Gifted & Talented Program for Heroes & Heroines

Barbie_renaissance Recently I had an interesting conversation with Wench Pat Rice regarding writing about characters with talents and special abilities. Like most the other Wenches, Pat and I have written our share of heroes and heroines with gifts and talents – some of them remarkable, extraordinary or downright strange.

As a mom, I’ve had sons in various Gifted and Talented Programs, which has been mostly a joy and a source of pride, and sometimes plain exhausting. As an author, it’s not dissimilar, minus the driving hours and the homework supervising. I love learning about my character’s gifts and abilities; I admire and respect them, and of course I think they’re the best ever… and I want those gifts to enrich the story for the reader, too.

For example, over the course of twenty books, I’ve written about heroes with musical and artistic talents (a fiddle player, a swordmaker); physical prowess (warriors, archers, swordsmen, forest outlaws); training and aptitude for healing or even mysterious healing powers; and psychic abilities (the ability to see the Fey, for instance). My heroines have been healers (both trained and natural) and psychics able to see the future or into the Otherworld; musicians, such as singers and a harpist; artists, including a stonecarver; and physically gifted heroines, such as a master archer as well as a swordswoman.

Keira_knightley What is the appeal of a fictional character—whether hero, heroine, main character or villain—who possesses abilities above and beyond the norm (or slightly off center, if we’re being directional about it)? Often there’s something compelling about those who have certain gifts, abilities or qualities; sometimes it is the gift or ability itself that fascinates. Some of my stories and their main characters were inspired as I researched a gift or vocation—such as Catriona, the Victorian folksong collector and singer in my 2003 novel, Kissing the Countess; a medieval archer so adept that he could catch arrows in flight, paired with a heroine whose skill at archery was a match for his own, in The Swan Maiden; or James Lindsay, a Scottish forest outlaw with an uncanny ability to train hawks, and Lady Isobel, who can foresee the future, in Laird of the Wind.

Twahbscan_3 Sometimes I’ve been so fascinated by the idea of the burden, the blessing and the price of an extraordinary gift that I’ve begun a story from that point. That was the case with Lady Miracle—where Lady Michaelmas’s gift of spontaneous healing touch is something she must hide, though it compels her to seek training as a physician in the fourteenth century; or To Wed A Highland Bride (Avon, 2007), where Elspeth can read others’ thoughts and knows the truth about others, especially James MacCarran, who doesn’t know quite what to make of it all.

Mysticrider170 Pat Rice has explored similar themes and issues in her novels. “I’ve never really tried to analyze the appeal,” she says. “It’s just something I’ve drifted toward naturally, as a more visible aspect of the character’s personality, I suppose. In MYSTIC RIDER, my heroine arouses emotion through her voice and her music. Skillful musicians can accomplish that without paranormal gifts, so Chantal’s abilities take music one step further, just enough to cause the hero grave problems. Possibly adding the extra element simply raises the stakes and the conflicts, which always makes a story more exciting.”

I know what Pat means here, and I’ve done the same thing. A story with a truly gifted, talented or extraordinarily able character naturally lends itself to situations out of the norm. Action and conflicts are a notch or two above ordinary; in historical romance, where events are often well beyond the realm of what might be considered normal, that’s useful for an author, and hopefully interesting for a reader. A character might be a gifted singer, but in fiction, that’s not always too exciting—music and art are not easy modes to convey in writing. Personally I don’t want to be told that a character is a brilliant musician, artist, or whatever. That’s a definite “show-me.” But if that gift raises the stakes, motivates story or characters and adds conflict and challenge, the label of brilliant or extraordinary is easier to accept. A character like Chantal in MYSTIC RIDER, whose astonishing musical ability ratchets things up in the story, adds a fascinating dimension.

Reading3 Years ago, when I was writing The Angel Knight, I was well into the first draft when I realized that the heroine was…a total bore. There was plenty of plot—a medieval Scotswoman held in an iron cage by the English, dying of exposure; the hero frees her and then chivalrously marries her; but to his surprise, she recovers (he has that healing-touch thing goin’ on); he is stuck with a wife, a ruined castle, and a life he never planned. But I freely admit that the heroine was an utter bore in that first draft. What she desperately needed was a hobby. But what did medieval ladies do?? Needlework? No thanks….

Marys_harp Impulsively I gave her a Celtic harp, and (after much research!) she became a gifted harper. That changed the nature of the character and the story so much that I learned the value of giving heroes and heroines something to DO — regardless of how exciting or fast-paced the story, believable characters, like all of us, need something that holds worth and meaning for them alone. In a story, that gift or ability can make all the difference when it dovetails with and enhances plot.

As writers, why do we choose certain gifts for some characters? Is it because it fits with the planned development of plot or character, or does it come from the author’s interest in exploring the gift itself? Mary Jo Putney says her answer to this is, quite simply, YES to all of the above, and the evidence is clear in A DISTANT MAGIC (now in paperback), and in so very many of her books.

Pat Rice gifts the heroes and heroines of her amazing Mystic Isle series with some extraordinary paranormal abilities, suited to the mystical world they live in part of the time. “After twenty-five years and forty-five books, I’ve covered most of the known territory that interests me and that the market allows, and the paranormal was a huge area relatively untouched during that time. I have never done a hero who can foresee the future like Ian from MYSTIC RIDER, for example. It adds a nice alpha quality to him if he “sees” danger and still walks into it–and I got to build plot and character around a man who willingly approaches danger."

Sometimes a writer chooses a gift or special ability for a character based on legends and myths that suit the time and setting of the story. I did that in The Sword Maiden, for example, when the heroine, Eva, is compelled to fulfill a clan prophecy in medieval Scotland; I put a sword in the girl’s hand, as she was obliged to defend her people. The research needed to make her smart and skilled with the blade was fascinating for me, and included some swordplay lessons. In that case, the character’s gift began with the model of a legend.

Mysticguardian170_2 That’s not often the case for Pat, who says that she while she plays on the myths of a beautiful legendary city that disappears, in MYSTIC GUARDIAN, she took the Breton legend of sea princess a little further with her mermaid heroine, along with the archetypal elements of a quest for a chalice. “But it’s not as if I set out to use those myths. They just fell into place as I plotted,” she says.

I find that a lot of what goes on in a story just falls into place, as Pat says, and that’s fodder for other blogs… and in the case of the Gifted and Talented hero and heroine, that ability has to fit in the story, and not simply stand alone. If it enriches the character and the story, it’s worth it not only for the author but the reader as well.

Currently I’m still exploring the G&T Program for Heroes and Heroines–this time with a Scottish Regency heroine, Fiona, who must see a fairy with her own eyes in order to inherit her grandmother’s estate in my next Sarah Gabriel romance, THE HIGHLAND GROOM (Avon, January 2009). Dougal MacGregor, a Highland smuggler who makes whisky according to an ancient fairy recipe, knows that if Fiona has the gift of looking into the Otherworld, that only means more trouble for him.

