Garden Bells

Wenches cloche copped colonial williamsburg attribe MizGingerSnapsIt's cold outside on the mountains today.  Last night it froze, amazing the poor silly daffodils.

I was thinking about how gardening folks dealt with these early, cold, unpredictable springs in Georgian and Regency days in England when greenhouses or hothouses were fairly rare and expensive. 

Wenches terrac ota cloche modern cc attrib jo-marshallThe English had a characteristically common-sense solution.  They used what we call a gardeners cloche.

Cloches were sort of a poor man's mini-greenhouse.  They could hold about one plant, so you needed a goodly number of them.  You had to keep an eye on them so as not to scorch a delicate plant in the sun.  Keep another eye on to guard from moisture build-up and mildew.  But, oh, how useful.  Cloches didn't just protect against the cold, they held in moisture and kept the wind out, they stand between the tasty succulent little plants and birds, deer, slugs and such hungry beasts like that. 

 The name 'cloche' comes from the shape of it — it's the French word for 'bell'.  In fact, when these glass shapes lived inside in a somwhat less robust form, our historical people called them 'bell jars'. Wenches cloche cc attrib smabssputzer

 These glasses seems to have reached England from French early in the 1600s.  In our Georgian and Regency times, cloches joined cold frames, forcing boxes of many kinds, terra cotta cloches and even woven baskets, in keeping plants warm and safe across the British Isles.

I think kindly of these homely glass hats sitting in the midst of our protagonist's kitchen garden.  How pretty, and how unexpected to come across while sneaking out to adventure in the early light of dawn.

attrib: coldframesmabsputzer; terracotta jomarshall;
cloche Mizgingersnaps' pair of cloches MaggieMcCain Wench cloche colonial williamsburg attrib Maggie McCain

 

What do you remember from some childhood garden in the spring?
          What are you going to admire and use in your garden this next month?

 

 

135 thoughts on “Garden Bells”

  1. I think that, instead of being a cloche, the terracotta bell in the second photo is for forcing rhubarb by keeping it warmer and in the dark. This makes the stems grow more quickly, and results in stems which are more tender, sweeter and don’t need to be peeled.
    I’ve always loved the idea of glass cloches but have never actually owned any.

    Reply
  2. I think that, instead of being a cloche, the terracotta bell in the second photo is for forcing rhubarb by keeping it warmer and in the dark. This makes the stems grow more quickly, and results in stems which are more tender, sweeter and don’t need to be peeled.
    I’ve always loved the idea of glass cloches but have never actually owned any.

    Reply
  3. I think that, instead of being a cloche, the terracotta bell in the second photo is for forcing rhubarb by keeping it warmer and in the dark. This makes the stems grow more quickly, and results in stems which are more tender, sweeter and don’t need to be peeled.
    I’ve always loved the idea of glass cloches but have never actually owned any.

    Reply
  4. I think that, instead of being a cloche, the terracotta bell in the second photo is for forcing rhubarb by keeping it warmer and in the dark. This makes the stems grow more quickly, and results in stems which are more tender, sweeter and don’t need to be peeled.
    I’ve always loved the idea of glass cloches but have never actually owned any.

    Reply
  5. I think that, instead of being a cloche, the terracotta bell in the second photo is for forcing rhubarb by keeping it warmer and in the dark. This makes the stems grow more quickly, and results in stems which are more tender, sweeter and don’t need to be peeled.
    I’ve always loved the idea of glass cloches but have never actually owned any.

    Reply
  6. HI HJ —
    Yes. The terra cotta jars are for protecting lettuces and rhubarb. The tops often lifted off to release humidity, apparently. I’m not sure whether they are called ‘cloche’ or not. The bell shape would seem to let them into the category …
    The glass cloches are lovely, are they not? Great ornaments.

    Reply
  7. HI HJ —
    Yes. The terra cotta jars are for protecting lettuces and rhubarb. The tops often lifted off to release humidity, apparently. I’m not sure whether they are called ‘cloche’ or not. The bell shape would seem to let them into the category …
    The glass cloches are lovely, are they not? Great ornaments.

    Reply
  8. HI HJ —
    Yes. The terra cotta jars are for protecting lettuces and rhubarb. The tops often lifted off to release humidity, apparently. I’m not sure whether they are called ‘cloche’ or not. The bell shape would seem to let them into the category …
    The glass cloches are lovely, are they not? Great ornaments.

    Reply
  9. HI HJ —
    Yes. The terra cotta jars are for protecting lettuces and rhubarb. The tops often lifted off to release humidity, apparently. I’m not sure whether they are called ‘cloche’ or not. The bell shape would seem to let them into the category …
    The glass cloches are lovely, are they not? Great ornaments.

    Reply
  10. HI HJ —
    Yes. The terra cotta jars are for protecting lettuces and rhubarb. The tops often lifted off to release humidity, apparently. I’m not sure whether they are called ‘cloche’ or not. The bell shape would seem to let them into the category …
    The glass cloches are lovely, are they not? Great ornaments.

    Reply
  11. The glass cloches are really pretty much more artistic than the upturned plastic bottles that often ‘grow’ in my garden ! Though they do the same job as long as the neighbourhood cat or the wind doesn’t move them on !

    Reply
  12. The glass cloches are really pretty much more artistic than the upturned plastic bottles that often ‘grow’ in my garden ! Though they do the same job as long as the neighbourhood cat or the wind doesn’t move them on !

    Reply
  13. The glass cloches are really pretty much more artistic than the upturned plastic bottles that often ‘grow’ in my garden ! Though they do the same job as long as the neighbourhood cat or the wind doesn’t move them on !

    Reply
  14. The glass cloches are really pretty much more artistic than the upturned plastic bottles that often ‘grow’ in my garden ! Though they do the same job as long as the neighbourhood cat or the wind doesn’t move them on !

    Reply
  15. The glass cloches are really pretty much more artistic than the upturned plastic bottles that often ‘grow’ in my garden ! Though they do the same job as long as the neighbourhood cat or the wind doesn’t move them on !

