simply appeal to different readers/
    I know many of you who are American will be away from your computers and with family and friends for most of today, but if you’re reading, I hope it’s going wonderfully. And if any family stresses emerge, a smile can be magic!
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  84. Lots of interesting comments. Thank you. We seem to be narrowing down and though I haven’t tallied, I’d say Rothgar and Dare are the leaders. Interesting when they’re very different characters, wouldn’t you say?
    Anyone want to speculate on what they have in common? Or do they simply appeal to different readers/
    I know many of you who are American will be away from your computers and with family and friends for most of today, but if you’re reading, I hope it’s going wonderfully. And if any family stresses emerge, a smile can be magic!
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  85. Lots of interesting comments. Thank you. We seem to be narrowing down and though I haven’t tallied, I’d say Rothgar and Dare are the leaders. Interesting when they’re very different characters, wouldn’t you say?
    Anyone want to speculate on what they have in common? Or do they simply appeal to different readers/
    I know many of you who are American will be away from your computers and with family and friends for most of today, but if you’re reading, I hope it’s going wonderfully. And if any family stresses emerge, a smile can be magic!
    Cheers,
    Jo

    Reply
  86. How coincidental, Mary Jo — I just finished rereading The Rogue and the Runaway a few days ago, and I agree he’d make a delightful companion.
    I have thought about Loretta’s heroes, and I think I like Rupert Carsington (Mr. Impossible) best – not only was he funny, and focused 🙂 – but he appreciated his lady on all levels, for her mind and her body, he supported her efforts and he was *proud* of her for being a brain. To me that’s all rare and very endearing.
    I’m still scared of most of Jo’s heroes though 😉

    Reply
  87. How coincidental, Mary Jo — I just finished rereading The Rogue and the Runaway a few days ago, and I agree he’d make a delightful companion.
    I have thought about Loretta’s heroes, and I think I like Rupert Carsington (Mr. Impossible) best – not only was he funny, and focused 🙂 – but he appreciated his lady on all levels, for her mind and her body, he supported her efforts and he was *proud* of her for being a brain. To me that’s all rare and very endearing.
    I’m still scared of most of Jo’s heroes though 😉

    Reply
  88. How coincidental, Mary Jo — I just finished rereading The Rogue and the Runaway a few days ago, and I agree he’d make a delightful companion.
    I have thought about Loretta’s heroes, and I think I like Rupert Carsington (Mr. Impossible) best – not only was he funny, and focused 🙂 – but he appreciated his lady on all levels, for her mind and her body, he supported her efforts and he was *proud* of her for being a brain. To me that’s all rare and very endearing.
    I’m still scared of most of Jo’s heroes though 😉

    Reply
  89. How coincidental, Mary Jo — I just finished rereading The Rogue and the Runaway a few days ago, and I agree he’d make a delightful companion.
    I have thought about Loretta’s heroes, and I think I like Rupert Carsington (Mr. Impossible) best – not only was he funny, and focused 🙂 – but he appreciated his lady on all levels, for her mind and her body, he supported her efforts and he was *proud* of her for being a brain. To me that’s all rare and very endearing.
    I’m still scared of most of Jo’s heroes though 😉

    Reply
  90. How coincidental, Mary Jo — I just finished rereading The Rogue and the Runaway a few days ago, and I agree he’d make a delightful companion.
    I have thought about Loretta’s heroes, and I think I like Rupert Carsington (Mr. Impossible) best – not only was he funny, and focused 🙂 – but he appreciated his lady on all levels, for her mind and her body, he supported her efforts and he was *proud* of her for being a brain. To me that’s all rare and very endearing.
    I’m still scared of most of Jo’s heroes though 😉

