Welcome Karen Harper & The Irish Princess

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Just in time for Saint Patrick's Day, we have an Irish treat for historical fiction fans! The Wenches are pleased to welcome back the amazing Karen Harper, whose newest historical fiction release, THE IRISH PRINCESS, is now out in trade paperback from NAL. Deeply researched and as fascinating as all of Karen's books, this tale of Irishwoman Elizabeth Fitzgerald and Queen Elizabeth I's court is, according to Publishers Weekly, a "skillfully fleshed-out tale of an adventurous young woman coming-of-age inside a court constantly on edge."

Irish_princess Here's what Karen has to say about THE IRISH PRINCESS:   
 
It was partly a trip to Ireland and partly my stumbling on an intriguing woman while I was researching another book that pointed my way to my latest Tudor-era historical novel, THE IRISH PRINCESS.  My husband and I had a wonderful trip to Ireland several years ago.  Although I am an Anglophile at heart and am a product of English and Scottish heritage (I even did Scottish Highland Dancing for years), I fell in love with Ireland and the Irish.
 
Of course we did all the usual stops:  kissed the Blarney stone—all authors are, of necessity, full of blarney.  We visited Cardiff Castle, did the Ring of Kerry, and Blarneycastle
toured old Dublin town where I walked into a bookstore that actually carried my books.  But at that time, although I looked for an Irish heroine as a hook for a book, I didn’t find one.
 
Fitzgerald,elizabeth(resized) But later when I was researching Queen Elizabeth I’s ladies-in-waiting for THE QUEEN’S GOVERNESS, I stumbled on the fact she had a long-time Irish friend, a celebrated beauty, at that.  The poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, had written a poem extolling ‘the Fair Geraldine,’ a woman named Elizabeth (nickname Gera) Fitzgerald, whose family had been called “the uncrowned kings of Ireland” and had been brutally ruined by King Henry VIII.
 
What gives, I thought.  Elizabeth Tudor mistrusted the Irish.  Beautiful women around her (and another redhead!) always made her nervous.  Was this another example of the unspoken Tudor practice that, if a powerful family threatens your throne, kill off the men and keep the women close so you can keep an eye on them?
 
But then I found what I call “a telling detail” about the these two Elizabeths.  The queen once sent Gera Fitzgerald to the Tower for ‘plainspeaking to the queen.’  Yet Gera was released almost immediately and was back in the queen’s good graces.  Stranger yet, at least once, Gera commanded a ship which captured pirates who were taking French ships and giving the queen a bad name.
 
200px-Edward,_Lord_Clinton,_by_Hans_Holbein_the_Younger Aha, I had to write a book about this Irish woman, the “uncrowned princess of Ireland.”  What a dynamic woman she must have been.  And to top it off, I found she had a bittersweet romance (yes, with a happy ending, a sine qua non for me) with a dashing, swashbuckling English hero, Edward Clinton, the Lord High Admiral of the English Navy.  Look out Johnny Depp!
 
But research wasn’t easy.  I had to “find” Gera in books about other people.  With the exception of her once hated rival and later longtime friend Elizabeth Tudor, I discovered Gera’s story through reading about the men whose lives she touched:  her husband, her father and her brother whose rebellion brought the wrath of the Tudors down on her family and Ireland.
 
Of course, I’m writing faction, basing the book on fact but fictionalizing what I cannot find.  But I believe I stayed true to the real woman, and I was pleased to see that Gera’s defiant face on the cover of THE IRISH PRINCESS is very close to her extant portraits.  Please check out more about Elizabeth Fitzgerald, the Irish Princess on my website www.KarenHarperAuthor.com.  And happy historical reading!

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Thank you, Karen — and best of luck with THE IRISH PRINCESS. (The Wenches love the term "faction," btw!) Happy Saint Patrick's Day to all! 

** Karen is giving away a copy of THE IRISH PRINCESS to a winner chosen at random from among those who leave comments! Be sure to post to this blog — you'll be entered to win!

 

 

100 thoughts on “Welcome Karen Harper & The Irish Princess”

  1. Karen, I can’t wait to read The Irish Princess. I’ve been in love with all things Irish since I was in my teens, and besides writing about Ireland, I’m always looking for new stories to read about my beloved Emerald Isle. Gera seems like a Irish heroine worthy of the name!
    Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you and all the wenches. Now I need to make sure I have all the ingredients for tomorrow night’s beef and Guinness stew!

