Going Dutch at Dyrham Park!

Dyrham 1Nicola here. Today I’m doing one of my virtual tours of an English stately home. On Monday, author Anna Campbell and I went on a day trip, as we tend to do when she is over visiting from Australia. This time our destination was Dyrham Park, a seventeenth century house near Bath which looks like a miniature version of Chatsworth House, home of the Duke of Devonshire. Dyrham was built at a very interesting time by a very interesting man: William Blathwayt, who started life as the son of a debt-ridden gentleman and ended a very rich man who made his fortune in the service of several monarchs.

Dyrham was built in the 1690s, when the Stuarts were on 220px-DyrhamKip the throne but the dynasty had changed direction somewhat after James II was deposed and his daughter Mary and her Dutch husband William had become joint King and Queen. William Blathwayt was very much a supporter of King William and he used the new house he was building at Dyrham Park to demonstrate his loyalty.

At a time when most houses were built out of local materials, Dyrham was an “international” house as William Blathwayt was able to use his extensive contacts in England and abroad to provide the raw materials. He ordered marble from Genoa, pine and spruce from Norway, and black walnut and red cedar from North America. In terms of furnishings, William had experienced first hand the fashionable style of the court. He imported a trunk of luxury items from the Netherlands including various printed silks and cottons with exotic designs, fine damask silks and crimson velvets. The interior of the house looks very rich and bright today; in candle light it must have seemed very lustrous and luxurious.

Dyrham stairMy favourite part of the house was the staircase, which was constructed out of black walnut and red cedar from Virginia and Carolina. Other American timber used in the construction was pine and cypress. It’s astonishing to look at the staircase today and imagine the journey made by those timbers all the way from the rivers of North America across the Atlantic to Bristol and London. The transport caused lots of problems because often the planks 18 – 24 feet in length, were too large for the ships or the captains charged huge fees to transport it! When some of the timber was brought up the Thames from London, the wood had cost £40 and the transport cost £10, an exorbitant sum. However Blathwayt was a rich man and wanted the best for his house – and the best was what he got!

The strong Dutch influence in the house is still visible today in the gilt leather panelling on the Dyrham interior walls and the many pieces of Delft ceramics. A number of the paintings are also by Dutch artists including the amazing “A view through the house” by Samuel van Hoogstraten, which captures a moment when a door opens and the viewer sees the world within. I loved this picture and wanted to step into it – or write a story set inside it! Another gorgeous picture was of a cocoa tree and a roasting hit; it illustrates the process of turning cacao into chocolate!

William’s library was the jewel of his house, a sentiment that we could totally endorse! He had a huge collection of books on law, history, religion, geography, politics and philosophy. He also had a number of dictionaries – as a fluent Dutch speaker, which was very rare in England, he was very interested in languages.

State bed DyrhamThe furniture on display in the house still contains a number of items from William Blathwayt’s original 17th century collection, most notably the state bed. This is a towering wooden four poster covered in crimson and gold silk, velvet and satin. Like so many beds from the period it looked very narrow and uncomfortable to me, more a single bed than a double, let alone a king or Queen size. The legend is that was ordered to encourage Queen Anne to come and visit when she was in Bath. Sadly she didn’t call!

King William and Queen Mary were keen gardeners and one of the ways for courtiers to curry favour was by copying their garden style, which Blathwayt did to great effect at Dyrham. Even on a dull day in winter the gardens looked gorgeous, with exotic trees, water cascades and elegant walkways. Blathwayt used both the trees and the statuary to declare his loyalty to the king;  there is an orangery at Dyrham full of orange trees, a not particularly subtle tribute to the fact that William III was from the House of Orange! A statue of Hercules also draws comparisons with the king, suggesting that he is a courageous and virtuous hero. There’s nothing like a bit of flattery to ingratiate yourself with the monarch!

My favourite aspect of the garden, though, was the fact that William, a businessman to the last, Dyrham garden had declared that the estate must be as self-sufficient as possible when it came to fruit and vegetables. He was quite ahead of his time with this ecological view and grew a range of apples and pear trees for cider and perry production, quince for jam and various other “organic” crops! He came unstuck with the mulberry bush, however, as he had planned to cultivate white mulberries to encourage silkworms but unfortunately he imported the black mulberry instead. It still bears fruit but the silkworms aren’t interested!