    Reply
  91. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  92. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  93. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  94. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  95. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  96. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  97. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  98. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  99. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  100. Congratulations, Jo! I first read Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed in 1988 and I’ve been reading Jo Bev books ever since. Twenty-nine of them are on my keeper shelves. I look forward to reading many more.
    I find the “assignment” fascinating because we aren’t asked to name a favorite hero but rather one whom we’d like to spend an evening with. For me at least, these are not necessarily the same. Rothgar is definitely one of my favorite heroes, and I’d love to spend an evening observing him. I don’t think I’d like to spend an evening with him. I’m a shy creature, and I’d be overwhelmed and intimidated, a response he would surely view with scorn. I think I’d choose Nicholas Delaney, a man of complexity, kindness, humor, and honor—a rare combination. I’d like to bring him into the 21st century and talk with him about this world as well as his own. I think he’d listen with genuine interest, and I’m sure he’d have insightful things to say, particularly about honor.
    It’s another tough pick among Mary Jo’s heroes, but self-interest carried the day. I’d choose to spend an evening with Kenzie Scott from The Spiral Path. I’d spend the evening interviewing him about fame and its prices, particularly the relentless press. The interview would give me the knowledge and the motivation to complete my revisions. 🙂
    Just to show, I’m an equal-opportunity wench reader, I’d also choose the following:
    Anne Gracie, Hugo Devenish, An Honorable Thief
    Susan King, Aedan MacBride, Waking the Princess
    Edith Layton, Arden Lyons, The Game of Love
    Patricia Rice, J. D. Marshall, Garden of Dreams
    Miranda Jarrett, Samson Fairbourne, Wishing
    Loretta Chase, no surprise here, I’m a Daniac. 🙂

    Reply
  101. have to think more about the challenge,but popped in to say:
    listened today to the CD-Rom of your workshop in Dallas last year on story beginnings. Really liked it. Wished I could have seen some of those colorcoded analyses!

    Reply
  102. have to think more about the challenge,but popped in to say:
    listened today to the CD-Rom of your workshop in Dallas last year on story beginnings. Really liked it. Wished I could have seen some of those colorcoded analyses!

    Reply
  103. have to think more about the challenge,but popped in to say:
    listened today to the CD-Rom of your workshop in Dallas last year on story beginnings. Really liked it. Wished I could have seen some of those colorcoded analyses!

    Reply
  104. have to think more about the challenge,but popped in to say:
    listened today to the CD-Rom of your workshop in Dallas last year on story beginnings. Really liked it. Wished I could have seen some of those colorcoded analyses!

    Reply
  105. have to think more about the challenge,but popped in to say:
    listened today to the CD-Rom of your workshop in Dallas last year on story beginnings. Really liked it. Wished I could have seen some of those colorcoded analyses!

    Reply
  106. Oh my, this is tough. For Jo’s hero, I’m torn between Nicholas and Race — I have to agree with the poster who thought Nicholas would be fascinating to discuss things with, but Race is just so much fun and would be so entertaining.
    Robin from Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue would also be sure to show a person a good time! Or at least an interesting time. 😉
    And Gideon from Anne’s the Perfect Rake would know the perfect secluded corner to have a… quiet discussion in.

    Reply
  107. Oh my, this is tough. For Jo’s hero, I’m torn between Nicholas and Race — I have to agree with the poster who thought Nicholas would be fascinating to discuss things with, but Race is just so much fun and would be so entertaining.
    Robin from Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue would also be sure to show a person a good time! Or at least an interesting time. 😉
    And Gideon from Anne’s the Perfect Rake would know the perfect secluded corner to have a… quiet discussion in.

    Reply
  108. Oh my, this is tough. For Jo’s hero, I’m torn between Nicholas and Race — I have to agree with the poster who thought Nicholas would be fascinating to discuss things with, but Race is just so much fun and would be so entertaining.
    Robin from Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue would also be sure to show a person a good time! Or at least an interesting time. 😉
    And Gideon from Anne’s the Perfect Rake would know the perfect secluded corner to have a… quiet discussion in.

