Guest Deanna Raybourn on Intrepid Heroines and Perilous Undertakings

APU_CoverRevealAndrea/Cara here, I’m delighted to kick off the new year with a bang—and a swoosh (you'll see why in a moment)—by welcoming the incomparable Deanna Raybourn as our guest on the Wenches. As most of you know, Deanna has won scads of awards and accolades for her writing, including the RITA. (For Deanna’s full bio, you can click here.) Her books feature a scintillating combination of mystery and romance, rich with intriguing characters and witty dialogue. Her settings take readers around the world—the Lady Julia series (fluttery fan-girl sigh) journeys through Victorian England, Europe and India, while A Spear of Summer Grass takes readers to Africa in the 1920s. With her new Veronica Speedwell series, (more fluttery fan girl sighs) Deanna returns to Victorian times—and the marvelously eccentric adventuring that only she can create. The second book in the series, A Perilous Undertaking, releases tomorrow (if you haven't met Veronica yet, you are in for a treat!) , and—well, I’ll now turn the pen over to Deanna and let her tell you more about it!

Raybourn MS-150 RET 3Deanna here, Oh, how I love a bit of banter between an intrepid heroine and a stubborn hero! In the case of my sleuthing pair, Veronica Speedwell and the Honourable Revelstoke Templeton-Vane, they are usually at it hammer and tongs—even on page one. In the opening of their second mystery together, A PERILOUS UNDERTAKING, Stoker is attempting to teach Veronica a few useful self-defense skills. Little does he realize, Veronica is even more adept and experienced than he is…



Chapter One
London, September 1887

“For the love of all that is holy, Veronica, the object is to maim or kill, not tickle,” Stoker informed me, clipping the words sharply as he handed me a knife. “Do it again.”
     I suppressed a sigh and took the knife, grasping it lightly as I had been taught. I faced the target, staring it down as if it were an approaching lion.
      “You are thinking too much.” Stoker folded his arms over the breadth of his chest and looked down his nose at me. “The entire purpose of this exercise is to train you to react, not to think. When your life is in danger, your body must know what to do, because there is no time for your mind to engage.”
      I turned to face him, not lowering the blade. “Might I remind you that I have, upon many and various occasions, been in mortal danger and I am still here.”
     “Anyone can get lucky,” he said coldly. “And I suspect your continued survival owes itself to a combination of good fortune and sheer bloody-mindedness. You are too stubborn to die.”
      “You are a fine one to talk!” I retorted. “It is not as if that scar upon your face were a love bite from a kitten.”
      His lips tightened. I found it entertaining that such a hardened man of the world could have gained so much experience as scientist, explorer, natural historian, naval surgeon, and taxidermist and still let himself be nettled by a woman half his size. The thin, silvered scar that trailed from brow to jaw on one side of his face was not at all disfiguring. Quite the opposite, in fact. But it was a constant reminder of the failed Amazonian expedition that had destroyed his career and his marriage and nearly ended his life. It was not entirely sporting of me to mention it, but we had begun to pluck one another’s nerves in recent days, and it had been his idea to train me in the combative arts as a way to exorcise our bad tempers. It almost worked, not least because I pretended to be entirely inexperienced in the matter. Men, I had often observed, were never happier than when they believed they were imparting wisdom.

1840_DarwinRichmondStoker is clearly not the typical Victorian male, and Veronica is no timid shrinking violet. And yet they are both based on composites of my favorite research topic—Victorian explorers! Veronica owes her inspiration to Margaret Fountaine, a lepidopterist who traveled the globe hunting butterflies and men with equal vigor, while Stoker shares much with Charles Darwin and Thomas Henry Huxley as well as Carl Akeley, natural historians who set off to see the world.

Fountaine_serengetiUnlike modern scientists who often work in minutely specialized fields, 19th-century natural historians were jacks- and jill-of-all-trades. They mapped out their adventures, traveling to remote and dangerous parts of the world that had never been fully explored. They collected specimens and experiences, sleeping rough and accepting hardships cheerfully. Discarding the expectations of polite society, the ladies packed up their parasols and petticoats, determined to equal—and in many cases surpass—the stamina and courage of the men. They ran the gamut from travelers who brought dozens of trunks and insisted on putting out the best china to those who carried a single carpetbag and got by on their wits and healthy doses of luck and castor oil.

ButterflyWhether butterfly hunters or archaeologists, botanists or cartographers, they were indefatigable in their quest for knowledge, but it was their commitment to a different sort of life that truly sets them apart from other Victorians. They rejected the conventional notions of hearth and home in favor of the dirt and dangers of travel at a time when it could take months to circumnavigate the globe and there were no guarantees of a safe return. Some were motivated by the lure of the unknown, some by the promise of better health in a different climate, Explorer 3some by the desperate need to flee the burden of expectation. Whatever their reasons for going, they went—and in going, they are our guides to the natural world in the 19th-century. Through journals, letters, memoirs, lectures, and articles, they shared their experiences, and reading their accounts is like walking hand in hand with them through the most arduous and inspiring of their travels. It’s not surprising then that when it came time for me to create a new heroine, I turned to some of the most exciting, creative, and daring women in history—the explorers.

(To read the first four chapters of A PERILOUS UNDERTAKING, click here.)

If you had the chance to travel with any Victorian explorer, what part of the world would you like to see? And would you be content with just a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream? Or would you pack a canvas bathtub and the silver tea set? Deanna has graciously offered to send a signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking to one lucky winner, chosen at random from those who leave a comment!

305 thoughts on “Guest Deanna Raybourn on Intrepid Heroines and Perilous Undertakings”

  1. While I enjoy reading about adventures, I would not be tempted to travel to these places myself. However, if I did, that canvas bathtub sounds like a good idea, but I think I’d leave the good china at home.

    Reply
  2. While I enjoy reading about adventures, I would not be tempted to travel to these places myself. However, if I did, that canvas bathtub sounds like a good idea, but I think I’d leave the good china at home.

    Reply
  3. While I enjoy reading about adventures, I would not be tempted to travel to these places myself. However, if I did, that canvas bathtub sounds like a good idea, but I think I’d leave the good china at home.

    Reply
  4. While I enjoy reading about adventures, I would not be tempted to travel to these places myself. However, if I did, that canvas bathtub sounds like a good idea, but I think I’d leave the good china at home.

    Reply
  5. While I enjoy reading about adventures, I would not be tempted to travel to these places myself. However, if I did, that canvas bathtub sounds like a good idea, but I think I’d leave the good china at home.

    Reply
  6. I’m more of a carpet bag & tin of tea traveler. It makes the pleasure of a good hotel visit more pronounced; esp if the room has deep tub and feather bedding. Less to haul also improves the travel experience. E-readers certainly reduced the weight of my bag.
    Love Veronica & Stoker!
    Off to read the first four chapters, and rummage the Internet about Margaret Fountaine.
    Thanks for a lovely post, and even more hours of reading happiness.