    Reply
  16. Yes, I was thinking that these days it’s plastic of one sort or another.
    Back in the Georgian times labour was cheap, so they could have an army of people putting on covers and taking them off.
    Not sure about childhood gardening, but I have mange tout peas coming along nicely that I planted last autumn. And I’m harvesting swiss chard leaves and sprouting broccoli. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  17. Yes, I was thinking that these days it’s plastic of one sort or another.
    Back in the Georgian times labour was cheap, so they could have an army of people putting on covers and taking them off.
    Not sure about childhood gardening, but I have mange tout peas coming along nicely that I planted last autumn. And I’m harvesting swiss chard leaves and sprouting broccoli. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  18. Yes, I was thinking that these days it’s plastic of one sort or another.
    Back in the Georgian times labour was cheap, so they could have an army of people putting on covers and taking them off.
    Not sure about childhood gardening, but I have mange tout peas coming along nicely that I planted last autumn. And I’m harvesting swiss chard leaves and sprouting broccoli. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  19. Yes, I was thinking that these days it’s plastic of one sort or another.
    Back in the Georgian times labour was cheap, so they could have an army of people putting on covers and taking them off.
    Not sure about childhood gardening, but I have mange tout peas coming along nicely that I planted last autumn. And I’m harvesting swiss chard leaves and sprouting broccoli. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  20. Yes, I was thinking that these days it’s plastic of one sort or another.
    Back in the Georgian times labour was cheap, so they could have an army of people putting on covers and taking them off.
    Not sure about childhood gardening, but I have mange tout peas coming along nicely that I planted last autumn. And I’m harvesting swiss chard leaves and sprouting broccoli. 🙂
    Jo

    Reply
  21. Jo–
    Since I grew up on a farm,we had a large and practical vegetable garden that was nominally mine, though my foather did all of the deciding and most of the work. There were rows of corn and lettuce and radishes, squash plants of various sorts, and hills of potatoes. I didn’t really appreciate the freshness of the produce until later years, when the available veg wasn’t usually as fresh. Now we have farmers’ markets for freshness.

    Reply
  22. Jo–
    Since I grew up on a farm,we had a large and practical vegetable garden that was nominally mine, though my foather did all of the deciding and most of the work. There were rows of corn and lettuce and radishes, squash plants of various sorts, and hills of potatoes. I didn’t really appreciate the freshness of the produce until later years, when the available veg wasn’t usually as fresh. Now we have farmers’ markets for freshness.

    Reply
  23. Jo–
    Since I grew up on a farm,we had a large and practical vegetable garden that was nominally mine, though my foather did all of the deciding and most of the work. There were rows of corn and lettuce and radishes, squash plants of various sorts, and hills of potatoes. I didn’t really appreciate the freshness of the produce until later years, when the available veg wasn’t usually as fresh. Now we have farmers’ markets for freshness.

    Reply
  24. Jo–
    Since I grew up on a farm,we had a large and practical vegetable garden that was nominally mine, though my foather did all of the deciding and most of the work. There were rows of corn and lettuce and radishes, squash plants of various sorts, and hills of potatoes. I didn’t really appreciate the freshness of the produce until later years, when the available veg wasn’t usually as fresh. Now we have farmers’ markets for freshness.

    Reply
  25. Jo–
    Since I grew up on a farm,we had a large and practical vegetable garden that was nominally mine, though my foather did all of the deciding and most of the work. There were rows of corn and lettuce and radishes, squash plants of various sorts, and hills of potatoes. I didn’t really appreciate the freshness of the produce until later years, when the available veg wasn’t usually as fresh. Now we have farmers’ markets for freshness.

    Reply
  26. Every site where I went to look at these old cloches, I saw also the modern equivalent. Plastic soda bottles.
    It makes so much sense to use these. It’s recycling, for one thing. And they don’t have to be stored for all the long winter.
    That might be one of the differences between the last century and this one: many people, even when they can put a small plot of ground into garden, find themselves without much space to store equipment from one year to the next.

    Reply
  27. Every site where I went to look at these old cloches, I saw also the modern equivalent. Plastic soda bottles.
    It makes so much sense to use these. It’s recycling, for one thing. And they don’t have to be stored for all the long winter.
    That might be one of the differences between the last century and this one: many people, even when they can put a small plot of ground into garden, find themselves without much space to store equipment from one year to the next.

    Reply
  28. Every site where I went to look at these old cloches, I saw also the modern equivalent. Plastic soda bottles.
    It makes so much sense to use these. It’s recycling, for one thing. And they don’t have to be stored for all the long winter.
    That might be one of the differences between the last century and this one: many people, even when they can put a small plot of ground into garden, find themselves without much space to store equipment from one year to the next.

    Reply
  29. Every site where I went to look at these old cloches, I saw also the modern equivalent. Plastic soda bottles.
    It makes so much sense to use these. It’s recycling, for one thing. And they don’t have to be stored for all the long winter.
    That might be one of the differences between the last century and this one: many people, even when they can put a small plot of ground into garden, find themselves without much space to store equipment from one year to the next.

    Reply
  30. Every site where I went to look at these old cloches, I saw also the modern equivalent. Plastic soda bottles.
    It makes so much sense to use these. It’s recycling, for one thing. And they don’t have to be stored for all the long winter.
    That might be one of the differences between the last century and this one: many people, even when they can put a small plot of ground into garden, find themselves without much space to store equipment from one year to the next.

    Reply
  31. Hi Mary Jo —
    I didn’t grow up with any kind of veggie plot. I’ve felt very lucky when I’ve had a bit of ground to work.
    My father grew up on a farm though. He’d shake his head at the vegetables and fruits available in grocery stores and say what was in there was what they’d have fed to the pigs back in his farm youth.
    Nowadays, I buy from a farmer’s market in season. Some of them — can I say I suspect some of them sell produce that doesn’t come from their farm at all, but is just bought up at the nearest wholesale market.

    Reply
  32. Hi Mary Jo —
    I didn’t grow up with any kind of veggie plot. I’ve felt very lucky when I’ve had a bit of ground to work.
    My father grew up on a farm though. He’d shake his head at the vegetables and fruits available in grocery stores and say what was in there was what they’d have fed to the pigs back in his farm youth.
    Nowadays, I buy from a farmer’s market in season. Some of them — can I say I suspect some of them sell produce that doesn’t come from their farm at all, but is just bought up at the nearest wholesale market.