    Reply
  2. Karen, I can’t wait to read The Irish Princess. I’ve been in love with all things Irish since I was in my teens, and besides writing about Ireland, I’m always looking for new stories to read about my beloved Emerald Isle. Gera seems like a Irish heroine worthy of the name!
    Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you and all the wenches. Now I need to make sure I have all the ingredients for tomorrow night’s beef and Guinness stew!

    Reply
  3. Karen, I can’t wait to read The Irish Princess. I’ve been in love with all things Irish since I was in my teens, and besides writing about Ireland, I’m always looking for new stories to read about my beloved Emerald Isle. Gera seems like a Irish heroine worthy of the name!
    Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you and all the wenches. Now I need to make sure I have all the ingredients for tomorrow night’s beef and Guinness stew!

    Reply
  4. Karen, I can’t wait to read The Irish Princess. I’ve been in love with all things Irish since I was in my teens, and besides writing about Ireland, I’m always looking for new stories to read about my beloved Emerald Isle. Gera seems like a Irish heroine worthy of the name!
    Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you and all the wenches. Now I need to make sure I have all the ingredients for tomorrow night’s beef and Guinness stew!

    Reply
  5. Karen, I can’t wait to read The Irish Princess. I’ve been in love with all things Irish since I was in my teens, and besides writing about Ireland, I’m always looking for new stories to read about my beloved Emerald Isle. Gera seems like a Irish heroine worthy of the name!
    Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you and all the wenches. Now I need to make sure I have all the ingredients for tomorrow night’s beef and Guinness stew!

    Reply
  6. What a stunning cover! And a real woman who commanded ships. I can’t wait to read this one.
    Isn’t it amazing how women, no matter how strong and brilliant, were not considered important enough to write about in those times? It’s rather sad that we have to dig out their lives from second hand sources.
    But I’m glad there are authors like you willing to do the work for lazy people like me! Thanks for stopping by, Karen.

    Reply
  7. What a stunning cover! And a real woman who commanded ships. I can’t wait to read this one.
    Isn’t it amazing how women, no matter how strong and brilliant, were not considered important enough to write about in those times? It’s rather sad that we have to dig out their lives from second hand sources.
    But I’m glad there are authors like you willing to do the work for lazy people like me! Thanks for stopping by, Karen.

    Reply
  8. What a stunning cover! And a real woman who commanded ships. I can’t wait to read this one.
    Isn’t it amazing how women, no matter how strong and brilliant, were not considered important enough to write about in those times? It’s rather sad that we have to dig out their lives from second hand sources.
    But I’m glad there are authors like you willing to do the work for lazy people like me! Thanks for stopping by, Karen.

    Reply
  9. What a stunning cover! And a real woman who commanded ships. I can’t wait to read this one.
    Isn’t it amazing how women, no matter how strong and brilliant, were not considered important enough to write about in those times? It’s rather sad that we have to dig out their lives from second hand sources.
    But I’m glad there are authors like you willing to do the work for lazy people like me! Thanks for stopping by, Karen.

    Reply
  10. What a stunning cover! And a real woman who commanded ships. I can’t wait to read this one.
    Isn’t it amazing how women, no matter how strong and brilliant, were not considered important enough to write about in those times? It’s rather sad that we have to dig out their lives from second hand sources.
    But I’m glad there are authors like you willing to do the work for lazy people like me! Thanks for stopping by, Karen.

    Reply
  11. What fascinating history. I’m surprised no one has written a biography of her.
    I love the Tudor period right down to the bones. What’s not to like? It was brimful of educated, forceful, intelligent and powerful women.

    Reply
  12. What fascinating history. I’m surprised no one has written a biography of her.
    I love the Tudor period right down to the bones. What’s not to like? It was brimful of educated, forceful, intelligent and powerful women.

    Reply
  13. What fascinating history. I’m surprised no one has written a biography of her.
    I love the Tudor period right down to the bones. What’s not to like? It was brimful of educated, forceful, intelligent and powerful women.

