Gettysburg

  Monument New Yorkby Mary Jo

In the way of such things, the Gettysburg battlefield isn't much more than an hour north of me and President Lincoln's train passed a mile or so from my house on his trip to speak at the dedication of the Gettysburg Soldiers National Cemetery in November 1863, yet I'd never made a real in-depth visit to the site.

However, the Mayhem Consultant has, and to celebrate the delivery of my Book That Would Not End, he took me to Gettysburg for an overnight getaway and a proper visit.

The Battle of Gettysburg has been widely studied and written about so I won't go into Military Musical Instrumentsmuch detail. The brilliant Confederate General Robert E. Lee wanted to take the war to the north, into Pennsylvania, in hopes of persuading the North ti end the fighting. The town of Gettysburg had ten roads entering it so it was a good place to assemble.

The Union Army of the Potomac was led by General George Meade, who had been in charge for a mere three days when he had to face the Southern invasion. The three day battle was fought all around the town, and was the bloodiest of the Civil War with over 50,000 casualties. The South's brave and futile attack called Pickett's Charge was called "the High Water Mark of the Confederacy" and a spot on the battlefield is designated at such.

 

Military FirearmsAfter three days of fierce fighting, the Union emerged victorious and Lee's army retreated. Though the war continued for another two years, this battle is considered the turning point.

There is much for modern visitors to see, including an excellent film explaining the origins of the war, the forces that led to the battle, and the battle itself. (Narrated by Morgan Freeman, which gives you an idea of the quality of the production!)

There is also a well restored cyclorama. Cycloramas were a popular phenomenon of the 19th century and consisted of a huge, drum shaped painting designed to put viewers into the center of the action.

Here is Wikipedia's description of the one we saw in the visitors center after viewing the movie:

The painting is the work of French artist Paul Dominique Philippoteaux. It depicts Pickett's Charge, the failed infantry assault that was the climax of the Battle of Gettysburg. The painting is a cyclorama, a type of 360° cylindrical painting. The intended effect is to immerse the viewer in the scene being depicted, often with the addition of foreground models and life-sized replicas to enhance the illusion. Among the sites documented in the painting are Cemetery Ridge, the Angle, and the "High-water mark of the Confederacy"….The version that hangs in Gettysburg, a recent (2005) restoration of the version created for Boston, is 42 feet (13 m) high and 377 feet (115 m) in circumference.

And I will say that it is dramatic, powerful, and sobering. It brings the battle alive as no school lesson could.

The battle also inspired one of the most powerful and honored speeches of American history, Lincoln's Gettysburg address. It is a myth that he jotted it on an envelope on his way to opening of the cemetery. Instead, he'd been asked to say a few words, and he carefully crafted the speech. He followed a well received two hour speech by the primary speaker–and in ten sentences and a little over two minutes, he conjured the heart and soul of America:

LincolnBronzeatMuseum Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

That sense of solemnity pervades the vast battlefield. There is a driving tour which can be done on one's own, plus one can buy excellent narration to explain what happened while you drive through the haunted hills and hollows of the battle. There are many monuments to the regiments that fought here.

Monument 94th NewYorkBut there was only one monument I really wanted to see: That of the New York 94th regiment, with which my great-grandfather Zimri Putney served. A twenty year old farmer from Western New York, he enlisted twice, first in the 105th New York Volunteers, then a reenlistment in the 94th. I never knew him and I don't know why he enlisted twice. Because he believed slavery should be abolished? Because of the lure of adventure, or proving himself in the company of men?

I'll probably never know, but I honor his service and am glad he returned home safely to marry and have a family. I have a photocopied picture of him, copied so often that details are unclear. He's a uniformed young man with a beard and a gun and an American flag in the background, and he held himself proudly. He died at the age of 76, much loved by friends and family.

His regiment's monument is one of the simpler ones, but it spoke to me. I'm always loved history, but this particular battle is more personal than most. Have you been to Gettysburg or any of the great, tragic battlefields of America and the world? Do you know of personal connections to them? Do they speak to you?

If so, I'd like to hear what they say….

Mary Jo

 

 

110 thoughts on “Gettysburg”

  1. Forgive my ignorance, but I have never come across the name “Zimri” before. I just spent a few minutes researching it. Such an interesting name!
    While I have a more than healthy interest in US history, my only travels in America have been weeks in Manhattan, and hours at LAX. So, no battlefields for me (yet)!
    The bloodiest battlefields of the Second World War were in Ukraine – more people died there than anywhere else. My family is from where Operation Barbarossa began. Because it’s the former USSR, there’s not a lot of organised tourism there, but when you drive through the countryside and the villages, you always remember you’re driving through one the most “haunted” places in the world.
    The countryside around my grandfather’s village is full of massive craters. The shelling was so intense there the land is permanently changed.

    Reply
  2. Forgive my ignorance, but I have never come across the name “Zimri” before. I just spent a few minutes researching it. Such an interesting name!
    While I have a more than healthy interest in US history, my only travels in America have been weeks in Manhattan, and hours at LAX. So, no battlefields for me (yet)!
    The bloodiest battlefields of the Second World War were in Ukraine – more people died there than anywhere else. My family is from where Operation Barbarossa began. Because it’s the former USSR, there’s not a lot of organised tourism there, but when you drive through the countryside and the villages, you always remember you’re driving through one the most “haunted” places in the world.
    The countryside around my grandfather’s village is full of massive craters. The shelling was so intense there the land is permanently changed.

    Reply
  3. Forgive my ignorance, but I have never come across the name “Zimri” before. I just spent a few minutes researching it. Such an interesting name!
    While I have a more than healthy interest in US history, my only travels in America have been weeks in Manhattan, and hours at LAX. So, no battlefields for me (yet)!
    The bloodiest battlefields of the Second World War were in Ukraine – more people died there than anywhere else. My family is from where Operation Barbarossa began. Because it’s the former USSR, there’s not a lot of organised tourism there, but when you drive through the countryside and the villages, you always remember you’re driving through one the most “haunted” places in the world.
    The countryside around my grandfather’s village is full of massive craters. The shelling was so intense there the land is permanently changed.