    Reply
  7. I’m more of a carpet bag & tin of tea traveler. It makes the pleasure of a good hotel visit more pronounced; esp if the room has deep tub and feather bedding. Less to haul also improves the travel experience. E-readers certainly reduced the weight of my bag.
    Love Veronica & Stoker!
    Off to read the first four chapters, and rummage the Internet about Margaret Fountaine.
    Thanks for a lovely post, and even more hours of reading happiness.

    Reply
  8. I’m more of a carpet bag & tin of tea traveler. It makes the pleasure of a good hotel visit more pronounced; esp if the room has deep tub and feather bedding. Less to haul also improves the travel experience. E-readers certainly reduced the weight of my bag.
    Love Veronica & Stoker!
    Off to read the first four chapters, and rummage the Internet about Margaret Fountaine.
    Thanks for a lovely post, and even more hours of reading happiness.

    Reply
  9. I’m more of a carpet bag & tin of tea traveler. It makes the pleasure of a good hotel visit more pronounced; esp if the room has deep tub and feather bedding. Less to haul also improves the travel experience. E-readers certainly reduced the weight of my bag.
    Love Veronica & Stoker!
    Off to read the first four chapters, and rummage the Internet about Margaret Fountaine.
    Thanks for a lovely post, and even more hours of reading happiness.

    Reply
  10. I’m more of a carpet bag & tin of tea traveler. It makes the pleasure of a good hotel visit more pronounced; esp if the room has deep tub and feather bedding. Less to haul also improves the travel experience. E-readers certainly reduced the weight of my bag.
    Love Veronica & Stoker!
    Off to read the first four chapters, and rummage the Internet about Margaret Fountaine.
    Thanks for a lovely post, and even more hours of reading happiness.

    Reply
  11. I’m not very adventurous. I quote JRR Tolkien, who said, “Adventures are nasty and uncomfortable things.” They also are much more pleasant to reflect on than experience. But I love reading about other peoples’ adventures as way of experiencing them vicariously.

    Reply
  12. I’m not very adventurous. I quote JRR Tolkien, who said, “Adventures are nasty and uncomfortable things.” They also are much more pleasant to reflect on than experience. But I love reading about other peoples’ adventures as way of experiencing them vicariously.

    Reply
  13. I’m not very adventurous. I quote JRR Tolkien, who said, “Adventures are nasty and uncomfortable things.” They also are much more pleasant to reflect on than experience. But I love reading about other peoples’ adventures as way of experiencing them vicariously.

    Reply
  14. I’m not very adventurous. I quote JRR Tolkien, who said, “Adventures are nasty and uncomfortable things.” They also are much more pleasant to reflect on than experience. But I love reading about other peoples’ adventures as way of experiencing them vicariously.

    Reply
  15. I’m not very adventurous. I quote JRR Tolkien, who said, “Adventures are nasty and uncomfortable things.” They also are much more pleasant to reflect on than experience. But I love reading about other peoples’ adventures as way of experiencing them vicariously.

    Reply
  16. Welcome back, Deanna! Panthers to pangolins! I share your fascination with Victorian explorers, and can’t believe that I missed Veronica Speedwell’s debut. This is a lack I must correct. *G* The possibilities for Victorian explorers are endless, and I look forward to seeing what you do with them.

    Reply
  17. Welcome back, Deanna! Panthers to pangolins! I share your fascination with Victorian explorers, and can’t believe that I missed Veronica Speedwell’s debut. This is a lack I must correct. *G* The possibilities for Victorian explorers are endless, and I look forward to seeing what you do with them.

    Reply
  18. Welcome back, Deanna! Panthers to pangolins! I share your fascination with Victorian explorers, and can’t believe that I missed Veronica Speedwell’s debut. This is a lack I must correct. *G* The possibilities for Victorian explorers are endless, and I look forward to seeing what you do with them.

    Reply
  19. Welcome back, Deanna! Panthers to pangolins! I share your fascination with Victorian explorers, and can’t believe that I missed Veronica Speedwell’s debut. This is a lack I must correct. *G* The possibilities for Victorian explorers are endless, and I look forward to seeing what you do with them.

    Reply
  20. Welcome back, Deanna! Panthers to pangolins! I share your fascination with Victorian explorers, and can’t believe that I missed Veronica Speedwell’s debut. This is a lack I must correct. *G* The possibilities for Victorian explorers are endless, and I look forward to seeing what you do with them.

    Reply
  21. Ha, ha, Mary. I done some mountain exploring out West, with only what I could carry on my back!So definitely no china, and there were lakes instead of bath tubs (but COLD!) It makes the one appreciate all the modern conveniences when one comes home!

    Reply
  22. Ha, ha, Mary. I done some mountain exploring out West, with only what I could carry on my back!So definitely no china, and there were lakes instead of bath tubs (but COLD!) It makes the one appreciate all the modern conveniences when one comes home!

    Reply
  23. Ha, ha, Mary. I done some mountain exploring out West, with only what I could carry on my back!So definitely no china, and there were lakes instead of bath tubs (but COLD!) It makes the one appreciate all the modern conveniences when one comes home!

    Reply
  24. Ha, ha, Mary. I done some mountain exploring out West, with only what I could carry on my back!So definitely no china, and there were lakes instead of bath tubs (but COLD!) It makes the one appreciate all the modern conveniences when one comes home!

    Reply
  25. Ha, ha, Mary. I done some mountain exploring out West, with only what I could carry on my back!So definitely no china, and there were lakes instead of bath tubs (but COLD!) It makes the one appreciate all the modern conveniences when one comes home!

    Reply
  26. I loved loved loved the first book in this series and cannot wait to read the second. If I was say 20 years younger I would be all for a Victorian adventure with a carpet bag and cold cream. I would love to explore Egypt like the victorians did. There was so much of the world to explore and discover in the late 1800’s that would have been so exciting!

    Reply
  27. I loved loved loved the first book in this series and cannot wait to read the second. If I was say 20 years younger I would be all for a Victorian adventure with a carpet bag and cold cream. I would love to explore Egypt like the victorians did. There was so much of the world to explore and discover in the late 1800’s that would have been so exciting!

    Reply
  28. I loved loved loved the first book in this series and cannot wait to read the second. If I was say 20 years younger I would be all for a Victorian adventure with a carpet bag and cold cream. I would love to explore Egypt like the victorians did. There was so much of the world to explore and discover in the late 1800’s that would have been so exciting!

