Google Books

Piratedavy
Jo here, assisted by Pirate Davy, talking about research. It does seem to be a bit of an obsession around here, doesn’t it?

(But first. A diversion. Back in September, 2006, when I was traveling I blogged about the trickiness of rhymes in English and American accents and challenged the readers here to reply in rhyme, offering a prize. Then I forgot! Mea culpa. Maya reminded me the other day, and I went to look. There were some good efforts there, but I decided Maya herself deserved the prize for length and ingenuity. So, Maya, e-mail me and we’ll arrange your prize.)

Back to research. It comes with the territory, doesn’t it? We write about something we haven’t and can’t experience – the past. Certainly visiting locations is useful, but there are changes. Some are minimal, as in parts of Bath. I visited Bath for a conference connected to my work back in the early ‘70s. Tough assignment, but someone had to do it! I remember being astonished at seeing Georgian slums. Yes, there were a lot of decrepit old houses there back then. Mind you, there are pretty run down Regency houses in Brighton now.Bhouse3 And those houses, in once-fashionable streets, are small! Seeing that is useful.

Excuse the tip-tiltedness. Here are some pictures.
http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/dhpics2.html

Most places, however, are considerably changed and one needs a strong and versatile imagination to see Clun1
places as they were 200 or more years ago. It’s a real trick to go to one of the great castles and visualize
it vivid and alive, full of people, with walls brightly painted and hung with cloths and banners and sounds of chatter, laughter and music.

Which is why the words of people from the past are so valuable, and why my blog today is about Google Books.
http://www.google.ca/books?hl=en

There’s been some kerfuffle about this project because people with work still in copyright worry about their work being on the Web. I’m not sure that was ever a real issue, but it certainly isn’t now. What is available through this service is access to the content of books that would cost a fortune if one could find them; the sort of books that are hard to get liberal use of, even if one finds a library that holds them.

Free and downloadable. A miracle!

From an article I read a while back, I gather the breakthrough is a new way of scanning old books. With flat-bed scanners, most old books are impossible short of taking them apart. However, someone invented a scanner that’s like a very thin slice. The book sits over it, hardly open at all, and the machine scans the two pages. Brilliant.

I went to Google Books last week in the faint hope of finding something about nuns in the 18th century France. Yes, I’m working on a new book. It’s Georgian. It has a nun and a rake, and it starts in France, about which my historical knowledge is thin. I don’t know why the muse does this to me. When I realized what they had there these days, I almost swooned. Travel guides from the mid 18th century, right where my book is set. Ones that neatly explain the complex coinage of France at the time. Ones that explain the even more complex posting system of the time. The roads belonged to the king and there were laws about everything, including how many horses you had to use depending on the number of wheels on the vehicle and passengers inside. Who knew?

And various sources are in firm agreement that because of winds and tides one sails to France via Calais and from France via Boulogne. Again, who knew?

So needless to say, I haven’t written as much as I might have of the book because…. well, who could with all those lovely books to look through?

If you go to advanced search, you can set the publication dates, which is where the things like travel guides and such turn up. I was looking in the mid 18th century, but just now I put in 1600-1700 and still turned up 2,780 books!

But more in my periods, we have Rosabella: or, A mother’s marriage, by the author of The romance of the Pyrenees, in which “Mr. Egremont, with a most graceful bow, pronounced himself most happy, that, even through his own individual suffering, his long panted for introduction to Miss Frederick had been accomplished.” They don’t make ‘em like that anymore – sentences or heroes!

But this is one I found most useful.
The gentleman’s guide, in his tour through France, wrote by an officer in the Royal-navy. 1770

There’s also a “Historical, genealogical, and classical dictionary” from 1743 which looks like an interesting addition to my “bookshelf.”

And “A journal from Calcutta … to England, in the year, 1750. To which are added, Directions by E…” almost tempts me to set a book then and there.

So, your mission, should you choose to accept it – go to Google Books, search, and bring back the name Trarsm_3
of the most intriguing title you find published between 1740 and 1840. Just for fun, because research is such fun.