    Reply
  4. Forgive my ignorance, but I have never come across the name “Zimri” before. I just spent a few minutes researching it. Such an interesting name!
    While I have a more than healthy interest in US history, my only travels in America have been weeks in Manhattan, and hours at LAX. So, no battlefields for me (yet)!
    The bloodiest battlefields of the Second World War were in Ukraine – more people died there than anywhere else. My family is from where Operation Barbarossa began. Because it’s the former USSR, there’s not a lot of organised tourism there, but when you drive through the countryside and the villages, you always remember you’re driving through one the most “haunted” places in the world.
    The countryside around my grandfather’s village is full of massive craters. The shelling was so intense there the land is permanently changed.

    Reply
  5. Forgive my ignorance, but I have never come across the name “Zimri” before. I just spent a few minutes researching it. Such an interesting name!
    While I have a more than healthy interest in US history, my only travels in America have been weeks in Manhattan, and hours at LAX. So, no battlefields for me (yet)!
    The bloodiest battlefields of the Second World War were in Ukraine – more people died there than anywhere else. My family is from where Operation Barbarossa began. Because it’s the former USSR, there’s not a lot of organised tourism there, but when you drive through the countryside and the villages, you always remember you’re driving through one the most “haunted” places in the world.
    The countryside around my grandfather’s village is full of massive craters. The shelling was so intense there the land is permanently changed.

    Reply
  6. A timely and poignant post, Mary Jo, and thank you.
    And Lincoln’s address. What irony in “the world will little know nor long remember what we say here…”
    but the part that had me in tears was: “that these dead shall not have died in vain—-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
    I was not more than 12 years old when the family visited Gettysburg, and I fell apart completely–my poor parents! I can still vividly remember the noise and stench and pain and anguish I experienced that day.
    And I’ve heard I’ve heard many times over the years about other “sensitives” who’ve been overwhelmed when visiting Gettysburg.
    Your granfather’s memorial is stern and handsome and very affecting.
    Thanks again, Faith

    Reply
  7. A timely and poignant post, Mary Jo, and thank you.
    And Lincoln’s address. What irony in “the world will little know nor long remember what we say here…”
    but the part that had me in tears was: “that these dead shall not have died in vain—-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
    I was not more than 12 years old when the family visited Gettysburg, and I fell apart completely–my poor parents! I can still vividly remember the noise and stench and pain and anguish I experienced that day.
    And I’ve heard I’ve heard many times over the years about other “sensitives” who’ve been overwhelmed when visiting Gettysburg.
    Your granfather’s memorial is stern and handsome and very affecting.
    Thanks again, Faith

    Reply
  8. A timely and poignant post, Mary Jo, and thank you.
    And Lincoln’s address. What irony in “the world will little know nor long remember what we say here…”
    but the part that had me in tears was: “that these dead shall not have died in vain—-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
    I was not more than 12 years old when the family visited Gettysburg, and I fell apart completely–my poor parents! I can still vividly remember the noise and stench and pain and anguish I experienced that day.
    And I’ve heard I’ve heard many times over the years about other “sensitives” who’ve been overwhelmed when visiting Gettysburg.
    Your granfather’s memorial is stern and handsome and very affecting.
    Thanks again, Faith

    Reply
  9. A timely and poignant post, Mary Jo, and thank you.
    And Lincoln’s address. What irony in “the world will little know nor long remember what we say here…”
    but the part that had me in tears was: “that these dead shall not have died in vain—-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
    I was not more than 12 years old when the family visited Gettysburg, and I fell apart completely–my poor parents! I can still vividly remember the noise and stench and pain and anguish I experienced that day.
    And I’ve heard I’ve heard many times over the years about other “sensitives” who’ve been overwhelmed when visiting Gettysburg.
    Your granfather’s memorial is stern and handsome and very affecting.
    Thanks again, Faith

    Reply
  10. A timely and poignant post, Mary Jo, and thank you.
    And Lincoln’s address. What irony in “the world will little know nor long remember what we say here…”
    but the part that had me in tears was: “that these dead shall not have died in vain—-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
    I was not more than 12 years old when the family visited Gettysburg, and I fell apart completely–my poor parents! I can still vividly remember the noise and stench and pain and anguish I experienced that day.
    And I’ve heard I’ve heard many times over the years about other “sensitives” who’ve been overwhelmed when visiting Gettysburg.
    Your granfather’s memorial is stern and handsome and very affecting.
    Thanks again, Faith

    Reply
  11. I went to Gettysburg once, and thought it a terribly sad place. My husband was fascinated by the battle, and kept telling me all about who was where and did what while I said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.” I was not remotely interested in the details of the battle, and went off on my own while he pored over his maps and charts. Shortly thereafter, I encountered my doppelganger. A couple about the same age as my husband and me were walking toward me. He was saying to her, “And so and so charged up there,” while she said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.”
    Another place that struck me as dreadfuly sad was Harper’s Ferry. Have you ever been there?

    Reply
  12. I went to Gettysburg once, and thought it a terribly sad place. My husband was fascinated by the battle, and kept telling me all about who was where and did what while I said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.” I was not remotely interested in the details of the battle, and went off on my own while he pored over his maps and charts. Shortly thereafter, I encountered my doppelganger. A couple about the same age as my husband and me were walking toward me. He was saying to her, “And so and so charged up there,” while she said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.”
    Another place that struck me as dreadfuly sad was Harper’s Ferry. Have you ever been there?

    Reply
  13. I went to Gettysburg once, and thought it a terribly sad place. My husband was fascinated by the battle, and kept telling me all about who was where and did what while I said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.” I was not remotely interested in the details of the battle, and went off on my own while he pored over his maps and charts. Shortly thereafter, I encountered my doppelganger. A couple about the same age as my husband and me were walking toward me. He was saying to her, “And so and so charged up there,” while she said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.”
    Another place that struck me as dreadfuly sad was Harper’s Ferry. Have you ever been there?