    Reply
  109. Oh my, this is tough. For Jo’s hero, I’m torn between Nicholas and Race — I have to agree with the poster who thought Nicholas would be fascinating to discuss things with, but Race is just so much fun and would be so entertaining.
    Robin from Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue would also be sure to show a person a good time! Or at least an interesting time. 😉
    And Gideon from Anne’s the Perfect Rake would know the perfect secluded corner to have a… quiet discussion in.

    Reply
  110. Oh my, this is tough. For Jo’s hero, I’m torn between Nicholas and Race — I have to agree with the poster who thought Nicholas would be fascinating to discuss things with, but Race is just so much fun and would be so entertaining.
    Robin from Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue would also be sure to show a person a good time! Or at least an interesting time. 😉
    And Gideon from Anne’s the Perfect Rake would know the perfect secluded corner to have a… quiet discussion in.

    Reply
  111. The first Jo’s book I ever read was Something Wicked. After that I tried to find as much as backlist I could.
    Jo’s hero who I’d like to spend time with would be Rothgar. Considering the time I waited for his book, I’d really like to met him. I’d like to pick his brain. I think he was the man of his time and I could learn a lot of things from him.
    As for other wenches’ hero, Robin from Mary Jo Putney’s Angel Rogue is in the top of my list. I love his view of the world, which not quite treated him gentry but he still had his laugh. He is one of the most fascinating character I ever read.
    Another hero I’d like to spend time with is Ismal from Loretta Chase’s Captives of the night. I love his background. The conversation would be very interesting. I can ask him how to survive the court intrigue and still become a better man.

    Reply
  112. The first Jo’s book I ever read was Something Wicked. After that I tried to find as much as backlist I could.
    Jo’s hero who I’d like to spend time with would be Rothgar. Considering the time I waited for his book, I’d really like to met him. I’d like to pick his brain. I think he was the man of his time and I could learn a lot of things from him.
    As for other wenches’ hero, Robin from Mary Jo Putney’s Angel Rogue is in the top of my list. I love his view of the world, which not quite treated him gentry but he still had his laugh. He is one of the most fascinating character I ever read.
    Another hero I’d like to spend time with is Ismal from Loretta Chase’s Captives of the night. I love his background. The conversation would be very interesting. I can ask him how to survive the court intrigue and still become a better man.

    Reply
  113. The first Jo’s book I ever read was Something Wicked. After that I tried to find as much as backlist I could.
    Jo’s hero who I’d like to spend time with would be Rothgar. Considering the time I waited for his book, I’d really like to met him. I’d like to pick his brain. I think he was the man of his time and I could learn a lot of things from him.
    As for other wenches’ hero, Robin from Mary Jo Putney’s Angel Rogue is in the top of my list. I love his view of the world, which not quite treated him gentry but he still had his laugh. He is one of the most fascinating character I ever read.
    Another hero I’d like to spend time with is Ismal from Loretta Chase’s Captives of the night. I love his background. The conversation would be very interesting. I can ask him how to survive the court intrigue and still become a better man.

    Reply
  114. The first Jo’s book I ever read was Something Wicked. After that I tried to find as much as backlist I could.
    Jo’s hero who I’d like to spend time with would be Rothgar. Considering the time I waited for his book, I’d really like to met him. I’d like to pick his brain. I think he was the man of his time and I could learn a lot of things from him.
    As for other wenches’ hero, Robin from Mary Jo Putney’s Angel Rogue is in the top of my list. I love his view of the world, which not quite treated him gentry but he still had his laugh. He is one of the most fascinating character I ever read.
    Another hero I’d like to spend time with is Ismal from Loretta Chase’s Captives of the night. I love his background. The conversation would be very interesting. I can ask him how to survive the court intrigue and still become a better man.

    Reply
  115. The first Jo’s book I ever read was Something Wicked. After that I tried to find as much as backlist I could.
    Jo’s hero who I’d like to spend time with would be Rothgar. Considering the time I waited for his book, I’d really like to met him. I’d like to pick his brain. I think he was the man of his time and I could learn a lot of things from him.
    As for other wenches’ hero, Robin from Mary Jo Putney’s Angel Rogue is in the top of my list. I love his view of the world, which not quite treated him gentry but he still had his laugh. He is one of the most fascinating character I ever read.
    Another hero I’d like to spend time with is Ismal from Loretta Chase’s Captives of the night. I love his background. The conversation would be very interesting. I can ask him how to survive the court intrigue and still become a better man.