    Reply
  29. I loved loved loved the first book in this series and cannot wait to read the second. If I was say 20 years younger I would be all for a Victorian adventure with a carpet bag and cold cream. I would love to explore Egypt like the victorians did. There was so much of the world to explore and discover in the late 1800’s that would have been so exciting!

    Reply
  30. I loved loved loved the first book in this series and cannot wait to read the second. If I was say 20 years younger I would be all for a Victorian adventure with a carpet bag and cold cream. I would love to explore Egypt like the victorians did. There was so much of the world to explore and discover in the late 1800’s that would have been so exciting!

    Reply
  31. I’m not much into roughing it and would want to take all of my creature comforts along with me on an adventure to Egypt. I love Deanna’s books.

    Reply
  32. I’m not much into roughing it and would want to take all of my creature comforts along with me on an adventure to Egypt. I love Deanna’s books.

    Reply
  33. I’m not much into roughing it and would want to take all of my creature comforts along with me on an adventure to Egypt. I love Deanna’s books.

    Reply
  34. I’m not much into roughing it and would want to take all of my creature comforts along with me on an adventure to Egypt. I love Deanna’s books.

    Reply
  35. I’m not much into roughing it and would want to take all of my creature comforts along with me on an adventure to Egypt. I love Deanna’s books.

    Reply
  36. I love that quote! It’s always amazing to me how resilient these travelers were in the face of nastiness and discomfort. I’d probably be fetal under a rock somewhere…

    Reply
  37. I love that quote! It’s always amazing to me how resilient these travelers were in the face of nastiness and discomfort. I’d probably be fetal under a rock somewhere…

    Reply
  38. I love that quote! It’s always amazing to me how resilient these travelers were in the face of nastiness and discomfort. I’d probably be fetal under a rock somewhere…

    Reply
  39. I love that quote! It’s always amazing to me how resilient these travelers were in the face of nastiness and discomfort. I’d probably be fetal under a rock somewhere…

    Reply
  40. I love that quote! It’s always amazing to me how resilient these travelers were in the face of nastiness and discomfort. I’d probably be fetal under a rock somewhere…

    Reply
  41. Delighted you’re enjoying, Shauna! There’s a great book by Amelia Edwards that you might enjoy–it details her trip along the Nile and is full of fabulous info.

    Reply
  42. Delighted you’re enjoying, Shauna! There’s a great book by Amelia Edwards that you might enjoy–it details her trip along the Nile and is full of fabulous info.

    Reply
  43. Delighted you’re enjoying, Shauna! There’s a great book by Amelia Edwards that you might enjoy–it details her trip along the Nile and is full of fabulous info.

    Reply
  44. Delighted you’re enjoying, Shauna! There’s a great book by Amelia Edwards that you might enjoy–it details her trip along the Nile and is full of fabulous info.

    Reply
  45. Delighted you’re enjoying, Shauna! There’s a great book by Amelia Edwards that you might enjoy–it details her trip along the Nile and is full of fabulous info.

    Reply
  46. I still travel with a print book, but having my e-reader makes me feel so secure that I’ll always have a back-up book! And thanks for the kind words.

    Reply
  47. I still travel with a print book, but having my e-reader makes me feel so secure that I’ll always have a back-up book! And thanks for the kind words.

    Reply
  48. I still travel with a print book, but having my e-reader makes me feel so secure that I’ll always have a back-up book! And thanks for the kind words.

    Reply
  49. I still travel with a print book, but having my e-reader makes me feel so secure that I’ll always have a back-up book! And thanks for the kind words.

    Reply
  50. I still travel with a print book, but having my e-reader makes me feel so secure that I’ll always have a back-up book! And thanks for the kind words.

    Reply
  51. For most of these travelers, once they packed up the bathtub, there wasn’t much point in leaving anything else behind! But it must have been so nice to get a hot soak on the road…

    Reply
  52. For most of these travelers, once they packed up the bathtub, there wasn’t much point in leaving anything else behind! But it must have been so nice to get a hot soak on the road…

    Reply
  53. For most of these travelers, once they packed up the bathtub, there wasn’t much point in leaving anything else behind! But it must have been so nice to get a hot soak on the road…

    Reply
  54. For most of these travelers, once they packed up the bathtub, there wasn’t much point in leaving anything else behind! But it must have been so nice to get a hot soak on the road…

    Reply
  55. For most of these travelers, once they packed up the bathtub, there wasn’t much point in leaving anything else behind! But it must have been so nice to get a hot soak on the road…

    Reply
  56. IRL, I have gone to a lot of the Middle East, and some places were more challenging than others. Some like Yemen are closed because of civil conflict. So if I were to chose some place to explore, I think it would be the Pacific Ocean islands. I know very little about them, except fabulous pictures. I know Darwin was especially inspired by Galapagos. And Indonesia sounds delightfully exotic. Plus with gale force winds from the arctic expected any day, I like thinking of warm, sunny places.

    Reply
  57. IRL, I have gone to a lot of the Middle East, and some places were more challenging than others. Some like Yemen are closed because of civil conflict. So if I were to chose some place to explore, I think it would be the Pacific Ocean islands. I know very little about them, except fabulous pictures. I know Darwin was especially inspired by Galapagos. And Indonesia sounds delightfully exotic. Plus with gale force winds from the arctic expected any day, I like thinking of warm, sunny places.

    Reply
  58. IRL, I have gone to a lot of the Middle East, and some places were more challenging than others. Some like Yemen are closed because of civil conflict. So if I were to chose some place to explore, I think it would be the Pacific Ocean islands. I know very little about them, except fabulous pictures. I know Darwin was especially inspired by Galapagos. And Indonesia sounds delightfully exotic. Plus with gale force winds from the arctic expected any day, I like thinking of warm, sunny places.

    Reply
  59. IRL, I have gone to a lot of the Middle East, and some places were more challenging than others. Some like Yemen are closed because of civil conflict. So if I were to chose some place to explore, I think it would be the Pacific Ocean islands. I know very little about them, except fabulous pictures. I know Darwin was especially inspired by Galapagos. And Indonesia sounds delightfully exotic. Plus with gale force winds from the arctic expected any day, I like thinking of warm, sunny places.

    Reply
  60. IRL, I have gone to a lot of the Middle East, and some places were more challenging than others. Some like Yemen are closed because of civil conflict. So if I were to chose some place to explore, I think it would be the Pacific Ocean islands. I know very little about them, except fabulous pictures. I know Darwin was especially inspired by Galapagos. And Indonesia sounds delightfully exotic. Plus with gale force winds from the arctic expected any day, I like thinking of warm, sunny places.

    Reply
  61. Lucky you on the Middle East, Shannon. There are a lot of places I’d love to visit, but right now it doesn’t seem a wise idea to travel there. The Pacific islands do look fascinating, as does Madagascar, another exotic spot that appeals to me. And yes, with frigid weather moving in where I am too, the tropics does sound tempting!

