Stuff

Kidswithflowers
If I’ve seemed a bit scatty recently, it’s because we decided to sell our house and do the apartment thing. I’m sure you can all imagine just how consuming this sort of thing is. I think about medieval households who packed and moved to a new residence on a regular basis.

Of course they had servants. And much less stuff.

Why do we have so much stuff? How is it that after extensive decluttering, including shipping a truck load to the beloved offspring now living elsewhere, many loads to the dump and charity, plus offerings on Freecycle and Craigslist, we still have too much stuff!

People in the past, even some wealthy people, got by with a lot less, and did just fine because we don’tSoane
need all this stuff, do we? Of course there were always the inveterate collectors, like John Soane, who had to buy the house next door to hold it all. If you’re in London, don’t miss this small but fascinating museum, especially if you’re interested in late Georgian/Regency living as the house is pretty well preserved as it was and the living spaces are typical. How many people here have been to the Soane Museum?

Jeeve
Wow! I see they have free audio, including an introduction by Stephen Fry, (Jeeves to Hugh Laurie’s House. Watching that, and then House, is quite a mind-bending experience.)

House

You do know that he also played a very unlikely Prince Regent on Blackadder? Lauriereg

Back to the Soane museum. There are some pictures of the interior here.  It’s actually a site about selling one’s house, which seems appropriate to today’s theme.

This is the description of the classic tour of Soane House. "A 60MB ZIP file containing
32 individual MP3 files (totaling 87MB) will be downloaded to your
computer. The files will be placed on your desktop or into your audio
software (i-Tunes, Windows Media Player or the software that came with
your MP3 player or phone). If the files are placed on your desktop,
select them all and drag or import them into your audio software.
Then transfer all the files to
your portable player, following the instructions supplied with your MP3
player or iPod and you’re ready to listen."

Isn’t that fabulous? I don’t have time to listen just now, so if you do and discover something fascinating, share it here.

Back to the stuff. It wouldn’t be so bad if I had some Roman pillars and an Egyptian sarcophagus to house, but instead it’s too many cups, pillow cases, and waste paper baskets….

Which raises another thought. I got into a discussion online somewhere about when the waste paper basket, by whatever name, came into existence, and what it was called. As I noted above, in the past people had less stuff and threw less away. No paper tissues for the nose. No used-up ball-point pens.  If purchased goods were wrapped, that brown paper or box would be put to some other use. But did that Georgian squire truly not need a receptacle for things of no further use? If so, when did the item come into existence?

Any enlightenment gladly received. Humorous speculation too. 🙂

Back to the stuff. Does anyone have time to look up the origin and date of the word "clutter?" If it goes back to the Anglo-Saxons, I will despair. And when did we embrace the idea — but rarely the practice — of "decluttering?"

Does anyone have any helpful suggestions for breaking this magnetic attraction to excess stuff?

Despite the above, I actually like things around me. I couldn’t live in a minimalist abode, with every surface clear except for a carefully placed piece of stark art. Flat surfaces are made to be put upon, says I. And many inclined ones, too! I like quirky objects, interesting fabrics, plants, fountains and bells everywhere. (Which box are my fountains in?)

It’s the stuff I don’t need, and don’t even want that’s driving me scatty. Why, why, why? Look around you and tell me the nearest piece of "stuff" blighting your world — by which I mean, something you don’t need, don’t want, and would be better off without. (And no, it can’t be one of your nearest and dearest.*G*) If possible, take a picture. You can’t share pictures in comments, but I can share some later.

On Saturday night, round about midnight pacific time, I’ll pick the best, or worst, one, and the winner will get a free book. But ONLY if she or he has already got rid of that bit of stuff. Oh, and the picture at the top? Cabbage Patch Kids might be stuffed, but are never "stuff." Flowers can sometimes be stinky and a prelude to unwanted seed-heads, but they’re not stuff either.

Is "stuff" always manufactured by humans? There’s a depressing thought.

 

Cheers,

Jo — back to the boxes, seeking fountains — water, wisdom, whatever….

 

120 thoughts on “Stuff”

  1. Oh, Jo! I’m sorry… 😉
    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) – Cite This Source – Share This
    clut·ter
    –verb (used with object)
    1. to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner: All kinds of papers cluttered the top of his desk.
    –verb (used without object)
    2. British Dialect. to run in disorder; move with bustle and confusion.
    3. British Dialect. to make a clatter.
    4. to speak so rapidly and inexactly that distortions of sound and phrasing result.
    –noun
    5. a disorderly heap or assemblage; litter: It’s impossible to find anything in all this clutter.
    6. a state or condition of confusion.
    7. confused noise; clatter.
    8. an echo or echoes on a radar screen that do not come from the target and can be caused by such factors as atmospheric conditions, objects other than the target, chaff, and jamming of the radar signal.
    [Origin: 1550–60; var. of clotter (now obs.), equiv. to clot + -er6]
    And:
    Clutter a confused collection; a clotted mass; a crowded and confused group; a collection. See also clowder.
    Examples: clutter of bodies, 1674; of business, 1649; of cats; of citations, 1666; of consonants, 1791; of narrow crooked, dark, and dirty lanes, 1792; of drops against the glass, 1841; of spiders; of thick and deep grass, 1670.
    Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Do you think even the Egyptians had clutter? Sometimes, I wonder…because I think mine has been around that long.

    Reply
  2. Oh, Jo! I’m sorry… 😉
    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) – Cite This Source – Share This
    clut·ter
    –verb (used with object)
    1. to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner: All kinds of papers cluttered the top of his desk.
    –verb (used without object)
    2. British Dialect. to run in disorder; move with bustle and confusion.
    3. British Dialect. to make a clatter.
    4. to speak so rapidly and inexactly that distortions of sound and phrasing result.
    –noun
    5. a disorderly heap or assemblage; litter: It’s impossible to find anything in all this clutter.
    6. a state or condition of confusion.
    7. confused noise; clatter.
    8. an echo or echoes on a radar screen that do not come from the target and can be caused by such factors as atmospheric conditions, objects other than the target, chaff, and jamming of the radar signal.
    [Origin: 1550–60; var. of clotter (now obs.), equiv. to clot + -er6]
    And:
    Clutter a confused collection; a clotted mass; a crowded and confused group; a collection. See also clowder.
    Examples: clutter of bodies, 1674; of business, 1649; of cats; of citations, 1666; of consonants, 1791; of narrow crooked, dark, and dirty lanes, 1792; of drops against the glass, 1841; of spiders; of thick and deep grass, 1670.
    Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Do you think even the Egyptians had clutter? Sometimes, I wonder…because I think mine has been around that long.

    Reply
  3. Oh, Jo! I’m sorry… 😉
    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) – Cite This Source – Share This
    clut·ter
    –verb (used with object)
    1. to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner: All kinds of papers cluttered the top of his desk.
    –verb (used without object)
    2. British Dialect. to run in disorder; move with bustle and confusion.
    3. British Dialect. to make a clatter.
    4. to speak so rapidly and inexactly that distortions of sound and phrasing result.
    –noun
    5. a disorderly heap or assemblage; litter: It’s impossible to find anything in all this clutter.
    6. a state or condition of confusion.
    7. confused noise; clatter.
    8. an echo or echoes on a radar screen that do not come from the target and can be caused by such factors as atmospheric conditions, objects other than the target, chaff, and jamming of the radar signal.
    [Origin: 1550–60; var. of clotter (now obs.), equiv. to clot + -er6]
    And:
    Clutter a confused collection; a clotted mass; a crowded and confused group; a collection. See also clowder.
    Examples: clutter of bodies, 1674; of business, 1649; of cats; of citations, 1666; of consonants, 1791; of narrow crooked, dark, and dirty lanes, 1792; of drops against the glass, 1841; of spiders; of thick and deep grass, 1670.
    Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Do you think even the Egyptians had clutter? Sometimes, I wonder…because I think mine has been around that long.

    Reply
  4. Oh, Jo! I’m sorry… 😉
    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) – Cite This Source – Share This
    clut·ter
    –verb (used with object)
    1. to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner: All kinds of papers cluttered the top of his desk.
    –verb (used without object)
    2. British Dialect. to run in disorder; move with bustle and confusion.
    3. British Dialect. to make a clatter.
    4. to speak so rapidly and inexactly that distortions of sound and phrasing result.
    –noun
    5. a disorderly heap or assemblage; litter: It’s impossible to find anything in all this clutter.
    6. a state or condition of confusion.
    7. confused noise; clatter.
    8. an echo or echoes on a radar screen that do not come from the target and can be caused by such factors as atmospheric conditions, objects other than the target, chaff, and jamming of the radar signal.
    [Origin: 1550–60; var. of clotter (now obs.), equiv. to clot + -er6]
    And:
    Clutter a confused collection; a clotted mass; a crowded and confused group; a collection. See also clowder.
    Examples: clutter of bodies, 1674; of business, 1649; of cats; of citations, 1666; of consonants, 1791; of narrow crooked, dark, and dirty lanes, 1792; of drops against the glass, 1841; of spiders; of thick and deep grass, 1670.
    Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Do you think even the Egyptians had clutter? Sometimes, I wonder…because I think mine has been around that long.

    Reply
  5. Oh, Jo! I’m sorry… 😉
    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) – Cite This Source – Share This
    clut·ter
    –verb (used with object)
    1. to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner: All kinds of papers cluttered the top of his desk.
    –verb (used without object)
    2. British Dialect. to run in disorder; move with bustle and confusion.
    3. British Dialect. to make a clatter.
    4. to speak so rapidly and inexactly that distortions of sound and phrasing result.
    –noun
    5. a disorderly heap or assemblage; litter: It’s impossible to find anything in all this clutter.
    6. a state or condition of confusion.
    7. confused noise; clatter.
    8. an echo or echoes on a radar screen that do not come from the target and can be caused by such factors as atmospheric conditions, objects other than the target, chaff, and jamming of the radar signal.
    [Origin: 1550–60; var. of clotter (now obs.), equiv. to clot + -er6]
    And:
    Clutter a confused collection; a clotted mass; a crowded and confused group; a collection. See also clowder.
    Examples: clutter of bodies, 1674; of business, 1649; of cats; of citations, 1666; of consonants, 1791; of narrow crooked, dark, and dirty lanes, 1792; of drops against the glass, 1841; of spiders; of thick and deep grass, 1670.
    Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Do you think even the Egyptians had clutter? Sometimes, I wonder…because I think mine has been around that long.

