Foyled Again!

Foyle 6
Andrea/Cara here, confessing to having felt a little blue-deviled last night as I finished streaming an episode Foyle’s War and realized that I’ve almost come to the end of the show’s eight seasons. Now, for those of you who aren’t familiar with the series, it’s a BBC period police procedural set in a Foyle 1coastal English village during WWII, and deals with the drama of ordinary people coping in a world of conflict and change

The mysteries deal with wartime issues—profiteering, pacifism, cowardice, among others—and the plots are vey well done. But to me the real appeal of the show is the subtle and layered characterizations and the exploration of human nature. Friendship, loyalty, love—all elemental themes that transcend any specific era. I’ve learned a lot about storytelling from the episodes, and I shall miss seeing my “friends” continue to grow and develop.

Foyle 5I think a good story always starts with interesting characters, and Foyle’s War has a wonderful trio. Detective Superintendent Foyle heads the cast. A widower with a grown son, he’s quiet, reserved and a keen observer. His driver, Samantha Stewart, is a young, enthusiastic young woman who wants to do her part for the war effort. At first blush, she’s like a friendly lab puppy, but there’s a sharp mind and intellect that just waiting to be challenged. And rounding out the group is wounded vet Detective Sergeant Milner, who is fighting personal demons while trying to prove his mettle.

Foyle 2The acting is superb. What struck me most was how brilliantly Foyle uses subtle facial expressions as part of his character. More than words, they really give the viewer a wonderful grasp of who he is. It’s obvious, of course, that by the nature of their respective mediums, film and print books develop character in different ways, with different tools. Foyle’s War is, for me, a perfect example of “show, don’t tell.”

Foyle 4We writers do have to tell a reader everything—what our characters look like, what they are thinking. But the show reminds me that being economical—I tend to be way too wordy—is often more powerful. A quick purse of Foyle’s tips can say more than a long-winded speech.

I find one aspect of storytelling in a series very similar in both film and the printed page—the developing of relationships, as strangers become friends, with all the complexities that friendship brings. The three main characters in Foyle’s War are so interesting because their different ages and experience mean they relate to each other in very different ways.

Foyle 8I’ve really enjoyed the dynamics over the course of the seasons as Sam grows more confident and independent and Foyle wrestles with disillusionment. Again, I feel like I’m getting a great reminder of how creating both tensions and bonds makes characters more engaging and interesting for the viewer or reader. It’s also fascinating how they react to a crisis or challenge. I think Anthony Horowitz, the creator of the show, has done a splendid job of crafting full-rounded people who are believable no matter what the situation. That’s no easy task! (Trust me, I’m making mental notes!)

Foyle 7The show also reminds me of how creating a world for your characters is so important and adds color and texture to a story. The production level of Foyle’s War is really high—the country scenery, the villages, the fashions are all wonderful. I love looking at all those details as I follow the plot.

Now, I have another confession—I’ve only lately started watching television series like this. I tend to relax with a book when I have leisure time. But I’m getting hooked. (I’ve very much enjoyed Poldark on PBS, The Crown on Netflix . . . and Game of Thrones on HBO, which I didn’t really expect to like, but did.)

Soooo, have you watched Foyle’s War? And if so, are you as big a fan as I am? What strikes a chord with you? An even more pressing question is, what other period drama series do you love? I’m looking for some great recommendations!

255 thoughts on “Foyled Again!”

  1. I think I’ve seen pretty much every episode of this show at least twice. It runs on repeat on free-to-air television in Australia quite often.
    Honeysuckle Weeks (the lead woman) has a younger sister who is so like her they play younger and older versions of each other in some productions. Occasionally I struggle to tell which actress it is!
    What I love most about British television is that they don’t always do what you expect, and do not always give you the happy ending you want. I also really like that they found a way to include useful and important female characters at that point in history without being anachronistic.
    If I have one complaint: the lead actor’s way of speaking, with long pauses mid-sentence, really irritates me!

    Reply
  2. I think I’ve seen pretty much every episode of this show at least twice. It runs on repeat on free-to-air television in Australia quite often.
    Honeysuckle Weeks (the lead woman) has a younger sister who is so like her they play younger and older versions of each other in some productions. Occasionally I struggle to tell which actress it is!
    What I love most about British television is that they don’t always do what you expect, and do not always give you the happy ending you want. I also really like that they found a way to include useful and important female characters at that point in history without being anachronistic.
    If I have one complaint: the lead actor’s way of speaking, with long pauses mid-sentence, really irritates me!

    Reply
  3. I think I’ve seen pretty much every episode of this show at least twice. It runs on repeat on free-to-air television in Australia quite often.
    Honeysuckle Weeks (the lead woman) has a younger sister who is so like her they play younger and older versions of each other in some productions. Occasionally I struggle to tell which actress it is!
    What I love most about British television is that they don’t always do what you expect, and do not always give you the happy ending you want. I also really like that they found a way to include useful and important female characters at that point in history without being anachronistic.
    If I have one complaint: the lead actor’s way of speaking, with long pauses mid-sentence, really irritates me!

    Reply
  4. I think I’ve seen pretty much every episode of this show at least twice. It runs on repeat on free-to-air television in Australia quite often.
    Honeysuckle Weeks (the lead woman) has a younger sister who is so like her they play younger and older versions of each other in some productions. Occasionally I struggle to tell which actress it is!
    What I love most about British television is that they don’t always do what you expect, and do not always give you the happy ending you want. I also really like that they found a way to include useful and important female characters at that point in history without being anachronistic.
    If I have one complaint: the lead actor’s way of speaking, with long pauses mid-sentence, really irritates me!