    Reply
  14. I went to Gettysburg once, and thought it a terribly sad place. My husband was fascinated by the battle, and kept telling me all about who was where and did what while I said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.” I was not remotely interested in the details of the battle, and went off on my own while he pored over his maps and charts. Shortly thereafter, I encountered my doppelganger. A couple about the same age as my husband and me were walking toward me. He was saying to her, “And so and so charged up there,” while she said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.”
    Another place that struck me as dreadfuly sad was Harper’s Ferry. Have you ever been there?

    Reply
  15. I went to Gettysburg once, and thought it a terribly sad place. My husband was fascinated by the battle, and kept telling me all about who was where and did what while I said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.” I was not remotely interested in the details of the battle, and went off on my own while he pored over his maps and charts. Shortly thereafter, I encountered my doppelganger. A couple about the same age as my husband and me were walking toward me. He was saying to her, “And so and so charged up there,” while she said, “Yes, dear. Yes, dear.”
    Another place that struck me as dreadfuly sad was Harper’s Ferry. Have you ever been there?

    Reply
  16. Sonya, you put your finger on an American oddity. I’m descended from the early Puritans who moved to the New England colonies in the 17th century to find religious freedom, and a Puritan custom was taking names from the Old Testament. So while the English were naming their children after traditional saints like James and John and Mary, the Puritans were pulling out names like Obadiah and Zimri. (Which is from Kings in the Old Testament.)
    I’m not sure how far back the name Zimri goes in the Putney family, but it was used twice in my generation.
    As for the battlefields of Ukraine–they must be some of the most haunted hills in the world! Did your family get out before the war, or after? If after, surely they’ve been tough survivors!

    Reply
  17. Sonya, you put your finger on an American oddity. I’m descended from the early Puritans who moved to the New England colonies in the 17th century to find religious freedom, and a Puritan custom was taking names from the Old Testament. So while the English were naming their children after traditional saints like James and John and Mary, the Puritans were pulling out names like Obadiah and Zimri. (Which is from Kings in the Old Testament.)
    I’m not sure how far back the name Zimri goes in the Putney family, but it was used twice in my generation.
    As for the battlefields of Ukraine–they must be some of the most haunted hills in the world! Did your family get out before the war, or after? If after, surely they’ve been tough survivors!

    Reply
  18. Sonya, you put your finger on an American oddity. I’m descended from the early Puritans who moved to the New England colonies in the 17th century to find religious freedom, and a Puritan custom was taking names from the Old Testament. So while the English were naming their children after traditional saints like James and John and Mary, the Puritans were pulling out names like Obadiah and Zimri. (Which is from Kings in the Old Testament.)
    I’m not sure how far back the name Zimri goes in the Putney family, but it was used twice in my generation.
    As for the battlefields of Ukraine–they must be some of the most haunted hills in the world! Did your family get out before the war, or after? If after, surely they’ve been tough survivors!

    Reply
  19. Sonya, you put your finger on an American oddity. I’m descended from the early Puritans who moved to the New England colonies in the 17th century to find religious freedom, and a Puritan custom was taking names from the Old Testament. So while the English were naming their children after traditional saints like James and John and Mary, the Puritans were pulling out names like Obadiah and Zimri. (Which is from Kings in the Old Testament.)
    I’m not sure how far back the name Zimri goes in the Putney family, but it was used twice in my generation.
    As for the battlefields of Ukraine–they must be some of the most haunted hills in the world! Did your family get out before the war, or after? If after, surely they’ve been tough survivors!

    Reply
  20. Sonya, you put your finger on an American oddity. I’m descended from the early Puritans who moved to the New England colonies in the 17th century to find religious freedom, and a Puritan custom was taking names from the Old Testament. So while the English were naming their children after traditional saints like James and John and Mary, the Puritans were pulling out names like Obadiah and Zimri. (Which is from Kings in the Old Testament.)
    I’m not sure how far back the name Zimri goes in the Putney family, but it was used twice in my generation.
    As for the battlefields of Ukraine–they must be some of the most haunted hills in the world! Did your family get out before the war, or after? If after, surely they’ve been tough survivors!

    Reply
  21. Faith, Lincoln’s words always bring tears to my eyes. THey’re carved on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Jefferson’s memorial has a similar effect on me. What power there is in words, and how brilliantly those men wielded them!

    Reply
  22. Faith, Lincoln’s words always bring tears to my eyes. THey’re carved on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Jefferson’s memorial has a similar effect on me. What power there is in words, and how brilliantly those men wielded them!

    Reply
  23. Faith, Lincoln’s words always bring tears to my eyes. THey’re carved on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Jefferson’s memorial has a similar effect on me. What power there is in words, and how brilliantly those men wielded them!

    Reply
  24. Faith, Lincoln’s words always bring tears to my eyes. THey’re carved on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Jefferson’s memorial has a similar effect on me. What power there is in words, and how brilliantly those men wielded them!

    Reply
  25. Faith, Lincoln’s words always bring tears to my eyes. THey’re carved on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Jefferson’s memorial has a similar effect on me. What power there is in words, and how brilliantly those men wielded them!

    Reply
  26. Lillian, you’re right, more men are military buffs who are fascinated by all the troop movements. (Like Waterloo, it was a VERY hard won battle.)
    Yes, I’ve been to Harper’s Ferry. I don’t find it so sad–I have happy memories of many WRW spring retreats being held there at the old Hilltop House hotel, where you could look down on hawks flying below you. But down in the old town, the history hangs heavy indeed.

    Reply
  27. Lillian, you’re right, more men are military buffs who are fascinated by all the troop movements. (Like Waterloo, it was a VERY hard won battle.)
    Yes, I’ve been to Harper’s Ferry. I don’t find it so sad–I have happy memories of many WRW spring retreats being held there at the old Hilltop House hotel, where you could look down on hawks flying below you. But down in the old town, the history hangs heavy indeed.

    Reply
  28. Lillian, you’re right, more men are military buffs who are fascinated by all the troop movements. (Like Waterloo, it was a VERY hard won battle.)
    Yes, I’ve been to Harper’s Ferry. I don’t find it so sad–I have happy memories of many WRW spring retreats being held there at the old Hilltop House hotel, where you could look down on hawks flying below you. But down in the old town, the history hangs heavy indeed.