    Reply
  14. What fascinating history. I’m surprised no one has written a biography of her.
    I love the Tudor period right down to the bones. What’s not to like? It was brimful of educated, forceful, intelligent and powerful women.

    Reply
  15. What fascinating history. I’m surprised no one has written a biography of her.
    I love the Tudor period right down to the bones. What’s not to like? It was brimful of educated, forceful, intelligent and powerful women.

    Reply
  16. Karen, thank you for sharing this fascinating woman with us. I can see why you were captivated and wanted to tell her story.(Ah, another wonderful addition for the TBR pile.) I can’t thinking how many other unknown heroines are out there buried in history,just waiting for us to find them and tell their stories! (Oh, and what a wonderful cover)

    Reply
  17. Karen, thank you for sharing this fascinating woman with us. I can see why you were captivated and wanted to tell her story.(Ah, another wonderful addition for the TBR pile.) I can’t thinking how many other unknown heroines are out there buried in history,just waiting for us to find them and tell their stories! (Oh, and what a wonderful cover)

    Reply
  18. Karen, thank you for sharing this fascinating woman with us. I can see why you were captivated and wanted to tell her story.(Ah, another wonderful addition for the TBR pile.) I can’t thinking how many other unknown heroines are out there buried in history,just waiting for us to find them and tell their stories! (Oh, and what a wonderful cover)

    Reply
  19. Karen, thank you for sharing this fascinating woman with us. I can see why you were captivated and wanted to tell her story.(Ah, another wonderful addition for the TBR pile.) I can’t thinking how many other unknown heroines are out there buried in history,just waiting for us to find them and tell their stories! (Oh, and what a wonderful cover)

    Reply
  20. Karen, thank you for sharing this fascinating woman with us. I can see why you were captivated and wanted to tell her story.(Ah, another wonderful addition for the TBR pile.) I can’t thinking how many other unknown heroines are out there buried in history,just waiting for us to find them and tell their stories! (Oh, and what a wonderful cover)

    Reply
  21. I love learning about women who really make history–and how frustrating that we can only learn about them from what we read in the books about men. *LOL* Still, she must have been quite the tornado to have been noted in many history books of various male relatives. *LOL*
    Can’t wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  22. I love learning about women who really make history–and how frustrating that we can only learn about them from what we read in the books about men. *LOL* Still, she must have been quite the tornado to have been noted in many history books of various male relatives. *LOL*
    Can’t wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  23. I love learning about women who really make history–and how frustrating that we can only learn about them from what we read in the books about men. *LOL* Still, she must have been quite the tornado to have been noted in many history books of various male relatives. *LOL*
    Can’t wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  24. I love learning about women who really make history–and how frustrating that we can only learn about them from what we read in the books about men. *LOL* Still, she must have been quite the tornado to have been noted in many history books of various male relatives. *LOL*
    Can’t wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  25. I love learning about women who really make history–and how frustrating that we can only learn about them from what we read in the books about men. *LOL* Still, she must have been quite the tornado to have been noted in many history books of various male relatives. *LOL*
    Can’t wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  26. I have to read this one just for the fact that she commanded a ship! Women didn’t do that. Unless they were queens, they were fashioned to be see and bedded, but never heard from.

    Reply
  27. I have to read this one just for the fact that she commanded a ship! Women didn’t do that. Unless they were queens, they were fashioned to be see and bedded, but never heard from.

    Reply
  28. I have to read this one just for the fact that she commanded a ship! Women didn’t do that. Unless they were queens, they were fashioned to be see and bedded, but never heard from.

    Reply
  29. I have to read this one just for the fact that she commanded a ship! Women didn’t do that. Unless they were queens, they were fashioned to be see and bedded, but never heard from.

    Reply
  30. I have to read this one just for the fact that she commanded a ship! Women didn’t do that. Unless they were queens, they were fashioned to be see and bedded, but never heard from.

    Reply
  31. I enjoy Irish history, especially the women’s stories. I’m looking forward to reading The Irish Princess. By the way, the cover is stunning, love that hair.

    Reply
  32. I enjoy Irish history, especially the women’s stories. I’m looking forward to reading The Irish Princess. By the way, the cover is stunning, love that hair.