    Reply
  6. Well, the word “clutter” comes from 1556, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=clutter&searchmode=none
    (had to do the url in two lines)
    clutter, 1556, var. of clotern “to form clots, to heap on,” sense of “litter” is first recorded 1666. (see clot).
    And I think a part of the reason we have so much “stuff” is that now there is more “stuff” to be had. If the rich aristocrats 200 years ago had access to the number of things we do, they would have had their houses jam-packed with it.
    Also from the Online Etymology Dictionary (search on waste)
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=waste&searchmode=none
    waste-paper first recorded 1585.

    Reply
  7. Well, the word “clutter” comes from 1556, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=clutter&searchmode=none
    (had to do the url in two lines)
    clutter, 1556, var. of clotern “to form clots, to heap on,” sense of “litter” is first recorded 1666. (see clot).
    And I think a part of the reason we have so much “stuff” is that now there is more “stuff” to be had. If the rich aristocrats 200 years ago had access to the number of things we do, they would have had their houses jam-packed with it.
    Also from the Online Etymology Dictionary (search on waste)
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=waste&searchmode=none
    waste-paper first recorded 1585.

    Reply
  8. Well, the word “clutter” comes from 1556, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=clutter&searchmode=none
    (had to do the url in two lines)
    clutter, 1556, var. of clotern “to form clots, to heap on,” sense of “litter” is first recorded 1666. (see clot).
    And I think a part of the reason we have so much “stuff” is that now there is more “stuff” to be had. If the rich aristocrats 200 years ago had access to the number of things we do, they would have had their houses jam-packed with it.
    Also from the Online Etymology Dictionary (search on waste)
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=waste&searchmode=none
    waste-paper first recorded 1585.

    Reply
  9. Well, the word “clutter” comes from 1556, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=clutter&searchmode=none
    (had to do the url in two lines)
    clutter, 1556, var. of clotern “to form clots, to heap on,” sense of “litter” is first recorded 1666. (see clot).
    And I think a part of the reason we have so much “stuff” is that now there is more “stuff” to be had. If the rich aristocrats 200 years ago had access to the number of things we do, they would have had their houses jam-packed with it.
    Also from the Online Etymology Dictionary (search on waste)
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=waste&searchmode=none
    waste-paper first recorded 1585.

    Reply
  10. Well, the word “clutter” comes from 1556, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=clutter&searchmode=none
    (had to do the url in two lines)
    clutter, 1556, var. of clotern “to form clots, to heap on,” sense of “litter” is first recorded 1666. (see clot).
    And I think a part of the reason we have so much “stuff” is that now there is more “stuff” to be had. If the rich aristocrats 200 years ago had access to the number of things we do, they would have had their houses jam-packed with it.
    Also from the Online Etymology Dictionary (search on waste)
    http://www.etymonline.com/
    index.php?search=waste&searchmode=none
    waste-paper first recorded 1585.

    Reply
  11. I dislike clutter, and try to keep such stuff to a minimum. We usually do a pretty good job, with only a few ornaments or pictures. Just looking at my desk though gives me shivers. There is the letter I need to file, bills to file, my husband’s bike computer (and why is it not on his bike?) Two pads of paper for said husband (apparently one isn’t enough). Lypsyl – there is one on every flat surface it seems, a magazine, pen and more loose papers to file. If only I would file the loose papers in a timely manner the clutter would be much reduced.

    Reply
  12. I dislike clutter, and try to keep such stuff to a minimum. We usually do a pretty good job, with only a few ornaments or pictures. Just looking at my desk though gives me shivers. There is the letter I need to file, bills to file, my husband’s bike computer (and why is it not on his bike?) Two pads of paper for said husband (apparently one isn’t enough). Lypsyl – there is one on every flat surface it seems, a magazine, pen and more loose papers to file. If only I would file the loose papers in a timely manner the clutter would be much reduced.

    Reply
  13. I dislike clutter, and try to keep such stuff to a minimum. We usually do a pretty good job, with only a few ornaments or pictures. Just looking at my desk though gives me shivers. There is the letter I need to file, bills to file, my husband’s bike computer (and why is it not on his bike?) Two pads of paper for said husband (apparently one isn’t enough). Lypsyl – there is one on every flat surface it seems, a magazine, pen and more loose papers to file. If only I would file the loose papers in a timely manner the clutter would be much reduced.

    Reply
  14. I dislike clutter, and try to keep such stuff to a minimum. We usually do a pretty good job, with only a few ornaments or pictures. Just looking at my desk though gives me shivers. There is the letter I need to file, bills to file, my husband’s bike computer (and why is it not on his bike?) Two pads of paper for said husband (apparently one isn’t enough). Lypsyl – there is one on every flat surface it seems, a magazine, pen and more loose papers to file. If only I would file the loose papers in a timely manner the clutter would be much reduced.

    Reply
  15. I dislike clutter, and try to keep such stuff to a minimum. We usually do a pretty good job, with only a few ornaments or pictures. Just looking at my desk though gives me shivers. There is the letter I need to file, bills to file, my husband’s bike computer (and why is it not on his bike?) Two pads of paper for said husband (apparently one isn’t enough). Lypsyl – there is one on every flat surface it seems, a magazine, pen and more loose papers to file. If only I would file the loose papers in a timely manner the clutter would be much reduced.

    Reply
  16. Back before 1976 we owned an old home in a suburb of Allentown PA with a cellar and a big attic. The attic was claimed by my dear husband for his “train room” to build a layout of model trains (everything to exact scale)
    This meant NO place for storage except for closets that didn’t exist till Joe (my dh) put in for us.
    Low and behold we moved out of town to a average sized OLDER home with attic and completely unusable cellar. (old stone foundation)
    BUT–there are out buildings (it used to be a saw mill/lumber yard). One building’s second floor was to be a train layout floor (that was in ’76 and he’s finally after 8 yrs of retirement) starting on it.
    BUT our home, one big barn and first floor of shed is FILLE with “STUFF”. Joe’s favorite hobby (other than trains) is to have something break and to fix it with some piece he saved from something else.
    We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! NOW he has hooked up a real hood from my kitchen and it’s grand. (I have a new microwave over my stove with an exhaust fan of it’s own).
    SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.

    Reply
  17. Back before 1976 we owned an old home in a suburb of Allentown PA with a cellar and a big attic. The attic was claimed by my dear husband for his “train room” to build a layout of model trains (everything to exact scale)
    This meant NO place for storage except for closets that didn’t exist till Joe (my dh) put in for us.
    Low and behold we moved out of town to a average sized OLDER home with attic and completely unusable cellar. (old stone foundation)
    BUT–there are out buildings (it used to be a saw mill/lumber yard). One building’s second floor was to be a train layout floor (that was in ’76 and he’s finally after 8 yrs of retirement) starting on it.
    BUT our home, one big barn and first floor of shed is FILLE with “STUFF”. Joe’s favorite hobby (other than trains) is to have something break and to fix it with some piece he saved from something else.
    We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! NOW he has hooked up a real hood from my kitchen and it’s grand. (I have a new microwave over my stove with an exhaust fan of it’s own).
    SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.

    Reply
  18. Back before 1976 we owned an old home in a suburb of Allentown PA with a cellar and a big attic. The attic was claimed by my dear husband for his “train room” to build a layout of model trains (everything to exact scale)
    This meant NO place for storage except for closets that didn’t exist till Joe (my dh) put in for us.
    Low and behold we moved out of town to a average sized OLDER home with attic and completely unusable cellar. (old stone foundation)
    BUT–there are out buildings (it used to be a saw mill/lumber yard). One building’s second floor was to be a train layout floor (that was in ’76 and he’s finally after 8 yrs of retirement) starting on it.
    BUT our home, one big barn and first floor of shed is FILLE with “STUFF”. Joe’s favorite hobby (other than trains) is to have something break and to fix it with some piece he saved from something else.
    We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! NOW he has hooked up a real hood from my kitchen and it’s grand. (I have a new microwave over my stove with an exhaust fan of it’s own).
    SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.

    Reply
  19. Back before 1976 we owned an old home in a suburb of Allentown PA with a cellar and a big attic. The attic was claimed by my dear husband for his “train room” to build a layout of model trains (everything to exact scale)
    This meant NO place for storage except for closets that didn’t exist till Joe (my dh) put in for us.
    Low and behold we moved out of town to a average sized OLDER home with attic and completely unusable cellar. (old stone foundation)
    BUT–there are out buildings (it used to be a saw mill/lumber yard). One building’s second floor was to be a train layout floor (that was in ’76 and he’s finally after 8 yrs of retirement) starting on it.
    BUT our home, one big barn and first floor of shed is FILLE with “STUFF”. Joe’s favorite hobby (other than trains) is to have something break and to fix it with some piece he saved from something else.
    We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! NOW he has hooked up a real hood from my kitchen and it’s grand. (I have a new microwave over my stove with an exhaust fan of it’s own).
    SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.

    Reply
  20. Back before 1976 we owned an old home in a suburb of Allentown PA with a cellar and a big attic. The attic was claimed by my dear husband for his “train room” to build a layout of model trains (everything to exact scale)
    This meant NO place for storage except for closets that didn’t exist till Joe (my dh) put in for us.
    Low and behold we moved out of town to a average sized OLDER home with attic and completely unusable cellar. (old stone foundation)
    BUT–there are out buildings (it used to be a saw mill/lumber yard). One building’s second floor was to be a train layout floor (that was in ’76 and he’s finally after 8 yrs of retirement) starting on it.
    BUT our home, one big barn and first floor of shed is FILLE with “STUFF”. Joe’s favorite hobby (other than trains) is to have something break and to fix it with some piece he saved from something else.
    We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! NOW he has hooked up a real hood from my kitchen and it’s grand. (I have a new microwave over my stove with an exhaust fan of it’s own).
    SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.

    Reply
  21. The Soane Museum is wonderful. The little guidebook they sell is interesting as well and worth attempting to track down even if you can’t get to London yourself to tour the house.
    And OMG, Hugh Laurie as Prinny is one of my favorite pieces of casting (closely followed by him as Bertie Wooster, making his performance as House all the more impressive). I own the complete Blackadder and the complete Jeeves and Wooseter on DVD . . . maybe it’s time for a weekend of loafing and laughing?
    I’m at my day job desk right now, so there’s lots of “stuff” I don’t want or need, but none of it very interesting. I think the “winner” for me is a really ugly snow globe with the old Joe Boxer happy face wearing a Santa hat inside. Why have I moved this hideous item from desk to desk for more than ten years?