    Reply
  29. Lillian, you’re right, more men are military buffs who are fascinated by all the troop movements. (Like Waterloo, it was a VERY hard won battle.)
    Yes, I’ve been to Harper’s Ferry. I don’t find it so sad–I have happy memories of many WRW spring retreats being held there at the old Hilltop House hotel, where you could look down on hawks flying below you. But down in the old town, the history hangs heavy indeed.

    Reply
  30. Lillian, you’re right, more men are military buffs who are fascinated by all the troop movements. (Like Waterloo, it was a VERY hard won battle.)
    Yes, I’ve been to Harper’s Ferry. I don’t find it so sad–I have happy memories of many WRW spring retreats being held there at the old Hilltop House hotel, where you could look down on hawks flying below you. But down in the old town, the history hangs heavy indeed.

    Reply
  31. First of all, my family from Indiana sent nearly an entire company to fight in the Civil War. Many were killed and some were put in prison in Andersonville. There were only 2 who lived through that, and they were put on a train to go home at the end of the war. Only one survived to arrive home.
    Second, I worked for FEMA and was stationed in Chambersburg PA. That was the only town in the north that was attacked and burned by the South. So the older part of the town is all the same age.
    And finally, I was fortunate enough to visit Gettysburg while I was stationed in PA. There was a wonderful man, a volunteer, who took the time to walk with me and describe the battle as it happened. I grew up in Texas and he describe exactly how Hood’s troops came up the hill. He spent a couple of hours sharing all the information and answers he could. It was a wonderful gift to me. (The 2 men who were with me, finally had to come and drag me away.)
    I felt the pain and the sorrow. I am not certain I have ever been to another place where there is such a terrible feeling of fear and pain. I have felt souls before in other places, but this was overwhelming.
    It is a place that I believe every person who lives in this country should go and see. I think there would be some strong hesitation before the idea of war would be trotted out for consideration.

    Reply
  32. First of all, my family from Indiana sent nearly an entire company to fight in the Civil War. Many were killed and some were put in prison in Andersonville. There were only 2 who lived through that, and they were put on a train to go home at the end of the war. Only one survived to arrive home.
    Second, I worked for FEMA and was stationed in Chambersburg PA. That was the only town in the north that was attacked and burned by the South. So the older part of the town is all the same age.
    And finally, I was fortunate enough to visit Gettysburg while I was stationed in PA. There was a wonderful man, a volunteer, who took the time to walk with me and describe the battle as it happened. I grew up in Texas and he describe exactly how Hood’s troops came up the hill. He spent a couple of hours sharing all the information and answers he could. It was a wonderful gift to me. (The 2 men who were with me, finally had to come and drag me away.)
    I felt the pain and the sorrow. I am not certain I have ever been to another place where there is such a terrible feeling of fear and pain. I have felt souls before in other places, but this was overwhelming.
    It is a place that I believe every person who lives in this country should go and see. I think there would be some strong hesitation before the idea of war would be trotted out for consideration.

    Reply
  33. First of all, my family from Indiana sent nearly an entire company to fight in the Civil War. Many were killed and some were put in prison in Andersonville. There were only 2 who lived through that, and they were put on a train to go home at the end of the war. Only one survived to arrive home.
    Second, I worked for FEMA and was stationed in Chambersburg PA. That was the only town in the north that was attacked and burned by the South. So the older part of the town is all the same age.
    And finally, I was fortunate enough to visit Gettysburg while I was stationed in PA. There was a wonderful man, a volunteer, who took the time to walk with me and describe the battle as it happened. I grew up in Texas and he describe exactly how Hood’s troops came up the hill. He spent a couple of hours sharing all the information and answers he could. It was a wonderful gift to me. (The 2 men who were with me, finally had to come and drag me away.)
    I felt the pain and the sorrow. I am not certain I have ever been to another place where there is such a terrible feeling of fear and pain. I have felt souls before in other places, but this was overwhelming.
    It is a place that I believe every person who lives in this country should go and see. I think there would be some strong hesitation before the idea of war would be trotted out for consideration.

    Reply
  34. First of all, my family from Indiana sent nearly an entire company to fight in the Civil War. Many were killed and some were put in prison in Andersonville. There were only 2 who lived through that, and they were put on a train to go home at the end of the war. Only one survived to arrive home.
    Second, I worked for FEMA and was stationed in Chambersburg PA. That was the only town in the north that was attacked and burned by the South. So the older part of the town is all the same age.
    And finally, I was fortunate enough to visit Gettysburg while I was stationed in PA. There was a wonderful man, a volunteer, who took the time to walk with me and describe the battle as it happened. I grew up in Texas and he describe exactly how Hood’s troops came up the hill. He spent a couple of hours sharing all the information and answers he could. It was a wonderful gift to me. (The 2 men who were with me, finally had to come and drag me away.)
    I felt the pain and the sorrow. I am not certain I have ever been to another place where there is such a terrible feeling of fear and pain. I have felt souls before in other places, but this was overwhelming.
    It is a place that I believe every person who lives in this country should go and see. I think there would be some strong hesitation before the idea of war would be trotted out for consideration.

    Reply
  35. First of all, my family from Indiana sent nearly an entire company to fight in the Civil War. Many were killed and some were put in prison in Andersonville. There were only 2 who lived through that, and they were put on a train to go home at the end of the war. Only one survived to arrive home.
    Second, I worked for FEMA and was stationed in Chambersburg PA. That was the only town in the north that was attacked and burned by the South. So the older part of the town is all the same age.
    And finally, I was fortunate enough to visit Gettysburg while I was stationed in PA. There was a wonderful man, a volunteer, who took the time to walk with me and describe the battle as it happened. I grew up in Texas and he describe exactly how Hood’s troops came up the hill. He spent a couple of hours sharing all the information and answers he could. It was a wonderful gift to me. (The 2 men who were with me, finally had to come and drag me away.)
    I felt the pain and the sorrow. I am not certain I have ever been to another place where there is such a terrible feeling of fear and pain. I have felt souls before in other places, but this was overwhelming.
    It is a place that I believe every person who lives in this country should go and see. I think there would be some strong hesitation before the idea of war would be trotted out for consideration.