Queen_marys_harp After a gap of several years, I’m once again researching harps for my work-in-progress about Queen Margaret of Scotland, whose household includes a female bard. This time, to make certain the details of the bard’s hobby are just right, I’ve started taking lessons in Celtic harp!   

What talents and abilities do you like to see in heroes and heroines? Does it appeal to you more, or less, if the gift is paranormal or "normal"?  And have you read novels in which the character’s special ability made the story truly extraordinary for you?

~Susan Sarah, on a hot, humid, rainy day in Maryland

75 thoughts on “Gifted & Talented Program for Heroes & Heroines”

  1. Wow, you’ve turned my haphazard remarks into a thought-provoking essay! Must now go and figure out why my next hero failed his Gifted and Talented test…

    Reply
  2. Wow, you’ve turned my haphazard remarks into a thought-provoking essay! Must now go and figure out why my next hero failed his Gifted and Talented test…

    Reply
  3. Wow, you’ve turned my haphazard remarks into a thought-provoking essay! Must now go and figure out why my next hero failed his Gifted and Talented test…

    Reply
  4. Wow, you’ve turned my haphazard remarks into a thought-provoking essay! Must now go and figure out why my next hero failed his Gifted and Talented test…

    Reply
  5. Wow, you’ve turned my haphazard remarks into a thought-provoking essay! Must now go and figure out why my next hero failed his Gifted and Talented test…

    Reply
  6. All so true! I never thought of it in such terms since I’m not analytical in that way, but gifts and talents beyond the norm do work beautifully with the over the top fun of historical romance.
    I had no idea that the heroine of Angel Knight started out as a bore. She certainly wasn’t when you got through with her. 🙂
    My very first heroine was also musically gifted, and that was the bond that brought her and the hero together. Shared passions. There are so many ways this can work.
    And they’re so much fun to write, and they bring extra life to stories. As I told you, sometimes my characters start out gifted, and other times they acquire gifts that fit plots. It’s All Good. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. All so true! I never thought of it in such terms since I’m not analytical in that way, but gifts and talents beyond the norm do work beautifully with the over the top fun of historical romance.
    I had no idea that the heroine of Angel Knight started out as a bore. She certainly wasn’t when you got through with her. 🙂
    My very first heroine was also musically gifted, and that was the bond that brought her and the hero together. Shared passions. There are so many ways this can work.
    And they’re so much fun to write, and they bring extra life to stories. As I told you, sometimes my characters start out gifted, and other times they acquire gifts that fit plots. It’s All Good. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. All so true! I never thought of it in such terms since I’m not analytical in that way, but gifts and talents beyond the norm do work beautifully with the over the top fun of historical romance.
    I had no idea that the heroine of Angel Knight started out as a bore. She certainly wasn’t when you got through with her. 🙂
    My very first heroine was also musically gifted, and that was the bond that brought her and the hero together. Shared passions. There are so many ways this can work.
    And they’re so much fun to write, and they bring extra life to stories. As I told you, sometimes my characters start out gifted, and other times they acquire gifts that fit plots. It’s All Good. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. All so true! I never thought of it in such terms since I’m not analytical in that way, but gifts and talents beyond the norm do work beautifully with the over the top fun of historical romance.
    I had no idea that the heroine of Angel Knight started out as a bore. She certainly wasn’t when you got through with her. 🙂
    My very first heroine was also musically gifted, and that was the bond that brought her and the hero together. Shared passions. There are so many ways this can work.
    And they’re so much fun to write, and they bring extra life to stories. As I told you, sometimes my characters start out gifted, and other times they acquire gifts that fit plots. It’s All Good. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. All so true! I never thought of it in such terms since I’m not analytical in that way, but gifts and talents beyond the norm do work beautifully with the over the top fun of historical romance.
    I had no idea that the heroine of Angel Knight started out as a bore. She certainly wasn’t when you got through with her. 🙂
    My very first heroine was also musically gifted, and that was the bond that brought her and the hero together. Shared passions. There are so many ways this can work.
    And they’re so much fun to write, and they bring extra life to stories. As I told you, sometimes my characters start out gifted, and other times they acquire gifts that fit plots. It’s All Good. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. I agree that I like both heroes and heroines who do something else besides being good people.
    What bothers me about paranormals is that in many of these, the only way women can have power is by being magical.
    What happened to intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination?
    I grant you, in an historical, it’s hard for a woman to get real power, since most of society was stacked against her. But in contemporaries? Nowadays women can get a lot farther than our mothers and grandmothers could. In some ways I consider paranormal powers for a heroine a copout for not working hard enough.
    Sarah, I’ve read your Scottish stories, and I love them. In “To Wed a Highland Bride”, the heroine is part fey, but she’s also an excellent weaver. And I love the hero—a titled nobleman who works for a living. My kind of story.
    While some paranormal is fun, I’m pretty tired of witches and vampires. If I read a paranormal, I want it unique, like the Mystic series.
    But I also want stories about women who make it because of the aforementioned intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination. As Einstein said, genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration.

    Reply
  12. I agree that I like both heroes and heroines who do something else besides being good people.
    What bothers me about paranormals is that in many of these, the only way women can have power is by being magical.
    What happened to intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination?
    I grant you, in an historical, it’s hard for a woman to get real power, since most of society was stacked against her. But in contemporaries? Nowadays women can get a lot farther than our mothers and grandmothers could. In some ways I consider paranormal powers for a heroine a copout for not working hard enough.
    Sarah, I’ve read your Scottish stories, and I love them. In “To Wed a Highland Bride”, the heroine is part fey, but she’s also an excellent weaver. And I love the hero—a titled nobleman who works for a living. My kind of story.
    While some paranormal is fun, I’m pretty tired of witches and vampires. If I read a paranormal, I want it unique, like the Mystic series.
    But I also want stories about women who make it because of the aforementioned intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination. As Einstein said, genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration.

    Reply
  13. I agree that I like both heroes and heroines who do something else besides being good people.
    What bothers me about paranormals is that in many of these, the only way women can have power is by being magical.
    What happened to intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination?
    I grant you, in an historical, it’s hard for a woman to get real power, since most of society was stacked against her. But in contemporaries? Nowadays women can get a lot farther than our mothers and grandmothers could. In some ways I consider paranormal powers for a heroine a copout for not working hard enough.
    Sarah, I’ve read your Scottish stories, and I love them. In “To Wed a Highland Bride”, the heroine is part fey, but she’s also an excellent weaver. And I love the hero—a titled nobleman who works for a living. My kind of story.
    While some paranormal is fun, I’m pretty tired of witches and vampires. If I read a paranormal, I want it unique, like the Mystic series.
    But I also want stories about women who make it because of the aforementioned intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination. As Einstein said, genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration.