Happy hunting,

Jo

80 thoughts on “Google Books”

  1. I’m not sure it would “intrigue” everyone, but finding it was useful for research on my WIP. Thanks, Jo! I just read parts of “A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans Under generals Ross, Pakenham and Lambert in the Years 1814 and 1815” (whew) by George Robert Gleig, a soldier aboard H.M.’s ship. His observances are delivered with dash and some poetry. For example, he describes the night sailing in the West Indies: “Then the ocean is so smooth, that scarcely a ripple is seen to break the moon-beams as they fall.”
    I’ve already bookmarked Google Books and can’t wait to play later. Reading Word Wenches always leads to something thought-provoking and improving…and never boring!

    Reply
  2. I’m not sure it would “intrigue” everyone, but finding it was useful for research on my WIP. Thanks, Jo! I just read parts of “A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans Under generals Ross, Pakenham and Lambert in the Years 1814 and 1815” (whew) by George Robert Gleig, a soldier aboard H.M.’s ship. His observances are delivered with dash and some poetry. For example, he describes the night sailing in the West Indies: “Then the ocean is so smooth, that scarcely a ripple is seen to break the moon-beams as they fall.”
    I’ve already bookmarked Google Books and can’t wait to play later. Reading Word Wenches always leads to something thought-provoking and improving…and never boring!

    Reply
  3. I’m not sure it would “intrigue” everyone, but finding it was useful for research on my WIP. Thanks, Jo! I just read parts of “A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans Under generals Ross, Pakenham and Lambert in the Years 1814 and 1815” (whew) by George Robert Gleig, a soldier aboard H.M.’s ship. His observances are delivered with dash and some poetry. For example, he describes the night sailing in the West Indies: “Then the ocean is so smooth, that scarcely a ripple is seen to break the moon-beams as they fall.”
    I’ve already bookmarked Google Books and can’t wait to play later. Reading Word Wenches always leads to something thought-provoking and improving…and never boring!

    Reply
  4. I’m not sure it would “intrigue” everyone, but finding it was useful for research on my WIP. Thanks, Jo! I just read parts of “A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans Under generals Ross, Pakenham and Lambert in the Years 1814 and 1815” (whew) by George Robert Gleig, a soldier aboard H.M.’s ship. His observances are delivered with dash and some poetry. For example, he describes the night sailing in the West Indies: “Then the ocean is so smooth, that scarcely a ripple is seen to break the moon-beams as they fall.”
    I’ve already bookmarked Google Books and can’t wait to play later. Reading Word Wenches always leads to something thought-provoking and improving…and never boring!

    Reply
  5. “An Enquiry Into the Causes Producing the Extraordinary Addition to the Number of Insane: together with extended observations on the cure of instanity with hints as to the better management of public asylums for insane persons. . .”
    Could this one be any longer????? LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  6. “An Enquiry Into the Causes Producing the Extraordinary Addition to the Number of Insane: together with extended observations on the cure of instanity with hints as to the better management of public asylums for insane persons. . .”
    Could this one be any longer????? LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  7. “An Enquiry Into the Causes Producing the Extraordinary Addition to the Number of Insane: together with extended observations on the cure of instanity with hints as to the better management of public asylums for insane persons. . .”
    Could this one be any longer????? LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  8. “An Enquiry Into the Causes Producing the Extraordinary Addition to the Number of Insane: together with extended observations on the cure of instanity with hints as to the better management of public asylums for insane persons. . .”
    Could this one be any longer????? LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  9. Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!
    Neat assignment and who knew, indeed, that research could be so much fun, and even interesting. My first impression of it being too much like work is likely because of too many holdovers from my school days I guess.
    Kathy

    Reply
  10. Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!
    Neat assignment and who knew, indeed, that research could be so much fun, and even interesting. My first impression of it being too much like work is likely because of too many holdovers from my school days I guess.
    Kathy

    Reply
  11. Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!
    Neat assignment and who knew, indeed, that research could be so much fun, and even interesting. My first impression of it being too much like work is likely because of too many holdovers from my school days I guess.
    Kathy

    Reply
  12. Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!
    Neat assignment and who knew, indeed, that research could be so much fun, and even interesting. My first impression of it being too much like work is likely because of too many holdovers from my school days I guess.
    Kathy