    Reply
  62. Lucky you on the Middle East, Shannon. There are a lot of places I’d love to visit, but right now it doesn’t seem a wise idea to travel there. The Pacific islands do look fascinating, as does Madagascar, another exotic spot that appeals to me. And yes, with frigid weather moving in where I am too, the tropics does sound tempting!

    Reply
  63. Lucky you on the Middle East, Shannon. There are a lot of places I’d love to visit, but right now it doesn’t seem a wise idea to travel there. The Pacific islands do look fascinating, as does Madagascar, another exotic spot that appeals to me. And yes, with frigid weather moving in where I am too, the tropics does sound tempting!

    Reply
  64. Lucky you on the Middle East, Shannon. There are a lot of places I’d love to visit, but right now it doesn’t seem a wise idea to travel there. The Pacific islands do look fascinating, as does Madagascar, another exotic spot that appeals to me. And yes, with frigid weather moving in where I am too, the tropics does sound tempting!

    Reply
  65. Lucky you on the Middle East, Shannon. There are a lot of places I’d love to visit, but right now it doesn’t seem a wise idea to travel there. The Pacific islands do look fascinating, as does Madagascar, another exotic spot that appeals to me. And yes, with frigid weather moving in where I am too, the tropics does sound tempting!

    Reply
  66. I can’t imagine packing all of those things and having to worry about them on a safari. I guess that with all of those porters going with you it wouldn’t be as much of a problem as I envision, but I still can’t imagine it. I will enjoy getting to know Veronica and Stoker.

    Reply
  67. I can’t imagine packing all of those things and having to worry about them on a safari. I guess that with all of those porters going with you it wouldn’t be as much of a problem as I envision, but I still can’t imagine it. I will enjoy getting to know Veronica and Stoker.

    Reply
  68. I can’t imagine packing all of those things and having to worry about them on a safari. I guess that with all of those porters going with you it wouldn’t be as much of a problem as I envision, but I still can’t imagine it. I will enjoy getting to know Veronica and Stoker.

    Reply
  69. I can’t imagine packing all of those things and having to worry about them on a safari. I guess that with all of those porters going with you it wouldn’t be as much of a problem as I envision, but I still can’t imagine it. I will enjoy getting to know Veronica and Stoker.

    Reply
  70. I can’t imagine packing all of those things and having to worry about them on a safari. I guess that with all of those porters going with you it wouldn’t be as much of a problem as I envision, but I still can’t imagine it. I will enjoy getting to know Veronica and Stoker.

    Reply
  71. I’d have to take the bathtub and perhaps the kitchen sink, also! I believe in over packing even for a long weekend. I’d love to win the signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking (and maybe take it on my own adventure to Hawaii!)

    Reply
  72. I’d have to take the bathtub and perhaps the kitchen sink, also! I believe in over packing even for a long weekend. I’d love to win the signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking (and maybe take it on my own adventure to Hawaii!)

    Reply
  73. I’d have to take the bathtub and perhaps the kitchen sink, also! I believe in over packing even for a long weekend. I’d love to win the signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking (and maybe take it on my own adventure to Hawaii!)

    Reply
  74. I’d have to take the bathtub and perhaps the kitchen sink, also! I believe in over packing even for a long weekend. I’d love to win the signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking (and maybe take it on my own adventure to Hawaii!)

    Reply
  75. I’d have to take the bathtub and perhaps the kitchen sink, also! I believe in over packing even for a long weekend. I’d love to win the signed copy of A Perilous Undertaking (and maybe take it on my own adventure to Hawaii!)

    Reply
  76. I would love to travel to South America with a Victorian explorer, especially if the said explore is Stoker. I would travel with a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream, and definitely pack a tin or two of tea. When I travel (in real life) I always pack tea bags of my favorite teas because the tea that is usually provided in hotels is not very good.

    Reply
  77. I would love to travel to South America with a Victorian explorer, especially if the said explore is Stoker. I would travel with a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream, and definitely pack a tin or two of tea. When I travel (in real life) I always pack tea bags of my favorite teas because the tea that is usually provided in hotels is not very good.

    Reply
  78. I would love to travel to South America with a Victorian explorer, especially if the said explore is Stoker. I would travel with a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream, and definitely pack a tin or two of tea. When I travel (in real life) I always pack tea bags of my favorite teas because the tea that is usually provided in hotels is not very good.

    Reply
  79. I would love to travel to South America with a Victorian explorer, especially if the said explore is Stoker. I would travel with a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream, and definitely pack a tin or two of tea. When I travel (in real life) I always pack tea bags of my favorite teas because the tea that is usually provided in hotels is not very good.

    Reply
  80. I would love to travel to South America with a Victorian explorer, especially if the said explore is Stoker. I would travel with a carpetbag and a jar of cold cream, and definitely pack a tin or two of tea. When I travel (in real life) I always pack tea bags of my favorite teas because the tea that is usually provided in hotels is not very good.

    Reply
  81. I was such a huge fan of the first book. I even bought a copy for my shelves which is saying something since my husband has asked me to only use my Kindle. Apparently he’s not thrilled with books covering all surfaces. Lol.
    I’d like to think I’d be able to travel lightly, but I doubt it. I might not NEED them, but I’d WANT luxuries. If I could travel anywhere with a Victorian explorer where would I go? I’m just not sure. Everywhere!

    Reply
  82. I was such a huge fan of the first book. I even bought a copy for my shelves which is saying something since my husband has asked me to only use my Kindle. Apparently he’s not thrilled with books covering all surfaces. Lol.
    I’d like to think I’d be able to travel lightly, but I doubt it. I might not NEED them, but I’d WANT luxuries. If I could travel anywhere with a Victorian explorer where would I go? I’m just not sure. Everywhere!

    Reply
  83. I was such a huge fan of the first book. I even bought a copy for my shelves which is saying something since my husband has asked me to only use my Kindle. Apparently he’s not thrilled with books covering all surfaces. Lol.
    I’d like to think I’d be able to travel lightly, but I doubt it. I might not NEED them, but I’d WANT luxuries. If I could travel anywhere with a Victorian explorer where would I go? I’m just not sure. Everywhere!

    Reply
  84. I was such a huge fan of the first book. I even bought a copy for my shelves which is saying something since my husband has asked me to only use my Kindle. Apparently he’s not thrilled with books covering all surfaces. Lol.
    I’d like to think I’d be able to travel lightly, but I doubt it. I might not NEED them, but I’d WANT luxuries. If I could travel anywhere with a Victorian explorer where would I go? I’m just not sure. Everywhere!