    Reply
  14. I agree that I like both heroes and heroines who do something else besides being good people.
    What bothers me about paranormals is that in many of these, the only way women can have power is by being magical.
    What happened to intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination?
    I grant you, in an historical, it’s hard for a woman to get real power, since most of society was stacked against her. But in contemporaries? Nowadays women can get a lot farther than our mothers and grandmothers could. In some ways I consider paranormal powers for a heroine a copout for not working hard enough.
    Sarah, I’ve read your Scottish stories, and I love them. In “To Wed a Highland Bride”, the heroine is part fey, but she’s also an excellent weaver. And I love the hero—a titled nobleman who works for a living. My kind of story.
    While some paranormal is fun, I’m pretty tired of witches and vampires. If I read a paranormal, I want it unique, like the Mystic series.
    But I also want stories about women who make it because of the aforementioned intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination. As Einstein said, genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration.

    Reply
  15. I agree that I like both heroes and heroines who do something else besides being good people.
    What bothers me about paranormals is that in many of these, the only way women can have power is by being magical.
    What happened to intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination?
    I grant you, in an historical, it’s hard for a woman to get real power, since most of society was stacked against her. But in contemporaries? Nowadays women can get a lot farther than our mothers and grandmothers could. In some ways I consider paranormal powers for a heroine a copout for not working hard enough.
    Sarah, I’ve read your Scottish stories, and I love them. In “To Wed a Highland Bride”, the heroine is part fey, but she’s also an excellent weaver. And I love the hero—a titled nobleman who works for a living. My kind of story.
    While some paranormal is fun, I’m pretty tired of witches and vampires. If I read a paranormal, I want it unique, like the Mystic series.
    But I also want stories about women who make it because of the aforementioned intelligence, lots of hard work and just plain determination. As Einstein said, genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration.

    Reply
  16. Re normal abilities, it doesn’t matter what – but preferably some art or craft I don’t know much about, because then the story is educational as well as entertaining. I’m always up for learning something new. Re paranormal, I like almost anything, as long as I feel that the character is a normal person in other ways. (For example, I’m fine with vampires, but I’d rather they weren’t undead. Even if they aren’t exactly dead, there’s always this sense of decay and unpleasant smells in the back of my mind when reading about that kind of vamp!) My favorite paranormals are where the magical abilities are at the boundaries of possibility, or just a little beyond.
    Barbara, who’s so absorbed in Lady Macbeth that she dreamed about it last night.

    Reply
  17. Re normal abilities, it doesn’t matter what – but preferably some art or craft I don’t know much about, because then the story is educational as well as entertaining. I’m always up for learning something new. Re paranormal, I like almost anything, as long as I feel that the character is a normal person in other ways. (For example, I’m fine with vampires, but I’d rather they weren’t undead. Even if they aren’t exactly dead, there’s always this sense of decay and unpleasant smells in the back of my mind when reading about that kind of vamp!) My favorite paranormals are where the magical abilities are at the boundaries of possibility, or just a little beyond.
    Barbara, who’s so absorbed in Lady Macbeth that she dreamed about it last night.

    Reply
  18. Re normal abilities, it doesn’t matter what – but preferably some art or craft I don’t know much about, because then the story is educational as well as entertaining. I’m always up for learning something new. Re paranormal, I like almost anything, as long as I feel that the character is a normal person in other ways. (For example, I’m fine with vampires, but I’d rather they weren’t undead. Even if they aren’t exactly dead, there’s always this sense of decay and unpleasant smells in the back of my mind when reading about that kind of vamp!) My favorite paranormals are where the magical abilities are at the boundaries of possibility, or just a little beyond.
    Barbara, who’s so absorbed in Lady Macbeth that she dreamed about it last night.

    Reply
  19. Re normal abilities, it doesn’t matter what – but preferably some art or craft I don’t know much about, because then the story is educational as well as entertaining. I’m always up for learning something new. Re paranormal, I like almost anything, as long as I feel that the character is a normal person in other ways. (For example, I’m fine with vampires, but I’d rather they weren’t undead. Even if they aren’t exactly dead, there’s always this sense of decay and unpleasant smells in the back of my mind when reading about that kind of vamp!) My favorite paranormals are where the magical abilities are at the boundaries of possibility, or just a little beyond.
    Barbara, who’s so absorbed in Lady Macbeth that she dreamed about it last night.

    Reply
  20. Re normal abilities, it doesn’t matter what – but preferably some art or craft I don’t know much about, because then the story is educational as well as entertaining. I’m always up for learning something new. Re paranormal, I like almost anything, as long as I feel that the character is a normal person in other ways. (For example, I’m fine with vampires, but I’d rather they weren’t undead. Even if they aren’t exactly dead, there’s always this sense of decay and unpleasant smells in the back of my mind when reading about that kind of vamp!) My favorite paranormals are where the magical abilities are at the boundaries of possibility, or just a little beyond.
    Barbara, who’s so absorbed in Lady Macbeth that she dreamed about it last night.

    Reply
  21. LOL on decaying vampires! I have a problem with them as well and much prefer the paranormal abilities be an extension of who the person is.
    I’ll have to think about the comment about the women not having any power unless it’s magical. I don’t think Susan or I have ever done that. We tend to be into strong heroines, even if they are quiet or even shy. Inner strength is necessary for heroism, IMO.
    I know historically, women were limited, but I’m also well aware that strong women were behind a LOT of strong men. So I’ve never bought into the historically passive female. Sure, they existed, just as they do today. We all know wimps. But everyone can’t be a heroine. Just the thought of giving magical powers to a wimp… That’s villain territory in my book! “G”

    Reply
  22. LOL on decaying vampires! I have a problem with them as well and much prefer the paranormal abilities be an extension of who the person is.
    I’ll have to think about the comment about the women not having any power unless it’s magical. I don’t think Susan or I have ever done that. We tend to be into strong heroines, even if they are quiet or even shy. Inner strength is necessary for heroism, IMO.
    I know historically, women were limited, but I’m also well aware that strong women were behind a LOT of strong men. So I’ve never bought into the historically passive female. Sure, they existed, just as they do today. We all know wimps. But everyone can’t be a heroine. Just the thought of giving magical powers to a wimp… That’s villain territory in my book! “G”

    Reply
  23. LOL on decaying vampires! I have a problem with them as well and much prefer the paranormal abilities be an extension of who the person is.
    I’ll have to think about the comment about the women not having any power unless it’s magical. I don’t think Susan or I have ever done that. We tend to be into strong heroines, even if they are quiet or even shy. Inner strength is necessary for heroism, IMO.
    I know historically, women were limited, but I’m also well aware that strong women were behind a LOT of strong men. So I’ve never bought into the historically passive female. Sure, they existed, just as they do today. We all know wimps. But everyone can’t be a heroine. Just the thought of giving magical powers to a wimp… That’s villain territory in my book! “G”