    Reply
  22. The Soane Museum is wonderful. The little guidebook they sell is interesting as well and worth attempting to track down even if you can’t get to London yourself to tour the house.
    And OMG, Hugh Laurie as Prinny is one of my favorite pieces of casting (closely followed by him as Bertie Wooster, making his performance as House all the more impressive). I own the complete Blackadder and the complete Jeeves and Wooseter on DVD . . . maybe it’s time for a weekend of loafing and laughing?
    I’m at my day job desk right now, so there’s lots of “stuff” I don’t want or need, but none of it very interesting. I think the “winner” for me is a really ugly snow globe with the old Joe Boxer happy face wearing a Santa hat inside. Why have I moved this hideous item from desk to desk for more than ten years?

    Reply
  23. The Soane Museum is wonderful. The little guidebook they sell is interesting as well and worth attempting to track down even if you can’t get to London yourself to tour the house.
    And OMG, Hugh Laurie as Prinny is one of my favorite pieces of casting (closely followed by him as Bertie Wooster, making his performance as House all the more impressive). I own the complete Blackadder and the complete Jeeves and Wooseter on DVD . . . maybe it’s time for a weekend of loafing and laughing?
    I’m at my day job desk right now, so there’s lots of “stuff” I don’t want or need, but none of it very interesting. I think the “winner” for me is a really ugly snow globe with the old Joe Boxer happy face wearing a Santa hat inside. Why have I moved this hideous item from desk to desk for more than ten years?

    Reply
  24. The Soane Museum is wonderful. The little guidebook they sell is interesting as well and worth attempting to track down even if you can’t get to London yourself to tour the house.
    And OMG, Hugh Laurie as Prinny is one of my favorite pieces of casting (closely followed by him as Bertie Wooster, making his performance as House all the more impressive). I own the complete Blackadder and the complete Jeeves and Wooseter on DVD . . . maybe it’s time for a weekend of loafing and laughing?
    I’m at my day job desk right now, so there’s lots of “stuff” I don’t want or need, but none of it very interesting. I think the “winner” for me is a really ugly snow globe with the old Joe Boxer happy face wearing a Santa hat inside. Why have I moved this hideous item from desk to desk for more than ten years?

    Reply
  25. The Soane Museum is wonderful. The little guidebook they sell is interesting as well and worth attempting to track down even if you can’t get to London yourself to tour the house.
    And OMG, Hugh Laurie as Prinny is one of my favorite pieces of casting (closely followed by him as Bertie Wooster, making his performance as House all the more impressive). I own the complete Blackadder and the complete Jeeves and Wooseter on DVD . . . maybe it’s time for a weekend of loafing and laughing?
    I’m at my day job desk right now, so there’s lots of “stuff” I don’t want or need, but none of it very interesting. I think the “winner” for me is a really ugly snow globe with the old Joe Boxer happy face wearing a Santa hat inside. Why have I moved this hideous item from desk to desk for more than ten years?

    Reply
  26. My dad had a rule when my niece came to live with us, anytime something came into the house, something had to leave. It’s a good theory, but someone has to really live by it. Today’s society does tend to put a high value on material wealth, which is why everyone wants the latest, greatest gadget that’s bigger, has more memory or something.

    Reply
  27. My dad had a rule when my niece came to live with us, anytime something came into the house, something had to leave. It’s a good theory, but someone has to really live by it. Today’s society does tend to put a high value on material wealth, which is why everyone wants the latest, greatest gadget that’s bigger, has more memory or something.

    Reply
  28. My dad had a rule when my niece came to live with us, anytime something came into the house, something had to leave. It’s a good theory, but someone has to really live by it. Today’s society does tend to put a high value on material wealth, which is why everyone wants the latest, greatest gadget that’s bigger, has more memory or something.

    Reply
  29. My dad had a rule when my niece came to live with us, anytime something came into the house, something had to leave. It’s a good theory, but someone has to really live by it. Today’s society does tend to put a high value on material wealth, which is why everyone wants the latest, greatest gadget that’s bigger, has more memory or something.

    Reply
  30. My dad had a rule when my niece came to live with us, anytime something came into the house, something had to leave. It’s a good theory, but someone has to really live by it. Today’s society does tend to put a high value on material wealth, which is why everyone wants the latest, greatest gadget that’s bigger, has more memory or something.

    Reply
  31. Since you mentioned Hugh Laurie, Jo…my boyfriend is currently sitting in the Charlotte airport on a layover and texted me to inform me that he is pretty certain he saw Hugh Laurie there. Pretty awesome…I love him!
    (I replied back that he should surrepitously stalk him to find out for sure, and I got made fun of for using surrepitously in a text message!)
    As for clutter, I grew up in a house so full of stuff it was probably a fire code violation, so I try hard to keep my apartment organized and decluttered. I’d say my biggest clutter problem is old paperwork. I’m afraid to discard bills, receipts, etc out until I’m sure I don’t need them, so annually I have to force myself to perform an hours-long purge of my filing cabinet. It’d be a lot more expedient to throw things out as they come in, but I just can’t do it.

    Reply
  32. Since you mentioned Hugh Laurie, Jo…my boyfriend is currently sitting in the Charlotte airport on a layover and texted me to inform me that he is pretty certain he saw Hugh Laurie there. Pretty awesome…I love him!
    (I replied back that he should surrepitously stalk him to find out for sure, and I got made fun of for using surrepitously in a text message!)
    As for clutter, I grew up in a house so full of stuff it was probably a fire code violation, so I try hard to keep my apartment organized and decluttered. I’d say my biggest clutter problem is old paperwork. I’m afraid to discard bills, receipts, etc out until I’m sure I don’t need them, so annually I have to force myself to perform an hours-long purge of my filing cabinet. It’d be a lot more expedient to throw things out as they come in, but I just can’t do it.

    Reply
  33. Since you mentioned Hugh Laurie, Jo…my boyfriend is currently sitting in the Charlotte airport on a layover and texted me to inform me that he is pretty certain he saw Hugh Laurie there. Pretty awesome…I love him!
    (I replied back that he should surrepitously stalk him to find out for sure, and I got made fun of for using surrepitously in a text message!)
    As for clutter, I grew up in a house so full of stuff it was probably a fire code violation, so I try hard to keep my apartment organized and decluttered. I’d say my biggest clutter problem is old paperwork. I’m afraid to discard bills, receipts, etc out until I’m sure I don’t need them, so annually I have to force myself to perform an hours-long purge of my filing cabinet. It’d be a lot more expedient to throw things out as they come in, but I just can’t do it.

    Reply
  34. Since you mentioned Hugh Laurie, Jo…my boyfriend is currently sitting in the Charlotte airport on a layover and texted me to inform me that he is pretty certain he saw Hugh Laurie there. Pretty awesome…I love him!
    (I replied back that he should surrepitously stalk him to find out for sure, and I got made fun of for using surrepitously in a text message!)
    As for clutter, I grew up in a house so full of stuff it was probably a fire code violation, so I try hard to keep my apartment organized and decluttered. I’d say my biggest clutter problem is old paperwork. I’m afraid to discard bills, receipts, etc out until I’m sure I don’t need them, so annually I have to force myself to perform an hours-long purge of my filing cabinet. It’d be a lot more expedient to throw things out as they come in, but I just can’t do it.

    Reply
  35. Since you mentioned Hugh Laurie, Jo…my boyfriend is currently sitting in the Charlotte airport on a layover and texted me to inform me that he is pretty certain he saw Hugh Laurie there. Pretty awesome…I love him!
    (I replied back that he should surrepitously stalk him to find out for sure, and I got made fun of for using surrepitously in a text message!)
    As for clutter, I grew up in a house so full of stuff it was probably a fire code violation, so I try hard to keep my apartment organized and decluttered. I’d say my biggest clutter problem is old paperwork. I’m afraid to discard bills, receipts, etc out until I’m sure I don’t need them, so annually I have to force myself to perform an hours-long purge of my filing cabinet. It’d be a lot more expedient to throw things out as they come in, but I just can’t do it.

    Reply
  36. Totally, utterly sympathize, Jo! Even after half a dozen moves in the last twelve years, we have an entire row of unpacked moving cartons sitting in our basement. We’ve given/sold/thrown out Stuff all along the way, but what does one do with great-grandmother’s china?

    Reply
  37. Totally, utterly sympathize, Jo! Even after half a dozen moves in the last twelve years, we have an entire row of unpacked moving cartons sitting in our basement. We’ve given/sold/thrown out Stuff all along the way, but what does one do with great-grandmother’s china?

    Reply
  38. Totally, utterly sympathize, Jo! Even after half a dozen moves in the last twelve years, we have an entire row of unpacked moving cartons sitting in our basement. We’ve given/sold/thrown out Stuff all along the way, but what does one do with great-grandmother’s china?

    Reply
  39. Totally, utterly sympathize, Jo! Even after half a dozen moves in the last twelve years, we have an entire row of unpacked moving cartons sitting in our basement. We’ve given/sold/thrown out Stuff all along the way, but what does one do with great-grandmother’s china?

    Reply
  40. Totally, utterly sympathize, Jo! Even after half a dozen moves in the last twelve years, we have an entire row of unpacked moving cartons sitting in our basement. We’ve given/sold/thrown out Stuff all along the way, but what does one do with great-grandmother’s china?

    Reply
  41. Jo, didn’t they put everything in the attics (“lumber room”) and keep it for generations in England? Of course those were the people who had country estates. But I seem to remember Heyer referring to the trunks and furniture stored in attics in several of her stories (Arabella and The Unknown Ajax are two that come to mind). Or did she make that part up? And country people today still burn and/or bury their trash; archaeologists have found rubbish dumps for every civilization they’ve ever studied. So I think we can argue that surrounding ourselves with stuff is a longtime behavior pattern; some of us have the gene that makes us feel better when we hoard, and others just can’t stand the clutter!

    Reply
  42. Jo, didn’t they put everything in the attics (“lumber room”) and keep it for generations in England? Of course those were the people who had country estates. But I seem to remember Heyer referring to the trunks and furniture stored in attics in several of her stories (Arabella and The Unknown Ajax are two that come to mind). Or did she make that part up? And country people today still burn and/or bury their trash; archaeologists have found rubbish dumps for every civilization they’ve ever studied. So I think we can argue that surrounding ourselves with stuff is a longtime behavior pattern; some of us have the gene that makes us feel better when we hoard, and others just can’t stand the clutter!