    Reply
  5. I think I’ve seen pretty much every episode of this show at least twice. It runs on repeat on free-to-air television in Australia quite often.
    Honeysuckle Weeks (the lead woman) has a younger sister who is so like her they play younger and older versions of each other in some productions. Occasionally I struggle to tell which actress it is!
    What I love most about British television is that they don’t always do what you expect, and do not always give you the happy ending you want. I also really like that they found a way to include useful and important female characters at that point in history without being anachronistic.
    If I have one complaint: the lead actor’s way of speaking, with long pauses mid-sentence, really irritates me!

    Reply
  6. I just remembered that the ads for the show they run here have some quote about how there’s still crime whether there’s a war going on or not.
    I like that – in the middle of the worst war in world history – they still have to deal with murders and robberies and all of that.

    Reply
  7. I just remembered that the ads for the show they run here have some quote about how there’s still crime whether there’s a war going on or not.
    I like that – in the middle of the worst war in world history – they still have to deal with murders and robberies and all of that.

    Reply
  8. I just remembered that the ads for the show they run here have some quote about how there’s still crime whether there’s a war going on or not.
    I like that – in the middle of the worst war in world history – they still have to deal with murders and robberies and all of that.

    Reply
  9. I just remembered that the ads for the show they run here have some quote about how there’s still crime whether there’s a war going on or not.
    I like that – in the middle of the worst war in world history – they still have to deal with murders and robberies and all of that.

    Reply
  10. I just remembered that the ads for the show they run here have some quote about how there’s still crime whether there’s a war going on or not.
    I like that – in the middle of the worst war in world history – they still have to deal with murders and robberies and all of that.

    Reply
  11. SO true, Anne—a winner on all counts. I’ve rarely gushed about a television show, as for me they all too often use their flashy “toys” (ie visual effects for pacing,and wow factors) instead of really developing nuanced characters, and the little details that make a story really meaty. Foyle’s War just blew me away. It does everything a great novel does. (And that’s my highest compliment!)

    Reply
  12. SO true, Anne—a winner on all counts. I’ve rarely gushed about a television show, as for me they all too often use their flashy “toys” (ie visual effects for pacing,and wow factors) instead of really developing nuanced characters, and the little details that make a story really meaty. Foyle’s War just blew me away. It does everything a great novel does. (And that’s my highest compliment!)

    Reply
  13. SO true, Anne—a winner on all counts. I’ve rarely gushed about a television show, as for me they all too often use their flashy “toys” (ie visual effects for pacing,and wow factors) instead of really developing nuanced characters, and the little details that make a story really meaty. Foyle’s War just blew me away. It does everything a great novel does. (And that’s my highest compliment!)

    Reply
  14. SO true, Anne—a winner on all counts. I’ve rarely gushed about a television show, as for me they all too often use their flashy “toys” (ie visual effects for pacing,and wow factors) instead of really developing nuanced characters, and the little details that make a story really meaty. Foyle’s War just blew me away. It does everything a great novel does. (And that’s my highest compliment!)

    Reply
  15. SO true, Anne—a winner on all counts. I’ve rarely gushed about a television show, as for me they all too often use their flashy “toys” (ie visual effects for pacing,and wow factors) instead of really developing nuanced characters, and the little details that make a story really meaty. Foyle’s War just blew me away. It does everything a great novel does. (And that’s my highest compliment!)

    Reply
  16. Sonya, that’s so true about the unexpected and very real twists of British TV. The shows are more nuanced than most American shows, which tend to paint things in black or white. (Though that’s changing—tv is getting more sophisticated as content is now being created not just by the big networks any more. There’s much more room for niche programming with all the cable channels, so production company can go for smaller audiences and do more complex stuff.

    Reply
  17. Sonya, that’s so true about the unexpected and very real twists of British TV. The shows are more nuanced than most American shows, which tend to paint things in black or white. (Though that’s changing—tv is getting more sophisticated as content is now being created not just by the big networks any more. There’s much more room for niche programming with all the cable channels, so production company can go for smaller audiences and do more complex stuff.

    Reply
  18. Sonya, that’s so true about the unexpected and very real twists of British TV. The shows are more nuanced than most American shows, which tend to paint things in black or white. (Though that’s changing—tv is getting more sophisticated as content is now being created not just by the big networks any more. There’s much more room for niche programming with all the cable channels, so production company can go for smaller audiences and do more complex stuff.

    Reply
  19. Sonya, that’s so true about the unexpected and very real twists of British TV. The shows are more nuanced than most American shows, which tend to paint things in black or white. (Though that’s changing—tv is getting more sophisticated as content is now being created not just by the big networks any more. There’s much more room for niche programming with all the cable channels, so production company can go for smaller audiences and do more complex stuff.

    Reply
  20. Sonya, that’s so true about the unexpected and very real twists of British TV. The shows are more nuanced than most American shows, which tend to paint things in black or white. (Though that’s changing—tv is getting more sophisticated as content is now being created not just by the big networks any more. There’s much more room for niche programming with all the cable channels, so production company can go for smaller audiences and do more complex stuff.

    Reply
  21. lol – I can be heard ranting about it every time the show is on, and no matter who is there with me, I *will* complain!
    I do like the actor otherwise. He is a likeable person. Actually, I can’t think of any cast member I’ve disliked. They’re not really “in your face”, but they’re quietly good.

    Reply
  22. lol – I can be heard ranting about it every time the show is on, and no matter who is there with me, I *will* complain!
    I do like the actor otherwise. He is a likeable person. Actually, I can’t think of any cast member I’ve disliked. They’re not really “in your face”, but they’re quietly good.

    Reply
  23. lol – I can be heard ranting about it every time the show is on, and no matter who is there with me, I *will* complain!
    I do like the actor otherwise. He is a likeable person. Actually, I can’t think of any cast member I’ve disliked. They’re not really “in your face”, but they’re quietly good.

    Reply
  24. lol – I can be heard ranting about it every time the show is on, and no matter who is there with me, I *will* complain!
    I do like the actor otherwise. He is a likeable person. Actually, I can’t think of any cast member I’ve disliked. They’re not really “in your face”, but they’re quietly good.