Visiting Dyrham Park was gorgeous but I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home. Presumably if William Blathwayt had fallen out of favour with the King he would have had to re-decorate his house and re-design his garden!

If you were to design your house or garden as a tribute to a famous person, who would it be? Would you honour them with plants, statues, pictures or something unique and different?

80 thoughts on “Going Dutch at Dyrham Park!”

  1. Thank you for the lovely virtual tour. Most of the homes I have been privileged to visit were built on a much more modest scale. I find myself wondering about Blathwayt and how he came to acquire such wealth.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  2. Thank you for the lovely virtual tour. Most of the homes I have been privileged to visit were built on a much more modest scale. I find myself wondering about Blathwayt and how he came to acquire such wealth.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  3. Thank you for the lovely virtual tour. Most of the homes I have been privileged to visit were built on a much more modest scale. I find myself wondering about Blathwayt and how he came to acquire such wealth.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  4. Thank you for the lovely virtual tour. Most of the homes I have been privileged to visit were built on a much more modest scale. I find myself wondering about Blathwayt and how he came to acquire such wealth.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  5. Thank you for the lovely virtual tour. Most of the homes I have been privileged to visit were built on a much more modest scale. I find myself wondering about Blathwayt and how he came to acquire such wealth.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  6. Thank you, Mary. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it. William Blathwayt made his fortune firstly though marrying an heiress who brought him the Dyrham estate, then through the support of his uncle who started him off in his career, and finally through working very hard a servant of the crown (and also through gifts, patronage etc as people did ad maybe still do!) He was also very careful with his money!

    Reply
  7. Thank you, Mary. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it. William Blathwayt made his fortune firstly though marrying an heiress who brought him the Dyrham estate, then through the support of his uncle who started him off in his career, and finally through working very hard a servant of the crown (and also through gifts, patronage etc as people did ad maybe still do!) He was also very careful with his money!

    Reply
  8. Thank you, Mary. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it. William Blathwayt made his fortune firstly though marrying an heiress who brought him the Dyrham estate, then through the support of his uncle who started him off in his career, and finally through working very hard a servant of the crown (and also through gifts, patronage etc as people did ad maybe still do!) He was also very careful with his money!

    Reply
  9. Thank you, Mary. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it. William Blathwayt made his fortune firstly though marrying an heiress who brought him the Dyrham estate, then through the support of his uncle who started him off in his career, and finally through working very hard a servant of the crown (and also through gifts, patronage etc as people did ad maybe still do!) He was also very careful with his money!

    Reply
  10. Thank you, Mary. I’m very pleased you enjoyed it. William Blathwayt made his fortune firstly though marrying an heiress who brought him the Dyrham estate, then through the support of his uncle who started him off in his career, and finally through working very hard a servant of the crown (and also through gifts, patronage etc as people did ad maybe still do!) He was also very careful with his money!

    Reply
  11. What a fascinating post, Nicola! Thank you for sharing. I have been eagerly following Anna’s FB posts about her trip. She is always so generous about sharing photos with her readers.
    I can’t imagine designing a house to honor someone. I do better with a garden designed for this purpose. I know several people who have tried Shakespeare gardens, and one friend is currently trying her hand at creating an Emily Dickinson garden with roses, daisies, peonies, zinnias, and others that I have forgotten.

    Reply
  12. What a fascinating post, Nicola! Thank you for sharing. I have been eagerly following Anna’s FB posts about her trip. She is always so generous about sharing photos with her readers.
    I can’t imagine designing a house to honor someone. I do better with a garden designed for this purpose. I know several people who have tried Shakespeare gardens, and one friend is currently trying her hand at creating an Emily Dickinson garden with roses, daisies, peonies, zinnias, and others that I have forgotten.

    Reply
  13. What a fascinating post, Nicola! Thank you for sharing. I have been eagerly following Anna’s FB posts about her trip. She is always so generous about sharing photos with her readers.
    I can’t imagine designing a house to honor someone. I do better with a garden designed for this purpose. I know several people who have tried Shakespeare gardens, and one friend is currently trying her hand at creating an Emily Dickinson garden with roses, daisies, peonies, zinnias, and others that I have forgotten.