    Reply
  36. That was a lovely post Mary Jo and lovely to hear of your connection to the battle and the war. My grand uncle fought and died in World War 1. He was Irish but fought for England. Only two years ago I discovered where he is buried in France. I would like to visit his grave some day. Unlike you I have no picture of him and no idea what he looked like. My mother is the only one of her family who knew anything about him. I cherish family stories like this and have been careful to pass this one on to my own children. It’s important that those of us left keep the memory of these brave men alive!

    Reply
  37. That was a lovely post Mary Jo and lovely to hear of your connection to the battle and the war. My grand uncle fought and died in World War 1. He was Irish but fought for England. Only two years ago I discovered where he is buried in France. I would like to visit his grave some day. Unlike you I have no picture of him and no idea what he looked like. My mother is the only one of her family who knew anything about him. I cherish family stories like this and have been careful to pass this one on to my own children. It’s important that those of us left keep the memory of these brave men alive!

    Reply
  38. That was a lovely post Mary Jo and lovely to hear of your connection to the battle and the war. My grand uncle fought and died in World War 1. He was Irish but fought for England. Only two years ago I discovered where he is buried in France. I would like to visit his grave some day. Unlike you I have no picture of him and no idea what he looked like. My mother is the only one of her family who knew anything about him. I cherish family stories like this and have been careful to pass this one on to my own children. It’s important that those of us left keep the memory of these brave men alive!

    Reply
  39. That was a lovely post Mary Jo and lovely to hear of your connection to the battle and the war. My grand uncle fought and died in World War 1. He was Irish but fought for England. Only two years ago I discovered where he is buried in France. I would like to visit his grave some day. Unlike you I have no picture of him and no idea what he looked like. My mother is the only one of her family who knew anything about him. I cherish family stories like this and have been careful to pass this one on to my own children. It’s important that those of us left keep the memory of these brave men alive!

    Reply
  40. That was a lovely post Mary Jo and lovely to hear of your connection to the battle and the war. My grand uncle fought and died in World War 1. He was Irish but fought for England. Only two years ago I discovered where he is buried in France. I would like to visit his grave some day. Unlike you I have no picture of him and no idea what he looked like. My mother is the only one of her family who knew anything about him. I cherish family stories like this and have been careful to pass this one on to my own children. It’s important that those of us left keep the memory of these brave men alive!

    Reply
  41. I’ve never been to Gettysburg, but I hope to see it someday. I’m a second generation American, so none of my ancestors fought in the Civil War; World War II was the one that was relevant to to my family, and the one that always fascinated me. However in recent years, I have taken more of an interest in the Civil War, mainly thanks to The New York Times’s excellent online “Disunion” series of essays(which now can be purchased as a book). And coincidentally, I recently saw the movie “The Free State of Jones”, which I highly recommend, it’s about a little known part of Civil War and Reconstruction history in Mississippi.

    Reply
  42. I’ve never been to Gettysburg, but I hope to see it someday. I’m a second generation American, so none of my ancestors fought in the Civil War; World War II was the one that was relevant to to my family, and the one that always fascinated me. However in recent years, I have taken more of an interest in the Civil War, mainly thanks to The New York Times’s excellent online “Disunion” series of essays(which now can be purchased as a book). And coincidentally, I recently saw the movie “The Free State of Jones”, which I highly recommend, it’s about a little known part of Civil War and Reconstruction history in Mississippi.

    Reply
  43. I’ve never been to Gettysburg, but I hope to see it someday. I’m a second generation American, so none of my ancestors fought in the Civil War; World War II was the one that was relevant to to my family, and the one that always fascinated me. However in recent years, I have taken more of an interest in the Civil War, mainly thanks to The New York Times’s excellent online “Disunion” series of essays(which now can be purchased as a book). And coincidentally, I recently saw the movie “The Free State of Jones”, which I highly recommend, it’s about a little known part of Civil War and Reconstruction history in Mississippi.

    Reply
  44. I’ve never been to Gettysburg, but I hope to see it someday. I’m a second generation American, so none of my ancestors fought in the Civil War; World War II was the one that was relevant to to my family, and the one that always fascinated me. However in recent years, I have taken more of an interest in the Civil War, mainly thanks to The New York Times’s excellent online “Disunion” series of essays(which now can be purchased as a book). And coincidentally, I recently saw the movie “The Free State of Jones”, which I highly recommend, it’s about a little known part of Civil War and Reconstruction history in Mississippi.

    Reply
  45. I’ve never been to Gettysburg, but I hope to see it someday. I’m a second generation American, so none of my ancestors fought in the Civil War; World War II was the one that was relevant to to my family, and the one that always fascinated me. However in recent years, I have taken more of an interest in the Civil War, mainly thanks to The New York Times’s excellent online “Disunion” series of essays(which now can be purchased as a book). And coincidentally, I recently saw the movie “The Free State of Jones”, which I highly recommend, it’s about a little known part of Civil War and Reconstruction history in Mississippi.

    Reply
  46. A timely post for me as I’ve just become a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Most of my ancestors were still in Scotland during the Civil War, but I have one line that goes back to the 1640’s here in America. My great-great-grandfather, Caleb Atherton Glasscock, fought in the 70th Ohio Infantry 1861-1865. He miraculously survived to marry and sire many children. I visited Gettysburg with my daughter on her school trip to Williamsburg, DC, Gettysburg, and Philadelphia. (If a group comes all the way from California, it needs to see as much as possible in 8 days!) We had a wonderful guide who was very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I do think that many (not all) men are more caught up in the logistics of the battle, though, and not so much the terrible price paid by the individual soldiers.
    The other battlefield that I found incredibly sad is Culloden. In fact, after going through the museum I was so overcome that I couldn’t bring myself to walk around the battlefield.

    Reply
  47. A timely post for me as I’ve just become a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Most of my ancestors were still in Scotland during the Civil War, but I have one line that goes back to the 1640’s here in America. My great-great-grandfather, Caleb Atherton Glasscock, fought in the 70th Ohio Infantry 1861-1865. He miraculously survived to marry and sire many children. I visited Gettysburg with my daughter on her school trip to Williamsburg, DC, Gettysburg, and Philadelphia. (If a group comes all the way from California, it needs to see as much as possible in 8 days!) We had a wonderful guide who was very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I do think that many (not all) men are more caught up in the logistics of the battle, though, and not so much the terrible price paid by the individual soldiers.
    The other battlefield that I found incredibly sad is Culloden. In fact, after going through the museum I was so overcome that I couldn’t bring myself to walk around the battlefield.