    Reply
  33. Hi Mary Jo —
    I didn’t grow up with any kind of veggie plot. I’ve felt very lucky when I’ve had a bit of ground to work.
    My father grew up on a farm though. He’d shake his head at the vegetables and fruits available in grocery stores and say what was in there was what they’d have fed to the pigs back in his farm youth.
    Nowadays, I buy from a farmer’s market in season. Some of them — can I say I suspect some of them sell produce that doesn’t come from their farm at all, but is just bought up at the nearest wholesale market.

    Reply
  34. Hi Mary Jo —
    I didn’t grow up with any kind of veggie plot. I’ve felt very lucky when I’ve had a bit of ground to work.
    My father grew up on a farm though. He’d shake his head at the vegetables and fruits available in grocery stores and say what was in there was what they’d have fed to the pigs back in his farm youth.
    Nowadays, I buy from a farmer’s market in season. Some of them — can I say I suspect some of them sell produce that doesn’t come from their farm at all, but is just bought up at the nearest wholesale market.

    Reply
  35. Hi Mary Jo —
    I didn’t grow up with any kind of veggie plot. I’ve felt very lucky when I’ve had a bit of ground to work.
    My father grew up on a farm though. He’d shake his head at the vegetables and fruits available in grocery stores and say what was in there was what they’d have fed to the pigs back in his farm youth.
    Nowadays, I buy from a farmer’s market in season. Some of them — can I say I suspect some of them sell produce that doesn’t come from their farm at all, but is just bought up at the nearest wholesale market.

    Reply
  36. These are lovely, Joanne, and I didn’t realize they were around during the Regency. I have a vague memory of them from the years I spent in England as a child as there were little gardens behind every home in the village where we lived.
    My Mother grew up on a share cropping farm and she grew vegetables when she could after she married Dad. We moved around quite a bit and some of our homes didn’t have room for a garden. Now both of my brothers have huge gardens and she puts up vegetables from those. She still tinkers with tomato plants at her home.
    I have five acres, but I simply don’t have the time to plant a big garden. However, the way the price of veggies is going up and the quality is going down I may do so in the near future.
    Fortunately there are plenty of farmer’s markets in our area and I am reasonably certain the produce there is home-grown.

    Reply
  37. These are lovely, Joanne, and I didn’t realize they were around during the Regency. I have a vague memory of them from the years I spent in England as a child as there were little gardens behind every home in the village where we lived.
    My Mother grew up on a share cropping farm and she grew vegetables when she could after she married Dad. We moved around quite a bit and some of our homes didn’t have room for a garden. Now both of my brothers have huge gardens and she puts up vegetables from those. She still tinkers with tomato plants at her home.
    I have five acres, but I simply don’t have the time to plant a big garden. However, the way the price of veggies is going up and the quality is going down I may do so in the near future.
    Fortunately there are plenty of farmer’s markets in our area and I am reasonably certain the produce there is home-grown.

    Reply
  38. These are lovely, Joanne, and I didn’t realize they were around during the Regency. I have a vague memory of them from the years I spent in England as a child as there were little gardens behind every home in the village where we lived.
    My Mother grew up on a share cropping farm and she grew vegetables when she could after she married Dad. We moved around quite a bit and some of our homes didn’t have room for a garden. Now both of my brothers have huge gardens and she puts up vegetables from those. She still tinkers with tomato plants at her home.
    I have five acres, but I simply don’t have the time to plant a big garden. However, the way the price of veggies is going up and the quality is going down I may do so in the near future.
    Fortunately there are plenty of farmer’s markets in our area and I am reasonably certain the produce there is home-grown.

    Reply
  39. These are lovely, Joanne, and I didn’t realize they were around during the Regency. I have a vague memory of them from the years I spent in England as a child as there were little gardens behind every home in the village where we lived.
    My Mother grew up on a share cropping farm and she grew vegetables when she could after she married Dad. We moved around quite a bit and some of our homes didn’t have room for a garden. Now both of my brothers have huge gardens and she puts up vegetables from those. She still tinkers with tomato plants at her home.
    I have five acres, but I simply don’t have the time to plant a big garden. However, the way the price of veggies is going up and the quality is going down I may do so in the near future.
    Fortunately there are plenty of farmer’s markets in our area and I am reasonably certain the produce there is home-grown.

    Reply
  40. These are lovely, Joanne, and I didn’t realize they were around during the Regency. I have a vague memory of them from the years I spent in England as a child as there were little gardens behind every home in the village where we lived.
    My Mother grew up on a share cropping farm and she grew vegetables when she could after she married Dad. We moved around quite a bit and some of our homes didn’t have room for a garden. Now both of my brothers have huge gardens and she puts up vegetables from those. She still tinkers with tomato plants at her home.
    I have five acres, but I simply don’t have the time to plant a big garden. However, the way the price of veggies is going up and the quality is going down I may do so in the near future.
    Fortunately there are plenty of farmer’s markets in our area and I am reasonably certain the produce there is home-grown.

    Reply
  41. The garden bells are lovely. I remember covering plants with newspapers whenever a frost was predicted or to protect new transplants from the heat of the sun. (We lived in California.)
    I remember, too, way back in the 40’s when my grandmother always kept a vegetable garden and would surround the veggie plots with flowers. We used to pick the big zinnia blossoms and pretend they were gowns for our dolls…long, long time ago! But not bad memories to keep.
    Diane

    Reply
  42. The garden bells are lovely. I remember covering plants with newspapers whenever a frost was predicted or to protect new transplants from the heat of the sun. (We lived in California.)
    I remember, too, way back in the 40’s when my grandmother always kept a vegetable garden and would surround the veggie plots with flowers. We used to pick the big zinnia blossoms and pretend they were gowns for our dolls…long, long time ago! But not bad memories to keep.
    Diane

    Reply
  43. The garden bells are lovely. I remember covering plants with newspapers whenever a frost was predicted or to protect new transplants from the heat of the sun. (We lived in California.)
    I remember, too, way back in the 40’s when my grandmother always kept a vegetable garden and would surround the veggie plots with flowers. We used to pick the big zinnia blossoms and pretend they were gowns for our dolls…long, long time ago! But not bad memories to keep.
    Diane

    Reply
  44. The garden bells are lovely. I remember covering plants with newspapers whenever a frost was predicted or to protect new transplants from the heat of the sun. (We lived in California.)
    I remember, too, way back in the 40’s when my grandmother always kept a vegetable garden and would surround the veggie plots with flowers. We used to pick the big zinnia blossoms and pretend they were gowns for our dolls…long, long time ago! But not bad memories to keep.
    Diane