    Reply
  116. Jo – Congratulations! I can’t believe you are one of the few authors I have been reading – since she began… I have never had a backlist to hunt for with you since I bought LWB back in the days when I would pick up Regencies by the handful!
    In terms of favorite heroes? My, what a rich field to choose from! I am one of your original “waiting for Rothgar” chics. (I may still have the button.) I would love to spend an evening with Rothgar, matching wits… though I suspect I would not be able to keep up with such an urbane fellow. Then we Saxonhurst from Forbidden Magic – a Christmas re-read pretty much every year. He is unpredictable and not quite crazy but – wow – he would be fun. (A little exhausting but… worth it?)
    The one I have been looking for in real life – Brand Malloren. Any lover you just says, “more?” and then can actually provide it? Whew… yeah, him I want to meet. A man who is down to earth but has a sense of non-malicious mischief and can laugh in bed… he was just a lovely fella.
    Cheers and happy anniversary!
    jpoorman

    Reply
  117. Jo – Congratulations! I can’t believe you are one of the few authors I have been reading – since she began… I have never had a backlist to hunt for with you since I bought LWB back in the days when I would pick up Regencies by the handful!
    In terms of favorite heroes? My, what a rich field to choose from! I am one of your original “waiting for Rothgar” chics. (I may still have the button.) I would love to spend an evening with Rothgar, matching wits… though I suspect I would not be able to keep up with such an urbane fellow. Then we Saxonhurst from Forbidden Magic – a Christmas re-read pretty much every year. He is unpredictable and not quite crazy but – wow – he would be fun. (A little exhausting but… worth it?)
    The one I have been looking for in real life – Brand Malloren. Any lover you just says, “more?” and then can actually provide it? Whew… yeah, him I want to meet. A man who is down to earth but has a sense of non-malicious mischief and can laugh in bed… he was just a lovely fella.
    Cheers and happy anniversary!
    jpoorman

    Reply
  118. Jo – Congratulations! I can’t believe you are one of the few authors I have been reading – since she began… I have never had a backlist to hunt for with you since I bought LWB back in the days when I would pick up Regencies by the handful!
    In terms of favorite heroes? My, what a rich field to choose from! I am one of your original “waiting for Rothgar” chics. (I may still have the button.) I would love to spend an evening with Rothgar, matching wits… though I suspect I would not be able to keep up with such an urbane fellow. Then we Saxonhurst from Forbidden Magic – a Christmas re-read pretty much every year. He is unpredictable and not quite crazy but – wow – he would be fun. (A little exhausting but… worth it?)
    The one I have been looking for in real life – Brand Malloren. Any lover you just says, “more?” and then can actually provide it? Whew… yeah, him I want to meet. A man who is down to earth but has a sense of non-malicious mischief and can laugh in bed… he was just a lovely fella.
    Cheers and happy anniversary!
    jpoorman

    Reply
  119. Jo – Congratulations! I can’t believe you are one of the few authors I have been reading – since she began… I have never had a backlist to hunt for with you since I bought LWB back in the days when I would pick up Regencies by the handful!
    In terms of favorite heroes? My, what a rich field to choose from! I am one of your original “waiting for Rothgar” chics. (I may still have the button.) I would love to spend an evening with Rothgar, matching wits… though I suspect I would not be able to keep up with such an urbane fellow. Then we Saxonhurst from Forbidden Magic – a Christmas re-read pretty much every year. He is unpredictable and not quite crazy but – wow – he would be fun. (A little exhausting but… worth it?)
    The one I have been looking for in real life – Brand Malloren. Any lover you just says, “more?” and then can actually provide it? Whew… yeah, him I want to meet. A man who is down to earth but has a sense of non-malicious mischief and can laugh in bed… he was just a lovely fella.
    Cheers and happy anniversary!
    jpoorman