    Reply
  85. I was such a huge fan of the first book. I even bought a copy for my shelves which is saying something since my husband has asked me to only use my Kindle. Apparently he’s not thrilled with books covering all surfaces. Lol.
    I’d like to think I’d be able to travel lightly, but I doubt it. I might not NEED them, but I’d WANT luxuries. If I could travel anywhere with a Victorian explorer where would I go? I’m just not sure. Everywhere!

    Reply
  86. Shannon, your travel wish list sounds amazing! I have written books set in Damascus, so I envy anyone who has been able to travel in the Middle East. And I’ve had great fun reading about Darwin’s travels! It’s in homage to him that I have included a Galapagos tortoise in the novels…

    Reply
  87. Shannon, your travel wish list sounds amazing! I have written books set in Damascus, so I envy anyone who has been able to travel in the Middle East. And I’ve had great fun reading about Darwin’s travels! It’s in homage to him that I have included a Galapagos tortoise in the novels…

    Reply
  88. Shannon, your travel wish list sounds amazing! I have written books set in Damascus, so I envy anyone who has been able to travel in the Middle East. And I’ve had great fun reading about Darwin’s travels! It’s in homage to him that I have included a Galapagos tortoise in the novels…

    Reply
  89. Shannon, your travel wish list sounds amazing! I have written books set in Damascus, so I envy anyone who has been able to travel in the Middle East. And I’ve had great fun reading about Darwin’s travels! It’s in homage to him that I have included a Galapagos tortoise in the novels…

    Reply
  90. Shannon, your travel wish list sounds amazing! I have written books set in Damascus, so I envy anyone who has been able to travel in the Middle East. And I’ve had great fun reading about Darwin’s travels! It’s in homage to him that I have included a Galapagos tortoise in the novels…

    Reply
  91. Oh my goodness…traveling/adventuring in Victorian times? I’d definitely bring a bar of soap, a good pair of scissors (for domestic chores as well as self-defense), and a long length of cotton (towel, headscarf, privacy screen, bathrobe, neck-warmer, wadded-up travel pillow). So yes…I’d be the one to over-pack. Every time!

    Reply
  92. Oh my goodness…traveling/adventuring in Victorian times? I’d definitely bring a bar of soap, a good pair of scissors (for domestic chores as well as self-defense), and a long length of cotton (towel, headscarf, privacy screen, bathrobe, neck-warmer, wadded-up travel pillow). So yes…I’d be the one to over-pack. Every time!

    Reply
  93. Oh my goodness…traveling/adventuring in Victorian times? I’d definitely bring a bar of soap, a good pair of scissors (for domestic chores as well as self-defense), and a long length of cotton (towel, headscarf, privacy screen, bathrobe, neck-warmer, wadded-up travel pillow). So yes…I’d be the one to over-pack. Every time!

    Reply
  94. Oh my goodness…traveling/adventuring in Victorian times? I’d definitely bring a bar of soap, a good pair of scissors (for domestic chores as well as self-defense), and a long length of cotton (towel, headscarf, privacy screen, bathrobe, neck-warmer, wadded-up travel pillow). So yes…I’d be the one to over-pack. Every time!

    Reply
  95. Oh my goodness…traveling/adventuring in Victorian times? I’d definitely bring a bar of soap, a good pair of scissors (for domestic chores as well as self-defense), and a long length of cotton (towel, headscarf, privacy screen, bathrobe, neck-warmer, wadded-up travel pillow). So yes…I’d be the one to over-pack. Every time!

    Reply
  96. As far as destinations go I am all about Egypt! As for what I would pack, I am a high maintenance modern girl so I have to imagine I would be the same in the victorian era. I would hope however that I would still be practical so yes on the bath tub no on the silver teaset. I do see myself packing lots of shoes those seem to be my weakness. A girl has to have options!

    Reply
  97. As far as destinations go I am all about Egypt! As for what I would pack, I am a high maintenance modern girl so I have to imagine I would be the same in the victorian era. I would hope however that I would still be practical so yes on the bath tub no on the silver teaset. I do see myself packing lots of shoes those seem to be my weakness. A girl has to have options!

    Reply
  98. As far as destinations go I am all about Egypt! As for what I would pack, I am a high maintenance modern girl so I have to imagine I would be the same in the victorian era. I would hope however that I would still be practical so yes on the bath tub no on the silver teaset. I do see myself packing lots of shoes those seem to be my weakness. A girl has to have options!

    Reply
  99. As far as destinations go I am all about Egypt! As for what I would pack, I am a high maintenance modern girl so I have to imagine I would be the same in the victorian era. I would hope however that I would still be practical so yes on the bath tub no on the silver teaset. I do see myself packing lots of shoes those seem to be my weakness. A girl has to have options!

    Reply
  100. As far as destinations go I am all about Egypt! As for what I would pack, I am a high maintenance modern girl so I have to imagine I would be the same in the victorian era. I would hope however that I would still be practical so yes on the bath tub no on the silver teaset. I do see myself packing lots of shoes those seem to be my weakness. A girl has to have options!

    Reply
  101. Egypt back then would have been fascinating. I can forego the silver tea set but can see the appeal of the bathtub 😀 Waves to Deanna, whose books I adore. btw, don’t put me in the draw as I already have Veronica’s second adventure ordered.

    Reply
  102. Egypt back then would have been fascinating. I can forego the silver tea set but can see the appeal of the bathtub 😀 Waves to Deanna, whose books I adore. btw, don’t put me in the draw as I already have Veronica’s second adventure ordered.

    Reply
  103. Egypt back then would have been fascinating. I can forego the silver tea set but can see the appeal of the bathtub 😀 Waves to Deanna, whose books I adore. btw, don’t put me in the draw as I already have Veronica’s second adventure ordered.

    Reply
  104. Egypt back then would have been fascinating. I can forego the silver tea set but can see the appeal of the bathtub 😀 Waves to Deanna, whose books I adore. btw, don’t put me in the draw as I already have Veronica’s second adventure ordered.

    Reply
  105. Egypt back then would have been fascinating. I can forego the silver tea set but can see the appeal of the bathtub 😀 Waves to Deanna, whose books I adore. btw, don’t put me in the draw as I already have Veronica’s second adventure ordered.