    Reply
  45. The garden bells are lovely. I remember covering plants with newspapers whenever a frost was predicted or to protect new transplants from the heat of the sun. (We lived in California.)
    I remember, too, way back in the 40’s when my grandmother always kept a vegetable garden and would surround the veggie plots with flowers. We used to pick the big zinnia blossoms and pretend they were gowns for our dolls…long, long time ago! But not bad memories to keep.
    Diane

    Reply
  46. Of my 5 neighbors in this rural community, 3 of us are single older women who live alone. Two years ago I invited one of them to enjoy the produce from my veggie garden if she’d till it with her little Mantis tiller. She did, and I did. That worked out so well, that last year I told her to give me a list of what she wanted planted and we’d do it again.
    So last year she tilled, I planted, we both weeded, and we still had so much produce we were giving it away. She enjoyed having a fresh salad at work every day, and I found new recipes for all that squash.
    This year, I invited the other lady, and now 3 of us will share in the produce (and the weeding!). I’ve often wished I had something like cloches so that I could plant earlier. This year, I’ve started a bunch of seedlings indoors and as soon as the weather warms up I’ll harden them off and then transplant them to my garden. I just might have to use some of my old plastic jugs as make-do cloches!

    Reply
  47. Of my 5 neighbors in this rural community, 3 of us are single older women who live alone. Two years ago I invited one of them to enjoy the produce from my veggie garden if she’d till it with her little Mantis tiller. She did, and I did. That worked out so well, that last year I told her to give me a list of what she wanted planted and we’d do it again.
    So last year she tilled, I planted, we both weeded, and we still had so much produce we were giving it away. She enjoyed having a fresh salad at work every day, and I found new recipes for all that squash.
    This year, I invited the other lady, and now 3 of us will share in the produce (and the weeding!). I’ve often wished I had something like cloches so that I could plant earlier. This year, I’ve started a bunch of seedlings indoors and as soon as the weather warms up I’ll harden them off and then transplant them to my garden. I just might have to use some of my old plastic jugs as make-do cloches!

    Reply
  48. Of my 5 neighbors in this rural community, 3 of us are single older women who live alone. Two years ago I invited one of them to enjoy the produce from my veggie garden if she’d till it with her little Mantis tiller. She did, and I did. That worked out so well, that last year I told her to give me a list of what she wanted planted and we’d do it again.
    So last year she tilled, I planted, we both weeded, and we still had so much produce we were giving it away. She enjoyed having a fresh salad at work every day, and I found new recipes for all that squash.
    This year, I invited the other lady, and now 3 of us will share in the produce (and the weeding!). I’ve often wished I had something like cloches so that I could plant earlier. This year, I’ve started a bunch of seedlings indoors and as soon as the weather warms up I’ll harden them off and then transplant them to my garden. I just might have to use some of my old plastic jugs as make-do cloches!

    Reply
  49. Of my 5 neighbors in this rural community, 3 of us are single older women who live alone. Two years ago I invited one of them to enjoy the produce from my veggie garden if she’d till it with her little Mantis tiller. She did, and I did. That worked out so well, that last year I told her to give me a list of what she wanted planted and we’d do it again.
    So last year she tilled, I planted, we both weeded, and we still had so much produce we were giving it away. She enjoyed having a fresh salad at work every day, and I found new recipes for all that squash.
    This year, I invited the other lady, and now 3 of us will share in the produce (and the weeding!). I’ve often wished I had something like cloches so that I could plant earlier. This year, I’ve started a bunch of seedlings indoors and as soon as the weather warms up I’ll harden them off and then transplant them to my garden. I just might have to use some of my old plastic jugs as make-do cloches!

    Reply
  50. Of my 5 neighbors in this rural community, 3 of us are single older women who live alone. Two years ago I invited one of them to enjoy the produce from my veggie garden if she’d till it with her little Mantis tiller. She did, and I did. That worked out so well, that last year I told her to give me a list of what she wanted planted and we’d do it again.
    So last year she tilled, I planted, we both weeded, and we still had so much produce we were giving it away. She enjoyed having a fresh salad at work every day, and I found new recipes for all that squash.
    This year, I invited the other lady, and now 3 of us will share in the produce (and the weeding!). I’ve often wished I had something like cloches so that I could plant earlier. This year, I’ve started a bunch of seedlings indoors and as soon as the weather warms up I’ll harden them off and then transplant them to my garden. I just might have to use some of my old plastic jugs as make-do cloches!

    Reply
  51. When i was a kid we always had big vegie patches and i remember my father putting put hessian sacks draped on stick frames over the tender plants when a frost was likely. We didn’t get snow, but we did have brilliant frosts. I *knew* Jack Frost was real because I saw his beautiful frost paintings on our windows in the morning.
    I still grow vegies in my back yard, but being in a city, and with only a small yard, there doesn’t seem to be a problem with frosts.

    Reply
  52. When i was a kid we always had big vegie patches and i remember my father putting put hessian sacks draped on stick frames over the tender plants when a frost was likely. We didn’t get snow, but we did have brilliant frosts. I *knew* Jack Frost was real because I saw his beautiful frost paintings on our windows in the morning.
    I still grow vegies in my back yard, but being in a city, and with only a small yard, there doesn’t seem to be a problem with frosts.

    Reply
  53. When i was a kid we always had big vegie patches and i remember my father putting put hessian sacks draped on stick frames over the tender plants when a frost was likely. We didn’t get snow, but we did have brilliant frosts. I *knew* Jack Frost was real because I saw his beautiful frost paintings on our windows in the morning.
    I still grow vegies in my back yard, but being in a city, and with only a small yard, there doesn’t seem to be a problem with frosts.

    Reply
  54. When i was a kid we always had big vegie patches and i remember my father putting put hessian sacks draped on stick frames over the tender plants when a frost was likely. We didn’t get snow, but we did have brilliant frosts. I *knew* Jack Frost was real because I saw his beautiful frost paintings on our windows in the morning.
    I still grow vegies in my back yard, but being in a city, and with only a small yard, there doesn’t seem to be a problem with frosts.

