Guest Tracy Grant on Mystery, Mayfair . . . and Governesses

 

5.30.15TracyMelCara/Andrea, Today I'm delighted to welcome back my good friend Tracy Grant, who has come to give us a little historical backstory to the latest book in her marvelous Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch historical mystery series. For those of you who have not yet read Tracy's books, well, you're in for a treat! Set in the late Regency, they feature wonderfully nuanced, complex stories involving the world of espionage—where personal and professional loyalties are often tangled, and moral choices test the concepts of love, family and friendship. Her characters are beautifully rendered and her research of all aspects of the era is impeccable. I've been lucky enough to read an ARC, but rather than say any more, I'll now hand the pen over to Tracy and let her tell you more! Welcome, Tracy!

The Mayfair AffairThe Mayfair Affair is a book I looked forward to writing for a long time. I knew that one of the longtime characters in the series was going to step from the shadows and assume a central role in this book. Laura Dudley is governess to the two children of Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch, the central spy couple in the series. Laura has been in the background of the series for some time, just as governesses tended to dwell in a sort of twilight zone between the family and the servants.

Governess_frontispiece2Governesses needed to be educated. They were expected to instruct their charges in reading, writing, mathematics, probably French and perhaps Italian as German as well, not to mention embroidery, painting (most likely water colors), music (singing and playing the pianoforte), and deportment. Governesses were often impoverished gentlewomen who had to  make their own way in the world – no easy thing for a single woman in the nineteenth century. In the complex social strata of Regency Britain, a governess might come from a family considered not so very far “beneath” her employers. Jane Fairfax in Jane Austen’s Emma moves in the came social circles in their small village as the heiress Emma Woodhouse, but lacking a dowry, Jane expects to have to make her way as a governess. Emma’s former governess, Miss Taylor, leaves the Woodhouse household at the start of the novel to marry their neighbor Mr. Weston.

Ba-gov 1A governess would considered of a higher social status than the other servants in the household and so was not really part of their world yet she was still a paid employee. She would probably take her meals with the children or alone in her room on a tray. She might bring the children in to the drawing room after dinner and to parties when the parents' entertained. Depending on how understanding her employers were she might socialize with the guests. More than one governess became entangled with an elder brother down from Oxford or a family a friend or even the father of her charges. But, Jane Eyre not withstanding, such entanglements were unlikely to lead to marriage. Ironically, while marriage was the main way a governess could escape her life of tutelage, the nature of her employment made marriage difficult. Her position made flirting dangerous. A governess's reputation was a fragile thing. Even a rumor could lead to her being dismissed without a reference. So governesses tended to remain in the background partly for self-preservation.

Governess 1On the other hand, governesses could come to seem like one of the family. In Emma, Miss Taylor has taken the place of a mother for motherless Emma and dines and socializes with the family now that Emma is grown. The real life Selina Trimmer, daughter of the writer and educational reformer Sarah Trimmer, was very close to her charges, Harriet and Georgiana Cavendish, the daughters of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, as well as the duke’s illegitimate daughter Caroline St. Jules and Lady Caroline Lamb, the Cavendish girls’ cousin. In her letters, the young Lady Harriet Cavenidsh calls her governess “Selina” rather than “Miss Trimmer.” When Harriet, by that time motherless herself, accepted a proposal from Granville Leveson-Gower, her aunt’s former lover, she poured her feelings into a letter to Selina, expressing the doubts and qualms she could probably not put into words to anyone else (the marriage proved to be remarkably happy).

Ba-gov 3Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch in my series are enlightened employers and treat Laura Dudley as one of the family, yet they are also careful not to intrude on her privacy. And so when she is accused of murder at the start of The Mayfair Affair, they realize in many ways they don't know her. And yet they are convinced she has to be innocent. Because, as Suzanne tells Malcolm, she can't accept that someone she trusted with her children could be capable of such an act. When I wrote that scene, I realized that Laura Dudley's story, which is many ways is very much rooted in the plight of governesses in the early nineteenth century, also has very contemporary implications. I face those implications every time I leave my three-and-a-half-year-old daughter Mélanie with a new nanny. I'm really fortunate to be able to be with Mélanie a lot myself and to have wonderful nannies and babysitters for her when I need to be away. But it's always a little bit nerve wracking every time I leave her with someone new. I tell myself I have good instincts, that I would know if I couldn't trust this person, just as Suzanne and Malcolm do. But I think the fear that one could be wrong is always there. At the same time it's amazing how quickly you can bond with someone who is helping look after your children. Even if you don't spend a lot of time with that person yourself, there's something very intimate in sharing the care of children. And there's nothing like the gratitude you can feel for someone who bonds with your children and makes them happy and secure. Suzanne and Malcolm feel that gratitude toward Laura and that shared bond with her, while at the same time the fear that they might be wrong about her lurks underneath.

Ba-gov 2Do you have a favorite book that centers around a governess? Do you see parallels between historical governesses and childcare workers today? I'll be giving away an e-book copy of The Mayfair Affair to one lucky reader, chosen at random, who leaves a comment here between now and Wednesday morning. from 

300 thoughts on “Guest Tracy Grant on Mystery, Mayfair . . . and Governesses”

  1. Hi Tracy, I do like governess stories, so I will have to read yours! I think it is because if I lived in times past, the very best I could hope would have been to be a governess although an unruly scullery maid is probably more likely given my antecedents. I love Jane Eyre. It was my first ‘tragic happy’ story and so holds a special place in my heart. However, I think my favourite governess story is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer – a governess as heroine (and I do like Ancilla Trent) and the Regency equivalent of a sports star as a hero in Sir Waldo Hawkridge. For a sports loving bookworm, it’s hard to do much better!

    Reply
  2. Hi Tracy, I do like governess stories, so I will have to read yours! I think it is because if I lived in times past, the very best I could hope would have been to be a governess although an unruly scullery maid is probably more likely given my antecedents. I love Jane Eyre. It was my first ‘tragic happy’ story and so holds a special place in my heart. However, I think my favourite governess story is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer – a governess as heroine (and I do like Ancilla Trent) and the Regency equivalent of a sports star as a hero in Sir Waldo Hawkridge. For a sports loving bookworm, it’s hard to do much better!