    Reply
  14. What a fascinating post, Nicola! Thank you for sharing. I have been eagerly following Anna’s FB posts about her trip. She is always so generous about sharing photos with her readers.
    I can’t imagine designing a house to honor someone. I do better with a garden designed for this purpose. I know several people who have tried Shakespeare gardens, and one friend is currently trying her hand at creating an Emily Dickinson garden with roses, daisies, peonies, zinnias, and others that I have forgotten.

    Reply
  15. What a fascinating post, Nicola! Thank you for sharing. I have been eagerly following Anna’s FB posts about her trip. She is always so generous about sharing photos with her readers.
    I can’t imagine designing a house to honor someone. I do better with a garden designed for this purpose. I know several people who have tried Shakespeare gardens, and one friend is currently trying her hand at creating an Emily Dickinson garden with roses, daisies, peonies, zinnias, and others that I have forgotten.

    Reply
  16. I love this post. Thank you, Nicola, for taking us for a virtual walkabout of the estate. Some of us will never see these in real life, so this window into it is much appreciated.
    “I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home.”
    Then there’s the famous Taj Mahal that Shah Jahan built for Mumtaz.

    Reply
  17. I love this post. Thank you, Nicola, for taking us for a virtual walkabout of the estate. Some of us will never see these in real life, so this window into it is much appreciated.
    “I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home.”
    Then there’s the famous Taj Mahal that Shah Jahan built for Mumtaz.

    Reply
  18. I love this post. Thank you, Nicola, for taking us for a virtual walkabout of the estate. Some of us will never see these in real life, so this window into it is much appreciated.
    “I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home.”
    Then there’s the famous Taj Mahal that Shah Jahan built for Mumtaz.

    Reply
  19. I love this post. Thank you, Nicola, for taking us for a virtual walkabout of the estate. Some of us will never see these in real life, so this window into it is much appreciated.
    “I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home.”
    Then there’s the famous Taj Mahal that Shah Jahan built for Mumtaz.

    Reply
  20. I love this post. Thank you, Nicola, for taking us for a virtual walkabout of the estate. Some of us will never see these in real life, so this window into it is much appreciated.
    “I did come away wondering about the concept of demonstrating your loyalty to a person or a cause through the way you decorate your home.”
    Then there’s the famous Taj Mahal that Shah Jahan built for Mumtaz.

    Reply
  21. I haven’t been to Dyrham Park yet so was very interested in your impressions Nicola. I also love the wide staircases in stately homes with all of the beautiful oil paintings that normally decorate the walls.
    I think I would like to design a garden tribute to Sir Isaac Newton. I would have a pergola with apple tree cordons trained across the top and at one end I would place a statue modelling the solar system.Under the statue there would be a plaque displaying Newton’s famous equation for gravitational attraction F= G*M1*M2/(R^2).
    As visitors walk under the pergola towards the statue, an occasional apple would fall, reminding them of how Newton reputedly was inspired to discover the force of gravity as he saw an apple in his garden falling to earth.

    Reply
  22. I haven’t been to Dyrham Park yet so was very interested in your impressions Nicola. I also love the wide staircases in stately homes with all of the beautiful oil paintings that normally decorate the walls.
    I think I would like to design a garden tribute to Sir Isaac Newton. I would have a pergola with apple tree cordons trained across the top and at one end I would place a statue modelling the solar system.Under the statue there would be a plaque displaying Newton’s famous equation for gravitational attraction F= G*M1*M2/(R^2).
    As visitors walk under the pergola towards the statue, an occasional apple would fall, reminding them of how Newton reputedly was inspired to discover the force of gravity as he saw an apple in his garden falling to earth.

    Reply
  23. I haven’t been to Dyrham Park yet so was very interested in your impressions Nicola. I also love the wide staircases in stately homes with all of the beautiful oil paintings that normally decorate the walls.
    I think I would like to design a garden tribute to Sir Isaac Newton. I would have a pergola with apple tree cordons trained across the top and at one end I would place a statue modelling the solar system.Under the statue there would be a plaque displaying Newton’s famous equation for gravitational attraction F= G*M1*M2/(R^2).
    As visitors walk under the pergola towards the statue, an occasional apple would fall, reminding them of how Newton reputedly was inspired to discover the force of gravity as he saw an apple in his garden falling to earth.