    Reply
  55. When i was a kid we always had big vegie patches and i remember my father putting put hessian sacks draped on stick frames over the tender plants when a frost was likely. We didn’t get snow, but we did have brilliant frosts. I *knew* Jack Frost was real because I saw his beautiful frost paintings on our windows in the morning.
    I still grow vegies in my back yard, but being in a city, and with only a small yard, there doesn’t seem to be a problem with frosts.

    Reply
  56. I too have become distressed by the declining quality of fruits and vegetable in the stores. There is not so much taste and smell resemblance between what’s in the bins and, y’know, vegetables. I just wish I had the time and the location to grow at least some of my own. It is so satisfying.
    In the past, I’ve tried to grow some vegetables that weren’t just in the common run of things. Heirloom varieties of tomatoes, for instance. I have had what one might politely call ‘mixed success’ at this. I fear I’m not a highly skilled gardener.
    Cloches go way back, historically. Before 1630, anyway, when they were mentioned in a gardening book of the time. A lot of these pictures are from the Colonial Williamsburg historical garden.

    Reply
  57. I too have become distressed by the declining quality of fruits and vegetable in the stores. There is not so much taste and smell resemblance between what’s in the bins and, y’know, vegetables. I just wish I had the time and the location to grow at least some of my own. It is so satisfying.
    In the past, I’ve tried to grow some vegetables that weren’t just in the common run of things. Heirloom varieties of tomatoes, for instance. I have had what one might politely call ‘mixed success’ at this. I fear I’m not a highly skilled gardener.
    Cloches go way back, historically. Before 1630, anyway, when they were mentioned in a gardening book of the time. A lot of these pictures are from the Colonial Williamsburg historical garden.

    Reply
  58. I too have become distressed by the declining quality of fruits and vegetable in the stores. There is not so much taste and smell resemblance between what’s in the bins and, y’know, vegetables. I just wish I had the time and the location to grow at least some of my own. It is so satisfying.
    In the past, I’ve tried to grow some vegetables that weren’t just in the common run of things. Heirloom varieties of tomatoes, for instance. I have had what one might politely call ‘mixed success’ at this. I fear I’m not a highly skilled gardener.
    Cloches go way back, historically. Before 1630, anyway, when they were mentioned in a gardening book of the time. A lot of these pictures are from the Colonial Williamsburg historical garden.

    Reply
  59. I too have become distressed by the declining quality of fruits and vegetable in the stores. There is not so much taste and smell resemblance between what’s in the bins and, y’know, vegetables. I just wish I had the time and the location to grow at least some of my own. It is so satisfying.
    In the past, I’ve tried to grow some vegetables that weren’t just in the common run of things. Heirloom varieties of tomatoes, for instance. I have had what one might politely call ‘mixed success’ at this. I fear I’m not a highly skilled gardener.
    Cloches go way back, historically. Before 1630, anyway, when they were mentioned in a gardening book of the time. A lot of these pictures are from the Colonial Williamsburg historical garden.

    Reply
  60. I too have become distressed by the declining quality of fruits and vegetable in the stores. There is not so much taste and smell resemblance between what’s in the bins and, y’know, vegetables. I just wish I had the time and the location to grow at least some of my own. It is so satisfying.
    In the past, I’ve tried to grow some vegetables that weren’t just in the common run of things. Heirloom varieties of tomatoes, for instance. I have had what one might politely call ‘mixed success’ at this. I fear I’m not a highly skilled gardener.
    Cloches go way back, historically. Before 1630, anyway, when they were mentioned in a gardening book of the time. A lot of these pictures are from the Colonial Williamsburg historical garden.

    Reply
  61. Yes. One does try to protect the tender young plants. Fortunately I always seemed to have loads of spare leaves left in piles from the fall before. Certainly enough to rake over the veggie garden.
    We had marigolds, lots of them, in the spaces around and between the edible stuff. I believe this is supposed to protect the plants from invading insects. Perhaps those zinnias served the same purpose …

    Reply
  62. Yes. One does try to protect the tender young plants. Fortunately I always seemed to have loads of spare leaves left in piles from the fall before. Certainly enough to rake over the veggie garden.
    We had marigolds, lots of them, in the spaces around and between the edible stuff. I believe this is supposed to protect the plants from invading insects. Perhaps those zinnias served the same purpose …

    Reply
  63. Yes. One does try to protect the tender young plants. Fortunately I always seemed to have loads of spare leaves left in piles from the fall before. Certainly enough to rake over the veggie garden.
    We had marigolds, lots of them, in the spaces around and between the edible stuff. I believe this is supposed to protect the plants from invading insects. Perhaps those zinnias served the same purpose …

    Reply
  64. Yes. One does try to protect the tender young plants. Fortunately I always seemed to have loads of spare leaves left in piles from the fall before. Certainly enough to rake over the veggie garden.
    We had marigolds, lots of them, in the spaces around and between the edible stuff. I believe this is supposed to protect the plants from invading insects. Perhaps those zinnias served the same purpose …

    Reply
  65. Yes. One does try to protect the tender young plants. Fortunately I always seemed to have loads of spare leaves left in piles from the fall before. Certainly enough to rake over the veggie garden.
    We had marigolds, lots of them, in the spaces around and between the edible stuff. I believe this is supposed to protect the plants from invading insects. Perhaps those zinnias served the same purpose …

    Reply
  66. It’s autumn here. 🙂
    We’re starting to get all the gorgeous colours, but because of extra long, extra hot summer, apparently they’re not going to last long this year.
    I know NOTHING about gardening, but I come from a family of (literally) Ukrainian peasants, so I’m the odd one out. Today I watched the other women in my family digging up horseradish for the Easter basket and it was like magic to me!

    Reply
  67. It’s autumn here. 🙂
    We’re starting to get all the gorgeous colours, but because of extra long, extra hot summer, apparently they’re not going to last long this year.
    I know NOTHING about gardening, but I come from a family of (literally) Ukrainian peasants, so I’m the odd one out. Today I watched the other women in my family digging up horseradish for the Easter basket and it was like magic to me!

    Reply
  68. It’s autumn here. 🙂
    We’re starting to get all the gorgeous colours, but because of extra long, extra hot summer, apparently they’re not going to last long this year.
    I know NOTHING about gardening, but I come from a family of (literally) Ukrainian peasants, so I’m the odd one out. Today I watched the other women in my family digging up horseradish for the Easter basket and it was like magic to me!