    Reply
  106. I would love to travel back to India and China and be one of the first English citizens to discover tea. I’d travel far and wide collecting tins of leaves to bring back to England and declare to the nation it’s tea time. I’d travel light going but no doubt coming back would be laden with chests full of treasures. 😊

    Reply
  107. I would love to travel back to India and China and be one of the first English citizens to discover tea. I’d travel far and wide collecting tins of leaves to bring back to England and declare to the nation it’s tea time. I’d travel light going but no doubt coming back would be laden with chests full of treasures. 😊

    Reply
  108. I would love to travel back to India and China and be one of the first English citizens to discover tea. I’d travel far and wide collecting tins of leaves to bring back to England and declare to the nation it’s tea time. I’d travel light going but no doubt coming back would be laden with chests full of treasures. 😊

    Reply
  109. I would love to travel back to India and China and be one of the first English citizens to discover tea. I’d travel far and wide collecting tins of leaves to bring back to England and declare to the nation it’s tea time. I’d travel light going but no doubt coming back would be laden with chests full of treasures. 😊

    Reply
  110. I would love to travel back to India and China and be one of the first English citizens to discover tea. I’d travel far and wide collecting tins of leaves to bring back to England and declare to the nation it’s tea time. I’d travel light going but no doubt coming back would be laden with chests full of treasures. 😊

    Reply
  111. I would choose the the United States (especially the Mid-West) in Victorian times. I have spent all my life here, but it was different then. I was living on Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois, when I found Dickens’ descriptions of it. Totally unrecognizable between his day and ours. I don’t count Dickens as an explorer, only a traveler; but there were many true explorers over here, I would like to have been able to join them or peek over their shoulders. And in my younger days, I would be the carpet bag, and a medicinal cream, rather than a face cream!

    Reply
  112. I would choose the the United States (especially the Mid-West) in Victorian times. I have spent all my life here, but it was different then. I was living on Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois, when I found Dickens’ descriptions of it. Totally unrecognizable between his day and ours. I don’t count Dickens as an explorer, only a traveler; but there were many true explorers over here, I would like to have been able to join them or peek over their shoulders. And in my younger days, I would be the carpet bag, and a medicinal cream, rather than a face cream!

    Reply
  113. I would choose the the United States (especially the Mid-West) in Victorian times. I have spent all my life here, but it was different then. I was living on Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois, when I found Dickens’ descriptions of it. Totally unrecognizable between his day and ours. I don’t count Dickens as an explorer, only a traveler; but there were many true explorers over here, I would like to have been able to join them or peek over their shoulders. And in my younger days, I would be the carpet bag, and a medicinal cream, rather than a face cream!

    Reply
  114. I would choose the the United States (especially the Mid-West) in Victorian times. I have spent all my life here, but it was different then. I was living on Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois, when I found Dickens’ descriptions of it. Totally unrecognizable between his day and ours. I don’t count Dickens as an explorer, only a traveler; but there were many true explorers over here, I would like to have been able to join them or peek over their shoulders. And in my younger days, I would be the carpet bag, and a medicinal cream, rather than a face cream!

    Reply
  115. I would choose the the United States (especially the Mid-West) in Victorian times. I have spent all my life here, but it was different then. I was living on Looking-Glass Prairie, Illinois, when I found Dickens’ descriptions of it. Totally unrecognizable between his day and ours. I don’t count Dickens as an explorer, only a traveler; but there were many true explorers over here, I would like to have been able to join them or peek over their shoulders. And in my younger days, I would be the carpet bag, and a medicinal cream, rather than a face cream!

    Reply
  116. Given my sensitivity to bug bites, I’m ruling out the tropics. I’d settle on a hiking expedition through the unspoiled, rugged beauty of Alaska or the Norwegian fjords.
    Deanna, I’m a great fan of your books and heartily make recommendations of the Lady Julia Gray series to all my friends. I have enjoyed this new series as well, and can’t wait for my copy to download tomorrow. May the words always flow!

    Reply
  117. Given my sensitivity to bug bites, I’m ruling out the tropics. I’d settle on a hiking expedition through the unspoiled, rugged beauty of Alaska or the Norwegian fjords.
    Deanna, I’m a great fan of your books and heartily make recommendations of the Lady Julia Gray series to all my friends. I have enjoyed this new series as well, and can’t wait for my copy to download tomorrow. May the words always flow!

    Reply
  118. Given my sensitivity to bug bites, I’m ruling out the tropics. I’d settle on a hiking expedition through the unspoiled, rugged beauty of Alaska or the Norwegian fjords.
    Deanna, I’m a great fan of your books and heartily make recommendations of the Lady Julia Gray series to all my friends. I have enjoyed this new series as well, and can’t wait for my copy to download tomorrow. May the words always flow!

    Reply
  119. Given my sensitivity to bug bites, I’m ruling out the tropics. I’d settle on a hiking expedition through the unspoiled, rugged beauty of Alaska or the Norwegian fjords.
    Deanna, I’m a great fan of your books and heartily make recommendations of the Lady Julia Gray series to all my friends. I have enjoyed this new series as well, and can’t wait for my copy to download tomorrow. May the words always flow!

    Reply
  120. Given my sensitivity to bug bites, I’m ruling out the tropics. I’d settle on a hiking expedition through the unspoiled, rugged beauty of Alaska or the Norwegian fjords.
    Deanna, I’m a great fan of your books and heartily make recommendations of the Lady Julia Gray series to all my friends. I have enjoyed this new series as well, and can’t wait for my copy to download tomorrow. May the words always flow!

    Reply
  121. In the mid 1960’s, I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. I loved the whole experience and the country and people. In Victorian times, it was not a very safe place to be, (it seems we have come full circle in that respect). So, I believe I would have liked to explore India, traveling as light as the times and dress code would allow.

    Reply
  122. In the mid 1960’s, I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. I loved the whole experience and the country and people. In Victorian times, it was not a very safe place to be, (it seems we have come full circle in that respect). So, I believe I would have liked to explore India, traveling as light as the times and dress code would allow.

    Reply
  123. In the mid 1960’s, I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. I loved the whole experience and the country and people. In Victorian times, it was not a very safe place to be, (it seems we have come full circle in that respect). So, I believe I would have liked to explore India, traveling as light as the times and dress code would allow.

    Reply
  124. In the mid 1960’s, I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. I loved the whole experience and the country and people. In Victorian times, it was not a very safe place to be, (it seems we have come full circle in that respect). So, I believe I would have liked to explore India, traveling as light as the times and dress code would allow.

    Reply
  125. In the mid 1960’s, I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. I loved the whole experience and the country and people. In Victorian times, it was not a very safe place to be, (it seems we have come full circle in that respect). So, I believe I would have liked to explore India, traveling as light as the times and dress code would allow.

    Reply
  126. Oops, I forgot to tell you, Deanna, how much I love your books. The Veronica Speedwell debut was delightful and I look forward to years of future enjoyment as the series progresses.

    Reply
  127. Oops, I forgot to tell you, Deanna, how much I love your books. The Veronica Speedwell debut was delightful and I look forward to years of future enjoyment as the series progresses.

    Reply
  128. Oops, I forgot to tell you, Deanna, how much I love your books. The Veronica Speedwell debut was delightful and I look forward to years of future enjoyment as the series progresses.

    Reply
  129. Oops, I forgot to tell you, Deanna, how much I love your books. The Veronica Speedwell debut was delightful and I look forward to years of future enjoyment as the series progresses.