    Reply
  3. Hi Tracy, I do like governess stories, so I will have to read yours! I think it is because if I lived in times past, the very best I could hope would have been to be a governess although an unruly scullery maid is probably more likely given my antecedents. I love Jane Eyre. It was my first ‘tragic happy’ story and so holds a special place in my heart. However, I think my favourite governess story is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer – a governess as heroine (and I do like Ancilla Trent) and the Regency equivalent of a sports star as a hero in Sir Waldo Hawkridge. For a sports loving bookworm, it’s hard to do much better!

    Reply
  4. Hi Tracy, I do like governess stories, so I will have to read yours! I think it is because if I lived in times past, the very best I could hope would have been to be a governess although an unruly scullery maid is probably more likely given my antecedents. I love Jane Eyre. It was my first ‘tragic happy’ story and so holds a special place in my heart. However, I think my favourite governess story is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer – a governess as heroine (and I do like Ancilla Trent) and the Regency equivalent of a sports star as a hero in Sir Waldo Hawkridge. For a sports loving bookworm, it’s hard to do much better!

    Reply
  5. Hi Tracy, I do like governess stories, so I will have to read yours! I think it is because if I lived in times past, the very best I could hope would have been to be a governess although an unruly scullery maid is probably more likely given my antecedents. I love Jane Eyre. It was my first ‘tragic happy’ story and so holds a special place in my heart. However, I think my favourite governess story is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer – a governess as heroine (and I do like Ancilla Trent) and the Regency equivalent of a sports star as a hero in Sir Waldo Hawkridge. For a sports loving bookworm, it’s hard to do much better!

    Reply
  6. I have been a huge fan of governess novels since I first started reading them in the 1960s. I wish more authors wrote them! One of my favorites is “An Unlikely Governess” by Karen Ranney. It’s a very good story.
    My favorite governess plot would go like this: The governess arrives at a huge, dark mansion located on the lonely moors. The child she is to care for has only his/her father because the mother is deceased. The father is very handsome (of course) but tends to stay in his office ignoring his child. The governess finds a sweet child who needs lots of loving. Sometimes, there is a mystery or perhaps a ghost. Of course, the governess and the father end of making eyes at each other and they find their HEA! 🙂

    Reply
  7. I have been a huge fan of governess novels since I first started reading them in the 1960s. I wish more authors wrote them! One of my favorites is “An Unlikely Governess” by Karen Ranney. It’s a very good story.
    My favorite governess plot would go like this: The governess arrives at a huge, dark mansion located on the lonely moors. The child she is to care for has only his/her father because the mother is deceased. The father is very handsome (of course) but tends to stay in his office ignoring his child. The governess finds a sweet child who needs lots of loving. Sometimes, there is a mystery or perhaps a ghost. Of course, the governess and the father end of making eyes at each other and they find their HEA! 🙂

    Reply
  8. I have been a huge fan of governess novels since I first started reading them in the 1960s. I wish more authors wrote them! One of my favorites is “An Unlikely Governess” by Karen Ranney. It’s a very good story.
    My favorite governess plot would go like this: The governess arrives at a huge, dark mansion located on the lonely moors. The child she is to care for has only his/her father because the mother is deceased. The father is very handsome (of course) but tends to stay in his office ignoring his child. The governess finds a sweet child who needs lots of loving. Sometimes, there is a mystery or perhaps a ghost. Of course, the governess and the father end of making eyes at each other and they find their HEA! 🙂

    Reply
  9. I have been a huge fan of governess novels since I first started reading them in the 1960s. I wish more authors wrote them! One of my favorites is “An Unlikely Governess” by Karen Ranney. It’s a very good story.
    My favorite governess plot would go like this: The governess arrives at a huge, dark mansion located on the lonely moors. The child she is to care for has only his/her father because the mother is deceased. The father is very handsome (of course) but tends to stay in his office ignoring his child. The governess finds a sweet child who needs lots of loving. Sometimes, there is a mystery or perhaps a ghost. Of course, the governess and the father end of making eyes at each other and they find their HEA! 🙂

    Reply
  10. I have been a huge fan of governess novels since I first started reading them in the 1960s. I wish more authors wrote them! One of my favorites is “An Unlikely Governess” by Karen Ranney. It’s a very good story.
    My favorite governess plot would go like this: The governess arrives at a huge, dark mansion located on the lonely moors. The child she is to care for has only his/her father because the mother is deceased. The father is very handsome (of course) but tends to stay in his office ignoring his child. The governess finds a sweet child who needs lots of loving. Sometimes, there is a mystery or perhaps a ghost. Of course, the governess and the father end of making eyes at each other and they find their HEA! 🙂

    Reply
  11. Well, I did leave a comment, but, sadly I don’t know where it went….My first love are novels depicting children in the care of their governesses… listening to Amanda Quick’s Lie By Moonlight…a bonus when a story contains suspense and intrigue!

    Reply
  12. Well, I did leave a comment, but, sadly I don’t know where it went….My first love are novels depicting children in the care of their governesses… listening to Amanda Quick’s Lie By Moonlight…a bonus when a story contains suspense and intrigue!

    Reply
  13. Well, I did leave a comment, but, sadly I don’t know where it went….My first love are novels depicting children in the care of their governesses… listening to Amanda Quick’s Lie By Moonlight…a bonus when a story contains suspense and intrigue!

    Reply
  14. Well, I did leave a comment, but, sadly I don’t know where it went….My first love are novels depicting children in the care of their governesses… listening to Amanda Quick’s Lie By Moonlight…a bonus when a story contains suspense and intrigue!

    Reply
  15. Well, I did leave a comment, but, sadly I don’t know where it went….My first love are novels depicting children in the care of their governesses… listening to Amanda Quick’s Lie By Moonlight…a bonus when a story contains suspense and intrigue!