    Reply
  24. LOL on decaying vampires! I have a problem with them as well and much prefer the paranormal abilities be an extension of who the person is.
    I’ll have to think about the comment about the women not having any power unless it’s magical. I don’t think Susan or I have ever done that. We tend to be into strong heroines, even if they are quiet or even shy. Inner strength is necessary for heroism, IMO.
    I know historically, women were limited, but I’m also well aware that strong women were behind a LOT of strong men. So I’ve never bought into the historically passive female. Sure, they existed, just as they do today. We all know wimps. But everyone can’t be a heroine. Just the thought of giving magical powers to a wimp… That’s villain territory in my book! “G”

    Reply
  25. LOL on decaying vampires! I have a problem with them as well and much prefer the paranormal abilities be an extension of who the person is.
    I’ll have to think about the comment about the women not having any power unless it’s magical. I don’t think Susan or I have ever done that. We tend to be into strong heroines, even if they are quiet or even shy. Inner strength is necessary for heroism, IMO.
    I know historically, women were limited, but I’m also well aware that strong women were behind a LOT of strong men. So I’ve never bought into the historically passive female. Sure, they existed, just as they do today. We all know wimps. But everyone can’t be a heroine. Just the thought of giving magical powers to a wimp… That’s villain territory in my book! “G”

    Reply
  26. I love talented protagonists (genesis, artist, musician, writer, fencer, etc), but as a reader I tend to avoid paranormal stories. I just don’t enjoy them as much as I do “straight” historicals. I spend too much time digging away mentally at the world-buliding and logic behind the “talent” and if I can’t make it jive in my head it pushes me out of the story (which I know is a *me* thing, so I don’t blame the books).
    For example, my friends and I went to see HELL BOY II yesterday. It’s visually stunning, but there were some issues with the logic of the magical realm . . . and we spent our entire evening talking about them, LOL!

    Reply
  27. I love talented protagonists (genesis, artist, musician, writer, fencer, etc), but as a reader I tend to avoid paranormal stories. I just don’t enjoy them as much as I do “straight” historicals. I spend too much time digging away mentally at the world-buliding and logic behind the “talent” and if I can’t make it jive in my head it pushes me out of the story (which I know is a *me* thing, so I don’t blame the books).
    For example, my friends and I went to see HELL BOY II yesterday. It’s visually stunning, but there were some issues with the logic of the magical realm . . . and we spent our entire evening talking about them, LOL!

    Reply
  28. I love talented protagonists (genesis, artist, musician, writer, fencer, etc), but as a reader I tend to avoid paranormal stories. I just don’t enjoy them as much as I do “straight” historicals. I spend too much time digging away mentally at the world-buliding and logic behind the “talent” and if I can’t make it jive in my head it pushes me out of the story (which I know is a *me* thing, so I don’t blame the books).
    For example, my friends and I went to see HELL BOY II yesterday. It’s visually stunning, but there were some issues with the logic of the magical realm . . . and we spent our entire evening talking about them, LOL!

    Reply
  29. I love talented protagonists (genesis, artist, musician, writer, fencer, etc), but as a reader I tend to avoid paranormal stories. I just don’t enjoy them as much as I do “straight” historicals. I spend too much time digging away mentally at the world-buliding and logic behind the “talent” and if I can’t make it jive in my head it pushes me out of the story (which I know is a *me* thing, so I don’t blame the books).
    For example, my friends and I went to see HELL BOY II yesterday. It’s visually stunning, but there were some issues with the logic of the magical realm . . . and we spent our entire evening talking about them, LOL!

    Reply
  30. I love talented protagonists (genesis, artist, musician, writer, fencer, etc), but as a reader I tend to avoid paranormal stories. I just don’t enjoy them as much as I do “straight” historicals. I spend too much time digging away mentally at the world-buliding and logic behind the “talent” and if I can’t make it jive in my head it pushes me out of the story (which I know is a *me* thing, so I don’t blame the books).
    For example, my friends and I went to see HELL BOY II yesterday. It’s visually stunning, but there were some issues with the logic of the magical realm . . . and we spent our entire evening talking about them, LOL!

    Reply
  31. You might like to take a look at my blog post “Definitions of Romance:
    http://tinyurl.com/6nh6jb
    especially part three–look up the comments by Northrop Frye. These are the most significant for me:
    [Fictions may be classified by the hero’s power of action, which may be greater than ours, less than ours, or roughly the same. If “superior in kind” to nature and to us, then “the hero is a divine being, and the story about him will be a myth”; “if superior in degree to other men and to his environment, the hero is the typical hero of romance, whose actions are marvelous but who is himself identified as a human being.”
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals, terrifying ogres and witches, and talismans of miraculous power violate no rule of probability once the postulates of romance have been established. Here we have moved from myth, properly so called, into legend, folk tale, marchen,” etc.
    33-4: Other steps down the ladder of genres are: High Mimetic Epic and Tragedy (hero is superior to other men, but not order of nature or social criticism) >> Low Mimetic comedy and realism (hero is one of us, and we demand some everyday probability to the story) >> Irony / lit of the absurd (hero is inferior in power and intelligence to us, so that we look down from above, and “we judge by the norms of a greater freedom”)
    The protagonists are indeed superior to those around them, even if they don’t have paranormal powers: they tend to be more intelligent, more compassionate, more courageous, more perceptive, and the like.
    You’ll note that I also quoted Mercedes Lackey. She does what I think is the best way to deal with paranormal powers: she writes about learning about them, learning to master them, and finally learning to use them. I think that this process, which is often a painful struggle involving sacrifices, is much more interesting than, “Oh, she can twitch her nose and turn the villain into a frog.”
    I too am vampired out, though I still have a bit of a thing for werewolves (mainly because I love wolves). I’ve noticed that now paranormal protagonists include demons, gargoyles, wizards (of course), and other, stranger creatures. Can a paranormal romance with a Republican hero be far behind?
    I’ve always wanted to write a novel (I do have a plot outline, believe it or not) about two ghosts–one a Regency-era duke and the other a contemporary feminist scholar–both murdered in the ducal castle by the same manner, setting out together to solve their own murders (and incidentally to save the life of the boy heir to the dukedom, the next intended victim).
    Anybody got any good references for ghost behavior?