    Reply
  130. Oops, I forgot to tell you, Deanna, how much I love your books. The Veronica Speedwell debut was delightful and I look forward to years of future enjoyment as the series progresses.

    Reply
  131. *waves back* So glad you pre-ordered! Hope you took advantage of claiming your pre-order digital goodie pack. And Egypt would have been SO intriguing!

    Reply
  132. *waves back* So glad you pre-ordered! Hope you took advantage of claiming your pre-order digital goodie pack. And Egypt would have been SO intriguing!

    Reply
  133. *waves back* So glad you pre-ordered! Hope you took advantage of claiming your pre-order digital goodie pack. And Egypt would have been SO intriguing!

    Reply
  134. *waves back* So glad you pre-ordered! Hope you took advantage of claiming your pre-order digital goodie pack. And Egypt would have been SO intriguing!

    Reply
  135. *waves back* So glad you pre-ordered! Hope you took advantage of claiming your pre-order digital goodie pack. And Egypt would have been SO intriguing!

    Reply
  136. Very kind of you, Kim–thanks so much. It’s been a grueling revision day, so the gracious words are even MORE appreciated!

    Reply
  137. Very kind of you, Kim–thanks so much. It’s been a grueling revision day, so the gracious words are even MORE appreciated!

    Reply
  138. Very kind of you, Kim–thanks so much. It’s been a grueling revision day, so the gracious words are even MORE appreciated!

    Reply
  139. Very kind of you, Kim–thanks so much. It’s been a grueling revision day, so the gracious words are even MORE appreciated!

    Reply
  140. Very kind of you, Kim–thanks so much. It’s been a grueling revision day, so the gracious words are even MORE appreciated!

    Reply
  141. How kind of you–I hope to write her for a long time! And how intrepid of you to be a Peace Corps volunteer. There are indeed fascinating parallels between 19th and 21st century Afghanistan. Sad to think that there are parts of the world that have known so much turmoil for so long. Glad you got to experience it when they were having a peaceful time!

    Reply
  142. How kind of you–I hope to write her for a long time! And how intrepid of you to be a Peace Corps volunteer. There are indeed fascinating parallels between 19th and 21st century Afghanistan. Sad to think that there are parts of the world that have known so much turmoil for so long. Glad you got to experience it when they were having a peaceful time!

    Reply
  143. How kind of you–I hope to write her for a long time! And how intrepid of you to be a Peace Corps volunteer. There are indeed fascinating parallels between 19th and 21st century Afghanistan. Sad to think that there are parts of the world that have known so much turmoil for so long. Glad you got to experience it when they were having a peaceful time!

    Reply
  144. How kind of you–I hope to write her for a long time! And how intrepid of you to be a Peace Corps volunteer. There are indeed fascinating parallels between 19th and 21st century Afghanistan. Sad to think that there are parts of the world that have known so much turmoil for so long. Glad you got to experience it when they were having a peaceful time!

    Reply
  145. How kind of you–I hope to write her for a long time! And how intrepid of you to be a Peace Corps volunteer. There are indeed fascinating parallels between 19th and 21st century Afghanistan. Sad to think that there are parts of the world that have known so much turmoil for so long. Glad you got to experience it when they were having a peaceful time!

    Reply
  146. My choise would be Canada. I’m not a fan of “roughing it”, but I think I would have liked traveling with David Thompson. For a few days, anyway.

    Reply
  147. My choise would be Canada. I’m not a fan of “roughing it”, but I think I would have liked traveling with David Thompson. For a few days, anyway.

    Reply
  148. My choise would be Canada. I’m not a fan of “roughing it”, but I think I would have liked traveling with David Thompson. For a few days, anyway.

    Reply
  149. My choise would be Canada. I’m not a fan of “roughing it”, but I think I would have liked traveling with David Thompson. For a few days, anyway.

    Reply
  150. My choise would be Canada. I’m not a fan of “roughing it”, but I think I would have liked traveling with David Thompson. For a few days, anyway.

    Reply
  151. May I recommend to you all Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley? She makes Amelia Peabody look quite tame. Imagine tramping knee-deep through infested waters in regulation Victorian dress, corseted as for a tea party, with no-one but native bearers for assistance. And it’s all real, not fiction! Myself, I’ll take a modern escorted tour, thank you very much, but hats off to my intreid namesake.

    Reply
  152. May I recommend to you all Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley? She makes Amelia Peabody look quite tame. Imagine tramping knee-deep through infested waters in regulation Victorian dress, corseted as for a tea party, with no-one but native bearers for assistance. And it’s all real, not fiction! Myself, I’ll take a modern escorted tour, thank you very much, but hats off to my intreid namesake.

    Reply
  153. May I recommend to you all Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley? She makes Amelia Peabody look quite tame. Imagine tramping knee-deep through infested waters in regulation Victorian dress, corseted as for a tea party, with no-one but native bearers for assistance. And it’s all real, not fiction! Myself, I’ll take a modern escorted tour, thank you very much, but hats off to my intreid namesake.

    Reply
  154. May I recommend to you all Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley? She makes Amelia Peabody look quite tame. Imagine tramping knee-deep through infested waters in regulation Victorian dress, corseted as for a tea party, with no-one but native bearers for assistance. And it’s all real, not fiction! Myself, I’ll take a modern escorted tour, thank you very much, but hats off to my intreid namesake.

    Reply
  155. May I recommend to you all Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley? She makes Amelia Peabody look quite tame. Imagine tramping knee-deep through infested waters in regulation Victorian dress, corseted as for a tea party, with no-one but native bearers for assistance. And it’s all real, not fiction! Myself, I’ll take a modern escorted tour, thank you very much, but hats off to my intreid namesake.

    Reply
  156. The way the Victorian and Edwardian women travelled is amazing. they defied the restrictions and constrictions of society and the clothes and went places doing things I would hesitate to visit or do with modern wardrobe and convenient camping equipment.
    Victoria sounds interesting. I’d like to read more about her.

    Reply
  157. The way the Victorian and Edwardian women travelled is amazing. they defied the restrictions and constrictions of society and the clothes and went places doing things I would hesitate to visit or do with modern wardrobe and convenient camping equipment.
    Victoria sounds interesting. I’d like to read more about her.

    Reply
  158. The way the Victorian and Edwardian women travelled is amazing. they defied the restrictions and constrictions of society and the clothes and went places doing things I would hesitate to visit or do with modern wardrobe and convenient camping equipment.
    Victoria sounds interesting. I’d like to read more about her.

    Reply
  159. The way the Victorian and Edwardian women travelled is amazing. they defied the restrictions and constrictions of society and the clothes and went places doing things I would hesitate to visit or do with modern wardrobe and convenient camping equipment.
    Victoria sounds interesting. I’d like to read more about her.