    Reply
  33. I enjoy Irish history, especially the women’s stories. I’m looking forward to reading The Irish Princess. By the way, the cover is stunning, love that hair.

    Reply
  34. I enjoy Irish history, especially the women’s stories. I’m looking forward to reading The Irish Princess. By the way, the cover is stunning, love that hair.

    Reply
  35. I enjoy Irish history, especially the women’s stories. I’m looking forward to reading The Irish Princess. By the way, the cover is stunning, love that hair.

    Reply
  36. I LOVE books like this, with a heroine who was a real woman in every sense of the word. Plain speaking indeed! Any woman who could hold her own with Elizabeth Tudor is a woman well worth knowing. And that cover is gorgeous. Can’t wait to read this book and thank you, Karen, for digging through those books to bring such a great character to life.

    Reply
  37. I LOVE books like this, with a heroine who was a real woman in every sense of the word. Plain speaking indeed! Any woman who could hold her own with Elizabeth Tudor is a woman well worth knowing. And that cover is gorgeous. Can’t wait to read this book and thank you, Karen, for digging through those books to bring such a great character to life.

    Reply
  38. I LOVE books like this, with a heroine who was a real woman in every sense of the word. Plain speaking indeed! Any woman who could hold her own with Elizabeth Tudor is a woman well worth knowing. And that cover is gorgeous. Can’t wait to read this book and thank you, Karen, for digging through those books to bring such a great character to life.

    Reply
  39. I LOVE books like this, with a heroine who was a real woman in every sense of the word. Plain speaking indeed! Any woman who could hold her own with Elizabeth Tudor is a woman well worth knowing. And that cover is gorgeous. Can’t wait to read this book and thank you, Karen, for digging through those books to bring such a great character to life.

    Reply
  40. I LOVE books like this, with a heroine who was a real woman in every sense of the word. Plain speaking indeed! Any woman who could hold her own with Elizabeth Tudor is a woman well worth knowing. And that cover is gorgeous. Can’t wait to read this book and thank you, Karen, for digging through those books to bring such a great character to life.

    Reply
  41. I love books that make women who are history’s footnotes the stars of their own stories. Thank you for The Irish Princess. I’ve already read and reviewed it and found it a wonderful read–from the dramatic opening scene through the final scene, an HEA that satisfied the romance reader in me.

    Reply
  42. I love books that make women who are history’s footnotes the stars of their own stories. Thank you for The Irish Princess. I’ve already read and reviewed it and found it a wonderful read–from the dramatic opening scene through the final scene, an HEA that satisfied the romance reader in me.

    Reply
  43. I love books that make women who are history’s footnotes the stars of their own stories. Thank you for The Irish Princess. I’ve already read and reviewed it and found it a wonderful read–from the dramatic opening scene through the final scene, an HEA that satisfied the romance reader in me.

    Reply
  44. I love books that make women who are history’s footnotes the stars of their own stories. Thank you for The Irish Princess. I’ve already read and reviewed it and found it a wonderful read–from the dramatic opening scene through the final scene, an HEA that satisfied the romance reader in me.

    Reply
  45. I love books that make women who are history’s footnotes the stars of their own stories. Thank you for The Irish Princess. I’ve already read and reviewed it and found it a wonderful read–from the dramatic opening scene through the final scene, an HEA that satisfied the romance reader in me.

    Reply
  46. Karen, I am an avid reader of Historical Romance and anything to do with the Irish, English and Scottish. I can hardly wait to start reading “The Irish Princess”. I am not Irish that I know of, but we raise and breed Irish Setters and look forward to returning to Ireland to see the beautiful redheads in there homeland. Keep these fabulous books of wonderul information and history coming, one can never get enough, one can never stop learning.

    Reply
  47. Karen, I am an avid reader of Historical Romance and anything to do with the Irish, English and Scottish. I can hardly wait to start reading “The Irish Princess”. I am not Irish that I know of, but we raise and breed Irish Setters and look forward to returning to Ireland to see the beautiful redheads in there homeland. Keep these fabulous books of wonderul information and history coming, one can never get enough, one can never stop learning.