    Reply
  16. Hello Tracy,
    I have to say up first that you’re a new author for me. Aside from Jane Eyre, I don’t think I’ve read a “governess novel” (and that was a very very long time ago – which makes me think I should reread Jane Eyre). That said, I was lucky that my parents (and later my sister-in-law) babysat my children so I was less worried about leaving them to go to work.
    Back to your story: I do love spy stories and a good mystery. I’m pretty sure I would love your novels.
    Thanks for a great insight into the world of governesses.

    Reply
  17. Hello Tracy,
    I have to say up first that you’re a new author for me. Aside from Jane Eyre, I don’t think I’ve read a “governess novel” (and that was a very very long time ago – which makes me think I should reread Jane Eyre). That said, I was lucky that my parents (and later my sister-in-law) babysat my children so I was less worried about leaving them to go to work.
    Back to your story: I do love spy stories and a good mystery. I’m pretty sure I would love your novels.
    Thanks for a great insight into the world of governesses.

    Reply
  18. Hello Tracy,
    I have to say up first that you’re a new author for me. Aside from Jane Eyre, I don’t think I’ve read a “governess novel” (and that was a very very long time ago – which makes me think I should reread Jane Eyre). That said, I was lucky that my parents (and later my sister-in-law) babysat my children so I was less worried about leaving them to go to work.
    Back to your story: I do love spy stories and a good mystery. I’m pretty sure I would love your novels.
    Thanks for a great insight into the world of governesses.

    Reply
  19. Hello Tracy,
    I have to say up first that you’re a new author for me. Aside from Jane Eyre, I don’t think I’ve read a “governess novel” (and that was a very very long time ago – which makes me think I should reread Jane Eyre). That said, I was lucky that my parents (and later my sister-in-law) babysat my children so I was less worried about leaving them to go to work.
    Back to your story: I do love spy stories and a good mystery. I’m pretty sure I would love your novels.
    Thanks for a great insight into the world of governesses.

    Reply
  20. Hello Tracy,
    I have to say up first that you’re a new author for me. Aside from Jane Eyre, I don’t think I’ve read a “governess novel” (and that was a very very long time ago – which makes me think I should reread Jane Eyre). That said, I was lucky that my parents (and later my sister-in-law) babysat my children so I was less worried about leaving them to go to work.
    Back to your story: I do love spy stories and a good mystery. I’m pretty sure I would love your novels.
    Thanks for a great insight into the world of governesses.

    Reply
  21. I don’t have a favorite governess story to share though I’ve read many as it’s a common trope in historical romances. I have enjoyed governess stories because they’re a bit like Pygmalion stories wether the impoverished plain duckling turns into a swan as she finds love among the nobility despite her lowly position. I started reading governess stories when gothic romances were popular by Mary Stewart, Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt. Perhaps that’s why this blog post caught my interest…I love the combination of mystery/intrigue and historical romance. I am very glad to be introduced to you today, Tracy!

    Reply
  22. I don’t have a favorite governess story to share though I’ve read many as it’s a common trope in historical romances. I have enjoyed governess stories because they’re a bit like Pygmalion stories wether the impoverished plain duckling turns into a swan as she finds love among the nobility despite her lowly position. I started reading governess stories when gothic romances were popular by Mary Stewart, Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt. Perhaps that’s why this blog post caught my interest…I love the combination of mystery/intrigue and historical romance. I am very glad to be introduced to you today, Tracy!

    Reply
  23. I don’t have a favorite governess story to share though I’ve read many as it’s a common trope in historical romances. I have enjoyed governess stories because they’re a bit like Pygmalion stories wether the impoverished plain duckling turns into a swan as she finds love among the nobility despite her lowly position. I started reading governess stories when gothic romances were popular by Mary Stewart, Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt. Perhaps that’s why this blog post caught my interest…I love the combination of mystery/intrigue and historical romance. I am very glad to be introduced to you today, Tracy!

    Reply
  24. I don’t have a favorite governess story to share though I’ve read many as it’s a common trope in historical romances. I have enjoyed governess stories because they’re a bit like Pygmalion stories wether the impoverished plain duckling turns into a swan as she finds love among the nobility despite her lowly position. I started reading governess stories when gothic romances were popular by Mary Stewart, Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt. Perhaps that’s why this blog post caught my interest…I love the combination of mystery/intrigue and historical romance. I am very glad to be introduced to you today, Tracy!

    Reply
  25. I don’t have a favorite governess story to share though I’ve read many as it’s a common trope in historical romances. I have enjoyed governess stories because they’re a bit like Pygmalion stories wether the impoverished plain duckling turns into a swan as she finds love among the nobility despite her lowly position. I started reading governess stories when gothic romances were popular by Mary Stewart, Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt. Perhaps that’s why this blog post caught my interest…I love the combination of mystery/intrigue and historical romance. I am very glad to be introduced to you today, Tracy!

    Reply
  26. Hi, Tracy! The Mayfair Affair is already on my Kindle, and I look forward to reading it as soon as I catch up with my review commitments. I am also thrilled to have digital copies of some of your Anthea Malcolm books.
    I have loved governess-as-heroine books since I first read Jane Eyre the summer I turned ten. I have fond memories of many governess heroines from the heyday of the Gothic romance. My keepers that use the trope include (but are not limited to) Anne Gracie’s Tallie’s Knight, Donna Lee Simpson’s Lord St. Claire’s Angel, Jen Turano’s A Change of Fortune, Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting, Lauren Willig’s The Orchid Affair, Miranda Neville’s The Duke of Dark Desires, and all Christina Dodd’s Governess Brides books.

    Reply
  27. Hi, Tracy! The Mayfair Affair is already on my Kindle, and I look forward to reading it as soon as I catch up with my review commitments. I am also thrilled to have digital copies of some of your Anthea Malcolm books.
    I have loved governess-as-heroine books since I first read Jane Eyre the summer I turned ten. I have fond memories of many governess heroines from the heyday of the Gothic romance. My keepers that use the trope include (but are not limited to) Anne Gracie’s Tallie’s Knight, Donna Lee Simpson’s Lord St. Claire’s Angel, Jen Turano’s A Change of Fortune, Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting, Lauren Willig’s The Orchid Affair, Miranda Neville’s The Duke of Dark Desires, and all Christina Dodd’s Governess Brides books.