    Reply
  48. A timely post for me as I’ve just become a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Most of my ancestors were still in Scotland during the Civil War, but I have one line that goes back to the 1640’s here in America. My great-great-grandfather, Caleb Atherton Glasscock, fought in the 70th Ohio Infantry 1861-1865. He miraculously survived to marry and sire many children. I visited Gettysburg with my daughter on her school trip to Williamsburg, DC, Gettysburg, and Philadelphia. (If a group comes all the way from California, it needs to see as much as possible in 8 days!) We had a wonderful guide who was very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I do think that many (not all) men are more caught up in the logistics of the battle, though, and not so much the terrible price paid by the individual soldiers.
    The other battlefield that I found incredibly sad is Culloden. In fact, after going through the museum I was so overcome that I couldn’t bring myself to walk around the battlefield.

    Reply
  49. A timely post for me as I’ve just become a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Most of my ancestors were still in Scotland during the Civil War, but I have one line that goes back to the 1640’s here in America. My great-great-grandfather, Caleb Atherton Glasscock, fought in the 70th Ohio Infantry 1861-1865. He miraculously survived to marry and sire many children. I visited Gettysburg with my daughter on her school trip to Williamsburg, DC, Gettysburg, and Philadelphia. (If a group comes all the way from California, it needs to see as much as possible in 8 days!) We had a wonderful guide who was very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I do think that many (not all) men are more caught up in the logistics of the battle, though, and not so much the terrible price paid by the individual soldiers.
    The other battlefield that I found incredibly sad is Culloden. In fact, after going through the museum I was so overcome that I couldn’t bring myself to walk around the battlefield.

    Reply
  50. A timely post for me as I’ve just become a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Most of my ancestors were still in Scotland during the Civil War, but I have one line that goes back to the 1640’s here in America. My great-great-grandfather, Caleb Atherton Glasscock, fought in the 70th Ohio Infantry 1861-1865. He miraculously survived to marry and sire many children. I visited Gettysburg with my daughter on her school trip to Williamsburg, DC, Gettysburg, and Philadelphia. (If a group comes all the way from California, it needs to see as much as possible in 8 days!) We had a wonderful guide who was very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I do think that many (not all) men are more caught up in the logistics of the battle, though, and not so much the terrible price paid by the individual soldiers.
    The other battlefield that I found incredibly sad is Culloden. In fact, after going through the museum I was so overcome that I couldn’t bring myself to walk around the battlefield.

    Reply
  51. I thought I had posted earlier, but it seems to have gotten lost.
    My northern Indiana family sent members to fight for the Union. My Missouri family had retired from fighting in the Indian wars or were pre-teens.
    Yes, my family were Union sympathizers. But personally, I deplore the war and don’t find it romantic or inspiring.
    Both sides believed they were being patriotic. And both sides had many heroes.

    Reply
  52. I thought I had posted earlier, but it seems to have gotten lost.
    My northern Indiana family sent members to fight for the Union. My Missouri family had retired from fighting in the Indian wars or were pre-teens.
    Yes, my family were Union sympathizers. But personally, I deplore the war and don’t find it romantic or inspiring.
    Both sides believed they were being patriotic. And both sides had many heroes.

    Reply
  53. I thought I had posted earlier, but it seems to have gotten lost.
    My northern Indiana family sent members to fight for the Union. My Missouri family had retired from fighting in the Indian wars or were pre-teens.
    Yes, my family were Union sympathizers. But personally, I deplore the war and don’t find it romantic or inspiring.
    Both sides believed they were being patriotic. And both sides had many heroes.

    Reply
  54. I thought I had posted earlier, but it seems to have gotten lost.
    My northern Indiana family sent members to fight for the Union. My Missouri family had retired from fighting in the Indian wars or were pre-teens.
    Yes, my family were Union sympathizers. But personally, I deplore the war and don’t find it romantic or inspiring.
    Both sides believed they were being patriotic. And both sides had many heroes.

    Reply
  55. I thought I had posted earlier, but it seems to have gotten lost.
    My northern Indiana family sent members to fight for the Union. My Missouri family had retired from fighting in the Indian wars or were pre-teens.
    Yes, my family were Union sympathizers. But personally, I deplore the war and don’t find it romantic or inspiring.
    Both sides believed they were being patriotic. And both sides had many heroes.

    Reply
  56. Annette, the story of your Indiana family and the sacrifices they made is heartbreaking, and not unique. So many young men died. Yes, every American should visit Gettysburg.
    The volunteer battled field guides are amazingly knowledgeable. We ran into one crossing the parking lot of the visitors center. I mentioned my interest in my great grandfather’s regiment, and he immediately knew which group they fought with, and where, and was able to pinpoint where the monument was. He was remarkable, but there are many like him, and like the one who guided you.

    Reply
  57. Annette, the story of your Indiana family and the sacrifices they made is heartbreaking, and not unique. So many young men died. Yes, every American should visit Gettysburg.
    The volunteer battled field guides are amazingly knowledgeable. We ran into one crossing the parking lot of the visitors center. I mentioned my interest in my great grandfather’s regiment, and he immediately knew which group they fought with, and where, and was able to pinpoint where the monument was. He was remarkable, but there are many like him, and like the one who guided you.

    Reply
  58. Annette, the story of your Indiana family and the sacrifices they made is heartbreaking, and not unique. So many young men died. Yes, every American should visit Gettysburg.
    The volunteer battled field guides are amazingly knowledgeable. We ran into one crossing the parking lot of the visitors center. I mentioned my interest in my great grandfather’s regiment, and he immediately knew which group they fought with, and where, and was able to pinpoint where the monument was. He was remarkable, but there are many like him, and like the one who guided you.