    Reply
  13. Actually I got too caught up in the book; it was actually *written* in 1993…*sigh* does this mean that I fail??
    Never mind, still searching….
    Kathy

    Reply
  14. Actually I got too caught up in the book; it was actually *written* in 1993…*sigh* does this mean that I fail??
    Never mind, still searching….
    Kathy

    Reply
  15. Actually I got too caught up in the book; it was actually *written* in 1993…*sigh* does this mean that I fail??
    Never mind, still searching….
    Kathy

    Reply
  16. Actually I got too caught up in the book; it was actually *written* in 1993…*sigh* does this mean that I fail??
    Never mind, still searching….
    Kathy

    Reply
  17. Jo! You are awesome! There is just no other word for it.
    I found a book I’ve been looking for for months. In truth, I never really hoped to find it. But I did!
    The hero in my current MIP is loosely based upon a real person who’s journal I’ve devoured. In the journal he fondly and repeatedly speaks of THE HERMIT OF THE CHAUSSEE D’ANTIN — all five volumes. I found a translated copy (The Paris spectator) of the work on Google books. The original title was L’hermite de la Chaussée-d’Antin [by V.J.É. de Jouy] Absolutely fascinating reading!! Now I have a much better understanding of the man and lots more fodder for my hero.
    Thanks Jo!
    Nina

    Reply
  18. Jo! You are awesome! There is just no other word for it.
    I found a book I’ve been looking for for months. In truth, I never really hoped to find it. But I did!
    The hero in my current MIP is loosely based upon a real person who’s journal I’ve devoured. In the journal he fondly and repeatedly speaks of THE HERMIT OF THE CHAUSSEE D’ANTIN — all five volumes. I found a translated copy (The Paris spectator) of the work on Google books. The original title was L’hermite de la Chaussée-d’Antin [by V.J.É. de Jouy] Absolutely fascinating reading!! Now I have a much better understanding of the man and lots more fodder for my hero.
    Thanks Jo!
    Nina

    Reply
  19. Jo! You are awesome! There is just no other word for it.
    I found a book I’ve been looking for for months. In truth, I never really hoped to find it. But I did!
    The hero in my current MIP is loosely based upon a real person who’s journal I’ve devoured. In the journal he fondly and repeatedly speaks of THE HERMIT OF THE CHAUSSEE D’ANTIN — all five volumes. I found a translated copy (The Paris spectator) of the work on Google books. The original title was L’hermite de la Chaussée-d’Antin [by V.J.É. de Jouy] Absolutely fascinating reading!! Now I have a much better understanding of the man and lots more fodder for my hero.
    Thanks Jo!
    Nina

    Reply
  20. Jo! You are awesome! There is just no other word for it.
    I found a book I’ve been looking for for months. In truth, I never really hoped to find it. But I did!
    The hero in my current MIP is loosely based upon a real person who’s journal I’ve devoured. In the journal he fondly and repeatedly speaks of THE HERMIT OF THE CHAUSSEE D’ANTIN — all five volumes. I found a translated copy (The Paris spectator) of the work on Google books. The original title was L’hermite de la Chaussée-d’Antin [by V.J.É. de Jouy] Absolutely fascinating reading!! Now I have a much better understanding of the man and lots more fodder for my hero.
    Thanks Jo!
    Nina

    Reply
  21. Oh, I forgot to mention that the book was published in French in 1811 and translated into English in 1815. My Englishman was definitely reading the French version.

    Reply
  22. Oh, I forgot to mention that the book was published in French in 1811 and translated into English in 1815. My Englishman was definitely reading the French version.

    Reply
  23. Oh, I forgot to mention that the book was published in French in 1811 and translated into English in 1815. My Englishman was definitely reading the French version.

    Reply
  24. Oh, I forgot to mention that the book was published in French in 1811 and translated into English in 1815. My Englishman was definitely reading the French version.