    Reply
  160. The way the Victorian and Edwardian women travelled is amazing. they defied the restrictions and constrictions of society and the clothes and went places doing things I would hesitate to visit or do with modern wardrobe and convenient camping equipment.
    Victoria sounds interesting. I’d like to read more about her.

    Reply
  161. I do love your books, Deanna.
    I have always thought that I would like to have been Amelia Peabody. She and her family traveled and explored, but for heaven’s sake, Amelia always made sure that they were able to never forget the amenities. I would love to be an explorer, but there are certain places I could never sleep on the ground….I do not intend to find things crawling or slithering over me.

    Reply
  162. I do love your books, Deanna.
    I have always thought that I would like to have been Amelia Peabody. She and her family traveled and explored, but for heaven’s sake, Amelia always made sure that they were able to never forget the amenities. I would love to be an explorer, but there are certain places I could never sleep on the ground….I do not intend to find things crawling or slithering over me.

    Reply
  163. I do love your books, Deanna.
    I have always thought that I would like to have been Amelia Peabody. She and her family traveled and explored, but for heaven’s sake, Amelia always made sure that they were able to never forget the amenities. I would love to be an explorer, but there are certain places I could never sleep on the ground….I do not intend to find things crawling or slithering over me.

    Reply
  164. I do love your books, Deanna.
    I have always thought that I would like to have been Amelia Peabody. She and her family traveled and explored, but for heaven’s sake, Amelia always made sure that they were able to never forget the amenities. I would love to be an explorer, but there are certain places I could never sleep on the ground….I do not intend to find things crawling or slithering over me.

    Reply
  165. I do love your books, Deanna.
    I have always thought that I would like to have been Amelia Peabody. She and her family traveled and explored, but for heaven’s sake, Amelia always made sure that they were able to never forget the amenities. I would love to be an explorer, but there are certain places I could never sleep on the ground….I do not intend to find things crawling or slithering over me.

    Reply
  166. I’m afraid I’m more of an armchair traveler. I love reading about explorers but I don’t think I’d ever be the sort to go in to the deep dark world. If I did I’d definitely have to have deodorant and my kindle. Those would be ‘must haves’!!
    Enjoyed this post very much even though I have yet to discover your books Deanna. They sound wonderful.

    Reply
  167. I’m afraid I’m more of an armchair traveler. I love reading about explorers but I don’t think I’d ever be the sort to go in to the deep dark world. If I did I’d definitely have to have deodorant and my kindle. Those would be ‘must haves’!!
    Enjoyed this post very much even though I have yet to discover your books Deanna. They sound wonderful.

    Reply
  168. I’m afraid I’m more of an armchair traveler. I love reading about explorers but I don’t think I’d ever be the sort to go in to the deep dark world. If I did I’d definitely have to have deodorant and my kindle. Those would be ‘must haves’!!
    Enjoyed this post very much even though I have yet to discover your books Deanna. They sound wonderful.

    Reply
  169. I’m afraid I’m more of an armchair traveler. I love reading about explorers but I don’t think I’d ever be the sort to go in to the deep dark world. If I did I’d definitely have to have deodorant and my kindle. Those would be ‘must haves’!!
    Enjoyed this post very much even though I have yet to discover your books Deanna. They sound wonderful.

    Reply
  170. I’m afraid I’m more of an armchair traveler. I love reading about explorers but I don’t think I’d ever be the sort to go in to the deep dark world. If I did I’d definitely have to have deodorant and my kindle. Those would be ‘must haves’!!
    Enjoyed this post very much even though I have yet to discover your books Deanna. They sound wonderful.

    Reply
  171. I love her book! I told the story of her falling into a big game trap and being saved by her petticoats in a recent interview. Highly recommended!

    Reply
  172. I love her book! I told the story of her falling into a big game trap and being saved by her petticoats in a recent interview. Highly recommended!

    Reply
  173. I love her book! I told the story of her falling into a big game trap and being saved by her petticoats in a recent interview. Highly recommended!

    Reply
  174. I love her book! I told the story of her falling into a big game trap and being saved by her petticoats in a recent interview. Highly recommended!

    Reply
  175. I love her book! I told the story of her falling into a big game trap and being saved by her petticoats in a recent interview. Highly recommended!

    Reply
  176. The travelers who brought a lot of gear with them employed a team of porters to carry it all. Some of these expeditions ran to hundreds of bearers!

    Reply
  177. The travelers who brought a lot of gear with them employed a team of porters to carry it all. Some of these expeditions ran to hundreds of bearers!

    Reply
  178. The travelers who brought a lot of gear with them employed a team of porters to carry it all. Some of these expeditions ran to hundreds of bearers!

    Reply
  179. The travelers who brought a lot of gear with them employed a team of porters to carry it all. Some of these expeditions ran to hundreds of bearers!

    Reply
  180. The travelers who brought a lot of gear with them employed a team of porters to carry it all. Some of these expeditions ran to hundreds of bearers!

    Reply
  181. I would love to go to Zanzibar. The exotic name alone evokes mystery and adventure. I’m one of those who can live out of a backpack for months, there’s nothing like traveling light!

    Reply
  182. I would love to go to Zanzibar. The exotic name alone evokes mystery and adventure. I’m one of those who can live out of a backpack for months, there’s nothing like traveling light!

    Reply
  183. I would love to go to Zanzibar. The exotic name alone evokes mystery and adventure. I’m one of those who can live out of a backpack for months, there’s nothing like traveling light!

    Reply
  184. I would love to go to Zanzibar. The exotic name alone evokes mystery and adventure. I’m one of those who can live out of a backpack for months, there’s nothing like traveling light!

    Reply
  185. I would love to go to Zanzibar. The exotic name alone evokes mystery and adventure. I’m one of those who can live out of a backpack for months, there’s nothing like traveling light!

    Reply
  186. It would have to be Egypt. It’s a great place to visit now, imagine experiencing it during the Victorian Era. Love your books, Deanna. I cannot wait to read your new book.

    Reply
  187. It would have to be Egypt. It’s a great place to visit now, imagine experiencing it during the Victorian Era. Love your books, Deanna. I cannot wait to read your new book.

    Reply
  188. It would have to be Egypt. It’s a great place to visit now, imagine experiencing it during the Victorian Era. Love your books, Deanna. I cannot wait to read your new book.

    Reply
  189. It would have to be Egypt. It’s a great place to visit now, imagine experiencing it during the Victorian Era. Love your books, Deanna. I cannot wait to read your new book.

    Reply
  190. It would have to be Egypt. It’s a great place to visit now, imagine experiencing it during the Victorian Era. Love your books, Deanna. I cannot wait to read your new book.

    Reply

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