    Reply
  32. You might like to take a look at my blog post “Definitions of Romance:
    http://tinyurl.com/6nh6jb
    especially part three–look up the comments by Northrop Frye. These are the most significant for me:
    [Fictions may be classified by the hero’s power of action, which may be greater than ours, less than ours, or roughly the same. If “superior in kind” to nature and to us, then “the hero is a divine being, and the story about him will be a myth”; “if superior in degree to other men and to his environment, the hero is the typical hero of romance, whose actions are marvelous but who is himself identified as a human being.”
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals, terrifying ogres and witches, and talismans of miraculous power violate no rule of probability once the postulates of romance have been established. Here we have moved from myth, properly so called, into legend, folk tale, marchen,” etc.
    33-4: Other steps down the ladder of genres are: High Mimetic Epic and Tragedy (hero is superior to other men, but not order of nature or social criticism) >> Low Mimetic comedy and realism (hero is one of us, and we demand some everyday probability to the story) >> Irony / lit of the absurd (hero is inferior in power and intelligence to us, so that we look down from above, and “we judge by the norms of a greater freedom”)
    The protagonists are indeed superior to those around them, even if they don’t have paranormal powers: they tend to be more intelligent, more compassionate, more courageous, more perceptive, and the like.
    You’ll note that I also quoted Mercedes Lackey. She does what I think is the best way to deal with paranormal powers: she writes about learning about them, learning to master them, and finally learning to use them. I think that this process, which is often a painful struggle involving sacrifices, is much more interesting than, “Oh, she can twitch her nose and turn the villain into a frog.”
    I too am vampired out, though I still have a bit of a thing for werewolves (mainly because I love wolves). I’ve noticed that now paranormal protagonists include demons, gargoyles, wizards (of course), and other, stranger creatures. Can a paranormal romance with a Republican hero be far behind?
    I’ve always wanted to write a novel (I do have a plot outline, believe it or not) about two ghosts–one a Regency-era duke and the other a contemporary feminist scholar–both murdered in the ducal castle by the same manner, setting out together to solve their own murders (and incidentally to save the life of the boy heir to the dukedom, the next intended victim).
    Anybody got any good references for ghost behavior?

    Reply
  33. You might like to take a look at my blog post “Definitions of Romance:
    http://tinyurl.com/6nh6jb
    especially part three–look up the comments by Northrop Frye. These are the most significant for me:
    [Fictions may be classified by the hero’s power of action, which may be greater than ours, less than ours, or roughly the same. If “superior in kind” to nature and to us, then “the hero is a divine being, and the story about him will be a myth”; “if superior in degree to other men and to his environment, the hero is the typical hero of romance, whose actions are marvelous but who is himself identified as a human being.”
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals, terrifying ogres and witches, and talismans of miraculous power violate no rule of probability once the postulates of romance have been established. Here we have moved from myth, properly so called, into legend, folk tale, marchen,” etc.
    33-4: Other steps down the ladder of genres are: High Mimetic Epic and Tragedy (hero is superior to other men, but not order of nature or social criticism) >> Low Mimetic comedy and realism (hero is one of us, and we demand some everyday probability to the story) >> Irony / lit of the absurd (hero is inferior in power and intelligence to us, so that we look down from above, and “we judge by the norms of a greater freedom”)
    The protagonists are indeed superior to those around them, even if they don’t have paranormal powers: they tend to be more intelligent, more compassionate, more courageous, more perceptive, and the like.
    You’ll note that I also quoted Mercedes Lackey. She does what I think is the best way to deal with paranormal powers: she writes about learning about them, learning to master them, and finally learning to use them. I think that this process, which is often a painful struggle involving sacrifices, is much more interesting than, “Oh, she can twitch her nose and turn the villain into a frog.”
    I too am vampired out, though I still have a bit of a thing for werewolves (mainly because I love wolves). I’ve noticed that now paranormal protagonists include demons, gargoyles, wizards (of course), and other, stranger creatures. Can a paranormal romance with a Republican hero be far behind?
    I’ve always wanted to write a novel (I do have a plot outline, believe it or not) about two ghosts–one a Regency-era duke and the other a contemporary feminist scholar–both murdered in the ducal castle by the same manner, setting out together to solve their own murders (and incidentally to save the life of the boy heir to the dukedom, the next intended victim).
    Anybody got any good references for ghost behavior?

    Reply
  34. You might like to take a look at my blog post “Definitions of Romance:
    http://tinyurl.com/6nh6jb
    especially part three–look up the comments by Northrop Frye. These are the most significant for me:
    [Fictions may be classified by the hero’s power of action, which may be greater than ours, less than ours, or roughly the same. If “superior in kind” to nature and to us, then “the hero is a divine being, and the story about him will be a myth”; “if superior in degree to other men and to his environment, the hero is the typical hero of romance, whose actions are marvelous but who is himself identified as a human being.”
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals, terrifying ogres and witches, and talismans of miraculous power violate no rule of probability once the postulates of romance have been established. Here we have moved from myth, properly so called, into legend, folk tale, marchen,” etc.
    33-4: Other steps down the ladder of genres are: High Mimetic Epic and Tragedy (hero is superior to other men, but not order of nature or social criticism) >> Low Mimetic comedy and realism (hero is one of us, and we demand some everyday probability to the story) >> Irony / lit of the absurd (hero is inferior in power and intelligence to us, so that we look down from above, and “we judge by the norms of a greater freedom”)
    The protagonists are indeed superior to those around them, even if they don’t have paranormal powers: they tend to be more intelligent, more compassionate, more courageous, more perceptive, and the like.
    You’ll note that I also quoted Mercedes Lackey. She does what I think is the best way to deal with paranormal powers: she writes about learning about them, learning to master them, and finally learning to use them. I think that this process, which is often a painful struggle involving sacrifices, is much more interesting than, “Oh, she can twitch her nose and turn the villain into a frog.”
    I too am vampired out, though I still have a bit of a thing for werewolves (mainly because I love wolves). I’ve noticed that now paranormal protagonists include demons, gargoyles, wizards (of course), and other, stranger creatures. Can a paranormal romance with a Republican hero be far behind?
    I’ve always wanted to write a novel (I do have a plot outline, believe it or not) about two ghosts–one a Regency-era duke and the other a contemporary feminist scholar–both murdered in the ducal castle by the same manner, setting out together to solve their own murders (and incidentally to save the life of the boy heir to the dukedom, the next intended victim).
    Anybody got any good references for ghost behavior?

    Reply
  35. You might like to take a look at my blog post “Definitions of Romance:
    http://tinyurl.com/6nh6jb
    especially part three–look up the comments by Northrop Frye. These are the most significant for me:
    [Fictions may be classified by the hero’s power of action, which may be greater than ours, less than ours, or roughly the same. If “superior in kind” to nature and to us, then “the hero is a divine being, and the story about him will be a myth”; “if superior in degree to other men and to his environment, the hero is the typical hero of romance, whose actions are marvelous but who is himself identified as a human being.”
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals, terrifying ogres and witches, and talismans of miraculous power violate no rule of probability once the postulates of romance have been established. Here we have moved from myth, properly so called, into legend, folk tale, marchen,” etc.
    33-4: Other steps down the ladder of genres are: High Mimetic Epic and Tragedy (hero is superior to other men, but not order of nature or social criticism) >> Low Mimetic comedy and realism (hero is one of us, and we demand some everyday probability to the story) >> Irony / lit of the absurd (hero is inferior in power and intelligence to us, so that we look down from above, and “we judge by the norms of a greater freedom”)
    The protagonists are indeed superior to those around them, even if they don’t have paranormal powers: they tend to be more intelligent, more compassionate, more courageous, more perceptive, and the like.
    You’ll note that I also quoted Mercedes Lackey. She does what I think is the best way to deal with paranormal powers: she writes about learning about them, learning to master them, and finally learning to use them. I think that this process, which is often a painful struggle involving sacrifices, is much more interesting than, “Oh, she can twitch her nose and turn the villain into a frog.”
    I too am vampired out, though I still have a bit of a thing for werewolves (mainly because I love wolves). I’ve noticed that now paranormal protagonists include demons, gargoyles, wizards (of course), and other, stranger creatures. Can a paranormal romance with a Republican hero be far behind?
    I’ve always wanted to write a novel (I do have a plot outline, believe it or not) about two ghosts–one a Regency-era duke and the other a contemporary feminist scholar–both murdered in the ducal castle by the same manner, setting out together to solve their own murders (and incidentally to save the life of the boy heir to the dukedom, the next intended victim).
    Anybody got any good references for ghost behavior?