    Reply
  25. lol – I can be heard ranting about it every time the show is on, and no matter who is there with me, I *will* complain!
    I do like the actor otherwise. He is a likeable person. Actually, I can’t think of any cast member I’ve disliked. They’re not really “in your face”, but they’re quietly good.

    Reply
  26. I love Foyle’s War, and have seen some episodes more than once. I, too, love Michael Kitchen’s facial expressions – they convey so much. You cannot be doing anything else, like knitting, when he is on, or you will miss so a great deal.
    I also like the fact that, even though the lives and relationships of the main characters are a continuing thread, each episode is a complete story and you really do not need to know what their stories are to enjoy and understand that particular installment. In fact, I find I get tired of many series that must be seen over more than one season before the tale is complete.
    I am sorry that I cannot think of any particular series to recommend. My mind is a blank.

    Reply
  27. I love Foyle’s War, and have seen some episodes more than once. I, too, love Michael Kitchen’s facial expressions – they convey so much. You cannot be doing anything else, like knitting, when he is on, or you will miss so a great deal.
    I also like the fact that, even though the lives and relationships of the main characters are a continuing thread, each episode is a complete story and you really do not need to know what their stories are to enjoy and understand that particular installment. In fact, I find I get tired of many series that must be seen over more than one season before the tale is complete.
    I am sorry that I cannot think of any particular series to recommend. My mind is a blank.

    Reply
  28. I love Foyle’s War, and have seen some episodes more than once. I, too, love Michael Kitchen’s facial expressions – they convey so much. You cannot be doing anything else, like knitting, when he is on, or you will miss so a great deal.
    I also like the fact that, even though the lives and relationships of the main characters are a continuing thread, each episode is a complete story and you really do not need to know what their stories are to enjoy and understand that particular installment. In fact, I find I get tired of many series that must be seen over more than one season before the tale is complete.
    I am sorry that I cannot think of any particular series to recommend. My mind is a blank.

    Reply
  29. I love Foyle’s War, and have seen some episodes more than once. I, too, love Michael Kitchen’s facial expressions – they convey so much. You cannot be doing anything else, like knitting, when he is on, or you will miss so a great deal.
    I also like the fact that, even though the lives and relationships of the main characters are a continuing thread, each episode is a complete story and you really do not need to know what their stories are to enjoy and understand that particular installment. In fact, I find I get tired of many series that must be seen over more than one season before the tale is complete.
    I am sorry that I cannot think of any particular series to recommend. My mind is a blank.

    Reply
  30. I love Foyle’s War, and have seen some episodes more than once. I, too, love Michael Kitchen’s facial expressions – they convey so much. You cannot be doing anything else, like knitting, when he is on, or you will miss so a great deal.
    I also like the fact that, even though the lives and relationships of the main characters are a continuing thread, each episode is a complete story and you really do not need to know what their stories are to enjoy and understand that particular installment. In fact, I find I get tired of many series that must be seen over more than one season before the tale is complete.
    I am sorry that I cannot think of any particular series to recommend. My mind is a blank.

    Reply
  31. I ADORE Foyle’s War and have watched all episodes/seasons. I wish there were more. I love the understated approach British Television has, far more than American Television. The nuanced, restrained approach works best for me, because the emotions when unrestrained have far more of an impact.
    I don’t have historical series to recommend, but I love Inspector Morse, Inspector Lewis, and MI-5.

    Reply
  32. I ADORE Foyle’s War and have watched all episodes/seasons. I wish there were more. I love the understated approach British Television has, far more than American Television. The nuanced, restrained approach works best for me, because the emotions when unrestrained have far more of an impact.
    I don’t have historical series to recommend, but I love Inspector Morse, Inspector Lewis, and MI-5.

    Reply
  33. I ADORE Foyle’s War and have watched all episodes/seasons. I wish there were more. I love the understated approach British Television has, far more than American Television. The nuanced, restrained approach works best for me, because the emotions when unrestrained have far more of an impact.
    I don’t have historical series to recommend, but I love Inspector Morse, Inspector Lewis, and MI-5.

    Reply
  34. I ADORE Foyle’s War and have watched all episodes/seasons. I wish there were more. I love the understated approach British Television has, far more than American Television. The nuanced, restrained approach works best for me, because the emotions when unrestrained have far more of an impact.
    I don’t have historical series to recommend, but I love Inspector Morse, Inspector Lewis, and MI-5.

    Reply
  35. I ADORE Foyle’s War and have watched all episodes/seasons. I wish there were more. I love the understated approach British Television has, far more than American Television. The nuanced, restrained approach works best for me, because the emotions when unrestrained have far more of an impact.
    I don’t have historical series to recommend, but I love Inspector Morse, Inspector Lewis, and MI-5.

    Reply
  36. Alison, I, too, really like that all episodes are a specific mystery that gets solved. Some shows really are incomprehensible if you don’t follow them from the beginning, like Game of Thrones. And you’re right, the characters develop very well within that framework. I think it’s another sign of how skillful the creator was with his scripts.

    Reply
  37. Alison, I, too, really like that all episodes are a specific mystery that gets solved. Some shows really are incomprehensible if you don’t follow them from the beginning, like Game of Thrones. And you’re right, the characters develop very well within that framework. I think it’s another sign of how skillful the creator was with his scripts.

    Reply
  38. Alison, I, too, really like that all episodes are a specific mystery that gets solved. Some shows really are incomprehensible if you don’t follow them from the beginning, like Game of Thrones. And you’re right, the characters develop very well within that framework. I think it’s another sign of how skillful the creator was with his scripts.

    Reply
  39. Alison, I, too, really like that all episodes are a specific mystery that gets solved. Some shows really are incomprehensible if you don’t follow them from the beginning, like Game of Thrones. And you’re right, the characters develop very well within that framework. I think it’s another sign of how skillful the creator was with his scripts.