    Reply
  43. Jo, didn’t they put everything in the attics (“lumber room”) and keep it for generations in England? Of course those were the people who had country estates. But I seem to remember Heyer referring to the trunks and furniture stored in attics in several of her stories (Arabella and The Unknown Ajax are two that come to mind). Or did she make that part up? And country people today still burn and/or bury their trash; archaeologists have found rubbish dumps for every civilization they’ve ever studied. So I think we can argue that surrounding ourselves with stuff is a longtime behavior pattern; some of us have the gene that makes us feel better when we hoard, and others just can’t stand the clutter!

    Reply
  44. Jo, didn’t they put everything in the attics (“lumber room”) and keep it for generations in England? Of course those were the people who had country estates. But I seem to remember Heyer referring to the trunks and furniture stored in attics in several of her stories (Arabella and The Unknown Ajax are two that come to mind). Or did she make that part up? And country people today still burn and/or bury their trash; archaeologists have found rubbish dumps for every civilization they’ve ever studied. So I think we can argue that surrounding ourselves with stuff is a longtime behavior pattern; some of us have the gene that makes us feel better when we hoard, and others just can’t stand the clutter!

    Reply
  45. Jo, didn’t they put everything in the attics (“lumber room”) and keep it for generations in England? Of course those were the people who had country estates. But I seem to remember Heyer referring to the trunks and furniture stored in attics in several of her stories (Arabella and The Unknown Ajax are two that come to mind). Or did she make that part up? And country people today still burn and/or bury their trash; archaeologists have found rubbish dumps for every civilization they’ve ever studied. So I think we can argue that surrounding ourselves with stuff is a longtime behavior pattern; some of us have the gene that makes us feel better when we hoard, and others just can’t stand the clutter!

    Reply
  46. Well, some “stuff” I have lots of includes all the guidebooks and brochures for all the places I visited when I lived in England for 5 years–including one for the Soane museum, which was lots of fun. The way we got rid of at least some of that “stuff” was to cut up the brochures and make a scrapbook of our time abroad, so at least that cut down on the volume a little bit!

    Reply
  47. Well, some “stuff” I have lots of includes all the guidebooks and brochures for all the places I visited when I lived in England for 5 years–including one for the Soane museum, which was lots of fun. The way we got rid of at least some of that “stuff” was to cut up the brochures and make a scrapbook of our time abroad, so at least that cut down on the volume a little bit!

    Reply
  48. Well, some “stuff” I have lots of includes all the guidebooks and brochures for all the places I visited when I lived in England for 5 years–including one for the Soane museum, which was lots of fun. The way we got rid of at least some of that “stuff” was to cut up the brochures and make a scrapbook of our time abroad, so at least that cut down on the volume a little bit!

    Reply
  49. Well, some “stuff” I have lots of includes all the guidebooks and brochures for all the places I visited when I lived in England for 5 years–including one for the Soane museum, which was lots of fun. The way we got rid of at least some of that “stuff” was to cut up the brochures and make a scrapbook of our time abroad, so at least that cut down on the volume a little bit!

    Reply
  50. Well, some “stuff” I have lots of includes all the guidebooks and brochures for all the places I visited when I lived in England for 5 years–including one for the Soane museum, which was lots of fun. The way we got rid of at least some of that “stuff” was to cut up the brochures and make a scrapbook of our time abroad, so at least that cut down on the volume a little bit!

    Reply
  51. Jo, you are my soul sister in terms of the “clutter” issue! I’m of the opinion that clutter accumulation (or, as I like to call it, being a “pack rat”) is genetic in nature. Many of my female relatives share the same trait, and we make all kinds of resolutions to resolve the clutter issue, such as what somebody else mentioned–i.e. when you buy something new, get rid of something old. What happens with me (especially when it comes to disposing of books) is that I sit down and think about what was going on in my life with the old item and half the time, I can’t bear to part with said item for sentimental reasons. Let’s just say that whoever came up with the concept of public storage spaces should be nominated for a gold medal!! At any rate, good luck on your clutter disposition!!

    Reply
  52. Jo, you are my soul sister in terms of the “clutter” issue! I’m of the opinion that clutter accumulation (or, as I like to call it, being a “pack rat”) is genetic in nature. Many of my female relatives share the same trait, and we make all kinds of resolutions to resolve the clutter issue, such as what somebody else mentioned–i.e. when you buy something new, get rid of something old. What happens with me (especially when it comes to disposing of books) is that I sit down and think about what was going on in my life with the old item and half the time, I can’t bear to part with said item for sentimental reasons. Let’s just say that whoever came up with the concept of public storage spaces should be nominated for a gold medal!! At any rate, good luck on your clutter disposition!!

    Reply
  53. Jo, you are my soul sister in terms of the “clutter” issue! I’m of the opinion that clutter accumulation (or, as I like to call it, being a “pack rat”) is genetic in nature. Many of my female relatives share the same trait, and we make all kinds of resolutions to resolve the clutter issue, such as what somebody else mentioned–i.e. when you buy something new, get rid of something old. What happens with me (especially when it comes to disposing of books) is that I sit down and think about what was going on in my life with the old item and half the time, I can’t bear to part with said item for sentimental reasons. Let’s just say that whoever came up with the concept of public storage spaces should be nominated for a gold medal!! At any rate, good luck on your clutter disposition!!

    Reply
  54. Jo, you are my soul sister in terms of the “clutter” issue! I’m of the opinion that clutter accumulation (or, as I like to call it, being a “pack rat”) is genetic in nature. Many of my female relatives share the same trait, and we make all kinds of resolutions to resolve the clutter issue, such as what somebody else mentioned–i.e. when you buy something new, get rid of something old. What happens with me (especially when it comes to disposing of books) is that I sit down and think about what was going on in my life with the old item and half the time, I can’t bear to part with said item for sentimental reasons. Let’s just say that whoever came up with the concept of public storage spaces should be nominated for a gold medal!! At any rate, good luck on your clutter disposition!!

    Reply
  55. Jo, you are my soul sister in terms of the “clutter” issue! I’m of the opinion that clutter accumulation (or, as I like to call it, being a “pack rat”) is genetic in nature. Many of my female relatives share the same trait, and we make all kinds of resolutions to resolve the clutter issue, such as what somebody else mentioned–i.e. when you buy something new, get rid of something old. What happens with me (especially when it comes to disposing of books) is that I sit down and think about what was going on in my life with the old item and half the time, I can’t bear to part with said item for sentimental reasons. Let’s just say that whoever came up with the concept of public storage spaces should be nominated for a gold medal!! At any rate, good luck on your clutter disposition!!