    Reply
  120. Jo – Congratulations! I can’t believe you are one of the few authors I have been reading – since she began… I have never had a backlist to hunt for with you since I bought LWB back in the days when I would pick up Regencies by the handful!
    In terms of favorite heroes? My, what a rich field to choose from! I am one of your original “waiting for Rothgar” chics. (I may still have the button.) I would love to spend an evening with Rothgar, matching wits… though I suspect I would not be able to keep up with such an urbane fellow. Then we Saxonhurst from Forbidden Magic – a Christmas re-read pretty much every year. He is unpredictable and not quite crazy but – wow – he would be fun. (A little exhausting but… worth it?)
    The one I have been looking for in real life – Brand Malloren. Any lover you just says, “more?” and then can actually provide it? Whew… yeah, him I want to meet. A man who is down to earth but has a sense of non-malicious mischief and can laugh in bed… he was just a lovely fella.
    Cheers and happy anniversary!
    jpoorman

    Reply
  121. Well of course Lord Rothgar! I’m in love with him since My Lady Notorious, with his strong personality, his intelligence and his wit,and his sensuality too. We should talk, save someone and do something else…:)
    Really Jo, you was the first romances writer I recognised. I started to look for your books. I appreciated you in Devil Heiress, but I loved you in the Malloreen series, well Fort (in Something Wicked?) maybe would be another hero of yours I would meet….
    Anyway I want you to know that I started learn seriously english because of your books, because I wanted to be able to read them in original language (tough to learn english it always was a reverie, for me) but with your rich language your books are difficult to me,and here we are, why your books are no more published in Italy? I’m waiting and looking for your books….otherwise I would try to order them on Internet and try to read them in english…
    Greetings and Congratulations!

    Reply
  122. Well of course Lord Rothgar! I’m in love with him since My Lady Notorious, with his strong personality, his intelligence and his wit,and his sensuality too. We should talk, save someone and do something else…:)
    Really Jo, you was the first romances writer I recognised. I started to look for your books. I appreciated you in Devil Heiress, but I loved you in the Malloreen series, well Fort (in Something Wicked?) maybe would be another hero of yours I would meet….
    Anyway I want you to know that I started learn seriously english because of your books, because I wanted to be able to read them in original language (tough to learn english it always was a reverie, for me) but with your rich language your books are difficult to me,and here we are, why your books are no more published in Italy? I’m waiting and looking for your books….otherwise I would try to order them on Internet and try to read them in english…
    Greetings and Congratulations!

    Reply
  123. Well of course Lord Rothgar! I’m in love with him since My Lady Notorious, with his strong personality, his intelligence and his wit,and his sensuality too. We should talk, save someone and do something else…:)
    Really Jo, you was the first romances writer I recognised. I started to look for your books. I appreciated you in Devil Heiress, but I loved you in the Malloreen series, well Fort (in Something Wicked?) maybe would be another hero of yours I would meet….
    Anyway I want you to know that I started learn seriously english because of your books, because I wanted to be able to read them in original language (tough to learn english it always was a reverie, for me) but with your rich language your books are difficult to me,and here we are, why your books are no more published in Italy? I’m waiting and looking for your books….otherwise I would try to order them on Internet and try to read them in english…
    Greetings and Congratulations!

    Reply
  124. Well of course Lord Rothgar! I’m in love with him since My Lady Notorious, with his strong personality, his intelligence and his wit,and his sensuality too. We should talk, save someone and do something else…:)
    Really Jo, you was the first romances writer I recognised. I started to look for your books. I appreciated you in Devil Heiress, but I loved you in the Malloreen series, well Fort (in Something Wicked?) maybe would be another hero of yours I would meet….
    Anyway I want you to know that I started learn seriously english because of your books, because I wanted to be able to read them in original language (tough to learn english it always was a reverie, for me) but with your rich language your books are difficult to me,and here we are, why your books are no more published in Italy? I’m waiting and looking for your books….otherwise I would try to order them on Internet and try to read them in english…
    Greetings and Congratulations!