    Reply
  36. ***snip***
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals,
    **end snip**
    talpianna, I’m happy that the definition of romance you found includes talking animals. I have a romance with talking animals (actually, the animals are talking to each other), and someone told me it was a fantasy. Others agreed with me, though, about it being a romance, since it is a courtship story with an HEA.

    Reply
  37. ***snip***
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals,
    **end snip**
    talpianna, I’m happy that the definition of romance you found includes talking animals. I have a romance with talking animals (actually, the animals are talking to each other), and someone told me it was a fantasy. Others agreed with me, though, about it being a romance, since it is a courtship story with an HEA.

    Reply
  38. ***snip***
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals,
    **end snip**
    talpianna, I’m happy that the definition of romance you found includes talking animals. I have a romance with talking animals (actually, the animals are talking to each other), and someone told me it was a fantasy. Others agreed with me, though, about it being a romance, since it is a courtship story with an HEA.

    Reply
  39. ***snip***
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals,
    **end snip**
    talpianna, I’m happy that the definition of romance you found includes talking animals. I have a romance with talking animals (actually, the animals are talking to each other), and someone told me it was a fantasy. Others agreed with me, though, about it being a romance, since it is a courtship story with an HEA.

    Reply
  40. ***snip***
    33: In a romance, “the ordinary laws of nature are slightly suspended: prodigies of courage and endurance, unnatural to us, are natural to him, and enchanted weapons, talking animals,
    **end snip**
    talpianna, I’m happy that the definition of romance you found includes talking animals. I have a romance with talking animals (actually, the animals are talking to each other), and someone told me it was a fantasy. Others agreed with me, though, about it being a romance, since it is a courtship story with an HEA.

    Reply
  41. Interesting insights, all, thanks for commenting. Not all my heroines and heroes have paranormal abilities, and I can understand Kalen’s preference. Each of my characters has something that they do, some kind of training, vocation, talent, art or calling that defines them as individuals, beyond being heroines in the story. My first heroine, in Black Thorne’s Rose, was a medieval manuscript illuminator, and while that gave me a chance to use some of my dissertation research, it also helped make the heroine unique, and hopefully readers learned something interesting about illumination techniques. I always try to include something about the training for whatever art or activity the hero or heroine does, so that it’s clear that there’s history and devotion there, with the character developing the skills, whether realistic or paranormal. It doesn’t just magically exist for them without some sweat and dedication, which is another good point made by Talpianna.
    Thank you, Linda, for the lovely comments on To Wed A Highland Bride! I hope you’ll look for Fiona’s story too!
    And Barbara — dreaming about Lady Macbeth when you’re reading about her, how cool is that!! Thank you!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  42. Interesting insights, all, thanks for commenting. Not all my heroines and heroes have paranormal abilities, and I can understand Kalen’s preference. Each of my characters has something that they do, some kind of training, vocation, talent, art or calling that defines them as individuals, beyond being heroines in the story. My first heroine, in Black Thorne’s Rose, was a medieval manuscript illuminator, and while that gave me a chance to use some of my dissertation research, it also helped make the heroine unique, and hopefully readers learned something interesting about illumination techniques. I always try to include something about the training for whatever art or activity the hero or heroine does, so that it’s clear that there’s history and devotion there, with the character developing the skills, whether realistic or paranormal. It doesn’t just magically exist for them without some sweat and dedication, which is another good point made by Talpianna.
    Thank you, Linda, for the lovely comments on To Wed A Highland Bride! I hope you’ll look for Fiona’s story too!
    And Barbara — dreaming about Lady Macbeth when you’re reading about her, how cool is that!! Thank you!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  43. Interesting insights, all, thanks for commenting. Not all my heroines and heroes have paranormal abilities, and I can understand Kalen’s preference. Each of my characters has something that they do, some kind of training, vocation, talent, art or calling that defines them as individuals, beyond being heroines in the story. My first heroine, in Black Thorne’s Rose, was a medieval manuscript illuminator, and while that gave me a chance to use some of my dissertation research, it also helped make the heroine unique, and hopefully readers learned something interesting about illumination techniques. I always try to include something about the training for whatever art or activity the hero or heroine does, so that it’s clear that there’s history and devotion there, with the character developing the skills, whether realistic or paranormal. It doesn’t just magically exist for them without some sweat and dedication, which is another good point made by Talpianna.
    Thank you, Linda, for the lovely comments on To Wed A Highland Bride! I hope you’ll look for Fiona’s story too!
    And Barbara — dreaming about Lady Macbeth when you’re reading about her, how cool is that!! Thank you!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  44. Interesting insights, all, thanks for commenting. Not all my heroines and heroes have paranormal abilities, and I can understand Kalen’s preference. Each of my characters has something that they do, some kind of training, vocation, talent, art or calling that defines them as individuals, beyond being heroines in the story. My first heroine, in Black Thorne’s Rose, was a medieval manuscript illuminator, and while that gave me a chance to use some of my dissertation research, it also helped make the heroine unique, and hopefully readers learned something interesting about illumination techniques. I always try to include something about the training for whatever art or activity the hero or heroine does, so that it’s clear that there’s history and devotion there, with the character developing the skills, whether realistic or paranormal. It doesn’t just magically exist for them without some sweat and dedication, which is another good point made by Talpianna.
    Thank you, Linda, for the lovely comments on To Wed A Highland Bride! I hope you’ll look for Fiona’s story too!
    And Barbara — dreaming about Lady Macbeth when you’re reading about her, how cool is that!! Thank you!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  45. Interesting insights, all, thanks for commenting. Not all my heroines and heroes have paranormal abilities, and I can understand Kalen’s preference. Each of my characters has something that they do, some kind of training, vocation, talent, art or calling that defines them as individuals, beyond being heroines in the story. My first heroine, in Black Thorne’s Rose, was a medieval manuscript illuminator, and while that gave me a chance to use some of my dissertation research, it also helped make the heroine unique, and hopefully readers learned something interesting about illumination techniques. I always try to include something about the training for whatever art or activity the hero or heroine does, so that it’s clear that there’s history and devotion there, with the character developing the skills, whether realistic or paranormal. It doesn’t just magically exist for them without some sweat and dedication, which is another good point made by Talpianna.
    Thank you, Linda, for the lovely comments on To Wed A Highland Bride! I hope you’ll look for Fiona’s story too!
    And Barbara — dreaming about Lady Macbeth when you’re reading about her, how cool is that!! Thank you!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  46. Sarah,
    I can tell you do a lot of research and I love that in a book. Thank you very much.
    Your geologist hero of “To Wed a Highland Bride” really rang true because of all the geology about the Highlands you included. I think too many books nowadays are short on the research and I dislike the trend