    Reply
  48. Karen, I am an avid reader of Historical Romance and anything to do with the Irish, English and Scottish. I can hardly wait to start reading “The Irish Princess”. I am not Irish that I know of, but we raise and breed Irish Setters and look forward to returning to Ireland to see the beautiful redheads in there homeland. Keep these fabulous books of wonderul information and history coming, one can never get enough, one can never stop learning.

    Reply
  49. Karen, I am an avid reader of Historical Romance and anything to do with the Irish, English and Scottish. I can hardly wait to start reading “The Irish Princess”. I am not Irish that I know of, but we raise and breed Irish Setters and look forward to returning to Ireland to see the beautiful redheads in there homeland. Keep these fabulous books of wonderul information and history coming, one can never get enough, one can never stop learning.

    Reply
  50. Karen, I am an avid reader of Historical Romance and anything to do with the Irish, English and Scottish. I can hardly wait to start reading “The Irish Princess”. I am not Irish that I know of, but we raise and breed Irish Setters and look forward to returning to Ireland to see the beautiful redheads in there homeland. Keep these fabulous books of wonderul information and history coming, one can never get enough, one can never stop learning.

    Reply
  51. Congratulations Karen on the new book. Gera sounds like a fascinating subject and someone I would like to learn more about.

    Reply
  52. Congratulations Karen on the new book. Gera sounds like a fascinating subject and someone I would like to learn more about.

    Reply
  53. Congratulations Karen on the new book. Gera sounds like a fascinating subject and someone I would like to learn more about.

    Reply
  54. Congratulations Karen on the new book. Gera sounds like a fascinating subject and someone I would like to learn more about.

    Reply
  55. Congratulations Karen on the new book. Gera sounds like a fascinating subject and someone I would like to learn more about.

    Reply
  56. Karen–
    Welcome once more to Wenchdom, and what an utterly fascinating woman you’ve found! Again! Thanks for letting me know that her romance does have a happy ending. I’ve very romanceye that way. *g*

    Reply
  57. Karen–
    Welcome once more to Wenchdom, and what an utterly fascinating woman you’ve found! Again! Thanks for letting me know that her romance does have a happy ending. I’ve very romanceye that way. *g*

    Reply
  58. Karen–
    Welcome once more to Wenchdom, and what an utterly fascinating woman you’ve found! Again! Thanks for letting me know that her romance does have a happy ending. I’ve very romanceye that way. *g*

    Reply
  59. Karen–
    Welcome once more to Wenchdom, and what an utterly fascinating woman you’ve found! Again! Thanks for letting me know that her romance does have a happy ending. I’ve very romanceye that way. *g*

    Reply
  60. Karen–
    Welcome once more to Wenchdom, and what an utterly fascinating woman you’ve found! Again! Thanks for letting me know that her romance does have a happy ending. I’ve very romanceye that way. *g*

    Reply
  61. Ah, I love strong women & being an American of Irish decent, of course, I love the theme of your book! A strong “Irish Princess”..she rocks!! Karen, have loved your previous books & I’m looking forward to reading this one.

    Reply
  62. Ah, I love strong women & being an American of Irish decent, of course, I love the theme of your book! A strong “Irish Princess”..she rocks!! Karen, have loved your previous books & I’m looking forward to reading this one.

    Reply
  63. Ah, I love strong women & being an American of Irish decent, of course, I love the theme of your book! A strong “Irish Princess”..she rocks!! Karen, have loved your previous books & I’m looking forward to reading this one.

    Reply
  64. Ah, I love strong women & being an American of Irish decent, of course, I love the theme of your book! A strong “Irish Princess”..she rocks!! Karen, have loved your previous books & I’m looking forward to reading this one.

    Reply
  65. Ah, I love strong women & being an American of Irish decent, of course, I love the theme of your book! A strong “Irish Princess”..she rocks!! Karen, have loved your previous books & I’m looking forward to reading this one.

    Reply
  66. My main reading focus is on English and Scotish historical romance but recently I read A Bride in the Bargain by Deeanne Gist which is set just after the Civil War. Since my husband loves to read American Revolutionary and Civil War history it was fascinating to read about a woman who left after the war and headed to the Northwest.
    I love reading books that have a strong female character (of course a few faults or weaknesses can also make them more interestging).