    Reply
  56. Thanks for the searching on clutter.
    I suppose the piles of bones and flint chips archeologists love to find could be seen as clutter, too.
    Martha said: “We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! ”
    My husband has done that. Apparently some tech bits have good fans. Muffin fans, I think. Don’t know why they’re called that.
    “SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.”
    Indeed. Yay, verily. Trouble is, in square footage there’s close to the same amount of space here! Just little storage.
    Good point, Lynne, about the lumber rooms — box rooms, I think they called them, or just attics. And as with the bones and flint, a lot of that “stuff” is valued later. That’s one of my problems. I look at things and wonder if someday someone will be delighted to find it.
    I did mend a teddy bear my mother made, but had problems with. Note, my mother died in 1987. A bit before she’d been making the teddy for my kids, but the joints for one leg and the head weren’t working, so I said I’d try to fix them. I did, but they needed new ones. She’d used recycled ones. She took reuse and recycle to extremes!
    Anyway, I was very guilty when I found the teddy bits in the bottom of a box, so I fixed him. He’s now happily hanging out with the CBKs we have here — Charlie and Billie.
    Not many of you have revealed a clutter item yet. I don’t believe you don’t have any! But if you’re a work, yes, home ones are better.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  57. Thanks for the searching on clutter.
    I suppose the piles of bones and flint chips archeologists love to find could be seen as clutter, too.
    Martha said: “We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! ”
    My husband has done that. Apparently some tech bits have good fans. Muffin fans, I think. Don’t know why they’re called that.
    “SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.”
    Indeed. Yay, verily. Trouble is, in square footage there’s close to the same amount of space here! Just little storage.
    Good point, Lynne, about the lumber rooms — box rooms, I think they called them, or just attics. And as with the bones and flint, a lot of that “stuff” is valued later. That’s one of my problems. I look at things and wonder if someday someone will be delighted to find it.
    I did mend a teddy bear my mother made, but had problems with. Note, my mother died in 1987. A bit before she’d been making the teddy for my kids, but the joints for one leg and the head weren’t working, so I said I’d try to fix them. I did, but they needed new ones. She’d used recycled ones. She took reuse and recycle to extremes!
    Anyway, I was very guilty when I found the teddy bits in the bottom of a box, so I fixed him. He’s now happily hanging out with the CBKs we have here — Charlie and Billie.
    Not many of you have revealed a clutter item yet. I don’t believe you don’t have any! But if you’re a work, yes, home ones are better.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  58. Thanks for the searching on clutter.
    I suppose the piles of bones and flint chips archeologists love to find could be seen as clutter, too.
    Martha said: “We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! ”
    My husband has done that. Apparently some tech bits have good fans. Muffin fans, I think. Don’t know why they’re called that.
    “SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.”
    Indeed. Yay, verily. Trouble is, in square footage there’s close to the same amount of space here! Just little storage.
    Good point, Lynne, about the lumber rooms — box rooms, I think they called them, or just attics. And as with the bones and flint, a lot of that “stuff” is valued later. That’s one of my problems. I look at things and wonder if someday someone will be delighted to find it.
    I did mend a teddy bear my mother made, but had problems with. Note, my mother died in 1987. A bit before she’d been making the teddy for my kids, but the joints for one leg and the head weren’t working, so I said I’d try to fix them. I did, but they needed new ones. She’d used recycled ones. She took reuse and recycle to extremes!
    Anyway, I was very guilty when I found the teddy bits in the bottom of a box, so I fixed him. He’s now happily hanging out with the CBKs we have here — Charlie and Billie.
    Not many of you have revealed a clutter item yet. I don’t believe you don’t have any! But if you’re a work, yes, home ones are better.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  59. Thanks for the searching on clutter.
    I suppose the piles of bones and flint chips archeologists love to find could be seen as clutter, too.
    Martha said: “We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! ”
    My husband has done that. Apparently some tech bits have good fans. Muffin fans, I think. Don’t know why they’re called that.
    “SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.”
    Indeed. Yay, verily. Trouble is, in square footage there’s close to the same amount of space here! Just little storage.
    Good point, Lynne, about the lumber rooms — box rooms, I think they called them, or just attics. And as with the bones and flint, a lot of that “stuff” is valued later. That’s one of my problems. I look at things and wonder if someday someone will be delighted to find it.
    I did mend a teddy bear my mother made, but had problems with. Note, my mother died in 1987. A bit before she’d been making the teddy for my kids, but the joints for one leg and the head weren’t working, so I said I’d try to fix them. I did, but they needed new ones. She’d used recycled ones. She took reuse and recycle to extremes!
    Anyway, I was very guilty when I found the teddy bits in the bottom of a box, so I fixed him. He’s now happily hanging out with the CBKs we have here — Charlie and Billie.
    Not many of you have revealed a clutter item yet. I don’t believe you don’t have any! But if you’re a work, yes, home ones are better.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  60. Thanks for the searching on clutter.
    I suppose the piles of bones and flint chips archeologists love to find could be seen as clutter, too.
    Martha said: “We have a screen porch and the charcoal smoke drove us nuts–MY Joe went, ripped out a fan from a printer that bit the dust and presto I had a weak but working fan to draw out smoke! ”
    My husband has done that. Apparently some tech bits have good fans. Muffin fans, I think. Don’t know why they’re called that.
    “SO–the more room you have–the more junk you keep! This I believe and I’m unanimous on it.”
    Indeed. Yay, verily. Trouble is, in square footage there’s close to the same amount of space here! Just little storage.
    Good point, Lynne, about the lumber rooms — box rooms, I think they called them, or just attics. And as with the bones and flint, a lot of that “stuff” is valued later. That’s one of my problems. I look at things and wonder if someday someone will be delighted to find it.
    I did mend a teddy bear my mother made, but had problems with. Note, my mother died in 1987. A bit before she’d been making the teddy for my kids, but the joints for one leg and the head weren’t working, so I said I’d try to fix them. I did, but they needed new ones. She’d used recycled ones. She took reuse and recycle to extremes!
    Anyway, I was very guilty when I found the teddy bits in the bottom of a box, so I fixed him. He’s now happily hanging out with the CBKs we have here — Charlie and Billie.
    Not many of you have revealed a clutter item yet. I don’t believe you don’t have any! But if you’re a work, yes, home ones are better.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  61. Okay, I’ll give…clutter…I have in my kitchen, my nice big kitchen with the 30 feet of counter space, only about four of it usable…three stacks of “gee, I really want to go through that catalog” catalogs, half a dozen canning jars that need to go back to my mother-in-law along with two baking dishes (she still sends care packages for her son, who I’ve been married to for 28 years…) a medium sized pile of craft stuff for the crafts I started a month ago that I have yet to finish, my mixer, blender, toaster, six plants and two stacks (because the one just got too tall and kept tipping over) of bills that I never open because I do all my banking and bill paying online so I have no idea why I can’t bring myself to toss them, three teddy bears the puppy thought to claim as her own (I have collected almost 200, all in my den, all various sizes and taking up most of THAT room!) two woobies that the puppy used to have as play things which she chewed the squeekers out of and I now need to sew, dirty dishes because my family still has no clue what a dishwasher is, three gallons of iced tea and a two liter of pop. My TBR pile that now sports almost 60 books, two big baskets full of fruit, one basket that is a ‘catch all’ for the valve stem seals, cotter pins and everything else that seems to make it home in my husband’s pockets, along with migrating clips, pens, pencils, a stapler (I have four of those) scotch tape dispenser (empty because the girls can’t find the brand new box sitting on my desk) my address book and my purse.
    The only things that Should be there are the appliances and the plants. Talk about clutter!
    And that’s just the kitchen. Then we have the great room that has…

    Reply
  62. Okay, I’ll give…clutter…I have in my kitchen, my nice big kitchen with the 30 feet of counter space, only about four of it usable…three stacks of “gee, I really want to go through that catalog” catalogs, half a dozen canning jars that need to go back to my mother-in-law along with two baking dishes (she still sends care packages for her son, who I’ve been married to for 28 years…) a medium sized pile of craft stuff for the crafts I started a month ago that I have yet to finish, my mixer, blender, toaster, six plants and two stacks (because the one just got too tall and kept tipping over) of bills that I never open because I do all my banking and bill paying online so I have no idea why I can’t bring myself to toss them, three teddy bears the puppy thought to claim as her own (I have collected almost 200, all in my den, all various sizes and taking up most of THAT room!) two woobies that the puppy used to have as play things which she chewed the squeekers out of and I now need to sew, dirty dishes because my family still has no clue what a dishwasher is, three gallons of iced tea and a two liter of pop. My TBR pile that now sports almost 60 books, two big baskets full of fruit, one basket that is a ‘catch all’ for the valve stem seals, cotter pins and everything else that seems to make it home in my husband’s pockets, along with migrating clips, pens, pencils, a stapler (I have four of those) scotch tape dispenser (empty because the girls can’t find the brand new box sitting on my desk) my address book and my purse.
    The only things that Should be there are the appliances and the plants. Talk about clutter!
    And that’s just the kitchen. Then we have the great room that has…

    Reply
  63. Okay, I’ll give…clutter…I have in my kitchen, my nice big kitchen with the 30 feet of counter space, only about four of it usable…three stacks of “gee, I really want to go through that catalog” catalogs, half a dozen canning jars that need to go back to my mother-in-law along with two baking dishes (she still sends care packages for her son, who I’ve been married to for 28 years…) a medium sized pile of craft stuff for the crafts I started a month ago that I have yet to finish, my mixer, blender, toaster, six plants and two stacks (because the one just got too tall and kept tipping over) of bills that I never open because I do all my banking and bill paying online so I have no idea why I can’t bring myself to toss them, three teddy bears the puppy thought to claim as her own (I have collected almost 200, all in my den, all various sizes and taking up most of THAT room!) two woobies that the puppy used to have as play things which she chewed the squeekers out of and I now need to sew, dirty dishes because my family still has no clue what a dishwasher is, three gallons of iced tea and a two liter of pop. My TBR pile that now sports almost 60 books, two big baskets full of fruit, one basket that is a ‘catch all’ for the valve stem seals, cotter pins and everything else that seems to make it home in my husband’s pockets, along with migrating clips, pens, pencils, a stapler (I have four of those) scotch tape dispenser (empty because the girls can’t find the brand new box sitting on my desk) my address book and my purse.
    The only things that Should be there are the appliances and the plants. Talk about clutter!
    And that’s just the kitchen. Then we have the great room that has…

    Reply
  64. Okay, I’ll give…clutter…I have in my kitchen, my nice big kitchen with the 30 feet of counter space, only about four of it usable…three stacks of “gee, I really want to go through that catalog” catalogs, half a dozen canning jars that need to go back to my mother-in-law along with two baking dishes (she still sends care packages for her son, who I’ve been married to for 28 years…) a medium sized pile of craft stuff for the crafts I started a month ago that I have yet to finish, my mixer, blender, toaster, six plants and two stacks (because the one just got too tall and kept tipping over) of bills that I never open because I do all my banking and bill paying online so I have no idea why I can’t bring myself to toss them, three teddy bears the puppy thought to claim as her own (I have collected almost 200, all in my den, all various sizes and taking up most of THAT room!) two woobies that the puppy used to have as play things which she chewed the squeekers out of and I now need to sew, dirty dishes because my family still has no clue what a dishwasher is, three gallons of iced tea and a two liter of pop. My TBR pile that now sports almost 60 books, two big baskets full of fruit, one basket that is a ‘catch all’ for the valve stem seals, cotter pins and everything else that seems to make it home in my husband’s pockets, along with migrating clips, pens, pencils, a stapler (I have four of those) scotch tape dispenser (empty because the girls can’t find the brand new box sitting on my desk) my address book and my purse.
    The only things that Should be there are the appliances and the plants. Talk about clutter!
    And that’s just the kitchen. Then we have the great room that has…

    Reply
  65. Okay, I’ll give…clutter…I have in my kitchen, my nice big kitchen with the 30 feet of counter space, only about four of it usable…three stacks of “gee, I really want to go through that catalog” catalogs, half a dozen canning jars that need to go back to my mother-in-law along with two baking dishes (she still sends care packages for her son, who I’ve been married to for 28 years…) a medium sized pile of craft stuff for the crafts I started a month ago that I have yet to finish, my mixer, blender, toaster, six plants and two stacks (because the one just got too tall and kept tipping over) of bills that I never open because I do all my banking and bill paying online so I have no idea why I can’t bring myself to toss them, three teddy bears the puppy thought to claim as her own (I have collected almost 200, all in my den, all various sizes and taking up most of THAT room!) two woobies that the puppy used to have as play things which she chewed the squeekers out of and I now need to sew, dirty dishes because my family still has no clue what a dishwasher is, three gallons of iced tea and a two liter of pop. My TBR pile that now sports almost 60 books, two big baskets full of fruit, one basket that is a ‘catch all’ for the valve stem seals, cotter pins and everything else that seems to make it home in my husband’s pockets, along with migrating clips, pens, pencils, a stapler (I have four of those) scotch tape dispenser (empty because the girls can’t find the brand new box sitting on my desk) my address book and my purse.
    The only things that Should be there are the appliances and the plants. Talk about clutter!
    And that’s just the kitchen. Then we have the great room that has…

    Reply
  66. The Soane museum is something else. Like all the British Museum packed into someone’s house. Whereas my house is just filled with junk!

    Reply
  67. The Soane museum is something else. Like all the British Museum packed into someone’s house. Whereas my house is just filled with junk!

    Reply
  68. The Soane museum is something else. Like all the British Museum packed into someone’s house. Whereas my house is just filled with junk!

    Reply
  69. The Soane museum is something else. Like all the British Museum packed into someone’s house. Whereas my house is just filled with junk!

    Reply
  70. The Soane museum is something else. Like all the British Museum packed into someone’s house. Whereas my house is just filled with junk!