    Reply
  69. It’s autumn here. 🙂
    We’re starting to get all the gorgeous colours, but because of extra long, extra hot summer, apparently they’re not going to last long this year.
    I know NOTHING about gardening, but I come from a family of (literally) Ukrainian peasants, so I’m the odd one out. Today I watched the other women in my family digging up horseradish for the Easter basket and it was like magic to me!

    Reply
  70. It’s autumn here. 🙂
    We’re starting to get all the gorgeous colours, but because of extra long, extra hot summer, apparently they’re not going to last long this year.
    I know NOTHING about gardening, but I come from a family of (literally) Ukrainian peasants, so I’m the odd one out. Today I watched the other women in my family digging up horseradish for the Easter basket and it was like magic to me!

    Reply
  71. The garden was a family project; what I remember is planting. For Dad it was running the tiller, picking out the corn seeds, cutting up the potatoes with growing eyes, and cutting back the prickly raspberries. Mom’s big projects were the tomatoes. peas, beans, and cucumbers. We grew other stuff, but these were babied. She had a green house, so we put out mainly seedlings that didn’t need to be cover. I’ve never seen cloches before.
    For the first crops, I remember the really tender asparagus. And the strawberries. They were always covered with mesh to prevent the birds from eating them. They were shameless, dive bombing us berries as soon as the mesh was pulled back. For the first strawberries, we kids usually ate more than ended in the bucket.

    Reply
  72. The garden was a family project; what I remember is planting. For Dad it was running the tiller, picking out the corn seeds, cutting up the potatoes with growing eyes, and cutting back the prickly raspberries. Mom’s big projects were the tomatoes. peas, beans, and cucumbers. We grew other stuff, but these were babied. She had a green house, so we put out mainly seedlings that didn’t need to be cover. I’ve never seen cloches before.
    For the first crops, I remember the really tender asparagus. And the strawberries. They were always covered with mesh to prevent the birds from eating them. They were shameless, dive bombing us berries as soon as the mesh was pulled back. For the first strawberries, we kids usually ate more than ended in the bucket.

    Reply
  73. The garden was a family project; what I remember is planting. For Dad it was running the tiller, picking out the corn seeds, cutting up the potatoes with growing eyes, and cutting back the prickly raspberries. Mom’s big projects were the tomatoes. peas, beans, and cucumbers. We grew other stuff, but these were babied. She had a green house, so we put out mainly seedlings that didn’t need to be cover. I’ve never seen cloches before.
    For the first crops, I remember the really tender asparagus. And the strawberries. They were always covered with mesh to prevent the birds from eating them. They were shameless, dive bombing us berries as soon as the mesh was pulled back. For the first strawberries, we kids usually ate more than ended in the bucket.

    Reply
  74. The garden was a family project; what I remember is planting. For Dad it was running the tiller, picking out the corn seeds, cutting up the potatoes with growing eyes, and cutting back the prickly raspberries. Mom’s big projects were the tomatoes. peas, beans, and cucumbers. We grew other stuff, but these were babied. She had a green house, so we put out mainly seedlings that didn’t need to be cover. I’ve never seen cloches before.
    For the first crops, I remember the really tender asparagus. And the strawberries. They were always covered with mesh to prevent the birds from eating them. They were shameless, dive bombing us berries as soon as the mesh was pulled back. For the first strawberries, we kids usually ate more than ended in the bucket.

    Reply
  75. The garden was a family project; what I remember is planting. For Dad it was running the tiller, picking out the corn seeds, cutting up the potatoes with growing eyes, and cutting back the prickly raspberries. Mom’s big projects were the tomatoes. peas, beans, and cucumbers. We grew other stuff, but these were babied. She had a green house, so we put out mainly seedlings that didn’t need to be cover. I’ve never seen cloches before.
    For the first crops, I remember the really tender asparagus. And the strawberries. They were always covered with mesh to prevent the birds from eating them. They were shameless, dive bombing us berries as soon as the mesh was pulled back. For the first strawberries, we kids usually ate more than ended in the bucket.

    Reply
  76. The plastic jugs milk and juice come in are supposed to be able to act as cloches.
    In fact, the other day I was talking to an old men in the local town, hanging about on a bench outside the town’s bookstore. He recommended those little plastic ‘hats’ for the garden. Locally we get very unpredictable weather in the spring. The mountains catch the winds from both east and west and create dozens of little microclimates.
    Strange to think the frankly unlovely cut-off mild jugs or soda bottles are the utilitarian descendents of the lovely glass cloches.

    Reply
  77. The plastic jugs milk and juice come in are supposed to be able to act as cloches.
    In fact, the other day I was talking to an old men in the local town, hanging about on a bench outside the town’s bookstore. He recommended those little plastic ‘hats’ for the garden. Locally we get very unpredictable weather in the spring. The mountains catch the winds from both east and west and create dozens of little microclimates.
    Strange to think the frankly unlovely cut-off mild jugs or soda bottles are the utilitarian descendents of the lovely glass cloches.

    Reply
  78. The plastic jugs milk and juice come in are supposed to be able to act as cloches.
    In fact, the other day I was talking to an old men in the local town, hanging about on a bench outside the town’s bookstore. He recommended those little plastic ‘hats’ for the garden. Locally we get very unpredictable weather in the spring. The mountains catch the winds from both east and west and create dozens of little microclimates.
    Strange to think the frankly unlovely cut-off mild jugs or soda bottles are the utilitarian descendents of the lovely glass cloches.

    Reply
  79. The plastic jugs milk and juice come in are supposed to be able to act as cloches.
    In fact, the other day I was talking to an old men in the local town, hanging about on a bench outside the town’s bookstore. He recommended those little plastic ‘hats’ for the garden. Locally we get very unpredictable weather in the spring. The mountains catch the winds from both east and west and create dozens of little microclimates.
    Strange to think the frankly unlovely cut-off mild jugs or soda bottles are the utilitarian descendents of the lovely glass cloches.

    Reply
  80. The plastic jugs milk and juice come in are supposed to be able to act as cloches.
    In fact, the other day I was talking to an old men in the local town, hanging about on a bench outside the town’s bookstore. He recommended those little plastic ‘hats’ for the garden. Locally we get very unpredictable weather in the spring. The mountains catch the winds from both east and west and create dozens of little microclimates.
    Strange to think the frankly unlovely cut-off mild jugs or soda bottles are the utilitarian descendents of the lovely glass cloches.