    Reply
  25. Okay, this one is neat…mostly because Russia, for the most part and even in spite of the fact of the vague bits of history learned about it in school, is still a large unknown…and it takes a bit of getting used to transferring F’s to S’s… but interesting, nevertheless.
    Russia: Or, A Compleat Historical Account of All the Nations which Compose that Empire
    by Johann Gottlieb Georgi, William Tooke – 1780
    The part that I’m reading is about the marriage customs of the Finnish Mordvines…it’s absolutely riveting to be given a glimpse into what life must have been like…probably why I enjoy Historicals so much!
    Well, I’m back to reading…^.^
    …once again, but for the last time today,
    Kathy

    Reply
  26. Okay, this one is neat…mostly because Russia, for the most part and even in spite of the fact of the vague bits of history learned about it in school, is still a large unknown…and it takes a bit of getting used to transferring F’s to S’s… but interesting, nevertheless.
    Russia: Or, A Compleat Historical Account of All the Nations which Compose that Empire
    by Johann Gottlieb Georgi, William Tooke – 1780
    The part that I’m reading is about the marriage customs of the Finnish Mordvines…it’s absolutely riveting to be given a glimpse into what life must have been like…probably why I enjoy Historicals so much!
    Well, I’m back to reading…^.^
    …once again, but for the last time today,
    Kathy

    Reply
  27. Okay, this one is neat…mostly because Russia, for the most part and even in spite of the fact of the vague bits of history learned about it in school, is still a large unknown…and it takes a bit of getting used to transferring F’s to S’s… but interesting, nevertheless.
    Russia: Or, A Compleat Historical Account of All the Nations which Compose that Empire
    by Johann Gottlieb Georgi, William Tooke – 1780
    The part that I’m reading is about the marriage customs of the Finnish Mordvines…it’s absolutely riveting to be given a glimpse into what life must have been like…probably why I enjoy Historicals so much!
    Well, I’m back to reading…^.^
    …once again, but for the last time today,
    Kathy

    Reply
  28. Okay, this one is neat…mostly because Russia, for the most part and even in spite of the fact of the vague bits of history learned about it in school, is still a large unknown…and it takes a bit of getting used to transferring F’s to S’s… but interesting, nevertheless.
    Russia: Or, A Compleat Historical Account of All the Nations which Compose that Empire
    by Johann Gottlieb Georgi, William Tooke – 1780
    The part that I’m reading is about the marriage customs of the Finnish Mordvines…it’s absolutely riveting to be given a glimpse into what life must have been like…probably why I enjoy Historicals so much!
    Well, I’m back to reading…^.^
    …once again, but for the last time today,
    Kathy

    Reply
  29. I passed up lots of instructive sermons and biographies of clergy and opened up “The Entomologist’s Useful Compendium: Or, An Introduction to the Knowledge of British Insects,”
    by George Samouelle – 1819. It was captivating! Thank you, Jo!

    Reply
  30. I passed up lots of instructive sermons and biographies of clergy and opened up “The Entomologist’s Useful Compendium: Or, An Introduction to the Knowledge of British Insects,”
    by George Samouelle – 1819. It was captivating! Thank you, Jo!

    Reply
  31. I passed up lots of instructive sermons and biographies of clergy and opened up “The Entomologist’s Useful Compendium: Or, An Introduction to the Knowledge of British Insects,”
    by George Samouelle – 1819. It was captivating! Thank you, Jo!

    Reply
  32. I passed up lots of instructive sermons and biographies of clergy and opened up “The Entomologist’s Useful Compendium: Or, An Introduction to the Knowledge of British Insects,”
    by George Samouelle – 1819. It was captivating! Thank you, Jo!

    Reply
  33. As a writer who also does genealogy, research is not only my meat & potatoes, but ALSO my dessert! Bless you and Google both!
    I wandered for more than an hour there, making a list of twenty to pursue and once I get done with them I will undoubtedly go back for more. I’m starting with “A Collection of All The Wills, Now Known To Be Extant,of The Kings and Queens of England” by John Nichols/pub.1780 and I hope it will prove interesting to learn if anything except money, lands or jewelry is deemed truly valuable by royal personages.
    I’m also looking forward to “A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland and Ireland” by Horace Walpole & Thomas Park/pub.1806.
    What a great way to spend time during Illinois’ below-zero weather!
    Thanks, Jo!