    Reply
  40. Alison, I, too, really like that all episodes are a specific mystery that gets solved. Some shows really are incomprehensible if you don’t follow them from the beginning, like Game of Thrones. And you’re right, the characters develop very well within that framework. I think it’s another sign of how skillful the creator was with his scripts.

    Reply
  41. Actually, I do have a new series to recommend — Keira’s comment about Inspector Morse reminded me. I’ve enjoyed all of Morse, and the follow up to that, Lewis, and now there’s a relatively new show about Morse when he was young and first joins the Oxford police force. It’s called ENDEAVOUR — which turns out to be Morse’s first name — and it’s really REALLY good. The actor playing Morse — Shaun Evans — is fabulous, and his older mentor is also wonderful.

    Reply
  42. Actually, I do have a new series to recommend — Keira’s comment about Inspector Morse reminded me. I’ve enjoyed all of Morse, and the follow up to that, Lewis, and now there’s a relatively new show about Morse when he was young and first joins the Oxford police force. It’s called ENDEAVOUR — which turns out to be Morse’s first name — and it’s really REALLY good. The actor playing Morse — Shaun Evans — is fabulous, and his older mentor is also wonderful.

    Reply
  43. Actually, I do have a new series to recommend — Keira’s comment about Inspector Morse reminded me. I’ve enjoyed all of Morse, and the follow up to that, Lewis, and now there’s a relatively new show about Morse when he was young and first joins the Oxford police force. It’s called ENDEAVOUR — which turns out to be Morse’s first name — and it’s really REALLY good. The actor playing Morse — Shaun Evans — is fabulous, and his older mentor is also wonderful.

    Reply
  44. Actually, I do have a new series to recommend — Keira’s comment about Inspector Morse reminded me. I’ve enjoyed all of Morse, and the follow up to that, Lewis, and now there’s a relatively new show about Morse when he was young and first joins the Oxford police force. It’s called ENDEAVOUR — which turns out to be Morse’s first name — and it’s really REALLY good. The actor playing Morse — Shaun Evans — is fabulous, and his older mentor is also wonderful.

    Reply
  45. Actually, I do have a new series to recommend — Keira’s comment about Inspector Morse reminded me. I’ve enjoyed all of Morse, and the follow up to that, Lewis, and now there’s a relatively new show about Morse when he was young and first joins the Oxford police force. It’s called ENDEAVOUR — which turns out to be Morse’s first name — and it’s really REALLY good. The actor playing Morse — Shaun Evans — is fabulous, and his older mentor is also wonderful.

    Reply
  46. I am a big Foyle’s War fan too. Eight seasons doesn’t seem like enough, though I admit that the last few episodes were kind of a downer. I have seen talk that Michael Kitchen wants to do another series, but nothing seems to have come of it, at least not yet.
    This production company is working on a dramatization of the Rendlesham Forest Incident. Nobody but reality TV and a zillion books have covered the subject, so since Eleventh Hour is known for excellent historical research, I hope they get it made.
    Historical series I’d recommend: Garrow’s Law; Inspector George Gently; The Crown; Endeavour; Wish Me Luck; Enemy at the Door; The Bletchley Circle; Cranford; North & South; Cadfael; the Lord Peter Wimsey series; and for fun, Campion and The Musketeers.

    Reply
  47. I am a big Foyle’s War fan too. Eight seasons doesn’t seem like enough, though I admit that the last few episodes were kind of a downer. I have seen talk that Michael Kitchen wants to do another series, but nothing seems to have come of it, at least not yet.
    This production company is working on a dramatization of the Rendlesham Forest Incident. Nobody but reality TV and a zillion books have covered the subject, so since Eleventh Hour is known for excellent historical research, I hope they get it made.
    Historical series I’d recommend: Garrow’s Law; Inspector George Gently; The Crown; Endeavour; Wish Me Luck; Enemy at the Door; The Bletchley Circle; Cranford; North & South; Cadfael; the Lord Peter Wimsey series; and for fun, Campion and The Musketeers.

    Reply
  48. I am a big Foyle’s War fan too. Eight seasons doesn’t seem like enough, though I admit that the last few episodes were kind of a downer. I have seen talk that Michael Kitchen wants to do another series, but nothing seems to have come of it, at least not yet.
    This production company is working on a dramatization of the Rendlesham Forest Incident. Nobody but reality TV and a zillion books have covered the subject, so since Eleventh Hour is known for excellent historical research, I hope they get it made.
    Historical series I’d recommend: Garrow’s Law; Inspector George Gently; The Crown; Endeavour; Wish Me Luck; Enemy at the Door; The Bletchley Circle; Cranford; North & South; Cadfael; the Lord Peter Wimsey series; and for fun, Campion and The Musketeers.

    Reply
  49. I am a big Foyle’s War fan too. Eight seasons doesn’t seem like enough, though I admit that the last few episodes were kind of a downer. I have seen talk that Michael Kitchen wants to do another series, but nothing seems to have come of it, at least not yet.
    This production company is working on a dramatization of the Rendlesham Forest Incident. Nobody but reality TV and a zillion books have covered the subject, so since Eleventh Hour is known for excellent historical research, I hope they get it made.
    Historical series I’d recommend: Garrow’s Law; Inspector George Gently; The Crown; Endeavour; Wish Me Luck; Enemy at the Door; The Bletchley Circle; Cranford; North & South; Cadfael; the Lord Peter Wimsey series; and for fun, Campion and The Musketeers.

    Reply
  50. I am a big Foyle’s War fan too. Eight seasons doesn’t seem like enough, though I admit that the last few episodes were kind of a downer. I have seen talk that Michael Kitchen wants to do another series, but nothing seems to have come of it, at least not yet.
    This production company is working on a dramatization of the Rendlesham Forest Incident. Nobody but reality TV and a zillion books have covered the subject, so since Eleventh Hour is known for excellent historical research, I hope they get it made.
    Historical series I’d recommend: Garrow’s Law; Inspector George Gently; The Crown; Endeavour; Wish Me Luck; Enemy at the Door; The Bletchley Circle; Cranford; North & South; Cadfael; the Lord Peter Wimsey series; and for fun, Campion and The Musketeers.