    Reply
  24. I haven’t been to Dyrham Park yet so was very interested in your impressions Nicola. I also love the wide staircases in stately homes with all of the beautiful oil paintings that normally decorate the walls.
    I think I would like to design a garden tribute to Sir Isaac Newton. I would have a pergola with apple tree cordons trained across the top and at one end I would place a statue modelling the solar system.Under the statue there would be a plaque displaying Newton’s famous equation for gravitational attraction F= G*M1*M2/(R^2).
    As visitors walk under the pergola towards the statue, an occasional apple would fall, reminding them of how Newton reputedly was inspired to discover the force of gravity as he saw an apple in his garden falling to earth.

    Reply
  25. I haven’t been to Dyrham Park yet so was very interested in your impressions Nicola. I also love the wide staircases in stately homes with all of the beautiful oil paintings that normally decorate the walls.
    I think I would like to design a garden tribute to Sir Isaac Newton. I would have a pergola with apple tree cordons trained across the top and at one end I would place a statue modelling the solar system.Under the statue there would be a plaque displaying Newton’s famous equation for gravitational attraction F= G*M1*M2/(R^2).
    As visitors walk under the pergola towards the statue, an occasional apple would fall, reminding them of how Newton reputedly was inspired to discover the force of gravity as he saw an apple in his garden falling to earth.

    Reply
  26. Thank you very much, Janga. I’m delighted you enjoyed it. It’s always a pleasure going country house visiting with Anna. We have a lot of fun!
    I absolutely love the idea of a Shakespeare Garden and feel quite inspired to try a tribute garden of my own after reading about the Emily Dickinson on. Lovely!

    Reply
  27. Thank you very much, Janga. I’m delighted you enjoyed it. It’s always a pleasure going country house visiting with Anna. We have a lot of fun!
    I absolutely love the idea of a Shakespeare Garden and feel quite inspired to try a tribute garden of my own after reading about the Emily Dickinson on. Lovely!

    Reply
  28. Thank you very much, Janga. I’m delighted you enjoyed it. It’s always a pleasure going country house visiting with Anna. We have a lot of fun!
    I absolutely love the idea of a Shakespeare Garden and feel quite inspired to try a tribute garden of my own after reading about the Emily Dickinson on. Lovely!

    Reply
  29. Thank you very much, Janga. I’m delighted you enjoyed it. It’s always a pleasure going country house visiting with Anna. We have a lot of fun!
    I absolutely love the idea of a Shakespeare Garden and feel quite inspired to try a tribute garden of my own after reading about the Emily Dickinson on. Lovely!

    Reply
  30. Thank you very much, Janga. I’m delighted you enjoyed it. It’s always a pleasure going country house visiting with Anna. We have a lot of fun!
    I absolutely love the idea of a Shakespeare Garden and feel quite inspired to try a tribute garden of my own after reading about the Emily Dickinson on. Lovely!

    Reply
  31. Thank you so much, Keira! Yes, the idea of building a “tribute house” is such an interesting one. It feels very calculated when there is a political element to it and much more “normal”, if that’s the word, when it’s built for love like the Taj Mahal or Ashdown House.

    Reply
  32. Thank you so much, Keira! Yes, the idea of building a “tribute house” is such an interesting one. It feels very calculated when there is a political element to it and much more “normal”, if that’s the word, when it’s built for love like the Taj Mahal or Ashdown House.

    Reply
  33. Thank you so much, Keira! Yes, the idea of building a “tribute house” is such an interesting one. It feels very calculated when there is a political element to it and much more “normal”, if that’s the word, when it’s built for love like the Taj Mahal or Ashdown House.

    Reply
  34. Thank you so much, Keira! Yes, the idea of building a “tribute house” is such an interesting one. It feels very calculated when there is a political element to it and much more “normal”, if that’s the word, when it’s built for love like the Taj Mahal or Ashdown House.

    Reply
  35. Thank you so much, Keira! Yes, the idea of building a “tribute house” is such an interesting one. It feels very calculated when there is a political element to it and much more “normal”, if that’s the word, when it’s built for love like the Taj Mahal or Ashdown House.

    Reply
  36. I can thoroughly recommend Dyrham Park for a visit, Quantum, and may I say that your design for a Isaac Newton Gardon sounds absolutely inspired. Have you pitched it to the National Trust for them to develop at Woolsthorpe? It would be marvellous!