    Reply
  34. As a writer who also does genealogy, research is not only my meat & potatoes, but ALSO my dessert! Bless you and Google both!
    I wandered for more than an hour there, making a list of twenty to pursue and once I get done with them I will undoubtedly go back for more. I’m starting with “A Collection of All The Wills, Now Known To Be Extant,of The Kings and Queens of England” by John Nichols/pub.1780 and I hope it will prove interesting to learn if anything except money, lands or jewelry is deemed truly valuable by royal personages.
    I’m also looking forward to “A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland and Ireland” by Horace Walpole & Thomas Park/pub.1806.
    What a great way to spend time during Illinois’ below-zero weather!
    Thanks, Jo!

    Reply
  35. As a writer who also does genealogy, research is not only my meat & potatoes, but ALSO my dessert! Bless you and Google both!
    I wandered for more than an hour there, making a list of twenty to pursue and once I get done with them I will undoubtedly go back for more. I’m starting with “A Collection of All The Wills, Now Known To Be Extant,of The Kings and Queens of England” by John Nichols/pub.1780 and I hope it will prove interesting to learn if anything except money, lands or jewelry is deemed truly valuable by royal personages.
    I’m also looking forward to “A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland and Ireland” by Horace Walpole & Thomas Park/pub.1806.
    What a great way to spend time during Illinois’ below-zero weather!
    Thanks, Jo!

    Reply
  36. As a writer who also does genealogy, research is not only my meat & potatoes, but ALSO my dessert! Bless you and Google both!
    I wandered for more than an hour there, making a list of twenty to pursue and once I get done with them I will undoubtedly go back for more. I’m starting with “A Collection of All The Wills, Now Known To Be Extant,of The Kings and Queens of England” by John Nichols/pub.1780 and I hope it will prove interesting to learn if anything except money, lands or jewelry is deemed truly valuable by royal personages.
    I’m also looking forward to “A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland and Ireland” by Horace Walpole & Thomas Park/pub.1806.
    What a great way to spend time during Illinois’ below-zero weather!
    Thanks, Jo!

    Reply
  37. How about some titles from the Minerva Press? “Donald Monteith, the Handsomest Man of the Age: A Novel in Five Volumes” sounds like a wickedly good novel to me.
    -Beth

    Reply
  38. How about some titles from the Minerva Press? “Donald Monteith, the Handsomest Man of the Age: A Novel in Five Volumes” sounds like a wickedly good novel to me.
    -Beth

    Reply
  39. How about some titles from the Minerva Press? “Donald Monteith, the Handsomest Man of the Age: A Novel in Five Volumes” sounds like a wickedly good novel to me.
    -Beth

    Reply
  40. How about some titles from the Minerva Press? “Donald Monteith, the Handsomest Man of the Age: A Novel in Five Volumes” sounds like a wickedly good novel to me.
    -Beth