    Reply
  81. Hi Anne —
    I believe cities are several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Something to do with all those flat, hard, reflective surfaces.
    The sacks over small wood frames sounds like a good idea. We don’t have as many things come in hessian sacks these days, I think. Mostly all plastic.

    Reply
  82. Hi Anne —
    I believe cities are several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Something to do with all those flat, hard, reflective surfaces.
    The sacks over small wood frames sounds like a good idea. We don’t have as many things come in hessian sacks these days, I think. Mostly all plastic.

    Reply
  83. Hi Anne —
    I believe cities are several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Something to do with all those flat, hard, reflective surfaces.
    The sacks over small wood frames sounds like a good idea. We don’t have as many things come in hessian sacks these days, I think. Mostly all plastic.

    Reply
  84. Hi Anne —
    I believe cities are several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Something to do with all those flat, hard, reflective surfaces.
    The sacks over small wood frames sounds like a good idea. We don’t have as many things come in hessian sacks these days, I think. Mostly all plastic.

    Reply
  85. Hi Anne —
    I believe cities are several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Something to do with all those flat, hard, reflective surfaces.
    The sacks over small wood frames sounds like a good idea. We don’t have as many things come in hessian sacks these days, I think. Mostly all plastic.

    Reply
  86. Hi Sonya —
    Autumn for you, huh? (I’m trying to work out in my head where you’ll be in the growing season.) Definitely harvest time for a lot of stuff.
    Around here, we have lots of pick-your-own produce. Strawberries in the spring. In the fall, apples mostly. We’re a big apple-producing area.
    I used to take the kids and we’d do this. Now I try to get out myself and do my own picking.

    Reply
  87. Hi Sonya —
    Autumn for you, huh? (I’m trying to work out in my head where you’ll be in the growing season.) Definitely harvest time for a lot of stuff.
    Around here, we have lots of pick-your-own produce. Strawberries in the spring. In the fall, apples mostly. We’re a big apple-producing area.
    I used to take the kids and we’d do this. Now I try to get out myself and do my own picking.

    Reply
  88. Hi Sonya —
    Autumn for you, huh? (I’m trying to work out in my head where you’ll be in the growing season.) Definitely harvest time for a lot of stuff.
    Around here, we have lots of pick-your-own produce. Strawberries in the spring. In the fall, apples mostly. We’re a big apple-producing area.
    I used to take the kids and we’d do this. Now I try to get out myself and do my own picking.

    Reply
  89. Hi Sonya —
    Autumn for you, huh? (I’m trying to work out in my head where you’ll be in the growing season.) Definitely harvest time for a lot of stuff.
    Around here, we have lots of pick-your-own produce. Strawberries in the spring. In the fall, apples mostly. We’re a big apple-producing area.
    I used to take the kids and we’d do this. Now I try to get out myself and do my own picking.

    Reply
  90. Hi Sonya —
    Autumn for you, huh? (I’m trying to work out in my head where you’ll be in the growing season.) Definitely harvest time for a lot of stuff.
    Around here, we have lots of pick-your-own produce. Strawberries in the spring. In the fall, apples mostly. We’re a big apple-producing area.
    I used to take the kids and we’d do this. Now I try to get out myself and do my own picking.

    Reply
  91. Sherrie, I love your community garden! Several friends and I (single ladies of a “certain age”) joke about buying a big house and living together, calling it Menopause Manor. 😉

    Reply
  92. Sherrie, I love your community garden! Several friends and I (single ladies of a “certain age”) joke about buying a big house and living together, calling it Menopause Manor. 😉

    Reply
  93. Sherrie, I love your community garden! Several friends and I (single ladies of a “certain age”) joke about buying a big house and living together, calling it Menopause Manor. 😉

    Reply
  94. Sherrie, I love your community garden! Several friends and I (single ladies of a “certain age”) joke about buying a big house and living together, calling it Menopause Manor. 😉

    Reply
  95. Sherrie, I love your community garden! Several friends and I (single ladies of a “certain age”) joke about buying a big house and living together, calling it Menopause Manor. 😉

    Reply
  96. Hi Shannon —
    You are so lucky to have these memories, though I imagine it was hard work and you spent at least some of the time wishing you’d never see another string bean.
    I put out bird mesh to protect the tomatoes from birdy-thieves. Mostly though, I get troubled by squirrels. I will admit — yes, I will admit it — I hate squirrels.

    Reply
  97. Hi Shannon —
    You are so lucky to have these memories, though I imagine it was hard work and you spent at least some of the time wishing you’d never see another string bean.
    I put out bird mesh to protect the tomatoes from birdy-thieves. Mostly though, I get troubled by squirrels. I will admit — yes, I will admit it — I hate squirrels.

    Reply
  98. Hi Shannon —
    You are so lucky to have these memories, though I imagine it was hard work and you spent at least some of the time wishing you’d never see another string bean.
    I put out bird mesh to protect the tomatoes from birdy-thieves. Mostly though, I get troubled by squirrels. I will admit — yes, I will admit it — I hate squirrels.

    Reply
  99. Hi Shannon —
    You are so lucky to have these memories, though I imagine it was hard work and you spent at least some of the time wishing you’d never see another string bean.
    I put out bird mesh to protect the tomatoes from birdy-thieves. Mostly though, I get troubled by squirrels. I will admit — yes, I will admit it — I hate squirrels.

    Reply
  100. Hi Shannon —
    You are so lucky to have these memories, though I imagine it was hard work and you spent at least some of the time wishing you’d never see another string bean.
    I put out bird mesh to protect the tomatoes from birdy-thieves. Mostly though, I get troubled by squirrels. I will admit — yes, I will admit it — I hate squirrels.

    Reply
  101. My childhood garden memory is the Jolly Green Giant’s garden pictured on vegetable cans and packages! But since then I’ve been lucky enough to live in the country, both in N. Va. at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts. and in the Bluegrass of central Ky. so I do enjoy gardening, especially roses.
    I’m currently in a condo so again, no garden plot. I do have a trio of dogwood trees just now blooming off of my back patio which are lovely.