    Reply
  51. I’m among those who keep hoping there will yet be another Foyle’s War series — been trying to read hints into the final episode ever since it ended! I second all of Janice’s suggestions — note there are several Lord Peters to choose from, and I highly recommend the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walters version which covers the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories.
    But my all time favorite series was Duchess of Duke Street, with a radiant young Gemma Jones in the title role and the gorgeous Christopher Cazenove. Based on the true story of a Cockney scullery maid who rose to become a great cook (she wouldn’t say chef) and hotel owner, it begins in Victoria’s reign and ends in the late 1920s. Wonderful character development throughout the series, lots of guest “stars” who weren’t at the time, costumes to swoon over, not to mention the food, and a love story any Wench would be proud to call her own!
    Must add that the first time I ever saw Michael Kitchen, he was playing Mercutio in a Royal Shakespeare Theatre production of Romeo & Juliet in Stratford (my first trip to England!)–and Romeo was played by Sean Bean!

    Reply
  52. I’m among those who keep hoping there will yet be another Foyle’s War series — been trying to read hints into the final episode ever since it ended! I second all of Janice’s suggestions — note there are several Lord Peters to choose from, and I highly recommend the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walters version which covers the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories.
    But my all time favorite series was Duchess of Duke Street, with a radiant young Gemma Jones in the title role and the gorgeous Christopher Cazenove. Based on the true story of a Cockney scullery maid who rose to become a great cook (she wouldn’t say chef) and hotel owner, it begins in Victoria’s reign and ends in the late 1920s. Wonderful character development throughout the series, lots of guest “stars” who weren’t at the time, costumes to swoon over, not to mention the food, and a love story any Wench would be proud to call her own!
    Must add that the first time I ever saw Michael Kitchen, he was playing Mercutio in a Royal Shakespeare Theatre production of Romeo & Juliet in Stratford (my first trip to England!)–and Romeo was played by Sean Bean!

    Reply
  53. I’m among those who keep hoping there will yet be another Foyle’s War series — been trying to read hints into the final episode ever since it ended! I second all of Janice’s suggestions — note there are several Lord Peters to choose from, and I highly recommend the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walters version which covers the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories.
    But my all time favorite series was Duchess of Duke Street, with a radiant young Gemma Jones in the title role and the gorgeous Christopher Cazenove. Based on the true story of a Cockney scullery maid who rose to become a great cook (she wouldn’t say chef) and hotel owner, it begins in Victoria’s reign and ends in the late 1920s. Wonderful character development throughout the series, lots of guest “stars” who weren’t at the time, costumes to swoon over, not to mention the food, and a love story any Wench would be proud to call her own!
    Must add that the first time I ever saw Michael Kitchen, he was playing Mercutio in a Royal Shakespeare Theatre production of Romeo & Juliet in Stratford (my first trip to England!)–and Romeo was played by Sean Bean!

    Reply
  54. I’m among those who keep hoping there will yet be another Foyle’s War series — been trying to read hints into the final episode ever since it ended! I second all of Janice’s suggestions — note there are several Lord Peters to choose from, and I highly recommend the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walters version which covers the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories.
    But my all time favorite series was Duchess of Duke Street, with a radiant young Gemma Jones in the title role and the gorgeous Christopher Cazenove. Based on the true story of a Cockney scullery maid who rose to become a great cook (she wouldn’t say chef) and hotel owner, it begins in Victoria’s reign and ends in the late 1920s. Wonderful character development throughout the series, lots of guest “stars” who weren’t at the time, costumes to swoon over, not to mention the food, and a love story any Wench would be proud to call her own!
    Must add that the first time I ever saw Michael Kitchen, he was playing Mercutio in a Royal Shakespeare Theatre production of Romeo & Juliet in Stratford (my first trip to England!)–and Romeo was played by Sean Bean!

    Reply
  55. I’m among those who keep hoping there will yet be another Foyle’s War series — been trying to read hints into the final episode ever since it ended! I second all of Janice’s suggestions — note there are several Lord Peters to choose from, and I highly recommend the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walters version which covers the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories.
    But my all time favorite series was Duchess of Duke Street, with a radiant young Gemma Jones in the title role and the gorgeous Christopher Cazenove. Based on the true story of a Cockney scullery maid who rose to become a great cook (she wouldn’t say chef) and hotel owner, it begins in Victoria’s reign and ends in the late 1920s. Wonderful character development throughout the series, lots of guest “stars” who weren’t at the time, costumes to swoon over, not to mention the food, and a love story any Wench would be proud to call her own!
    Must add that the first time I ever saw Michael Kitchen, he was playing Mercutio in a Royal Shakespeare Theatre production of Romeo & Juliet in Stratford (my first trip to England!)–and Romeo was played by Sean Bean!