    Reply
  59. Annette, the story of your Indiana family and the sacrifices they made is heartbreaking, and not unique. So many young men died. Yes, every American should visit Gettysburg.
    The volunteer battled field guides are amazingly knowledgeable. We ran into one crossing the parking lot of the visitors center. I mentioned my interest in my great grandfather’s regiment, and he immediately knew which group they fought with, and where, and was able to pinpoint where the monument was. He was remarkable, but there are many like him, and like the one who guided you.

    Reply
  60. Annette, the story of your Indiana family and the sacrifices they made is heartbreaking, and not unique. So many young men died. Yes, every American should visit Gettysburg.
    The volunteer battled field guides are amazingly knowledgeable. We ran into one crossing the parking lot of the visitors center. I mentioned my interest in my great grandfather’s regiment, and he immediately knew which group they fought with, and where, and was able to pinpoint where the monument was. He was remarkable, but there are many like him, and like the one who guided you.

    Reply
  61. Karin, I’ve heard that THE FREE STATE OF JONES is really excellent, and I hope to see it. Though your ancestors weren’t in the US at the time of the Civil War, the war and its consequences, some of when still affect us today, are a powerful part of the history of all AMericans.

    Reply
  62. Karin, I’ve heard that THE FREE STATE OF JONES is really excellent, and I hope to see it. Though your ancestors weren’t in the US at the time of the Civil War, the war and its consequences, some of when still affect us today, are a powerful part of the history of all AMericans.

    Reply
  63. Karin, I’ve heard that THE FREE STATE OF JONES is really excellent, and I hope to see it. Though your ancestors weren’t in the US at the time of the Civil War, the war and its consequences, some of when still affect us today, are a powerful part of the history of all AMericans.

    Reply
  64. Karin, I’ve heard that THE FREE STATE OF JONES is really excellent, and I hope to see it. Though your ancestors weren’t in the US at the time of the Civil War, the war and its consequences, some of when still affect us today, are a powerful part of the history of all AMericans.

    Reply
  65. Karin, I’ve heard that THE FREE STATE OF JONES is really excellent, and I hope to see it. Though your ancestors weren’t in the US at the time of the Civil War, the war and its consequences, some of when still affect us today, are a powerful part of the history of all AMericans.

    Reply
  66. Linda S, I agree that a California school group really needs to see as much as possible! So much American history is in the Mid-Atlantic area; my most recent book, Once a Rebel, is set in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Neat about the Daughters of Union Veterans! I’m not familiar with the group, but my father was a member of the GAR, the Grand Army of the Republic, and he was a real Civil War buff. I’m sure he hear stories about in from his grandfather Zimri.

    Reply
  67. Linda S, I agree that a California school group really needs to see as much as possible! So much American history is in the Mid-Atlantic area; my most recent book, Once a Rebel, is set in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Neat about the Daughters of Union Veterans! I’m not familiar with the group, but my father was a member of the GAR, the Grand Army of the Republic, and he was a real Civil War buff. I’m sure he hear stories about in from his grandfather Zimri.

    Reply
  68. Linda S, I agree that a California school group really needs to see as much as possible! So much American history is in the Mid-Atlantic area; my most recent book, Once a Rebel, is set in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Neat about the Daughters of Union Veterans! I’m not familiar with the group, but my father was a member of the GAR, the Grand Army of the Republic, and he was a real Civil War buff. I’m sure he hear stories about in from his grandfather Zimri.

    Reply
  69. Linda S, I agree that a California school group really needs to see as much as possible! So much American history is in the Mid-Atlantic area; my most recent book, Once a Rebel, is set in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Neat about the Daughters of Union Veterans! I’m not familiar with the group, but my father was a member of the GAR, the Grand Army of the Republic, and he was a real Civil War buff. I’m sure he hear stories about in from his grandfather Zimri.

    Reply
  70. Linda S, I agree that a California school group really needs to see as much as possible! So much American history is in the Mid-Atlantic area; my most recent book, Once a Rebel, is set in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Neat about the Daughters of Union Veterans! I’m not familiar with the group, but my father was a member of the GAR, the Grand Army of the Republic, and he was a real Civil War buff. I’m sure he hear stories about in from his grandfather Zimri.

    Reply
  71. Sue, I agree that both sides had much bravery and heroism, and that most of those young soldiers fought from patriotism. But it’s also true, no matter how much apologists try to spin the truth, that it was at heart a war about slavery, which was the only issue that could not be negotiated. Other issues could have been worked out, but not that one. And so many died for that.

    Reply
  72. Sue, I agree that both sides had much bravery and heroism, and that most of those young soldiers fought from patriotism. But it’s also true, no matter how much apologists try to spin the truth, that it was at heart a war about slavery, which was the only issue that could not be negotiated. Other issues could have been worked out, but not that one. And so many died for that.

    Reply
  73. Sue, I agree that both sides had much bravery and heroism, and that most of those young soldiers fought from patriotism. But it’s also true, no matter how much apologists try to spin the truth, that it was at heart a war about slavery, which was the only issue that could not be negotiated. Other issues could have been worked out, but not that one. And so many died for that.

    Reply
  74. Sue, I agree that both sides had much bravery and heroism, and that most of those young soldiers fought from patriotism. But it’s also true, no matter how much apologists try to spin the truth, that it was at heart a war about slavery, which was the only issue that could not be negotiated. Other issues could have been worked out, but not that one. And so many died for that.

    Reply
  75. Sue, I agree that both sides had much bravery and heroism, and that most of those young soldiers fought from patriotism. But it’s also true, no matter how much apologists try to spin the truth, that it was at heart a war about slavery, which was the only issue that could not be negotiated. Other issues could have been worked out, but not that one. And so many died for that.