    Reply
  125. Well of course Lord Rothgar! I’m in love with him since My Lady Notorious, with his strong personality, his intelligence and his wit,and his sensuality too. We should talk, save someone and do something else…:)
    Really Jo, you was the first romances writer I recognised. I started to look for your books. I appreciated you in Devil Heiress, but I loved you in the Malloreen series, well Fort (in Something Wicked?) maybe would be another hero of yours I would meet….
    Anyway I want you to know that I started learn seriously english because of your books, because I wanted to be able to read them in original language (tough to learn english it always was a reverie, for me) but with your rich language your books are difficult to me,and here we are, why your books are no more published in Italy? I’m waiting and looking for your books….otherwise I would try to order them on Internet and try to read them in english…
    Greetings and Congratulations!

    Reply
  126. Thanks, Julie.
    Laura, you buffed up your English for me. I’m honored!
    I am still being published by Mondadori, or do you mean you can’t find English editions? I’m not sure how that works, but I can try to find out, if that is the problem.
    Best,
    Jo

    Reply
  127. Thanks, Julie.
    Laura, you buffed up your English for me. I’m honored!
    I am still being published by Mondadori, or do you mean you can’t find English editions? I’m not sure how that works, but I can try to find out, if that is the problem.
    Best,
    Jo

    Reply
  128. Thanks, Julie.
    Laura, you buffed up your English for me. I’m honored!
    I am still being published by Mondadori, or do you mean you can’t find English editions? I’m not sure how that works, but I can try to find out, if that is the problem.
    Best,
    Jo

    Reply
  129. Thanks, Julie.
    Laura, you buffed up your English for me. I’m honored!
    I am still being published by Mondadori, or do you mean you can’t find English editions? I’m not sure how that works, but I can try to find out, if that is the problem.
    Best,
    Jo

    Reply
  130. Thanks, Julie.
    Laura, you buffed up your English for me. I’m honored!
    I am still being published by Mondadori, or do you mean you can’t find English editions? I’m not sure how that works, but I can try to find out, if that is the problem.
    Best,
    Jo

    Reply
  131. I’m honored too for your answering! Yes I found your website, looking for news about the Malloreen series and I read excerpt of your book, Devilish actually, and I understood I had to learn english…anyway, last book of yours Mondadori published was Winter Fire, I’m still waiting for A Most Unsuitable Man, in fact I was thinking of ordering it by Amazon. Do you think they would deliver to Italy? If you can do something about Mondadori I will be grateful, because I read a lot of books of different kind, but yours, are “Magic Books”.
    With estimation and admiration
    Laura

    Reply
  132. I’m honored too for your answering! Yes I found your website, looking for news about the Malloreen series and I read excerpt of your book, Devilish actually, and I understood I had to learn english…anyway, last book of yours Mondadori published was Winter Fire, I’m still waiting for A Most Unsuitable Man, in fact I was thinking of ordering it by Amazon. Do you think they would deliver to Italy? If you can do something about Mondadori I will be grateful, because I read a lot of books of different kind, but yours, are “Magic Books”.
    With estimation and admiration
    Laura

    Reply
  133. I’m honored too for your answering! Yes I found your website, looking for news about the Malloreen series and I read excerpt of your book, Devilish actually, and I understood I had to learn english…anyway, last book of yours Mondadori published was Winter Fire, I’m still waiting for A Most Unsuitable Man, in fact I was thinking of ordering it by Amazon. Do you think they would deliver to Italy? If you can do something about Mondadori I will be grateful, because I read a lot of books of different kind, but yours, are “Magic Books”.
    With estimation and admiration
    Laura