    Reply
  56. I have watched Foyle’s War. I loved all three main characters. Like you, I wanted the series to continue longer than WWII.
    I am a subscriber to ACORN TV and have been for several years. They have given me many gifts of British Television series. Right now, one of my favorites is a New Zealand Series called Brokenwood.
    And absolutely, in many ways it is easier for a film to show me what someone is thinking by a facial expression or what the atmosphere can do to a character.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  57. I have watched Foyle’s War. I loved all three main characters. Like you, I wanted the series to continue longer than WWII.
    I am a subscriber to ACORN TV and have been for several years. They have given me many gifts of British Television series. Right now, one of my favorites is a New Zealand Series called Brokenwood.
    And absolutely, in many ways it is easier for a film to show me what someone is thinking by a facial expression or what the atmosphere can do to a character.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  58. I have watched Foyle’s War. I loved all three main characters. Like you, I wanted the series to continue longer than WWII.
    I am a subscriber to ACORN TV and have been for several years. They have given me many gifts of British Television series. Right now, one of my favorites is a New Zealand Series called Brokenwood.
    And absolutely, in many ways it is easier for a film to show me what someone is thinking by a facial expression or what the atmosphere can do to a character.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  59. I have watched Foyle’s War. I loved all three main characters. Like you, I wanted the series to continue longer than WWII.
    I am a subscriber to ACORN TV and have been for several years. They have given me many gifts of British Television series. Right now, one of my favorites is a New Zealand Series called Brokenwood.
    And absolutely, in many ways it is easier for a film to show me what someone is thinking by a facial expression or what the atmosphere can do to a character.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  60. I have watched Foyle’s War. I loved all three main characters. Like you, I wanted the series to continue longer than WWII.
    I am a subscriber to ACORN TV and have been for several years. They have given me many gifts of British Television series. Right now, one of my favorites is a New Zealand Series called Brokenwood.
    And absolutely, in many ways it is easier for a film to show me what someone is thinking by a facial expression or what the atmosphere can do to a character.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  61. Like all the above, my husband and I are fans of Foyle’s war. We’ve watched the entire series more than two run throughs.
    I’m not the watcher in this household; my husband watches almost everything on Janice’s list and adores them. And he is a very great fan of Inspector Morse and of Endeavor!
    Did you know that Anthony Horowitz is also a novelist? My husband has downloaded at least two series and a good many stand-alone books to his Kindle.

    Reply
  62. Like all the above, my husband and I are fans of Foyle’s war. We’ve watched the entire series more than two run throughs.
    I’m not the watcher in this household; my husband watches almost everything on Janice’s list and adores them. And he is a very great fan of Inspector Morse and of Endeavor!
    Did you know that Anthony Horowitz is also a novelist? My husband has downloaded at least two series and a good many stand-alone books to his Kindle.

    Reply
  63. Like all the above, my husband and I are fans of Foyle’s war. We’ve watched the entire series more than two run throughs.
    I’m not the watcher in this household; my husband watches almost everything on Janice’s list and adores them. And he is a very great fan of Inspector Morse and of Endeavor!
    Did you know that Anthony Horowitz is also a novelist? My husband has downloaded at least two series and a good many stand-alone books to his Kindle.

    Reply
  64. Like all the above, my husband and I are fans of Foyle’s war. We’ve watched the entire series more than two run throughs.
    I’m not the watcher in this household; my husband watches almost everything on Janice’s list and adores them. And he is a very great fan of Inspector Morse and of Endeavor!
    Did you know that Anthony Horowitz is also a novelist? My husband has downloaded at least two series and a good many stand-alone books to his Kindle.

    Reply
  65. Like all the above, my husband and I are fans of Foyle’s war. We’ve watched the entire series more than two run throughs.
    I’m not the watcher in this household; my husband watches almost everything on Janice’s list and adores them. And he is a very great fan of Inspector Morse and of Endeavor!
    Did you know that Anthony Horowitz is also a novelist? My husband has downloaded at least two series and a good many stand-alone books to his Kindle.

    Reply
  66. I liked both Ian Carmichael and Edward Petherbridge as each brought out different aspects of Lord Peter’s personality. Carmichael was better at the flippant comedic stuff, Petherbridge was good at the more serious things.
    In 1940 MGM did LP as a movie called Haunted Honeymoon with Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. It’s not “really” Lord Peter As We Know Him; they went for more of a PG Wodehouse romantic comedy. But I think it’s entertaining, as is Piccadilly Jim, Montgomery’s other and genuine PG Wodehouse piece.

    Reply
  67. I liked both Ian Carmichael and Edward Petherbridge as each brought out different aspects of Lord Peter’s personality. Carmichael was better at the flippant comedic stuff, Petherbridge was good at the more serious things.
    In 1940 MGM did LP as a movie called Haunted Honeymoon with Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. It’s not “really” Lord Peter As We Know Him; they went for more of a PG Wodehouse romantic comedy. But I think it’s entertaining, as is Piccadilly Jim, Montgomery’s other and genuine PG Wodehouse piece.

    Reply
  68. I liked both Ian Carmichael and Edward Petherbridge as each brought out different aspects of Lord Peter’s personality. Carmichael was better at the flippant comedic stuff, Petherbridge was good at the more serious things.
    In 1940 MGM did LP as a movie called Haunted Honeymoon with Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. It’s not “really” Lord Peter As We Know Him; they went for more of a PG Wodehouse romantic comedy. But I think it’s entertaining, as is Piccadilly Jim, Montgomery’s other and genuine PG Wodehouse piece.

    Reply
  69. I liked both Ian Carmichael and Edward Petherbridge as each brought out different aspects of Lord Peter’s personality. Carmichael was better at the flippant comedic stuff, Petherbridge was good at the more serious things.
    In 1940 MGM did LP as a movie called Haunted Honeymoon with Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. It’s not “really” Lord Peter As We Know Him; they went for more of a PG Wodehouse romantic comedy. But I think it’s entertaining, as is Piccadilly Jim, Montgomery’s other and genuine PG Wodehouse piece.

    Reply
  70. I liked both Ian Carmichael and Edward Petherbridge as each brought out different aspects of Lord Peter’s personality. Carmichael was better at the flippant comedic stuff, Petherbridge was good at the more serious things.
    In 1940 MGM did LP as a movie called Haunted Honeymoon with Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. It’s not “really” Lord Peter As We Know Him; they went for more of a PG Wodehouse romantic comedy. But I think it’s entertaining, as is Piccadilly Jim, Montgomery’s other and genuine PG Wodehouse piece.

    Reply
  71. If you like Horowitz’s writing, you might like some of his other series, like Collision (a contemporary about the lead up to and consequences of a freeway accident) and New Blood (buddy cops, oddly assorted).