    Reply
  71. I loved the Soane Museum, although IIRC he eventually used 3 houses, not 2 to store and display all his stuff. Part of what I remember is that things were in layers on the wall or in drawers or frames for drawings that were attached on one side and viewed as if pages in a book. It reminded me a bit of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston due to the clutter and the very real sense of the founder — these were not museums laid out by professional curators but by idiosyncratic collectors.
    As for my own clutter, I must say that it’s mostly books. I’ve got bookcases in almost every room, some two layers deep, but there are also books on the dressers, nightstands, in boxes (many, many boxes), on the floor, under the eaves, and anywhere there’s a flat surface that doesn’t need to be used for anything else. Once my sons’ lives are settled I’m going to make them take their books and then I’ll organize all the ones that remain (which will still be enough to start a small UBS). I dream of separating fiction from non-fiction and alphabetizing by author, but that someday is definitely not today.

    Reply
  72. I loved the Soane Museum, although IIRC he eventually used 3 houses, not 2 to store and display all his stuff. Part of what I remember is that things were in layers on the wall or in drawers or frames for drawings that were attached on one side and viewed as if pages in a book. It reminded me a bit of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston due to the clutter and the very real sense of the founder — these were not museums laid out by professional curators but by idiosyncratic collectors.
    As for my own clutter, I must say that it’s mostly books. I’ve got bookcases in almost every room, some two layers deep, but there are also books on the dressers, nightstands, in boxes (many, many boxes), on the floor, under the eaves, and anywhere there’s a flat surface that doesn’t need to be used for anything else. Once my sons’ lives are settled I’m going to make them take their books and then I’ll organize all the ones that remain (which will still be enough to start a small UBS). I dream of separating fiction from non-fiction and alphabetizing by author, but that someday is definitely not today.

    Reply
  73. I loved the Soane Museum, although IIRC he eventually used 3 houses, not 2 to store and display all his stuff. Part of what I remember is that things were in layers on the wall or in drawers or frames for drawings that were attached on one side and viewed as if pages in a book. It reminded me a bit of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston due to the clutter and the very real sense of the founder — these were not museums laid out by professional curators but by idiosyncratic collectors.
    As for my own clutter, I must say that it’s mostly books. I’ve got bookcases in almost every room, some two layers deep, but there are also books on the dressers, nightstands, in boxes (many, many boxes), on the floor, under the eaves, and anywhere there’s a flat surface that doesn’t need to be used for anything else. Once my sons’ lives are settled I’m going to make them take their books and then I’ll organize all the ones that remain (which will still be enough to start a small UBS). I dream of separating fiction from non-fiction and alphabetizing by author, but that someday is definitely not today.

    Reply
  74. I loved the Soane Museum, although IIRC he eventually used 3 houses, not 2 to store and display all his stuff. Part of what I remember is that things were in layers on the wall or in drawers or frames for drawings that were attached on one side and viewed as if pages in a book. It reminded me a bit of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston due to the clutter and the very real sense of the founder — these were not museums laid out by professional curators but by idiosyncratic collectors.
    As for my own clutter, I must say that it’s mostly books. I’ve got bookcases in almost every room, some two layers deep, but there are also books on the dressers, nightstands, in boxes (many, many boxes), on the floor, under the eaves, and anywhere there’s a flat surface that doesn’t need to be used for anything else. Once my sons’ lives are settled I’m going to make them take their books and then I’ll organize all the ones that remain (which will still be enough to start a small UBS). I dream of separating fiction from non-fiction and alphabetizing by author, but that someday is definitely not today.

    Reply
  75. I loved the Soane Museum, although IIRC he eventually used 3 houses, not 2 to store and display all his stuff. Part of what I remember is that things were in layers on the wall or in drawers or frames for drawings that were attached on one side and viewed as if pages in a book. It reminded me a bit of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston due to the clutter and the very real sense of the founder — these were not museums laid out by professional curators but by idiosyncratic collectors.
    As for my own clutter, I must say that it’s mostly books. I’ve got bookcases in almost every room, some two layers deep, but there are also books on the dressers, nightstands, in boxes (many, many boxes), on the floor, under the eaves, and anywhere there’s a flat surface that doesn’t need to be used for anything else. Once my sons’ lives are settled I’m going to make them take their books and then I’ll organize all the ones that remain (which will still be enough to start a small UBS). I dream of separating fiction from non-fiction and alphabetizing by author, but that someday is definitely not today.

    Reply
  76. “Clowder” is still the correct collective noun for cats.
    I remember reading, about half a century ago, that part of a lost play by Menander, the famous Greek comic playwright, was found in the form of papyrus scraps used as packing material inside Coptic sarcophagi.
    I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…
    Jo, no doubt when you pass to your heavenly reward, they will find two boxes in your attic: one labeled “String Saved,” the other labeled “String Too Short to Be Saved.”

    Reply
  77. “Clowder” is still the correct collective noun for cats.
    I remember reading, about half a century ago, that part of a lost play by Menander, the famous Greek comic playwright, was found in the form of papyrus scraps used as packing material inside Coptic sarcophagi.
    I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…
    Jo, no doubt when you pass to your heavenly reward, they will find two boxes in your attic: one labeled “String Saved,” the other labeled “String Too Short to Be Saved.”

    Reply
  78. “Clowder” is still the correct collective noun for cats.
    I remember reading, about half a century ago, that part of a lost play by Menander, the famous Greek comic playwright, was found in the form of papyrus scraps used as packing material inside Coptic sarcophagi.
    I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…
    Jo, no doubt when you pass to your heavenly reward, they will find two boxes in your attic: one labeled “String Saved,” the other labeled “String Too Short to Be Saved.”

    Reply
  79. “Clowder” is still the correct collective noun for cats.
    I remember reading, about half a century ago, that part of a lost play by Menander, the famous Greek comic playwright, was found in the form of papyrus scraps used as packing material inside Coptic sarcophagi.
    I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…
    Jo, no doubt when you pass to your heavenly reward, they will find two boxes in your attic: one labeled “String Saved,” the other labeled “String Too Short to Be Saved.”

    Reply
  80. “Clowder” is still the correct collective noun for cats.
    I remember reading, about half a century ago, that part of a lost play by Menander, the famous Greek comic playwright, was found in the form of papyrus scraps used as packing material inside Coptic sarcophagi.
    I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…
    Jo, no doubt when you pass to your heavenly reward, they will find two boxes in your attic: one labeled “String Saved,” the other labeled “String Too Short to Be Saved.”

    Reply
  81. +JMJ+
    I’ll admit to being really bad with clutter, too, Jo! =P
    My bedside table is full of bottles and tubes of lotion and body butter–all different sizes and scents. Which one I choose to smooth on after my shower depends on my mood–so I make sure I’m well stocked and have cucumber when I need something “cool smelling” or vanilla for when I’m nostalgic for childhood Christmases, etc.
    As for my bookcases . . . they are overflowing with more than just books and my notebooks. The top of one case is for cosmetics and accessories. I wish I could say they’re neatly arranged, but I have one plastic bowl in which I toss all the makeup and another plastic bowl in which I toss all the accessories. And because two bowls don’t take up much room, I have lord-knows-what-else in the spaces between them. (Well, I know that my mobile phone’s charger is there somewhere . . .)
    What else? I have lots of paper bags from shopping expeditions folded under my bed, just in case I may need them again someday. (Ha! Not likely, but I can never bear to throw away a pretty and sturdy paper bag that has been used just once.)
    If I ever have to pack up and move, the books will be the first priority. I won’t mind throwing everything else out, but my library travels with me or I stay put! =P

    Reply
  82. +JMJ+
    I’ll admit to being really bad with clutter, too, Jo! =P
    My bedside table is full of bottles and tubes of lotion and body butter–all different sizes and scents. Which one I choose to smooth on after my shower depends on my mood–so I make sure I’m well stocked and have cucumber when I need something “cool smelling” or vanilla for when I’m nostalgic for childhood Christmases, etc.
    As for my bookcases . . . they are overflowing with more than just books and my notebooks. The top of one case is for cosmetics and accessories. I wish I could say they’re neatly arranged, but I have one plastic bowl in which I toss all the makeup and another plastic bowl in which I toss all the accessories. And because two bowls don’t take up much room, I have lord-knows-what-else in the spaces between them. (Well, I know that my mobile phone’s charger is there somewhere . . .)
    What else? I have lots of paper bags from shopping expeditions folded under my bed, just in case I may need them again someday. (Ha! Not likely, but I can never bear to throw away a pretty and sturdy paper bag that has been used just once.)
    If I ever have to pack up and move, the books will be the first priority. I won’t mind throwing everything else out, but my library travels with me or I stay put! =P

    Reply
  83. +JMJ+
    I’ll admit to being really bad with clutter, too, Jo! =P
    My bedside table is full of bottles and tubes of lotion and body butter–all different sizes and scents. Which one I choose to smooth on after my shower depends on my mood–so I make sure I’m well stocked and have cucumber when I need something “cool smelling” or vanilla for when I’m nostalgic for childhood Christmases, etc.
    As for my bookcases . . . they are overflowing with more than just books and my notebooks. The top of one case is for cosmetics and accessories. I wish I could say they’re neatly arranged, but I have one plastic bowl in which I toss all the makeup and another plastic bowl in which I toss all the accessories. And because two bowls don’t take up much room, I have lord-knows-what-else in the spaces between them. (Well, I know that my mobile phone’s charger is there somewhere . . .)
    What else? I have lots of paper bags from shopping expeditions folded under my bed, just in case I may need them again someday. (Ha! Not likely, but I can never bear to throw away a pretty and sturdy paper bag that has been used just once.)
    If I ever have to pack up and move, the books will be the first priority. I won’t mind throwing everything else out, but my library travels with me or I stay put! =P

    Reply
  84. +JMJ+
    I’ll admit to being really bad with clutter, too, Jo! =P
    My bedside table is full of bottles and tubes of lotion and body butter–all different sizes and scents. Which one I choose to smooth on after my shower depends on my mood–so I make sure I’m well stocked and have cucumber when I need something “cool smelling” or vanilla for when I’m nostalgic for childhood Christmases, etc.
    As for my bookcases . . . they are overflowing with more than just books and my notebooks. The top of one case is for cosmetics and accessories. I wish I could say they’re neatly arranged, but I have one plastic bowl in which I toss all the makeup and another plastic bowl in which I toss all the accessories. And because two bowls don’t take up much room, I have lord-knows-what-else in the spaces between them. (Well, I know that my mobile phone’s charger is there somewhere . . .)
    What else? I have lots of paper bags from shopping expeditions folded under my bed, just in case I may need them again someday. (Ha! Not likely, but I can never bear to throw away a pretty and sturdy paper bag that has been used just once.)
    If I ever have to pack up and move, the books will be the first priority. I won’t mind throwing everything else out, but my library travels with me or I stay put! =P