    Reply
  67. My main reading focus is on English and Scotish historical romance but recently I read A Bride in the Bargain by Deeanne Gist which is set just after the Civil War. Since my husband loves to read American Revolutionary and Civil War history it was fascinating to read about a woman who left after the war and headed to the Northwest.
    I love reading books that have a strong female character (of course a few faults or weaknesses can also make them more interestging).

    Reply
  68. My main reading focus is on English and Scotish historical romance but recently I read A Bride in the Bargain by Deeanne Gist which is set just after the Civil War. Since my husband loves to read American Revolutionary and Civil War history it was fascinating to read about a woman who left after the war and headed to the Northwest.
    I love reading books that have a strong female character (of course a few faults or weaknesses can also make them more interestging).

    Reply
  69. My main reading focus is on English and Scotish historical romance but recently I read A Bride in the Bargain by Deeanne Gist which is set just after the Civil War. Since my husband loves to read American Revolutionary and Civil War history it was fascinating to read about a woman who left after the war and headed to the Northwest.
    I love reading books that have a strong female character (of course a few faults or weaknesses can also make them more interestging).

    Reply
  70. My main reading focus is on English and Scotish historical romance but recently I read A Bride in the Bargain by Deeanne Gist which is set just after the Civil War. Since my husband loves to read American Revolutionary and Civil War history it was fascinating to read about a woman who left after the war and headed to the Northwest.
    I love reading books that have a strong female character (of course a few faults or weaknesses can also make them more interestging).

    Reply
  71. I have always wanted to travel to Ireland, but since it’s not possible I love reading books about Ireland! The Irish Princess sounds like such a book.The scenery is so so green. WOW!
    Thanks!
    Rebecca
    rbooth43(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  72. I have always wanted to travel to Ireland, but since it’s not possible I love reading books about Ireland! The Irish Princess sounds like such a book.The scenery is so so green. WOW!
    Thanks!
    Rebecca
    rbooth43(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  73. I have always wanted to travel to Ireland, but since it’s not possible I love reading books about Ireland! The Irish Princess sounds like such a book.The scenery is so so green. WOW!
    Thanks!
    Rebecca
    rbooth43(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  74. I have always wanted to travel to Ireland, but since it’s not possible I love reading books about Ireland! The Irish Princess sounds like such a book.The scenery is so so green. WOW!
    Thanks!
    Rebecca
    rbooth43(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  75. I have always wanted to travel to Ireland, but since it’s not possible I love reading books about Ireland! The Irish Princess sounds like such a book.The scenery is so so green. WOW!
    Thanks!
    Rebecca
    rbooth43(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  76. Hi, Karen, I read the title of this book elsewhere and intended to find it. Your further explanations here have whetted my appetite even more. I’ve read several of your Elizabeth I mysteries as well as The Queen’s Governess and enjoyed all of them very much. I’m trying to find the others, as well as The Irish Princess. I know I’ll enjoy them.

    Reply
  77. Hi, Karen, I read the title of this book elsewhere and intended to find it. Your further explanations here have whetted my appetite even more. I’ve read several of your Elizabeth I mysteries as well as The Queen’s Governess and enjoyed all of them very much. I’m trying to find the others, as well as The Irish Princess. I know I’ll enjoy them.

    Reply
  78. Hi, Karen, I read the title of this book elsewhere and intended to find it. Your further explanations here have whetted my appetite even more. I’ve read several of your Elizabeth I mysteries as well as The Queen’s Governess and enjoyed all of them very much. I’m trying to find the others, as well as The Irish Princess. I know I’ll enjoy them.

    Reply
  79. Hi, Karen, I read the title of this book elsewhere and intended to find it. Your further explanations here have whetted my appetite even more. I’ve read several of your Elizabeth I mysteries as well as The Queen’s Governess and enjoyed all of them very much. I’m trying to find the others, as well as The Irish Princess. I know I’ll enjoy them.

    Reply
  80. Hi, Karen, I read the title of this book elsewhere and intended to find it. Your further explanations here have whetted my appetite even more. I’ve read several of your Elizabeth I mysteries as well as The Queen’s Governess and enjoyed all of them very much. I’m trying to find the others, as well as The Irish Princess. I know I’ll enjoy them.

    Reply

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