    Reply
  37. I can thoroughly recommend Dyrham Park for a visit, Quantum, and may I say that your design for a Isaac Newton Gardon sounds absolutely inspired. Have you pitched it to the National Trust for them to develop at Woolsthorpe? It would be marvellous!

    Reply
  38. I can thoroughly recommend Dyrham Park for a visit, Quantum, and may I say that your design for a Isaac Newton Gardon sounds absolutely inspired. Have you pitched it to the National Trust for them to develop at Woolsthorpe? It would be marvellous!

    Reply
  39. I can thoroughly recommend Dyrham Park for a visit, Quantum, and may I say that your design for a Isaac Newton Gardon sounds absolutely inspired. Have you pitched it to the National Trust for them to develop at Woolsthorpe? It would be marvellous!

    Reply
  40. I can thoroughly recommend Dyrham Park for a visit, Quantum, and may I say that your design for a Isaac Newton Gardon sounds absolutely inspired. Have you pitched it to the National Trust for them to develop at Woolsthorpe? It would be marvellous!

    Reply
  41. I guess in modern times, and I can only speak as an American here, we tend to group that sort of thing as embarrassingly pretentious. But then we do love to visit historic homes, show homes, etc., and gather inspiration from those into either our current style or ideas for a future dream house. That may be why love visiting Britain too. Exploring historical sites we’ve read about or witnessed in historical dramas.
    If money were no object and I was much younger, I think I’d also like to do a tribute garden….but who too? When I WAS much younger I did try to have an English cutting border and was quite successful at it. That was in central NY state where we lived for 18 years. Then we moved to TX and all of a sudden I knew nothing about gardening anymore. Ha!! Had to learn all over again. No English cutting garden.
    I too am following Anna’s photo travelogue on Facebook. Thanks for this great blog posting Nicola.

    Reply
  42. I guess in modern times, and I can only speak as an American here, we tend to group that sort of thing as embarrassingly pretentious. But then we do love to visit historic homes, show homes, etc., and gather inspiration from those into either our current style or ideas for a future dream house. That may be why love visiting Britain too. Exploring historical sites we’ve read about or witnessed in historical dramas.
    If money were no object and I was much younger, I think I’d also like to do a tribute garden….but who too? When I WAS much younger I did try to have an English cutting border and was quite successful at it. That was in central NY state where we lived for 18 years. Then we moved to TX and all of a sudden I knew nothing about gardening anymore. Ha!! Had to learn all over again. No English cutting garden.
    I too am following Anna’s photo travelogue on Facebook. Thanks for this great blog posting Nicola.

    Reply
  43. I guess in modern times, and I can only speak as an American here, we tend to group that sort of thing as embarrassingly pretentious. But then we do love to visit historic homes, show homes, etc., and gather inspiration from those into either our current style or ideas for a future dream house. That may be why love visiting Britain too. Exploring historical sites we’ve read about or witnessed in historical dramas.
    If money were no object and I was much younger, I think I’d also like to do a tribute garden….but who too? When I WAS much younger I did try to have an English cutting border and was quite successful at it. That was in central NY state where we lived for 18 years. Then we moved to TX and all of a sudden I knew nothing about gardening anymore. Ha!! Had to learn all over again. No English cutting garden.
    I too am following Anna’s photo travelogue on Facebook. Thanks for this great blog posting Nicola.

    Reply
  44. I guess in modern times, and I can only speak as an American here, we tend to group that sort of thing as embarrassingly pretentious. But then we do love to visit historic homes, show homes, etc., and gather inspiration from those into either our current style or ideas for a future dream house. That may be why love visiting Britain too. Exploring historical sites we’ve read about or witnessed in historical dramas.
    If money were no object and I was much younger, I think I’d also like to do a tribute garden….but who too? When I WAS much younger I did try to have an English cutting border and was quite successful at it. That was in central NY state where we lived for 18 years. Then we moved to TX and all of a sudden I knew nothing about gardening anymore. Ha!! Had to learn all over again. No English cutting garden.
    I too am following Anna’s photo travelogue on Facebook. Thanks for this great blog posting Nicola.