    Reply
  85. +JMJ+
    I’ll admit to being really bad with clutter, too, Jo! =P
    My bedside table is full of bottles and tubes of lotion and body butter–all different sizes and scents. Which one I choose to smooth on after my shower depends on my mood–so I make sure I’m well stocked and have cucumber when I need something “cool smelling” or vanilla for when I’m nostalgic for childhood Christmases, etc.
    As for my bookcases . . . they are overflowing with more than just books and my notebooks. The top of one case is for cosmetics and accessories. I wish I could say they’re neatly arranged, but I have one plastic bowl in which I toss all the makeup and another plastic bowl in which I toss all the accessories. And because two bowls don’t take up much room, I have lord-knows-what-else in the spaces between them. (Well, I know that my mobile phone’s charger is there somewhere . . .)
    What else? I have lots of paper bags from shopping expeditions folded under my bed, just in case I may need them again someday. (Ha! Not likely, but I can never bear to throw away a pretty and sturdy paper bag that has been used just once.)
    If I ever have to pack up and move, the books will be the first priority. I won’t mind throwing everything else out, but my library travels with me or I stay put! =P

    Reply
  86. Tal, that’s funny! String saved and string too short…
    I have a question though. One or two commented that they grew up in a cluttered house and have tried not to do the same. I grew up in a house where my parents saved *everything*! I think it came from that depression era mentality but that’s just a guess on my part. But I’m curious to know how many clutterers came from a cluttered home and vice versa.
    I don’t have nearly the clutter I grew up in, but I can’t seem to stop myself from doing the same thing. I tend to save antique furniture along with my books though. Between the two, my nice big house feels rather cramped at times.
    But really, do we take on those idiosyncrasies from our parents? Or develop ones of our own?

    Reply
  87. Tal, that’s funny! String saved and string too short…
    I have a question though. One or two commented that they grew up in a cluttered house and have tried not to do the same. I grew up in a house where my parents saved *everything*! I think it came from that depression era mentality but that’s just a guess on my part. But I’m curious to know how many clutterers came from a cluttered home and vice versa.
    I don’t have nearly the clutter I grew up in, but I can’t seem to stop myself from doing the same thing. I tend to save antique furniture along with my books though. Between the two, my nice big house feels rather cramped at times.
    But really, do we take on those idiosyncrasies from our parents? Or develop ones of our own?

    Reply
  88. Tal, that’s funny! String saved and string too short…
    I have a question though. One or two commented that they grew up in a cluttered house and have tried not to do the same. I grew up in a house where my parents saved *everything*! I think it came from that depression era mentality but that’s just a guess on my part. But I’m curious to know how many clutterers came from a cluttered home and vice versa.
    I don’t have nearly the clutter I grew up in, but I can’t seem to stop myself from doing the same thing. I tend to save antique furniture along with my books though. Between the two, my nice big house feels rather cramped at times.
    But really, do we take on those idiosyncrasies from our parents? Or develop ones of our own?

    Reply
  89. Tal, that’s funny! String saved and string too short…
    I have a question though. One or two commented that they grew up in a cluttered house and have tried not to do the same. I grew up in a house where my parents saved *everything*! I think it came from that depression era mentality but that’s just a guess on my part. But I’m curious to know how many clutterers came from a cluttered home and vice versa.
    I don’t have nearly the clutter I grew up in, but I can’t seem to stop myself from doing the same thing. I tend to save antique furniture along with my books though. Between the two, my nice big house feels rather cramped at times.
    But really, do we take on those idiosyncrasies from our parents? Or develop ones of our own?

    Reply
  90. Tal, that’s funny! String saved and string too short…
    I have a question though. One or two commented that they grew up in a cluttered house and have tried not to do the same. I grew up in a house where my parents saved *everything*! I think it came from that depression era mentality but that’s just a guess on my part. But I’m curious to know how many clutterers came from a cluttered home and vice versa.
    I don’t have nearly the clutter I grew up in, but I can’t seem to stop myself from doing the same thing. I tend to save antique furniture along with my books though. Between the two, my nice big house feels rather cramped at times.
    But really, do we take on those idiosyncrasies from our parents? Or develop ones of our own?

    Reply
  91. LOL, Theo! I’m sure if I had 40′ of counter space, it’d be like that. At the moment, I have about 4! I don’t know about the influence of where we grew up, though. My parents kept a lot of stuff “in case it proved useful”, which in often did. And they had some of that Victorian thing lingering, where knick-knacks were desirable.
    Me, I don’t do china dishes and pottery figurines, but I like my dragons and other strange creatures.*G* And plants. Lots of plants.
    “I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…”
    Oh, Tal. I can sympathize. I get attached to my stuff. Especially smaller, pretty boxes. 🙂 But then I was just looking for a nice place for my new camera and its bits. I ended up with a plastic box, but I know I have something special somewhere.
    I’ve not been checking back here much because of digging through the mess. (Found thebattery charger and rechargeable batteries. Yay!) If you want to see the mess, check out these pictures. http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2AbN2zdu4bMneA
    You will perhaps detect that beneath the chaos is a magnificent Edwardian oak panelled room, which forms the main part of the place. The kitchen, you will see, is tiny. It’s a chunk of a mansion, very little altered. The room is the dining room, complete with butler’s station as shown. The bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom are shoehorned into the butler’s pantry and there are stairs down to what would have been the kitchens and servants’ area.
    I have ambiance for a while, even if it is the wrong period.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  92. LOL, Theo! I’m sure if I had 40′ of counter space, it’d be like that. At the moment, I have about 4! I don’t know about the influence of where we grew up, though. My parents kept a lot of stuff “in case it proved useful”, which in often did. And they had some of that Victorian thing lingering, where knick-knacks were desirable.
    Me, I don’t do china dishes and pottery figurines, but I like my dragons and other strange creatures.*G* And plants. Lots of plants.
    “I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…”
    Oh, Tal. I can sympathize. I get attached to my stuff. Especially smaller, pretty boxes. 🙂 But then I was just looking for a nice place for my new camera and its bits. I ended up with a plastic box, but I know I have something special somewhere.
    I’ve not been checking back here much because of digging through the mess. (Found thebattery charger and rechargeable batteries. Yay!) If you want to see the mess, check out these pictures. http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2AbN2zdu4bMneA
    You will perhaps detect that beneath the chaos is a magnificent Edwardian oak panelled room, which forms the main part of the place. The kitchen, you will see, is tiny. It’s a chunk of a mansion, very little altered. The room is the dining room, complete with butler’s station as shown. The bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom are shoehorned into the butler’s pantry and there are stairs down to what would have been the kitchens and servants’ area.
    I have ambiance for a while, even if it is the wrong period.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  93. LOL, Theo! I’m sure if I had 40′ of counter space, it’d be like that. At the moment, I have about 4! I don’t know about the influence of where we grew up, though. My parents kept a lot of stuff “in case it proved useful”, which in often did. And they had some of that Victorian thing lingering, where knick-knacks were desirable.
    Me, I don’t do china dishes and pottery figurines, but I like my dragons and other strange creatures.*G* And plants. Lots of plants.
    “I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…”
    Oh, Tal. I can sympathize. I get attached to my stuff. Especially smaller, pretty boxes. 🙂 But then I was just looking for a nice place for my new camera and its bits. I ended up with a plastic box, but I know I have something special somewhere.
    I’ve not been checking back here much because of digging through the mess. (Found thebattery charger and rechargeable batteries. Yay!) If you want to see the mess, check out these pictures. http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2AbN2zdu4bMneA
    You will perhaps detect that beneath the chaos is a magnificent Edwardian oak panelled room, which forms the main part of the place. The kitchen, you will see, is tiny. It’s a chunk of a mansion, very little altered. The room is the dining room, complete with butler’s station as shown. The bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom are shoehorned into the butler’s pantry and there are stairs down to what would have been the kitchens and servants’ area.
    I have ambiance for a while, even if it is the wrong period.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  94. LOL, Theo! I’m sure if I had 40′ of counter space, it’d be like that. At the moment, I have about 4! I don’t know about the influence of where we grew up, though. My parents kept a lot of stuff “in case it proved useful”, which in often did. And they had some of that Victorian thing lingering, where knick-knacks were desirable.
    Me, I don’t do china dishes and pottery figurines, but I like my dragons and other strange creatures.*G* And plants. Lots of plants.
    “I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…”
    Oh, Tal. I can sympathize. I get attached to my stuff. Especially smaller, pretty boxes. 🙂 But then I was just looking for a nice place for my new camera and its bits. I ended up with a plastic box, but I know I have something special somewhere.
    I’ve not been checking back here much because of digging through the mess. (Found thebattery charger and rechargeable batteries. Yay!) If you want to see the mess, check out these pictures. http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2AbN2zdu4bMneA
    You will perhaps detect that beneath the chaos is a magnificent Edwardian oak panelled room, which forms the main part of the place. The kitchen, you will see, is tiny. It’s a chunk of a mansion, very little altered. The room is the dining room, complete with butler’s station as shown. The bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom are shoehorned into the butler’s pantry and there are stairs down to what would have been the kitchens and servants’ area.
    I have ambiance for a while, even if it is the wrong period.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  95. LOL, Theo! I’m sure if I had 40′ of counter space, it’d be like that. At the moment, I have about 4! I don’t know about the influence of where we grew up, though. My parents kept a lot of stuff “in case it proved useful”, which in often did. And they had some of that Victorian thing lingering, where knick-knacks were desirable.
    Me, I don’t do china dishes and pottery figurines, but I like my dragons and other strange creatures.*G* And plants. Lots of plants.
    “I never throw out decent cardboard boxes. I claim I can use them to put stuff in. But my friends called for an intervention when I started giving them names…”
    Oh, Tal. I can sympathize. I get attached to my stuff. Especially smaller, pretty boxes. 🙂 But then I was just looking for a nice place for my new camera and its bits. I ended up with a plastic box, but I know I have something special somewhere.
    I’ve not been checking back here much because of digging through the mess. (Found thebattery charger and rechargeable batteries. Yay!) If you want to see the mess, check out these pictures. http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=2AbN2zdu4bMneA
    You will perhaps detect that beneath the chaos is a magnificent Edwardian oak panelled room, which forms the main part of the place. The kitchen, you will see, is tiny. It’s a chunk of a mansion, very little altered. The room is the dining room, complete with butler’s station as shown. The bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom are shoehorned into the butler’s pantry and there are stairs down to what would have been the kitchens and servants’ area.
    I have ambiance for a while, even if it is the wrong period.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  96. Hi,
    I don’t have any clutter, my DH chucks it out…not good stuff! that is put away in a place for to to live or be kept.
    I’m glad though, if clutter were left to me, I could get lost in it! Thank goodness for recycling!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  97. Hi,
    I don’t have any clutter, my DH chucks it out…not good stuff! that is put away in a place for to to live or be kept.
    I’m glad though, if clutter were left to me, I could get lost in it! Thank goodness for recycling!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  98. Hi,
    I don’t have any clutter, my DH chucks it out…not good stuff! that is put away in a place for to to live or be kept.
    I’m glad though, if clutter were left to me, I could get lost in it! Thank goodness for recycling!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  99. Hi,
    I don’t have any clutter, my DH chucks it out…not good stuff! that is put away in a place for to to live or be kept.
    I’m glad though, if clutter were left to me, I could get lost in it! Thank goodness for recycling!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  100. Hi,
    I don’t have any clutter, my DH chucks it out…not good stuff! that is put away in a place for to to live or be kept.
    I’m glad though, if clutter were left to me, I could get lost in it! Thank goodness for recycling!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  101. Well, Jo, I can definitely appreciate the glass of wine centered in picture 5! LOL! And is this where you’re moving ‘from’? Or ‘to’?
    And if it’s any consolation, I moved from a half-a-fanny kitchen to the one I have now and have no more room now than I did then. I think our clutter tends to expand into the space it’s allowed which I suppose means, if we all lived in a small box, we wouldn’t have too much of a problem…or would it all be relative?
    But that Edwardian oak paneled room is gorgeous!! And what a view. 🙂
    And Carol, my DH has threatened to toss my clutter at times until I remind him of the wet sander, pliers, two saw blades, wrench and hammer that are still sitting on one corner of my kitchen counter (they’ve been there so long, I think they’ve petrified and I don’t even notice them anymore!) and what would happen should he decide I don’t need my clutter…’nuff said…