    Reply
  28. Hi, Tracy! The Mayfair Affair is already on my Kindle, and I look forward to reading it as soon as I catch up with my review commitments. I am also thrilled to have digital copies of some of your Anthea Malcolm books.
    I have loved governess-as-heroine books since I first read Jane Eyre the summer I turned ten. I have fond memories of many governess heroines from the heyday of the Gothic romance. My keepers that use the trope include (but are not limited to) Anne Gracie’s Tallie’s Knight, Donna Lee Simpson’s Lord St. Claire’s Angel, Jen Turano’s A Change of Fortune, Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting, Lauren Willig’s The Orchid Affair, Miranda Neville’s The Duke of Dark Desires, and all Christina Dodd’s Governess Brides books.

    Reply
  29. Hi, Tracy! The Mayfair Affair is already on my Kindle, and I look forward to reading it as soon as I catch up with my review commitments. I am also thrilled to have digital copies of some of your Anthea Malcolm books.
    I have loved governess-as-heroine books since I first read Jane Eyre the summer I turned ten. I have fond memories of many governess heroines from the heyday of the Gothic romance. My keepers that use the trope include (but are not limited to) Anne Gracie’s Tallie’s Knight, Donna Lee Simpson’s Lord St. Claire’s Angel, Jen Turano’s A Change of Fortune, Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting, Lauren Willig’s The Orchid Affair, Miranda Neville’s The Duke of Dark Desires, and all Christina Dodd’s Governess Brides books.

    Reply
  30. Hi, Tracy! The Mayfair Affair is already on my Kindle, and I look forward to reading it as soon as I catch up with my review commitments. I am also thrilled to have digital copies of some of your Anthea Malcolm books.
    I have loved governess-as-heroine books since I first read Jane Eyre the summer I turned ten. I have fond memories of many governess heroines from the heyday of the Gothic romance. My keepers that use the trope include (but are not limited to) Anne Gracie’s Tallie’s Knight, Donna Lee Simpson’s Lord St. Claire’s Angel, Jen Turano’s A Change of Fortune, Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting, Lauren Willig’s The Orchid Affair, Miranda Neville’s The Duke of Dark Desires, and all Christina Dodd’s Governess Brides books.

    Reply
  31. Thank you for this new book. It feels like I have waited forever for the next installment for Suzanne and Malcolm. I own everything you have written, even Anthea Malcolm.
    Governesses. Such a terrible job if the employers are unfeeling or disinterested in their family. I don’t think I have a favorite governess story although Christina Dodd did an entire series for them. They were pretty good,

    Reply
  32. Thank you for this new book. It feels like I have waited forever for the next installment for Suzanne and Malcolm. I own everything you have written, even Anthea Malcolm.
    Governesses. Such a terrible job if the employers are unfeeling or disinterested in their family. I don’t think I have a favorite governess story although Christina Dodd did an entire series for them. They were pretty good,

    Reply
  33. Thank you for this new book. It feels like I have waited forever for the next installment for Suzanne and Malcolm. I own everything you have written, even Anthea Malcolm.
    Governesses. Such a terrible job if the employers are unfeeling or disinterested in their family. I don’t think I have a favorite governess story although Christina Dodd did an entire series for them. They were pretty good,

    Reply
  34. Thank you for this new book. It feels like I have waited forever for the next installment for Suzanne and Malcolm. I own everything you have written, even Anthea Malcolm.
    Governesses. Such a terrible job if the employers are unfeeling or disinterested in their family. I don’t think I have a favorite governess story although Christina Dodd did an entire series for them. They were pretty good,

    Reply
  35. Thank you for this new book. It feels like I have waited forever for the next installment for Suzanne and Malcolm. I own everything you have written, even Anthea Malcolm.
    Governesses. Such a terrible job if the employers are unfeeling or disinterested in their family. I don’t think I have a favorite governess story although Christina Dodd did an entire series for them. They were pretty good,

    Reply
  36. Jana mentioned Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting”. It’s my favorite governess story other than Jane Eyre. Also it’s a 20th century governess. I also like some of the other books mentioned such as “The Nonesuch”. Governess stories are not particularly my favorite romances but I do enjoy the very good ones.

    Reply
  37. Jana mentioned Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting”. It’s my favorite governess story other than Jane Eyre. Also it’s a 20th century governess. I also like some of the other books mentioned such as “The Nonesuch”. Governess stories are not particularly my favorite romances but I do enjoy the very good ones.

    Reply
  38. Jana mentioned Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting”. It’s my favorite governess story other than Jane Eyre. Also it’s a 20th century governess. I also like some of the other books mentioned such as “The Nonesuch”. Governess stories are not particularly my favorite romances but I do enjoy the very good ones.

    Reply
  39. Jana mentioned Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting”. It’s my favorite governess story other than Jane Eyre. Also it’s a 20th century governess. I also like some of the other books mentioned such as “The Nonesuch”. Governess stories are not particularly my favorite romances but I do enjoy the very good ones.

    Reply
  40. Jana mentioned Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting”. It’s my favorite governess story other than Jane Eyre. Also it’s a 20th century governess. I also like some of the other books mentioned such as “The Nonesuch”. Governess stories are not particularly my favorite romances but I do enjoy the very good ones.

    Reply
  41. I love governess stories! One of my favs is Christina Dodd’s My Favorite Bride (Governess Brides #7). It’s a bit of a “The Sound of Music” story.

    Reply
  42. I love governess stories! One of my favs is Christina Dodd’s My Favorite Bride (Governess Brides #7). It’s a bit of a “The Sound of Music” story.

    Reply
  43. I love governess stories! One of my favs is Christina Dodd’s My Favorite Bride (Governess Brides #7). It’s a bit of a “The Sound of Music” story.

    Reply
  44. I love governess stories! One of my favs is Christina Dodd’s My Favorite Bride (Governess Brides #7). It’s a bit of a “The Sound of Music” story.

    Reply
  45. I love governess stories! One of my favs is Christina Dodd’s My Favorite Bride (Governess Brides #7). It’s a bit of a “The Sound of Music” story.