    Reply
  76. I always loved Gettysburg. When we were stationed in Maryland when I was a child and our Kansas relatives came to visit, I always went along. Even at 9 years old, I knew it was sacred ground. Two of my great-great grandfathers on my mother’s side fought on the Union side, but in the Western theater of War so neither were at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  77. I always loved Gettysburg. When we were stationed in Maryland when I was a child and our Kansas relatives came to visit, I always went along. Even at 9 years old, I knew it was sacred ground. Two of my great-great grandfathers on my mother’s side fought on the Union side, but in the Western theater of War so neither were at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  78. I always loved Gettysburg. When we were stationed in Maryland when I was a child and our Kansas relatives came to visit, I always went along. Even at 9 years old, I knew it was sacred ground. Two of my great-great grandfathers on my mother’s side fought on the Union side, but in the Western theater of War so neither were at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  79. I always loved Gettysburg. When we were stationed in Maryland when I was a child and our Kansas relatives came to visit, I always went along. Even at 9 years old, I knew it was sacred ground. Two of my great-great grandfathers on my mother’s side fought on the Union side, but in the Western theater of War so neither were at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  80. I always loved Gettysburg. When we were stationed in Maryland when I was a child and our Kansas relatives came to visit, I always went along. Even at 9 years old, I knew it was sacred ground. Two of my great-great grandfathers on my mother’s side fought on the Union side, but in the Western theater of War so neither were at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  81. Did you ever see the movie “Gettysburg” or read the Garry Wills analysis of Lincoln’s speech? IIRC, the movie opens with Sam Elliott and just keeps getting better and better (especially liked Jeff Daniels as the future president of Bowdoin College defending Little Round Top). One of the things I remember about the Wills’ book was that before the speech people said “the United States are” and after they said “the United States is” — a change in how they saw us as one country and not merely an group of states.

    Reply
  82. Did you ever see the movie “Gettysburg” or read the Garry Wills analysis of Lincoln’s speech? IIRC, the movie opens with Sam Elliott and just keeps getting better and better (especially liked Jeff Daniels as the future president of Bowdoin College defending Little Round Top). One of the things I remember about the Wills’ book was that before the speech people said “the United States are” and after they said “the United States is” — a change in how they saw us as one country and not merely an group of states.

    Reply
  83. Did you ever see the movie “Gettysburg” or read the Garry Wills analysis of Lincoln’s speech? IIRC, the movie opens with Sam Elliott and just keeps getting better and better (especially liked Jeff Daniels as the future president of Bowdoin College defending Little Round Top). One of the things I remember about the Wills’ book was that before the speech people said “the United States are” and after they said “the United States is” — a change in how they saw us as one country and not merely an group of states.

    Reply
  84. Did you ever see the movie “Gettysburg” or read the Garry Wills analysis of Lincoln’s speech? IIRC, the movie opens with Sam Elliott and just keeps getting better and better (especially liked Jeff Daniels as the future president of Bowdoin College defending Little Round Top). One of the things I remember about the Wills’ book was that before the speech people said “the United States are” and after they said “the United States is” — a change in how they saw us as one country and not merely an group of states.

    Reply
  85. Did you ever see the movie “Gettysburg” or read the Garry Wills analysis of Lincoln’s speech? IIRC, the movie opens with Sam Elliott and just keeps getting better and better (especially liked Jeff Daniels as the future president of Bowdoin College defending Little Round Top). One of the things I remember about the Wills’ book was that before the speech people said “the United States are” and after they said “the United States is” — a change in how they saw us as one country and not merely an group of states.

    Reply
  86. Janet–clearly you were born with a sense of history. Even though your great-great grandfathers fought in the west, they were still part of that titanic struggle, and surely they celebrated when they learned of the Union victory at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  87. Janet–clearly you were born with a sense of history. Even though your great-great grandfathers fought in the west, they were still part of that titanic struggle, and surely they celebrated when they learned of the Union victory at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  88. Janet–clearly you were born with a sense of history. Even though your great-great grandfathers fought in the west, they were still part of that titanic struggle, and surely they celebrated when they learned of the Union victory at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  89. Janet–clearly you were born with a sense of history. Even though your great-great grandfathers fought in the west, they were still part of that titanic struggle, and surely they celebrated when they learned of the Union victory at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  90. Janet–clearly you were born with a sense of history. Even though your great-great grandfathers fought in the west, they were still part of that titanic struggle, and surely they celebrated when they learned of the Union victory at Gettysburg.

    Reply
  91. Susan, yes, watched the movie GETTYSBURG a couple of years ago (the Mayhem Consultant was preparing me for the visit ), and it was very good–a grand, dramatic overview of the battle and the key figures. Like you, I was particularly struck by Col. Joshua Chamberlain (Jeff Daniels) defense of Little Round Top, one of the key engagements of the battle. He led his Mainers to victory even though he was ill. If they’d had to retreat, the battle might have gone to Lee.

    Reply
  92. Susan, yes, watched the movie GETTYSBURG a couple of years ago (the Mayhem Consultant was preparing me for the visit ), and it was very good–a grand, dramatic overview of the battle and the key figures. Like you, I was particularly struck by Col. Joshua Chamberlain (Jeff Daniels) defense of Little Round Top, one of the key engagements of the battle. He led his Mainers to victory even though he was ill. If they’d had to retreat, the battle might have gone to Lee.

    Reply
  93. Susan, yes, watched the movie GETTYSBURG a couple of years ago (the Mayhem Consultant was preparing me for the visit ), and it was very good–a grand, dramatic overview of the battle and the key figures. Like you, I was particularly struck by Col. Joshua Chamberlain (Jeff Daniels) defense of Little Round Top, one of the key engagements of the battle. He led his Mainers to victory even though he was ill. If they’d had to retreat, the battle might have gone to Lee.

    Reply
  94. Susan, yes, watched the movie GETTYSBURG a couple of years ago (the Mayhem Consultant was preparing me for the visit ), and it was very good–a grand, dramatic overview of the battle and the key figures. Like you, I was particularly struck by Col. Joshua Chamberlain (Jeff Daniels) defense of Little Round Top, one of the key engagements of the battle. He led his Mainers to victory even though he was ill. If they’d had to retreat, the battle might have gone to Lee.

    Reply
  95. Susan, yes, watched the movie GETTYSBURG a couple of years ago (the Mayhem Consultant was preparing me for the visit ), and it was very good–a grand, dramatic overview of the battle and the key figures. Like you, I was particularly struck by Col. Joshua Chamberlain (Jeff Daniels) defense of Little Round Top, one of the key engagements of the battle. He led his Mainers to victory even though he was ill. If they’d had to retreat, the battle might have gone to Lee.

    Reply

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