    Reply
  102. Well, Jo, I can definitely appreciate the glass of wine centered in picture 5! LOL! And is this where you’re moving ‘from’? Or ‘to’?
    And if it’s any consolation, I moved from a half-a-fanny kitchen to the one I have now and have no more room now than I did then. I think our clutter tends to expand into the space it’s allowed which I suppose means, if we all lived in a small box, we wouldn’t have too much of a problem…or would it all be relative?
    But that Edwardian oak paneled room is gorgeous!! And what a view. 🙂
    And Carol, my DH has threatened to toss my clutter at times until I remind him of the wet sander, pliers, two saw blades, wrench and hammer that are still sitting on one corner of my kitchen counter (they’ve been there so long, I think they’ve petrified and I don’t even notice them anymore!) and what would happen should he decide I don’t need my clutter…’nuff said…

    Reply
  103. Well, Jo, I can definitely appreciate the glass of wine centered in picture 5! LOL! And is this where you’re moving ‘from’? Or ‘to’?
    And if it’s any consolation, I moved from a half-a-fanny kitchen to the one I have now and have no more room now than I did then. I think our clutter tends to expand into the space it’s allowed which I suppose means, if we all lived in a small box, we wouldn’t have too much of a problem…or would it all be relative?
    But that Edwardian oak paneled room is gorgeous!! And what a view. 🙂
    And Carol, my DH has threatened to toss my clutter at times until I remind him of the wet sander, pliers, two saw blades, wrench and hammer that are still sitting on one corner of my kitchen counter (they’ve been there so long, I think they’ve petrified and I don’t even notice them anymore!) and what would happen should he decide I don’t need my clutter…’nuff said…

    Reply
  104. Well, Jo, I can definitely appreciate the glass of wine centered in picture 5! LOL! And is this where you’re moving ‘from’? Or ‘to’?
    And if it’s any consolation, I moved from a half-a-fanny kitchen to the one I have now and have no more room now than I did then. I think our clutter tends to expand into the space it’s allowed which I suppose means, if we all lived in a small box, we wouldn’t have too much of a problem…or would it all be relative?
    But that Edwardian oak paneled room is gorgeous!! And what a view. 🙂
    And Carol, my DH has threatened to toss my clutter at times until I remind him of the wet sander, pliers, two saw blades, wrench and hammer that are still sitting on one corner of my kitchen counter (they’ve been there so long, I think they’ve petrified and I don’t even notice them anymore!) and what would happen should he decide I don’t need my clutter…’nuff said…

    Reply
  105. Well, Jo, I can definitely appreciate the glass of wine centered in picture 5! LOL! And is this where you’re moving ‘from’? Or ‘to’?
    And if it’s any consolation, I moved from a half-a-fanny kitchen to the one I have now and have no more room now than I did then. I think our clutter tends to expand into the space it’s allowed which I suppose means, if we all lived in a small box, we wouldn’t have too much of a problem…or would it all be relative?
    But that Edwardian oak paneled room is gorgeous!! And what a view. 🙂
    And Carol, my DH has threatened to toss my clutter at times until I remind him of the wet sander, pliers, two saw blades, wrench and hammer that are still sitting on one corner of my kitchen counter (they’ve been there so long, I think they’ve petrified and I don’t even notice them anymore!) and what would happen should he decide I don’t need my clutter…’nuff said…

    Reply
  106. The Edwardian mess is moved to. Probably not long term, but fun. 🙂
    To complete this saga of stuff, I’d better confess my office supply excess. I’ve just been sorting it out, so I thought I’d count.
    This isn’t complete, of course as more must be lurking, but I have before me:
    24 propelling pencils, most with only a lead left. (I like to do pencil puzzles to relax, but why so many?)
    10 erasers, including 4 click erasers, which are mostly the only ones I use.
    26 Uniball Vision pens, many colours. No problem with this. It’s my favorite pen and I regularly use them dry.
    20 ball point pens, which I hardly ever use.
    31 post-it pads. 31!
    Part of the trouble is the promo stuff I get here and there. That accounts for most of the ball points and post-its.
    \
    I’ve already thrown out some of the above, but it seems crazy to throw out post-it pads just because I have too many.
    ::sigh::
    Now none of you really attempted my challenge, so I’ll pick the winner some other way.
    Happy summer!
    Jo

    Reply
  107. The Edwardian mess is moved to. Probably not long term, but fun. 🙂
    To complete this saga of stuff, I’d better confess my office supply excess. I’ve just been sorting it out, so I thought I’d count.
    This isn’t complete, of course as more must be lurking, but I have before me:
    24 propelling pencils, most with only a lead left. (I like to do pencil puzzles to relax, but why so many?)
    10 erasers, including 4 click erasers, which are mostly the only ones I use.
    26 Uniball Vision pens, many colours. No problem with this. It’s my favorite pen and I regularly use them dry.
    20 ball point pens, which I hardly ever use.
    31 post-it pads. 31!
    Part of the trouble is the promo stuff I get here and there. That accounts for most of the ball points and post-its.
    \
    I’ve already thrown out some of the above, but it seems crazy to throw out post-it pads just because I have too many.
    ::sigh::
    Now none of you really attempted my challenge, so I’ll pick the winner some other way.
    Happy summer!
    Jo

    Reply
  108. The Edwardian mess is moved to. Probably not long term, but fun. 🙂
    To complete this saga of stuff, I’d better confess my office supply excess. I’ve just been sorting it out, so I thought I’d count.
    This isn’t complete, of course as more must be lurking, but I have before me:
    24 propelling pencils, most with only a lead left. (I like to do pencil puzzles to relax, but why so many?)
    10 erasers, including 4 click erasers, which are mostly the only ones I use.
    26 Uniball Vision pens, many colours. No problem with this. It’s my favorite pen and I regularly use them dry.
    20 ball point pens, which I hardly ever use.
    31 post-it pads. 31!
    Part of the trouble is the promo stuff I get here and there. That accounts for most of the ball points and post-its.
    \
    I’ve already thrown out some of the above, but it seems crazy to throw out post-it pads just because I have too many.
    ::sigh::
    Now none of you really attempted my challenge, so I’ll pick the winner some other way.
    Happy summer!
    Jo

    Reply
  109. The Edwardian mess is moved to. Probably not long term, but fun. 🙂
    To complete this saga of stuff, I’d better confess my office supply excess. I’ve just been sorting it out, so I thought I’d count.
    This isn’t complete, of course as more must be lurking, but I have before me:
    24 propelling pencils, most with only a lead left. (I like to do pencil puzzles to relax, but why so many?)
    10 erasers, including 4 click erasers, which are mostly the only ones I use.
    26 Uniball Vision pens, many colours. No problem with this. It’s my favorite pen and I regularly use them dry.
    20 ball point pens, which I hardly ever use.
    31 post-it pads. 31!
    Part of the trouble is the promo stuff I get here and there. That accounts for most of the ball points and post-its.
    \
    I’ve already thrown out some of the above, but it seems crazy to throw out post-it pads just because I have too many.
    ::sigh::
    Now none of you really attempted my challenge, so I’ll pick the winner some other way.
    Happy summer!
    Jo

    Reply
  110. The Edwardian mess is moved to. Probably not long term, but fun. 🙂
    To complete this saga of stuff, I’d better confess my office supply excess. I’ve just been sorting it out, so I thought I’d count.
    This isn’t complete, of course as more must be lurking, but I have before me:
    24 propelling pencils, most with only a lead left. (I like to do pencil puzzles to relax, but why so many?)
    10 erasers, including 4 click erasers, which are mostly the only ones I use.
    26 Uniball Vision pens, many colours. No problem with this. It’s my favorite pen and I regularly use them dry.
    20 ball point pens, which I hardly ever use.
    31 post-it pads. 31!
    Part of the trouble is the promo stuff I get here and there. That accounts for most of the ball points and post-its.
    \
    I’ve already thrown out some of the above, but it seems crazy to throw out post-it pads just because I have too many.
    ::sigh::
    Now none of you really attempted my challenge, so I’ll pick the winner some other way.
    Happy summer!
    Jo

    Reply

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