    Reply
  41. “Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!”
    It wasn’t one of the downloadable ones, Kathy? To spare myself frustration, I generally search with only that option clicked on.
    Ah, it being a modern book would explain it. But search for something on that subject from older texts. I’ll bet you find some.
    Yes, Beth, there are some Minerva novels there, which will be fun reading. I’m collecting some on my laptop so that they’ll provide good road reading.
    I’m glad you’re having fun with this, everyone. And hats off to the Google people, because as far as I can see there is zero financial benefit to them from this. Public service does still exist.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  42. “Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!”
    It wasn’t one of the downloadable ones, Kathy? To spare myself frustration, I generally search with only that option clicked on.
    Ah, it being a modern book would explain it. But search for something on that subject from older texts. I’ll bet you find some.
    Yes, Beth, there are some Minerva novels there, which will be fun reading. I’m collecting some on my laptop so that they’ll provide good road reading.
    I’m glad you’re having fun with this, everyone. And hats off to the Google people, because as far as I can see there is zero financial benefit to them from this. Public service does still exist.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  43. “Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!”
    It wasn’t one of the downloadable ones, Kathy? To spare myself frustration, I generally search with only that option clicked on.
    Ah, it being a modern book would explain it. But search for something on that subject from older texts. I’ll bet you find some.
    Yes, Beth, there are some Minerva novels there, which will be fun reading. I’m collecting some on my laptop so that they’ll provide good road reading.
    I’m glad you’re having fun with this, everyone. And hats off to the Google people, because as far as I can see there is zero financial benefit to them from this. Public service does still exist.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  44. “Wow! Who knew what you could find? I typed in 1759 ’cause it’s 200 years before I was born and the title that I came across ~ and subsequent story ~ is called:
    Song of Courage, Song of Freedom: The story of the child, Mary Campbell, held captive in Ohio by the Delaware Indians from 1759 to 1764.
    It sounds like a fascinating book from the pages that I’ve read. I may actually have to look into finding this book!”
    It wasn’t one of the downloadable ones, Kathy? To spare myself frustration, I generally search with only that option clicked on.
    Ah, it being a modern book would explain it. But search for something on that subject from older texts. I’ll bet you find some.
    Yes, Beth, there are some Minerva novels there, which will be fun reading. I’m collecting some on my laptop so that they’ll provide good road reading.
    I’m glad you’re having fun with this, everyone. And hats off to the Google people, because as far as I can see there is zero financial benefit to them from this. Public service does still exist.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  45. I limited myself to 1790-1815 just to narrow the search a bit, and even so, there’s so much there! Thanks for pointing the way to this resource, Jo!
    My favorite find thus far is “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,” by a Hester Lynch Piozzi and printed in Dublin in 1794. It’s sort of a thesaurus with elaborations, taking sets of nearly synonymous words and explaining the nuances of their usage–e.g. ludicrous, comical, laughable, humourous, and droll, or heroism, magnanimity, firmness, and gallantry. That might sound kind of dry, but it really is fascinating, especially because the examples offer a glimpse into the mindset and values of ~200 years ago.

    Reply
  46. I limited myself to 1790-1815 just to narrow the search a bit, and even so, there’s so much there! Thanks for pointing the way to this resource, Jo!
    My favorite find thus far is “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,” by a Hester Lynch Piozzi and printed in Dublin in 1794. It’s sort of a thesaurus with elaborations, taking sets of nearly synonymous words and explaining the nuances of their usage–e.g. ludicrous, comical, laughable, humourous, and droll, or heroism, magnanimity, firmness, and gallantry. That might sound kind of dry, but it really is fascinating, especially because the examples offer a glimpse into the mindset and values of ~200 years ago.

    Reply
  47. I limited myself to 1790-1815 just to narrow the search a bit, and even so, there’s so much there! Thanks for pointing the way to this resource, Jo!
    My favorite find thus far is “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,” by a Hester Lynch Piozzi and printed in Dublin in 1794. It’s sort of a thesaurus with elaborations, taking sets of nearly synonymous words and explaining the nuances of their usage–e.g. ludicrous, comical, laughable, humourous, and droll, or heroism, magnanimity, firmness, and gallantry. That might sound kind of dry, but it really is fascinating, especially because the examples offer a glimpse into the mindset and values of ~200 years ago.

    Reply
  48. I limited myself to 1790-1815 just to narrow the search a bit, and even so, there’s so much there! Thanks for pointing the way to this resource, Jo!
    My favorite find thus far is “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,” by a Hester Lynch Piozzi and printed in Dublin in 1794. It’s sort of a thesaurus with elaborations, taking sets of nearly synonymous words and explaining the nuances of their usage–e.g. ludicrous, comical, laughable, humourous, and droll, or heroism, magnanimity, firmness, and gallantry. That might sound kind of dry, but it really is fascinating, especially because the examples offer a glimpse into the mindset and values of ~200 years ago.

    Reply
  49. “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,”
    That does sound fascinating, Susan.
    I couldn’t resist going to play again and found another similar one.
    “English Synonyms Explained, in Alphabetical Order: With Copious Illustrations and Examples Drawn…” by George Crabb – 1818
    But I must download this for browsing. A Collection of Farces and Other Afterpieces: which are acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury-Lane,…1815
    I find plays are often the best mirrors of the society of the time.
    Jo, who has to get back to the copy edits of Lady Beware.