    Reply
  45. I guess in modern times, and I can only speak as an American here, we tend to group that sort of thing as embarrassingly pretentious. But then we do love to visit historic homes, show homes, etc., and gather inspiration from those into either our current style or ideas for a future dream house. That may be why love visiting Britain too. Exploring historical sites we’ve read about or witnessed in historical dramas.
    If money were no object and I was much younger, I think I’d also like to do a tribute garden….but who too? When I WAS much younger I did try to have an English cutting border and was quite successful at it. That was in central NY state where we lived for 18 years. Then we moved to TX and all of a sudden I knew nothing about gardening anymore. Ha!! Had to learn all over again. No English cutting garden.
    I too am following Anna’s photo travelogue on Facebook. Thanks for this great blog posting Nicola.

    Reply
  46. I too enjoyed the virtual tour.
    I don’t think I could do a tribute house or garden. I like Quantum’s idea of an Isaac Newton garden and the Emily Dickison garden Janga mentioned, but i don’t come up with any ideas on my own.
    I have always admired Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott, but can’t imagine gardens or housing appropriate to either.

    Reply
  47. I too enjoyed the virtual tour.
    I don’t think I could do a tribute house or garden. I like Quantum’s idea of an Isaac Newton garden and the Emily Dickison garden Janga mentioned, but i don’t come up with any ideas on my own.
    I have always admired Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott, but can’t imagine gardens or housing appropriate to either.

    Reply
  48. I too enjoyed the virtual tour.
    I don’t think I could do a tribute house or garden. I like Quantum’s idea of an Isaac Newton garden and the Emily Dickison garden Janga mentioned, but i don’t come up with any ideas on my own.
    I have always admired Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott, but can’t imagine gardens or housing appropriate to either.

    Reply
  49. I too enjoyed the virtual tour.
    I don’t think I could do a tribute house or garden. I like Quantum’s idea of an Isaac Newton garden and the Emily Dickison garden Janga mentioned, but i don’t come up with any ideas on my own.
    I have always admired Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott, but can’t imagine gardens or housing appropriate to either.

    Reply
  50. I too enjoyed the virtual tour.
    I don’t think I could do a tribute house or garden. I like Quantum’s idea of an Isaac Newton garden and the Emily Dickison garden Janga mentioned, but i don’t come up with any ideas on my own.
    I have always admired Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott, but can’t imagine gardens or housing appropriate to either.

    Reply
  51. Michelle, I’m fascinated by the idea of needing to re-learn all your gardening experience when you move. We don’t have such different extremes of climate here but of course there are places like Northern Scotland where certain trees don’t grow, and plants that prefer a maritime garden etc. I’d love to create a seaside garden but before that I’d have to buy the house by the sea…

    Reply
  52. Michelle, I’m fascinated by the idea of needing to re-learn all your gardening experience when you move. We don’t have such different extremes of climate here but of course there are places like Northern Scotland where certain trees don’t grow, and plants that prefer a maritime garden etc. I’d love to create a seaside garden but before that I’d have to buy the house by the sea…

    Reply
  53. Michelle, I’m fascinated by the idea of needing to re-learn all your gardening experience when you move. We don’t have such different extremes of climate here but of course there are places like Northern Scotland where certain trees don’t grow, and plants that prefer a maritime garden etc. I’d love to create a seaside garden but before that I’d have to buy the house by the sea…

    Reply
  54. Michelle, I’m fascinated by the idea of needing to re-learn all your gardening experience when you move. We don’t have such different extremes of climate here but of course there are places like Northern Scotland where certain trees don’t grow, and plants that prefer a maritime garden etc. I’d love to create a seaside garden but before that I’d have to buy the house by the sea…

    Reply
  55. Michelle, I’m fascinated by the idea of needing to re-learn all your gardening experience when you move. We don’t have such different extremes of climate here but of course there are places like Northern Scotland where certain trees don’t grow, and plants that prefer a maritime garden etc. I’d love to create a seaside garden but before that I’d have to buy the house by the sea…

    Reply
  56. Thank you, Sue, I’m glad you liked the tour! I’d like to think about the sort of tribute garden appropriate for both Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott… I’m sure we could come up with some ideas if we all put our heads together!

    Reply
  57. Thank you, Sue, I’m glad you liked the tour! I’d like to think about the sort of tribute garden appropriate for both Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott… I’m sure we could come up with some ideas if we all put our heads together!