    Reply
  47. Sarah,
    I can tell you do a lot of research and I love that in a book. Thank you very much.
    Your geologist hero of “To Wed a Highland Bride” really rang true because of all the geology about the Highlands you included. I think too many books nowadays are short on the research and I dislike the trend

    Reply
  48. Sarah,
    I can tell you do a lot of research and I love that in a book. Thank you very much.
    Your geologist hero of “To Wed a Highland Bride” really rang true because of all the geology about the Highlands you included. I think too many books nowadays are short on the research and I dislike the trend

    Reply
  49. Sarah,
    I can tell you do a lot of research and I love that in a book. Thank you very much.
    Your geologist hero of “To Wed a Highland Bride” really rang true because of all the geology about the Highlands you included. I think too many books nowadays are short on the research and I dislike the trend

    Reply
  50. Sarah,
    I can tell you do a lot of research and I love that in a book. Thank you very much.
    Your geologist hero of “To Wed a Highland Bride” really rang true because of all the geology about the Highlands you included. I think too many books nowadays are short on the research and I dislike the trend

    Reply
  51. Northrop Frye was talking about medieval romance, such as Malory and the Gawain Poet, where you do get real magic, faeries, etc., and about THE FAERIE QUEENE. I think the “magical” part now mostly translates, outside paranormals, into superior skills or intelligence.
    I know that Barbara Metzger has written at least one romance which is narrated in part by the heroine’s dog. And I think animals often have speaking parts in the Regency anthologies with cats or kittens as the theme.

    Reply
  52. Northrop Frye was talking about medieval romance, such as Malory and the Gawain Poet, where you do get real magic, faeries, etc., and about THE FAERIE QUEENE. I think the “magical” part now mostly translates, outside paranormals, into superior skills or intelligence.
    I know that Barbara Metzger has written at least one romance which is narrated in part by the heroine’s dog. And I think animals often have speaking parts in the Regency anthologies with cats or kittens as the theme.

    Reply
  53. Northrop Frye was talking about medieval romance, such as Malory and the Gawain Poet, where you do get real magic, faeries, etc., and about THE FAERIE QUEENE. I think the “magical” part now mostly translates, outside paranormals, into superior skills or intelligence.
    I know that Barbara Metzger has written at least one romance which is narrated in part by the heroine’s dog. And I think animals often have speaking parts in the Regency anthologies with cats or kittens as the theme.

    Reply
  54. Northrop Frye was talking about medieval romance, such as Malory and the Gawain Poet, where you do get real magic, faeries, etc., and about THE FAERIE QUEENE. I think the “magical” part now mostly translates, outside paranormals, into superior skills or intelligence.
    I know that Barbara Metzger has written at least one romance which is narrated in part by the heroine’s dog. And I think animals often have speaking parts in the Regency anthologies with cats or kittens as the theme.

    Reply
  55. Northrop Frye was talking about medieval romance, such as Malory and the Gawain Poet, where you do get real magic, faeries, etc., and about THE FAERIE QUEENE. I think the “magical” part now mostly translates, outside paranormals, into superior skills or intelligence.
    I know that Barbara Metzger has written at least one romance which is narrated in part by the heroine’s dog. And I think animals often have speaking parts in the Regency anthologies with cats or kittens as the theme.

    Reply
  56. OFF TOPIC: I watched a very interesting program on PBS last night about “the greatest courtesan of the twentieth century,” Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. She was born into the minor nobility and first married Winston Churchill’s son, then producer Leland Hayward, and last Averill Harriman–meanwhile fooling around with a lot of other people, including Edward R. Murrow, who almost left his wife for her. You might check your local listings to see if it’s going to be rebroadcast.
    She wound up as a power in the Democratic Party, sponsoring the career of Bill Clinton, who named her Ambassador to France (where the British Ambassador, giving a reception for the young Queen, once said she wouldn’t have that harlot under her roof!
    Francesca, eat your heart out!

    Reply
  57. OFF TOPIC: I watched a very interesting program on PBS last night about “the greatest courtesan of the twentieth century,” Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. She was born into the minor nobility and first married Winston Churchill’s son, then producer Leland Hayward, and last Averill Harriman–meanwhile fooling around with a lot of other people, including Edward R. Murrow, who almost left his wife for her. You might check your local listings to see if it’s going to be rebroadcast.
    She wound up as a power in the Democratic Party, sponsoring the career of Bill Clinton, who named her Ambassador to France (where the British Ambassador, giving a reception for the young Queen, once said she wouldn’t have that harlot under her roof!
    Francesca, eat your heart out!

    Reply
  58. OFF TOPIC: I watched a very interesting program on PBS last night about “the greatest courtesan of the twentieth century,” Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. She was born into the minor nobility and first married Winston Churchill’s son, then producer Leland Hayward, and last Averill Harriman–meanwhile fooling around with a lot of other people, including Edward R. Murrow, who almost left his wife for her. You might check your local listings to see if it’s going to be rebroadcast.
    She wound up as a power in the Democratic Party, sponsoring the career of Bill Clinton, who named her Ambassador to France (where the British Ambassador, giving a reception for the young Queen, once said she wouldn’t have that harlot under her roof!
    Francesca, eat your heart out!

    Reply
  59. OFF TOPIC: I watched a very interesting program on PBS last night about “the greatest courtesan of the twentieth century,” Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. She was born into the minor nobility and first married Winston Churchill’s son, then producer Leland Hayward, and last Averill Harriman–meanwhile fooling around with a lot of other people, including Edward R. Murrow, who almost left his wife for her. You might check your local listings to see if it’s going to be rebroadcast.
    She wound up as a power in the Democratic Party, sponsoring the career of Bill Clinton, who named her Ambassador to France (where the British Ambassador, giving a reception for the young Queen, once said she wouldn’t have that harlot under her roof!
    Francesca, eat your heart out!

    Reply
  60. OFF TOPIC: I watched a very interesting program on PBS last night about “the greatest courtesan of the twentieth century,” Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. She was born into the minor nobility and first married Winston Churchill’s son, then producer Leland Hayward, and last Averill Harriman–meanwhile fooling around with a lot of other people, including Edward R. Murrow, who almost left his wife for her. You might check your local listings to see if it’s going to be rebroadcast.
    She wound up as a power in the Democratic Party, sponsoring the career of Bill Clinton, who named her Ambassador to France (where the British Ambassador, giving a reception for the young Queen, once said she wouldn’t have that harlot under her roof!
    Francesca, eat your heart out!