    Reply
  50. “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,”
    That does sound fascinating, Susan.
    I couldn’t resist going to play again and found another similar one.
    “English Synonyms Explained, in Alphabetical Order: With Copious Illustrations and Examples Drawn…” by George Crabb – 1818
    But I must download this for browsing. A Collection of Farces and Other Afterpieces: which are acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury-Lane,…1815
    I find plays are often the best mirrors of the society of the time.
    Jo, who has to get back to the copy edits of Lady Beware.

    Reply
  51. “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,”
    That does sound fascinating, Susan.
    I couldn’t resist going to play again and found another similar one.
    “English Synonyms Explained, in Alphabetical Order: With Copious Illustrations and Examples Drawn…” by George Crabb – 1818
    But I must download this for browsing. A Collection of Farces and Other Afterpieces: which are acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury-Lane,…1815
    I find plays are often the best mirrors of the society of the time.
    Jo, who has to get back to the copy edits of Lady Beware.

    Reply
  52. “British Synonymy: Or, An Attempt at Regulating the Choice of Words in Familiar Conversation,”
    That does sound fascinating, Susan.
    I couldn’t resist going to play again and found another similar one.
    “English Synonyms Explained, in Alphabetical Order: With Copious Illustrations and Examples Drawn…” by George Crabb – 1818
    But I must download this for browsing. A Collection of Farces and Other Afterpieces: which are acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury-Lane,…1815
    I find plays are often the best mirrors of the society of the time.
    Jo, who has to get back to the copy edits of Lady Beware.

    Reply
  53. I’m late to this party, but I am glad I came anyway because I have been having such fun with Google Books. I used the years Jo suggested and googled “women’s rights.” I found a lot of fascinating bits, but I got sidetracked with one, the relevance of which is still unclear to me: The Dramatic Works of Baron Kotzebue Translated from the German by Charles Smith (1800). He begins with an author’s introduction in which he assures critics that his works will certainly “displease” them since the plays have won the “public’s approbation.” Absurdly delightful! And Elizabeth Inchbald’s adaptation of Kotzebue’s play “Lovers’ Vows” figures in Mansfield Park. Strange how many roads lead to Austen.

    Reply
  54. I’m late to this party, but I am glad I came anyway because I have been having such fun with Google Books. I used the years Jo suggested and googled “women’s rights.” I found a lot of fascinating bits, but I got sidetracked with one, the relevance of which is still unclear to me: The Dramatic Works of Baron Kotzebue Translated from the German by Charles Smith (1800). He begins with an author’s introduction in which he assures critics that his works will certainly “displease” them since the plays have won the “public’s approbation.” Absurdly delightful! And Elizabeth Inchbald’s adaptation of Kotzebue’s play “Lovers’ Vows” figures in Mansfield Park. Strange how many roads lead to Austen.

    Reply
  55. I’m late to this party, but I am glad I came anyway because I have been having such fun with Google Books. I used the years Jo suggested and googled “women’s rights.” I found a lot of fascinating bits, but I got sidetracked with one, the relevance of which is still unclear to me: The Dramatic Works of Baron Kotzebue Translated from the German by Charles Smith (1800). He begins with an author’s introduction in which he assures critics that his works will certainly “displease” them since the plays have won the “public’s approbation.” Absurdly delightful! And Elizabeth Inchbald’s adaptation of Kotzebue’s play “Lovers’ Vows” figures in Mansfield Park. Strange how many roads lead to Austen.

    Reply
  56. I’m late to this party, but I am glad I came anyway because I have been having such fun with Google Books. I used the years Jo suggested and googled “women’s rights.” I found a lot of fascinating bits, but I got sidetracked with one, the relevance of which is still unclear to me: The Dramatic Works of Baron Kotzebue Translated from the German by Charles Smith (1800). He begins with an author’s introduction in which he assures critics that his works will certainly “displease” them since the plays have won the “public’s approbation.” Absurdly delightful! And Elizabeth Inchbald’s adaptation of Kotzebue’s play “Lovers’ Vows” figures in Mansfield Park. Strange how many roads lead to Austen.

    Reply
  57. What fun! Site is BOOKMARKED.
    I found Roses & Myrtles by Sarah Jerusha Cornwall 1881
    Invocation
    Come gentle Muses, teach me how to write;
    Gladly I’ll join you in your airy flight,
    Whether you lead me far o’er boundless seas,
    Or waft me heavenward on the evening breeze;
    I’ll range with you the starry realms of light,
    And learn sweet wisdom from the quiet night.