    Reply
  134. I’m honored too for your answering! Yes I found your website, looking for news about the Malloreen series and I read excerpt of your book, Devilish actually, and I understood I had to learn english…anyway, last book of yours Mondadori published was Winter Fire, I’m still waiting for A Most Unsuitable Man, in fact I was thinking of ordering it by Amazon. Do you think they would deliver to Italy? If you can do something about Mondadori I will be grateful, because I read a lot of books of different kind, but yours, are “Magic Books”.
    With estimation and admiration
    Laura

    Reply
  135. I’m honored too for your answering! Yes I found your website, looking for news about the Malloreen series and I read excerpt of your book, Devilish actually, and I understood I had to learn english…anyway, last book of yours Mondadori published was Winter Fire, I’m still waiting for A Most Unsuitable Man, in fact I was thinking of ordering it by Amazon. Do you think they would deliver to Italy? If you can do something about Mondadori I will be grateful, because I read a lot of books of different kind, but yours, are “Magic Books”.
    With estimation and admiration
    Laura

    Reply
  136. Congratulations! I used to haunt the library for Jo Beverley and Mary Jo Putney books (and Patricia Veryan). I’ve always been a science fiction and fantasy fan as well. Romance has always seemed a fantasy to me. I think it is because I would never want to actually have to meet any of the heroes of romances, they are too overpowering

    Reply
  137. Congratulations! I used to haunt the library for Jo Beverley and Mary Jo Putney books (and Patricia Veryan). I’ve always been a science fiction and fantasy fan as well. Romance has always seemed a fantasy to me. I think it is because I would never want to actually have to meet any of the heroes of romances, they are too overpowering

    Reply
  138. Congratulations! I used to haunt the library for Jo Beverley and Mary Jo Putney books (and Patricia Veryan). I’ve always been a science fiction and fantasy fan as well. Romance has always seemed a fantasy to me. I think it is because I would never want to actually have to meet any of the heroes of romances, they are too overpowering

    Reply
  139. Congratulations! I used to haunt the library for Jo Beverley and Mary Jo Putney books (and Patricia Veryan). I’ve always been a science fiction and fantasy fan as well. Romance has always seemed a fantasy to me. I think it is because I would never want to actually have to meet any of the heroes of romances, they are too overpowering

    Reply
  140. Congratulations! I used to haunt the library for Jo Beverley and Mary Jo Putney books (and Patricia Veryan). I’ve always been a science fiction and fantasy fan as well. Romance has always seemed a fantasy to me. I think it is because I would never want to actually have to meet any of the heroes of romances, they are too overpowering

    Reply
  141. Oh Finally! I found Forbidden Magic published by Mondadori (Magia Proibita) and I’m in the middle of Saxonhurst and Meg Gillingham adventures, I’m very very very happy!Sax is so a peculiar hero….Jo your characters are so enthralling, your way to describe human feeling so…real not at all mawkish

    Reply
  142. Oh Finally! I found Forbidden Magic published by Mondadori (Magia Proibita) and I’m in the middle of Saxonhurst and Meg Gillingham adventures, I’m very very very happy!Sax is so a peculiar hero….Jo your characters are so enthralling, your way to describe human feeling so…real not at all mawkish

    Reply
  143. Oh Finally! I found Forbidden Magic published by Mondadori (Magia Proibita) and I’m in the middle of Saxonhurst and Meg Gillingham adventures, I’m very very very happy!Sax is so a peculiar hero….Jo your characters are so enthralling, your way to describe human feeling so…real not at all mawkish

    Reply
  144. Oh Finally! I found Forbidden Magic published by Mondadori (Magia Proibita) and I’m in the middle of Saxonhurst and Meg Gillingham adventures, I’m very very very happy!Sax is so a peculiar hero….Jo your characters are so enthralling, your way to describe human feeling so…real not at all mawkish

    Reply
  145. Oh Finally! I found Forbidden Magic published by Mondadori (Magia Proibita) and I’m in the middle of Saxonhurst and Meg Gillingham adventures, I’m very very very happy!Sax is so a peculiar hero….Jo your characters are so enthralling, your way to describe human feeling so…real not at all mawkish

    Reply

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