    Reply
  102. My childhood garden memory is the Jolly Green Giant’s garden pictured on vegetable cans and packages! But since then I’ve been lucky enough to live in the country, both in N. Va. at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts. and in the Bluegrass of central Ky. so I do enjoy gardening, especially roses.
    I’m currently in a condo so again, no garden plot. I do have a trio of dogwood trees just now blooming off of my back patio which are lovely.

    Reply
  103. My childhood garden memory is the Jolly Green Giant’s garden pictured on vegetable cans and packages! But since then I’ve been lucky enough to live in the country, both in N. Va. at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts. and in the Bluegrass of central Ky. so I do enjoy gardening, especially roses.
    I’m currently in a condo so again, no garden plot. I do have a trio of dogwood trees just now blooming off of my back patio which are lovely.

    Reply
  104. My childhood garden memory is the Jolly Green Giant’s garden pictured on vegetable cans and packages! But since then I’ve been lucky enough to live in the country, both in N. Va. at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts. and in the Bluegrass of central Ky. so I do enjoy gardening, especially roses.
    I’m currently in a condo so again, no garden plot. I do have a trio of dogwood trees just now blooming off of my back patio which are lovely.

    Reply
  105. My childhood garden memory is the Jolly Green Giant’s garden pictured on vegetable cans and packages! But since then I’ve been lucky enough to live in the country, both in N. Va. at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts. and in the Bluegrass of central Ky. so I do enjoy gardening, especially roses.
    I’m currently in a condo so again, no garden plot. I do have a trio of dogwood trees just now blooming off of my back patio which are lovely.

    Reply
  106. What a fun post! I don’t remember anything nearly as darling as these cloches. There was the green house, of course, but my favorite is from growing up in northern climes – we had little wooden louvered “teepees” we’d place over shrubbery in the winter, to keep snow from crushing or breaking the branches. so New England practical 😀

    Reply
  107. What a fun post! I don’t remember anything nearly as darling as these cloches. There was the green house, of course, but my favorite is from growing up in northern climes – we had little wooden louvered “teepees” we’d place over shrubbery in the winter, to keep snow from crushing or breaking the branches. so New England practical 😀

    Reply
  108. What a fun post! I don’t remember anything nearly as darling as these cloches. There was the green house, of course, but my favorite is from growing up in northern climes – we had little wooden louvered “teepees” we’d place over shrubbery in the winter, to keep snow from crushing or breaking the branches. so New England practical 😀

    Reply
  109. What a fun post! I don’t remember anything nearly as darling as these cloches. There was the green house, of course, but my favorite is from growing up in northern climes – we had little wooden louvered “teepees” we’d place over shrubbery in the winter, to keep snow from crushing or breaking the branches. so New England practical 😀

    Reply
  110. What a fun post! I don’t remember anything nearly as darling as these cloches. There was the green house, of course, but my favorite is from growing up in northern climes – we had little wooden louvered “teepees” we’d place over shrubbery in the winter, to keep snow from crushing or breaking the branches. so New England practical 😀

    Reply
  111. I’ve never grown roses, and I’ve always wanted to.
    When I was growing up we had rose vines running up and over the brick garage. They were smallish red roses, just very simple. Only a few petals. And oh, how those roses filled the air with their smell. And they seemed to be in bloom for months.
    I’d like to grown those roses.

    Reply
  112. I’ve never grown roses, and I’ve always wanted to.
    When I was growing up we had rose vines running up and over the brick garage. They were smallish red roses, just very simple. Only a few petals. And oh, how those roses filled the air with their smell. And they seemed to be in bloom for months.
    I’d like to grown those roses.

    Reply
  113. I’ve never grown roses, and I’ve always wanted to.
    When I was growing up we had rose vines running up and over the brick garage. They were smallish red roses, just very simple. Only a few petals. And oh, how those roses filled the air with their smell. And they seemed to be in bloom for months.
    I’d like to grown those roses.

    Reply
  114. I’ve never grown roses, and I’ve always wanted to.
    When I was growing up we had rose vines running up and over the brick garage. They were smallish red roses, just very simple. Only a few petals. And oh, how those roses filled the air with their smell. And they seemed to be in bloom for months.
    I’d like to grown those roses.

    Reply
  115. I’ve never grown roses, and I’ve always wanted to.
    When I was growing up we had rose vines running up and over the brick garage. They were smallish red roses, just very simple. Only a few petals. And oh, how those roses filled the air with their smell. And they seemed to be in bloom for months.
    I’d like to grown those roses.

    Reply
  116. When I lived in a few other countries – like Korea – the strawberries arriving was a really big thing! You knew winter was done when you could buy a big box of strawberries from people on the street.

    Reply
  117. When I lived in a few other countries – like Korea – the strawberries arriving was a really big thing! You knew winter was done when you could buy a big box of strawberries from people on the street.

    Reply
  118. When I lived in a few other countries – like Korea – the strawberries arriving was a really big thing! You knew winter was done when you could buy a big box of strawberries from people on the street.

    Reply
  119. When I lived in a few other countries – like Korea – the strawberries arriving was a really big thing! You knew winter was done when you could buy a big box of strawberries from people on the street.

    Reply
  120. When I lived in a few other countries – like Korea – the strawberries arriving was a really big thing! You knew winter was done when you could buy a big box of strawberries from people on the street.

    Reply
  121. I remember in Iran, there used to be these small, very sour fruits. Maybe … plums.
    Strangely enough, after many months of very few vegetables and no fruit in the market — those plums were just exactly what i wanted.

    Reply
  122. I remember in Iran, there used to be these small, very sour fruits. Maybe … plums.
    Strangely enough, after many months of very few vegetables and no fruit in the market — those plums were just exactly what i wanted.

    Reply
  123. I remember in Iran, there used to be these small, very sour fruits. Maybe … plums.
    Strangely enough, after many months of very few vegetables and no fruit in the market — those plums were just exactly what i wanted.

    Reply
  124. I remember in Iran, there used to be these small, very sour fruits. Maybe … plums.
    Strangely enough, after many months of very few vegetables and no fruit in the market — those plums were just exactly what i wanted.

    Reply
  125. I remember in Iran, there used to be these small, very sour fruits. Maybe … plums.
    Strangely enough, after many months of very few vegetables and no fruit in the market — those plums were just exactly what i wanted.

    Reply

Leave a Comment