    Reply
  46. Hi Laura! I read Jane Eyre really young – I was nine – and so it made a particularly vivid impression and probably has a lot to do with my interest in governess stories. The Nonesuch is also a great suggestion of a favorite governess book that one doesn’t hear as often.

    Reply
  47. Hi Laura! I read Jane Eyre really young – I was nine – and so it made a particularly vivid impression and probably has a lot to do with my interest in governess stories. The Nonesuch is also a great suggestion of a favorite governess book that one doesn’t hear as often.

    Reply
  48. Hi Laura! I read Jane Eyre really young – I was nine – and so it made a particularly vivid impression and probably has a lot to do with my interest in governess stories. The Nonesuch is also a great suggestion of a favorite governess book that one doesn’t hear as often.

    Reply
  49. Hi Laura! I read Jane Eyre really young – I was nine – and so it made a particularly vivid impression and probably has a lot to do with my interest in governess stories. The Nonesuch is also a great suggestion of a favorite governess book that one doesn’t hear as often.

    Reply
  50. Hi Laura! I read Jane Eyre really young – I was nine – and so it made a particularly vivid impression and probably has a lot to do with my interest in governess stories. The Nonesuch is also a great suggestion of a favorite governess book that one doesn’t hear as often.

    Reply
  51. Hi Liette! How wonderful your parents and sister-in-law could babysit your children. It’s so great to have family members who can help with childcare.
    Great to hear you like spy stories and mysteries!

    Reply
  52. Hi Liette! How wonderful your parents and sister-in-law could babysit your children. It’s so great to have family members who can help with childcare.
    Great to hear you like spy stories and mysteries!

    Reply
  53. Hi Liette! How wonderful your parents and sister-in-law could babysit your children. It’s so great to have family members who can help with childcare.
    Great to hear you like spy stories and mysteries!

    Reply
  54. Hi Liette! How wonderful your parents and sister-in-law could babysit your children. It’s so great to have family members who can help with childcare.
    Great to hear you like spy stories and mysteries!

    Reply
  55. Hi Liette! How wonderful your parents and sister-in-law could babysit your children. It’s so great to have family members who can help with childcare.
    Great to hear you like spy stories and mysteries!

    Reply
  56. Hi Janga! So glad you have Mayfair ready to read! And I’m really excited about the e-versions of the Anthea Malcolm books. We’re working on getting the rest out.
    Love your list of governess books!

    Reply
  57. Hi Janga! So glad you have Mayfair ready to read! And I’m really excited about the e-versions of the Anthea Malcolm books. We’re working on getting the rest out.
    Love your list of governess books!

    Reply
  58. Hi Janga! So glad you have Mayfair ready to read! And I’m really excited about the e-versions of the Anthea Malcolm books. We’re working on getting the rest out.
    Love your list of governess books!

    Reply
  59. Hi Janga! So glad you have Mayfair ready to read! And I’m really excited about the e-versions of the Anthea Malcolm books. We’re working on getting the rest out.
    Love your list of governess books!

    Reply
  60. Hi Janga! So glad you have Mayfair ready to read! And I’m really excited about the e-versions of the Anthea Malcolm books. We’re working on getting the rest out.
    Love your list of governess books!

    Reply
  61. So great to hear you have read all my books going to Anthea Malcolm, Anne! I hope you enjoy The Mayfair Affair.
    I agree about governesses having a really challenging job – and they were so at the mercy of their employers as you say.

    Reply
  62. So great to hear you have read all my books going to Anthea Malcolm, Anne! I hope you enjoy The Mayfair Affair.
    I agree about governesses having a really challenging job – and they were so at the mercy of their employers as you say.

    Reply
  63. So great to hear you have read all my books going to Anthea Malcolm, Anne! I hope you enjoy The Mayfair Affair.
    I agree about governesses having a really challenging job – and they were so at the mercy of their employers as you say.

    Reply
  64. So great to hear you have read all my books going to Anthea Malcolm, Anne! I hope you enjoy The Mayfair Affair.
    I agree about governesses having a really challenging job – and they were so at the mercy of their employers as you say.

    Reply
  65. So great to hear you have read all my books going to Anthea Malcolm, Anne! I hope you enjoy The Mayfair Affair.
    I agree about governesses having a really challenging job – and they were so at the mercy of their employers as you say.

    Reply
  66. Hi Jane Eyre was one of my first governess novels, which I read in English, and I think in French. I’ve been enjoying Christina Dodd’s governess school series, and have reread several of them.

    Reply
  67. Hi Jane Eyre was one of my first governess novels, which I read in English, and I think in French. I’ve been enjoying Christina Dodd’s governess school series, and have reread several of them.

    Reply
  68. Hi Jane Eyre was one of my first governess novels, which I read in English, and I think in French. I’ve been enjoying Christina Dodd’s governess school series, and have reread several of them.

    Reply
  69. Hi Jane Eyre was one of my first governess novels, which I read in English, and I think in French. I’ve been enjoying Christina Dodd’s governess school series, and have reread several of them.

    Reply
  70. Hi Jane Eyre was one of my first governess novels, which I read in English, and I think in French. I’ve been enjoying Christina Dodd’s governess school series, and have reread several of them.

    Reply
  71. I know I’ve read and loved some governess stories, probably Victoria Holt were my first such books. When I read post this though, the governess that popped into my head is Claudia Martin in Mary Balogh’s Simply Perfect. She walked out on a bratty charge, a sister of a duke, and she founded a school for girls.

    Reply
  72. I know I’ve read and loved some governess stories, probably Victoria Holt were my first such books. When I read post this though, the governess that popped into my head is Claudia Martin in Mary Balogh’s Simply Perfect. She walked out on a bratty charge, a sister of a duke, and she founded a school for girls.

    Reply
  73. I know I’ve read and loved some governess stories, probably Victoria Holt were my first such books. When I read post this though, the governess that popped into my head is Claudia Martin in Mary Balogh’s Simply Perfect. She walked out on a bratty charge, a sister of a duke, and she founded a school for girls.