    Reply
  58. Thank you, Sue, I’m glad you liked the tour! I’d like to think about the sort of tribute garden appropriate for both Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott… I’m sure we could come up with some ideas if we all put our heads together!

    Reply
  59. Thank you, Sue, I’m glad you liked the tour! I’d like to think about the sort of tribute garden appropriate for both Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott… I’m sure we could come up with some ideas if we all put our heads together!

    Reply
  60. Thank you, Sue, I’m glad you liked the tour! I’d like to think about the sort of tribute garden appropriate for both Abraham Lincoln and Louisa May Alcott… I’m sure we could come up with some ideas if we all put our heads together!

    Reply
  61. Thanks so much for this, Nicola – I am lucky enough to have been to Dyrham Park three times, but I never thought about it from the perspective of showing loyalty (or toadying favor!). If I’m ever lucky enough to visit again, I’ll be seeing it in a new light.
    As for a tribute garden, I have always wanted to develop a “moon garden” in the style of Gertrude Jekyll, whose garden designs are so wonderfully accessible, or at least seem to be until you undertake one yourself! A moon garden is filled with plants that reflect moonlight, maintain their scent throughout the evening, so are mostly white-flowered and many have gray-green foliage. I have managed to create a small sitting area with white clematis and climbing white roses on a trellis, and white begonias in pots. When we sit there, my husband calls it “visiting Gertrude.”

    Reply
  62. Thanks so much for this, Nicola – I am lucky enough to have been to Dyrham Park three times, but I never thought about it from the perspective of showing loyalty (or toadying favor!). If I’m ever lucky enough to visit again, I’ll be seeing it in a new light.
    As for a tribute garden, I have always wanted to develop a “moon garden” in the style of Gertrude Jekyll, whose garden designs are so wonderfully accessible, or at least seem to be until you undertake one yourself! A moon garden is filled with plants that reflect moonlight, maintain their scent throughout the evening, so are mostly white-flowered and many have gray-green foliage. I have managed to create a small sitting area with white clematis and climbing white roses on a trellis, and white begonias in pots. When we sit there, my husband calls it “visiting Gertrude.”

    Reply
  63. Thanks so much for this, Nicola – I am lucky enough to have been to Dyrham Park three times, but I never thought about it from the perspective of showing loyalty (or toadying favor!). If I’m ever lucky enough to visit again, I’ll be seeing it in a new light.
    As for a tribute garden, I have always wanted to develop a “moon garden” in the style of Gertrude Jekyll, whose garden designs are so wonderfully accessible, or at least seem to be until you undertake one yourself! A moon garden is filled with plants that reflect moonlight, maintain their scent throughout the evening, so are mostly white-flowered and many have gray-green foliage. I have managed to create a small sitting area with white clematis and climbing white roses on a trellis, and white begonias in pots. When we sit there, my husband calls it “visiting Gertrude.”

    Reply
  64. Thanks so much for this, Nicola – I am lucky enough to have been to Dyrham Park three times, but I never thought about it from the perspective of showing loyalty (or toadying favor!). If I’m ever lucky enough to visit again, I’ll be seeing it in a new light.
    As for a tribute garden, I have always wanted to develop a “moon garden” in the style of Gertrude Jekyll, whose garden designs are so wonderfully accessible, or at least seem to be until you undertake one yourself! A moon garden is filled with plants that reflect moonlight, maintain their scent throughout the evening, so are mostly white-flowered and many have gray-green foliage. I have managed to create a small sitting area with white clematis and climbing white roses on a trellis, and white begonias in pots. When we sit there, my husband calls it “visiting Gertrude.”

    Reply
  65. Thanks so much for this, Nicola – I am lucky enough to have been to Dyrham Park three times, but I never thought about it from the perspective of showing loyalty (or toadying favor!). If I’m ever lucky enough to visit again, I’ll be seeing it in a new light.
    As for a tribute garden, I have always wanted to develop a “moon garden” in the style of Gertrude Jekyll, whose garden designs are so wonderfully accessible, or at least seem to be until you undertake one yourself! A moon garden is filled with plants that reflect moonlight, maintain their scent throughout the evening, so are mostly white-flowered and many have gray-green foliage. I have managed to create a small sitting area with white clematis and climbing white roses on a trellis, and white begonias in pots. When we sit there, my husband calls it “visiting Gertrude.”

    Reply

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