    Reply
  72. If you like Horowitz’s writing, you might like some of his other series, like Collision (a contemporary about the lead up to and consequences of a freeway accident) and New Blood (buddy cops, oddly assorted).

    Reply
  73. If you like Horowitz’s writing, you might like some of his other series, like Collision (a contemporary about the lead up to and consequences of a freeway accident) and New Blood (buddy cops, oddly assorted).

    Reply
  74. If you like Horowitz’s writing, you might like some of his other series, like Collision (a contemporary about the lead up to and consequences of a freeway accident) and New Blood (buddy cops, oddly assorted).

    Reply
  75. If you like Horowitz’s writing, you might like some of his other series, like Collision (a contemporary about the lead up to and consequences of a freeway accident) and New Blood (buddy cops, oddly assorted).

    Reply
  76. I absolutely love Foyle’s War and own the whole the series on dvd. I’ve watched them over and over again. Nearly all the ones mentioned above are ones I was going to tell you about too. There is one, it’s an older one and the first episode is a bit slow, but if you stick with it, it’s an amazing series, it’s called A Family at War. It’s a long series and I thought it was brilliant. You have plenty of viewing lined up now, just don’t let it interfere with writing your new books :-):-)

    Reply
  77. I absolutely love Foyle’s War and own the whole the series on dvd. I’ve watched them over and over again. Nearly all the ones mentioned above are ones I was going to tell you about too. There is one, it’s an older one and the first episode is a bit slow, but if you stick with it, it’s an amazing series, it’s called A Family at War. It’s a long series and I thought it was brilliant. You have plenty of viewing lined up now, just don’t let it interfere with writing your new books :-):-)

    Reply
  78. I absolutely love Foyle’s War and own the whole the series on dvd. I’ve watched them over and over again. Nearly all the ones mentioned above are ones I was going to tell you about too. There is one, it’s an older one and the first episode is a bit slow, but if you stick with it, it’s an amazing series, it’s called A Family at War. It’s a long series and I thought it was brilliant. You have plenty of viewing lined up now, just don’t let it interfere with writing your new books :-):-)

    Reply
  79. I absolutely love Foyle’s War and own the whole the series on dvd. I’ve watched them over and over again. Nearly all the ones mentioned above are ones I was going to tell you about too. There is one, it’s an older one and the first episode is a bit slow, but if you stick with it, it’s an amazing series, it’s called A Family at War. It’s a long series and I thought it was brilliant. You have plenty of viewing lined up now, just don’t let it interfere with writing your new books :-):-)

    Reply
  80. I absolutely love Foyle’s War and own the whole the series on dvd. I’ve watched them over and over again. Nearly all the ones mentioned above are ones I was going to tell you about too. There is one, it’s an older one and the first episode is a bit slow, but if you stick with it, it’s an amazing series, it’s called A Family at War. It’s a long series and I thought it was brilliant. You have plenty of viewing lined up now, just don’t let it interfere with writing your new books :-):-)

    Reply
  81. LOVE LOVE LOVE Foyle’s War was so sad that it have ended. Love the charcters and teh actors who play them. Can’t say enough good things about the series. I always wondered about the reality of how they portrayed England of the time (Being a Yankee that was born in England) I visited Rngland a number of years ago and was vistiing an old family friend and noticed the DVD’s on her bookcase. I knew she had served as a nurse during WWII so I asked her how well it protrayed what it was like at that time. Her respose was spot on and that was why she liked it so much. I have watched it with a new appreciation ever since. I have bought all the DVD Just love it
    Wendy

    Reply
  82. LOVE LOVE LOVE Foyle’s War was so sad that it have ended. Love the charcters and teh actors who play them. Can’t say enough good things about the series. I always wondered about the reality of how they portrayed England of the time (Being a Yankee that was born in England) I visited Rngland a number of years ago and was vistiing an old family friend and noticed the DVD’s on her bookcase. I knew she had served as a nurse during WWII so I asked her how well it protrayed what it was like at that time. Her respose was spot on and that was why she liked it so much. I have watched it with a new appreciation ever since. I have bought all the DVD Just love it
    Wendy

    Reply
  83. LOVE LOVE LOVE Foyle’s War was so sad that it have ended. Love the charcters and teh actors who play them. Can’t say enough good things about the series. I always wondered about the reality of how they portrayed England of the time (Being a Yankee that was born in England) I visited Rngland a number of years ago and was vistiing an old family friend and noticed the DVD’s on her bookcase. I knew she had served as a nurse during WWII so I asked her how well it protrayed what it was like at that time. Her respose was spot on and that was why she liked it so much. I have watched it with a new appreciation ever since. I have bought all the DVD Just love it
    Wendy

    Reply
  84. LOVE LOVE LOVE Foyle’s War was so sad that it have ended. Love the charcters and teh actors who play them. Can’t say enough good things about the series. I always wondered about the reality of how they portrayed England of the time (Being a Yankee that was born in England) I visited Rngland a number of years ago and was vistiing an old family friend and noticed the DVD’s on her bookcase. I knew she had served as a nurse during WWII so I asked her how well it protrayed what it was like at that time. Her respose was spot on and that was why she liked it so much. I have watched it with a new appreciation ever since. I have bought all the DVD Just love it
    Wendy

    Reply
  85. LOVE LOVE LOVE Foyle’s War was so sad that it have ended. Love the charcters and teh actors who play them. Can’t say enough good things about the series. I always wondered about the reality of how they portrayed England of the time (Being a Yankee that was born in England) I visited Rngland a number of years ago and was vistiing an old family friend and noticed the DVD’s on her bookcase. I knew she had served as a nurse during WWII so I asked her how well it protrayed what it was like at that time. Her respose was spot on and that was why she liked it so much. I have watched it with a new appreciation ever since. I have bought all the DVD Just love it
    Wendy

    Reply
  86. All the comments about WWII series made me remember: Danger UXB! A fabulous series that I was told by my dad, who did a similar job for the US Army, was so realistic it was difficult for him to watch! Not for me — own it and have watched many times. Anthony Andrews pre-Brideshead, and a truly wonderful ensemble cast. Also hoping we get more Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries over here. I echo the comments about British tv versus American – and would add Australian series quality to the positive column, too. Miss Fisher is a treat on so many levels! The hats!!!