    Reply
  74. I know I’ve read and loved some governess stories, probably Victoria Holt were my first such books. When I read post this though, the governess that popped into my head is Claudia Martin in Mary Balogh’s Simply Perfect. She walked out on a bratty charge, a sister of a duke, and she founded a school for girls.

    Reply
  75. I know I’ve read and loved some governess stories, probably Victoria Holt were my first such books. When I read post this though, the governess that popped into my head is Claudia Martin in Mary Balogh’s Simply Perfect. She walked out on a bratty charge, a sister of a duke, and she founded a school for girls.

    Reply
  76. Yes, I like the governess stories. Since these are “romance” books, they do get happiness at the end. It is kind of like a Cinderella story, usually not waiting for a “prince” but doing something about it. You usually see two types, the one that fades into the background, and the one that doesn’t and gets into trouble. Love them all!

    Reply
  77. Yes, I like the governess stories. Since these are “romance” books, they do get happiness at the end. It is kind of like a Cinderella story, usually not waiting for a “prince” but doing something about it. You usually see two types, the one that fades into the background, and the one that doesn’t and gets into trouble. Love them all!

    Reply
  78. Yes, I like the governess stories. Since these are “romance” books, they do get happiness at the end. It is kind of like a Cinderella story, usually not waiting for a “prince” but doing something about it. You usually see two types, the one that fades into the background, and the one that doesn’t and gets into trouble. Love them all!

    Reply
  79. Yes, I like the governess stories. Since these are “romance” books, they do get happiness at the end. It is kind of like a Cinderella story, usually not waiting for a “prince” but doing something about it. You usually see two types, the one that fades into the background, and the one that doesn’t and gets into trouble. Love them all!

    Reply
  80. Yes, I like the governess stories. Since these are “romance” books, they do get happiness at the end. It is kind of like a Cinderella story, usually not waiting for a “prince” but doing something about it. You usually see two types, the one that fades into the background, and the one that doesn’t and gets into trouble. Love them all!

    Reply
  81. Mary Stewart at her best is superb and Nine Coaches Waiting was one of the best. I remember her description of the heroine waiting for her luggage to emerge. She drew a picture with every paragraph!

    Reply
  82. Mary Stewart at her best is superb and Nine Coaches Waiting was one of the best. I remember her description of the heroine waiting for her luggage to emerge. She drew a picture with every paragraph!

    Reply
  83. Mary Stewart at her best is superb and Nine Coaches Waiting was one of the best. I remember her description of the heroine waiting for her luggage to emerge. She drew a picture with every paragraph!

    Reply
  84. Mary Stewart at her best is superb and Nine Coaches Waiting was one of the best. I remember her description of the heroine waiting for her luggage to emerge. She drew a picture with every paragraph!

    Reply
  85. Mary Stewart at her best is superb and Nine Coaches Waiting was one of the best. I remember her description of the heroine waiting for her luggage to emerge. She drew a picture with every paragraph!

    Reply
  86. That’s a great way of putting it about the two types of governess, Cindy, and fits with what I said in the post about how easily governesses could get in trouble if there was even the least bit of gossip about them.

    Reply
  87. That’s a great way of putting it about the two types of governess, Cindy, and fits with what I said in the post about how easily governesses could get in trouble if there was even the least bit of gossip about them.

    Reply
  88. That’s a great way of putting it about the two types of governess, Cindy, and fits with what I said in the post about how easily governesses could get in trouble if there was even the least bit of gossip about them.

    Reply
  89. That’s a great way of putting it about the two types of governess, Cindy, and fits with what I said in the post about how easily governesses could get in trouble if there was even the least bit of gossip about them.

    Reply
  90. That’s a great way of putting it about the two types of governess, Cindy, and fits with what I said in the post about how easily governesses could get in trouble if there was even the least bit of gossip about them.

    Reply
  91. I loved Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This, which was a governess story.
    Tracy, I started out with Vienna Waltz and adored it! I now have The Paris Affair. Thank you for this series! Do you think I can cheat and skip ahead to The Mayfair Affair and then go back to the other books? I will definitely be reading them all.

    Reply
  92. I loved Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This, which was a governess story.
    Tracy, I started out with Vienna Waltz and adored it! I now have The Paris Affair. Thank you for this series! Do you think I can cheat and skip ahead to The Mayfair Affair and then go back to the other books? I will definitely be reading them all.

    Reply
  93. I loved Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This, which was a governess story.
    Tracy, I started out with Vienna Waltz and adored it! I now have The Paris Affair. Thank you for this series! Do you think I can cheat and skip ahead to The Mayfair Affair and then go back to the other books? I will definitely be reading them all.

    Reply
  94. I loved Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This, which was a governess story.
    Tracy, I started out with Vienna Waltz and adored it! I now have The Paris Affair. Thank you for this series! Do you think I can cheat and skip ahead to The Mayfair Affair and then go back to the other books? I will definitely be reading them all.

    Reply
  95. I loved Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This, which was a governess story.
    Tracy, I started out with Vienna Waltz and adored it! I now have The Paris Affair. Thank you for this series! Do you think I can cheat and skip ahead to The Mayfair Affair and then go back to the other books? I will definitely be reading them all.

    Reply
  96. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  97. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  98. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  99. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  100. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  101. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  102. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  103. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  104. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  105. Just as you said, the governess was in a very difficult, lonely position somewhere between family and servants. She was also at the mercy of amorous sons of the house, etc. One book that featured a governess who pushed back (and got dismissed) is Mary Balogh’s The Ideal Wife. It worked out well for her (marriage), but in the real world, such a governess would have been in a frightening position.

    Reply
  106. Hi Paige! So glad you are enjoying the series! Yes, I think it’s fine to skip ahead – each mystery is wrapped up in that book and I try not to have spoilers for the mystery.

    Reply
  107. Hi Paige! So glad you are enjoying the series! Yes, I think it’s fine to skip ahead – each mystery is wrapped up in that book and I try not to have spoilers for the mystery.

    Reply
  108. Hi Paige! So glad you are enjoying the series! Yes, I think it’s fine to skip ahead – each mystery is wrapped up in that book and I try not to have spoilers for the mystery.