    Reply
  61. +JMJ+
    I don’t really have anything deep to contribute to the discussion. It’s just that I finished a Romance last night in which the hero can do magic tricks such as “conjuring” and “mind reading.” It’s not just window dressing; his skills work well for the plot and help to make him one of the most memorable Romance heroes I’ve ever read!
    Anyway, after I finished the book, I remembered this post. =)

    Reply
  62. +JMJ+
    I don’t really have anything deep to contribute to the discussion. It’s just that I finished a Romance last night in which the hero can do magic tricks such as “conjuring” and “mind reading.” It’s not just window dressing; his skills work well for the plot and help to make him one of the most memorable Romance heroes I’ve ever read!
    Anyway, after I finished the book, I remembered this post. =)

    Reply
  63. +JMJ+
    I don’t really have anything deep to contribute to the discussion. It’s just that I finished a Romance last night in which the hero can do magic tricks such as “conjuring” and “mind reading.” It’s not just window dressing; his skills work well for the plot and help to make him one of the most memorable Romance heroes I’ve ever read!
    Anyway, after I finished the book, I remembered this post. =)

    Reply
  64. +JMJ+
    I don’t really have anything deep to contribute to the discussion. It’s just that I finished a Romance last night in which the hero can do magic tricks such as “conjuring” and “mind reading.” It’s not just window dressing; his skills work well for the plot and help to make him one of the most memorable Romance heroes I’ve ever read!
    Anyway, after I finished the book, I remembered this post. =)

    Reply
  65. +JMJ+
    I don’t really have anything deep to contribute to the discussion. It’s just that I finished a Romance last night in which the hero can do magic tricks such as “conjuring” and “mind reading.” It’s not just window dressing; his skills work well for the plot and help to make him one of the most memorable Romance heroes I’ve ever read!
    Anyway, after I finished the book, I remembered this post. =)

    Reply
  66. Why is it that when one Vampire or “magic” novel sells all the publishers make (request?) authors to all write that type book? It’s like copy-cat movies.
    Just because I loved PBS Louis Jourdan’s Vampire doesn’t mean I want to read Vampire after vampire book!
    Sorry but it seemed in one publication all the covers and I mean all of them had ladies in various stages of pregnancy. I wrote and said that the more “mature” ladies that love to read romance might like a heroine that wasn’t pregnant. THEY wrote back that they were sorry to hear I didn’t like Pregnant women! LOL–IDIOTS!
    I love history. Add magic (a little) and I like that too but if there is too much concentration on magic or Vampires then you think early on-OK this is not a normal hero who has to battle something we can understand but someone who can wave a magic wand, get friends to concentrate on healing him, or some other “other worldly” way to escape the human consequences.
    I lose interest. This is just my opinion. I love ESP and GHOSTS as I have had some VERY UN-EXPLAINABLE happenings in my life!

    Reply
  67. Why is it that when one Vampire or “magic” novel sells all the publishers make (request?) authors to all write that type book? It’s like copy-cat movies.
    Just because I loved PBS Louis Jourdan’s Vampire doesn’t mean I want to read Vampire after vampire book!
    Sorry but it seemed in one publication all the covers and I mean all of them had ladies in various stages of pregnancy. I wrote and said that the more “mature” ladies that love to read romance might like a heroine that wasn’t pregnant. THEY wrote back that they were sorry to hear I didn’t like Pregnant women! LOL–IDIOTS!
    I love history. Add magic (a little) and I like that too but if there is too much concentration on magic or Vampires then you think early on-OK this is not a normal hero who has to battle something we can understand but someone who can wave a magic wand, get friends to concentrate on healing him, or some other “other worldly” way to escape the human consequences.
    I lose interest. This is just my opinion. I love ESP and GHOSTS as I have had some VERY UN-EXPLAINABLE happenings in my life!

    Reply
  68. Why is it that when one Vampire or “magic” novel sells all the publishers make (request?) authors to all write that type book? It’s like copy-cat movies.
    Just because I loved PBS Louis Jourdan’s Vampire doesn’t mean I want to read Vampire after vampire book!
    Sorry but it seemed in one publication all the covers and I mean all of them had ladies in various stages of pregnancy. I wrote and said that the more “mature” ladies that love to read romance might like a heroine that wasn’t pregnant. THEY wrote back that they were sorry to hear I didn’t like Pregnant women! LOL–IDIOTS!
    I love history. Add magic (a little) and I like that too but if there is too much concentration on magic or Vampires then you think early on-OK this is not a normal hero who has to battle something we can understand but someone who can wave a magic wand, get friends to concentrate on healing him, or some other “other worldly” way to escape the human consequences.
    I lose interest. This is just my opinion. I love ESP and GHOSTS as I have had some VERY UN-EXPLAINABLE happenings in my life!

    Reply
  69. Why is it that when one Vampire or “magic” novel sells all the publishers make (request?) authors to all write that type book? It’s like copy-cat movies.
    Just because I loved PBS Louis Jourdan’s Vampire doesn’t mean I want to read Vampire after vampire book!
    Sorry but it seemed in one publication all the covers and I mean all of them had ladies in various stages of pregnancy. I wrote and said that the more “mature” ladies that love to read romance might like a heroine that wasn’t pregnant. THEY wrote back that they were sorry to hear I didn’t like Pregnant women! LOL–IDIOTS!
    I love history. Add magic (a little) and I like that too but if there is too much concentration on magic or Vampires then you think early on-OK this is not a normal hero who has to battle something we can understand but someone who can wave a magic wand, get friends to concentrate on healing him, or some other “other worldly” way to escape the human consequences.
    I lose interest. This is just my opinion. I love ESP and GHOSTS as I have had some VERY UN-EXPLAINABLE happenings in my life!

    Reply
  70. Why is it that when one Vampire or “magic” novel sells all the publishers make (request?) authors to all write that type book? It’s like copy-cat movies.
    Just because I loved PBS Louis Jourdan’s Vampire doesn’t mean I want to read Vampire after vampire book!
    Sorry but it seemed in one publication all the covers and I mean all of them had ladies in various stages of pregnancy. I wrote and said that the more “mature” ladies that love to read romance might like a heroine that wasn’t pregnant. THEY wrote back that they were sorry to hear I didn’t like Pregnant women! LOL–IDIOTS!
    I love history. Add magic (a little) and I like that too but if there is too much concentration on magic or Vampires then you think early on-OK this is not a normal hero who has to battle something we can understand but someone who can wave a magic wand, get friends to concentrate on healing him, or some other “other worldly” way to escape the human consequences.
    I lose interest. This is just my opinion. I love ESP and GHOSTS as I have had some VERY UN-EXPLAINABLE happenings in my life!

    Reply

Leave a Comment