    Reply
  58. What fun! Site is BOOKMARKED.
    I found Roses & Myrtles by Sarah Jerusha Cornwall 1881
    Invocation
    Come gentle Muses, teach me how to write;
    Gladly I’ll join you in your airy flight,
    Whether you lead me far o’er boundless seas,
    Or waft me heavenward on the evening breeze;
    I’ll range with you the starry realms of light,
    And learn sweet wisdom from the quiet night.

    Reply
  59. What fun! Site is BOOKMARKED.
    I found Roses & Myrtles by Sarah Jerusha Cornwall 1881
    Invocation
    Come gentle Muses, teach me how to write;
    Gladly I’ll join you in your airy flight,
    Whether you lead me far o’er boundless seas,
    Or waft me heavenward on the evening breeze;
    I’ll range with you the starry realms of light,
    And learn sweet wisdom from the quiet night.

    Reply
  60. What fun! Site is BOOKMARKED.
    I found Roses & Myrtles by Sarah Jerusha Cornwall 1881
    Invocation
    Come gentle Muses, teach me how to write;
    Gladly I’ll join you in your airy flight,
    Whether you lead me far o’er boundless seas,
    Or waft me heavenward on the evening breeze;
    I’ll range with you the starry realms of light,
    And learn sweet wisdom from the quiet night.

    Reply
  61. Darn you and your time wasting ways!!!! I am now up much too late reading sermons written by my (let me get the fingers out) g-g-g-g-grandfather prior to the civil war (and finding many under an entry error – libraries cataloging him by his two first names and dropping the surname)
    Darn you! in “Political Duties of Christian Men and Ministers” he calls for the formation of a political movement that crosses party lines to advance enforcement of Christian goals (temperance, morality, etc). Sorry, our bad!

    Reply
  62. Darn you and your time wasting ways!!!! I am now up much too late reading sermons written by my (let me get the fingers out) g-g-g-g-grandfather prior to the civil war (and finding many under an entry error – libraries cataloging him by his two first names and dropping the surname)
    Darn you! in “Political Duties of Christian Men and Ministers” he calls for the formation of a political movement that crosses party lines to advance enforcement of Christian goals (temperance, morality, etc). Sorry, our bad!

    Reply
  63. Darn you and your time wasting ways!!!! I am now up much too late reading sermons written by my (let me get the fingers out) g-g-g-g-grandfather prior to the civil war (and finding many under an entry error – libraries cataloging him by his two first names and dropping the surname)
    Darn you! in “Political Duties of Christian Men and Ministers” he calls for the formation of a political movement that crosses party lines to advance enforcement of Christian goals (temperance, morality, etc). Sorry, our bad!

    Reply
  64. Darn you and your time wasting ways!!!! I am now up much too late reading sermons written by my (let me get the fingers out) g-g-g-g-grandfather prior to the civil war (and finding many under an entry error – libraries cataloging him by his two first names and dropping the surname)
    Darn you! in “Political Duties of Christian Men and Ministers” he calls for the formation of a political movement that crosses party lines to advance enforcement of Christian goals (temperance, morality, etc). Sorry, our bad!

    Reply
  65. Ah yes, the wonderful Google Books. I was so happy when they made every full book available for download, as opposed to a limited amount a few months ago. I have to confess that I suffer from research-itis due to this marvelous website. *G*

    Reply
  66. Ah yes, the wonderful Google Books. I was so happy when they made every full book available for download, as opposed to a limited amount a few months ago. I have to confess that I suffer from research-itis due to this marvelous website. *G*

    Reply
  67. Ah yes, the wonderful Google Books. I was so happy when they made every full book available for download, as opposed to a limited amount a few months ago. I have to confess that I suffer from research-itis due to this marvelous website. *G*

    Reply
  68. Ah yes, the wonderful Google Books. I was so happy when they made every full book available for download, as opposed to a limited amount a few months ago. I have to confess that I suffer from research-itis due to this marvelous website. *G*

    Reply

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