    Reply
  109. Hi Paige! So glad you are enjoying the series! Yes, I think it’s fine to skip ahead – each mystery is wrapped up in that book and I try not to have spoilers for the mystery.

    Reply
  110. Hi Paige! So glad you are enjoying the series! Yes, I think it’s fine to skip ahead – each mystery is wrapped up in that book and I try not to have spoilers for the mystery.

    Reply
  111. The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt was the first gothic romance which I read. I found it on my high school’s library shelves. This led me to discover Mary Stewart, Dorothy Eden, and Jane Aiken Hodge among numerous others. Martha Leigh and Linda Martin of Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart are still my favorite governesses.

    Reply
  112. The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt was the first gothic romance which I read. I found it on my high school’s library shelves. This led me to discover Mary Stewart, Dorothy Eden, and Jane Aiken Hodge among numerous others. Martha Leigh and Linda Martin of Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart are still my favorite governesses.

    Reply
  113. The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt was the first gothic romance which I read. I found it on my high school’s library shelves. This led me to discover Mary Stewart, Dorothy Eden, and Jane Aiken Hodge among numerous others. Martha Leigh and Linda Martin of Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart are still my favorite governesses.

    Reply
  114. The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt was the first gothic romance which I read. I found it on my high school’s library shelves. This led me to discover Mary Stewart, Dorothy Eden, and Jane Aiken Hodge among numerous others. Martha Leigh and Linda Martin of Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart are still my favorite governesses.

    Reply
  115. The Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt was the first gothic romance which I read. I found it on my high school’s library shelves. This led me to discover Mary Stewart, Dorothy Eden, and Jane Aiken Hodge among numerous others. Martha Leigh and Linda Martin of Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart are still my favorite governesses.

    Reply
  116. I have read several governess stories set in the Regency, Victorian England, Australia, and even American west. Of course, in most the governess and the widower fall in love . I can believe it more in the contemporary stories than in the historical ones. I hadn’t come across Tracy’s books before but they sound interesting. I must say that my first thought when I read that the governess had been accused of a crime was “When did she have time?

    Reply
  117. I have read several governess stories set in the Regency, Victorian England, Australia, and even American west. Of course, in most the governess and the widower fall in love . I can believe it more in the contemporary stories than in the historical ones. I hadn’t come across Tracy’s books before but they sound interesting. I must say that my first thought when I read that the governess had been accused of a crime was “When did she have time?

    Reply
  118. I have read several governess stories set in the Regency, Victorian England, Australia, and even American west. Of course, in most the governess and the widower fall in love . I can believe it more in the contemporary stories than in the historical ones. I hadn’t come across Tracy’s books before but they sound interesting. I must say that my first thought when I read that the governess had been accused of a crime was “When did she have time?

    Reply
  119. I have read several governess stories set in the Regency, Victorian England, Australia, and even American west. Of course, in most the governess and the widower fall in love . I can believe it more in the contemporary stories than in the historical ones. I hadn’t come across Tracy’s books before but they sound interesting. I must say that my first thought when I read that the governess had been accused of a crime was “When did she have time?

    Reply
  120. I have read several governess stories set in the Regency, Victorian England, Australia, and even American west. Of course, in most the governess and the widower fall in love . I can believe it more in the contemporary stories than in the historical ones. I hadn’t come across Tracy’s books before but they sound interesting. I must say that my first thought when I read that the governess had been accused of a crime was “When did she have time?

    Reply
  121. One governess romance I remember with particular joy is Grace Burrowes Ethan. Ethan is the widowed bastard son of an Earl and lives estranged from his family with two small sons. Alice, his sons crippled governess, helps him rebild his life and family. Ethan and Alice have both been through their personal Hell and this is a sweet and delightful story about two wounded people who get a second chanse at love.

    Reply
  122. One governess romance I remember with particular joy is Grace Burrowes Ethan. Ethan is the widowed bastard son of an Earl and lives estranged from his family with two small sons. Alice, his sons crippled governess, helps him rebild his life and family. Ethan and Alice have both been through their personal Hell and this is a sweet and delightful story about two wounded people who get a second chanse at love.

    Reply
  123. One governess romance I remember with particular joy is Grace Burrowes Ethan. Ethan is the widowed bastard son of an Earl and lives estranged from his family with two small sons. Alice, his sons crippled governess, helps him rebild his life and family. Ethan and Alice have both been through their personal Hell and this is a sweet and delightful story about two wounded people who get a second chanse at love.

    Reply
  124. One governess romance I remember with particular joy is Grace Burrowes Ethan. Ethan is the widowed bastard son of an Earl and lives estranged from his family with two small sons. Alice, his sons crippled governess, helps him rebild his life and family. Ethan and Alice have both been through their personal Hell and this is a sweet and delightful story about two wounded people who get a second chanse at love.

    Reply
  125. One governess romance I remember with particular joy is Grace Burrowes Ethan. Ethan is the widowed bastard son of an Earl and lives estranged from his family with two small sons. Alice, his sons crippled governess, helps him rebild his life and family. Ethan and Alice have both been through their personal Hell and this is a sweet and delightful story about two wounded people who get a second chanse at love.

    Reply
  126. No one governess story comes to mind right now, even though I know I’ve read many. After all, I’ve been reading romances for over 40 years – grin.
    I haven’t run across Tracy Grant’s books before so I’ll have to look for one now.

    Reply
  127. No one governess story comes to mind right now, even though I know I’ve read many. After all, I’ve been reading romances for over 40 years – grin.
    I haven’t run across Tracy Grant’s books before so I’ll have to look for one now.

    Reply
  128. No one governess story comes to mind right now, even though I know I’ve read many. After all, I’ve been reading romances for over 40 years – grin.
    I haven’t run across Tracy Grant’s books before so I’ll have to look for one now.

    Reply
  129. No one governess story comes to mind right now, even though I know I’ve read many. After all, I’ve been reading romances for over 40 years – grin.
    I haven’t run across Tracy Grant’s books before so I’ll have to look for one now.

    Reply
  130. No one governess story comes to mind right now, even though I know I’ve read many. After all, I’ve been reading romances for over 40 years – grin.
    I haven’t run across Tracy Grant’s books before so I’ll have to look for one now.

    Reply
  131. Excellent point about the timing, Nancy :-). The murder Laura is accused of happens in them middle of the night, and Laura has slipped out of the house under mysterious circumstances. When she asks her employers, Malcolm and Suzanne, if they think she was the mistress of the duke she is accused of having murdered, Suzanne replies, “It’s difficult to see how you’d have had time for it.”

    Reply
  132. Excellent point about the timing, Nancy :-). The murder Laura is accused of happens in them middle of the night, and Laura has slipped out of the house under mysterious circumstances. When she asks her employers, Malcolm and Suzanne, if they think she was the mistress of the duke she is accused of having murdered, Suzanne replies, “It’s difficult to see how you’d have had time for it.”

    Reply
  133. Excellent point about the timing, Nancy :-). The murder Laura is accused of happens in them middle of the night, and Laura has slipped out of the house under mysterious circumstances. When she asks her employers, Malcolm and Suzanne, if they think she was the mistress of the duke she is accused of having murdered, Suzanne replies, “It’s difficult to see how you’d have had time for it.”

    Reply
  134. Excellent point about the timing, Nancy :-). The murder Laura is accused of happens in them middle of the night, and Laura has slipped out of the house under mysterious circumstances. When she asks her employers, Malcolm and Suzanne, if they think she was the mistress of the duke she is accused of having murdered, Suzanne replies, “It’s difficult to see how you’d have had time for it.”

    Reply
  135. Excellent point about the timing, Nancy :-). The murder Laura is accused of happens in them middle of the night, and Laura has slipped out of the house under mysterious circumstances. When she asks her employers, Malcolm and Suzanne, if they think she was the mistress of the duke she is accused of having murdered, Suzanne replies, “It’s difficult to see how you’d have had time for it.”

    Reply
  136. I’m a bit late, because it is summertime, but besides the great ones already mentioned, Liz Carlyle wrote a couple of books with governess heroines, “Beauty Like the Night” and “One Touch of Scandal”. Like all her books, these have strong heroines and are very intense, emotional stories. Also, there’s a heroine masquerading as a governess in “A Question of Honor” by Nita Abrams, whose books remind me of Tracy’s a bit, as they are also spy stories.
    I’ve enjoyed all of the Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch series, and I definitely intend to read “The Mayfair Affair” soon!

    Reply
  137. I’m a bit late, because it is summertime, but besides the great ones already mentioned, Liz Carlyle wrote a couple of books with governess heroines, “Beauty Like the Night” and “One Touch of Scandal”. Like all her books, these have strong heroines and are very intense, emotional stories. Also, there’s a heroine masquerading as a governess in “A Question of Honor” by Nita Abrams, whose books remind me of Tracy’s a bit, as they are also spy stories.
    I’ve enjoyed all of the Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch series, and I definitely intend to read “The Mayfair Affair” soon!

    Reply
  138. I’m a bit late, because it is summertime, but besides the great ones already mentioned, Liz Carlyle wrote a couple of books with governess heroines, “Beauty Like the Night” and “One Touch of Scandal”. Like all her books, these have strong heroines and are very intense, emotional stories. Also, there’s a heroine masquerading as a governess in “A Question of Honor” by Nita Abrams, whose books remind me of Tracy’s a bit, as they are also spy stories.
    I’ve enjoyed all of the Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch series, and I definitely intend to read “The Mayfair Affair” soon!

    Reply
  139. I’m a bit late, because it is summertime, but besides the great ones already mentioned, Liz Carlyle wrote a couple of books with governess heroines, “Beauty Like the Night” and “One Touch of Scandal”. Like all her books, these have strong heroines and are very intense, emotional stories. Also, there’s a heroine masquerading as a governess in “A Question of Honor” by Nita Abrams, whose books remind me of Tracy’s a bit, as they are also spy stories.
    I’ve enjoyed all of the Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch series, and I definitely intend to read “The Mayfair Affair” soon!

    Reply
  140. I’m a bit late, because it is summertime, but besides the great ones already mentioned, Liz Carlyle wrote a couple of books with governess heroines, “Beauty Like the Night” and “One Touch of Scandal”. Like all her books, these have strong heroines and are very intense, emotional stories. Also, there’s a heroine masquerading as a governess in “A Question of Honor” by Nita Abrams, whose books remind me of Tracy’s a bit, as they are also spy stories.
    I’ve enjoyed all of the Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch series, and I definitely intend to read “The Mayfair Affair” soon!

    Reply
  141. I think my favourite governess story is Agnes Grey (1847), written by Anne Brontë. It’s not so passionate as Jane Eyre but more thoughtful, there’s more class-awareness, I think.

    Reply
  142. I think my favourite governess story is Agnes Grey (1847), written by Anne Brontë. It’s not so passionate as Jane Eyre but more thoughtful, there’s more class-awareness, I think.

    Reply
  143. I think my favourite governess story is Agnes Grey (1847), written by Anne Brontë. It’s not so passionate as Jane Eyre but more thoughtful, there’s more class-awareness, I think.

    Reply
  144. I think my favourite governess story is Agnes Grey (1847), written by Anne Brontë. It’s not so passionate as Jane Eyre but more thoughtful, there’s more class-awareness, I think.

    Reply
  145. I think my favourite governess story is Agnes Grey (1847), written by Anne Brontë. It’s not so passionate as Jane Eyre but more thoughtful, there’s more class-awareness, I think.

    Reply
  146. I too love Agnes Grey and have read it many times. My favourite Bronte novel. My all time fav though is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer. Just read it recently again.

    Reply
  147. I too love Agnes Grey and have read it many times. My favourite Bronte novel. My all time fav though is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer. Just read it recently again.

    Reply
  148. I too love Agnes Grey and have read it many times. My favourite Bronte novel. My all time fav though is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer. Just read it recently again.

    Reply
  149. I too love Agnes Grey and have read it many times. My favourite Bronte novel. My all time fav though is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer. Just read it recently again.

    Reply
  150. I too love Agnes Grey and have read it many times. My favourite Bronte novel. My all time fav though is The Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer. Just read it recently again.

    Reply

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