    Reply
  87. All the comments about WWII series made me remember: Danger UXB! A fabulous series that I was told by my dad, who did a similar job for the US Army, was so realistic it was difficult for him to watch! Not for me — own it and have watched many times. Anthony Andrews pre-Brideshead, and a truly wonderful ensemble cast. Also hoping we get more Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries over here. I echo the comments about British tv versus American – and would add Australian series quality to the positive column, too. Miss Fisher is a treat on so many levels! The hats!!!

    Reply
  88. All the comments about WWII series made me remember: Danger UXB! A fabulous series that I was told by my dad, who did a similar job for the US Army, was so realistic it was difficult for him to watch! Not for me — own it and have watched many times. Anthony Andrews pre-Brideshead, and a truly wonderful ensemble cast. Also hoping we get more Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries over here. I echo the comments about British tv versus American – and would add Australian series quality to the positive column, too. Miss Fisher is a treat on so many levels! The hats!!!

    Reply
  89. All the comments about WWII series made me remember: Danger UXB! A fabulous series that I was told by my dad, who did a similar job for the US Army, was so realistic it was difficult for him to watch! Not for me — own it and have watched many times. Anthony Andrews pre-Brideshead, and a truly wonderful ensemble cast. Also hoping we get more Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries over here. I echo the comments about British tv versus American – and would add Australian series quality to the positive column, too. Miss Fisher is a treat on so many levels! The hats!!!

    Reply
  90. All the comments about WWII series made me remember: Danger UXB! A fabulous series that I was told by my dad, who did a similar job for the US Army, was so realistic it was difficult for him to watch! Not for me — own it and have watched many times. Anthony Andrews pre-Brideshead, and a truly wonderful ensemble cast. Also hoping we get more Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries over here. I echo the comments about British tv versus American – and would add Australian series quality to the positive column, too. Miss Fisher is a treat on so many levels! The hats!!!

    Reply
  91. I didn’t realize Anthony Horowitz created Foyle’s War! He wrote a YA series that my son loves. Its hero is Alex Rider. Lots of espionage and adventure, I understand.

    Reply
  92. I didn’t realize Anthony Horowitz created Foyle’s War! He wrote a YA series that my son loves. Its hero is Alex Rider. Lots of espionage and adventure, I understand.

    Reply
  93. I didn’t realize Anthony Horowitz created Foyle’s War! He wrote a YA series that my son loves. Its hero is Alex Rider. Lots of espionage and adventure, I understand.

    Reply
  94. I didn’t realize Anthony Horowitz created Foyle’s War! He wrote a YA series that my son loves. Its hero is Alex Rider. Lots of espionage and adventure, I understand.

    Reply
  95. I didn’t realize Anthony Horowitz created Foyle’s War! He wrote a YA series that my son loves. Its hero is Alex Rider. Lots of espionage and adventure, I understand.

    Reply
  96. Oh dear. Now I have to add Endeavour to my list of shows I really should see. My husband and I have enjoyed Foyle’s War and I bought the DVD set for him a couple years ago, but I’m guilty of what Andrea mentioned: I’d so much rather read! Plus I tend to fall asleep REALLY fast when I sit down to watch something . . . .

    Reply
  97. Oh dear. Now I have to add Endeavour to my list of shows I really should see. My husband and I have enjoyed Foyle’s War and I bought the DVD set for him a couple years ago, but I’m guilty of what Andrea mentioned: I’d so much rather read! Plus I tend to fall asleep REALLY fast when I sit down to watch something . . . .

    Reply
  98. Oh dear. Now I have to add Endeavour to my list of shows I really should see. My husband and I have enjoyed Foyle’s War and I bought the DVD set for him a couple years ago, but I’m guilty of what Andrea mentioned: I’d so much rather read! Plus I tend to fall asleep REALLY fast when I sit down to watch something . . . .

    Reply
  99. Oh dear. Now I have to add Endeavour to my list of shows I really should see. My husband and I have enjoyed Foyle’s War and I bought the DVD set for him a couple years ago, but I’m guilty of what Andrea mentioned: I’d so much rather read! Plus I tend to fall asleep REALLY fast when I sit down to watch something . . . .

    Reply
  100. Oh dear. Now I have to add Endeavour to my list of shows I really should see. My husband and I have enjoyed Foyle’s War and I bought the DVD set for him a couple years ago, but I’m guilty of what Andrea mentioned: I’d so much rather read! Plus I tend to fall asleep REALLY fast when I sit down to watch something . . . .

    Reply
  101. Loved Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen in anything he does. Another period piece that I’ve become addicted to is the Murdoch Mysteries. From Acorn TV, but also on DVD from my library.

    Reply
  102. Loved Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen in anything he does. Another period piece that I’ve become addicted to is the Murdoch Mysteries. From Acorn TV, but also on DVD from my library.

    Reply
  103. Loved Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen in anything he does. Another period piece that I’ve become addicted to is the Murdoch Mysteries. From Acorn TV, but also on DVD from my library.

    Reply
  104. Loved Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen in anything he does. Another period piece that I’ve become addicted to is the Murdoch Mysteries. From Acorn TV, but also on DVD from my library.

    Reply
  105. Loved Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen in anything he does. Another period piece that I’ve become addicted to is the Murdoch Mysteries. From Acorn TV, but also on DVD from my library.

    Reply
  106. I am convinced that Foyle’s War is literally the best series ever made. Since my taste in books and TV/movies runs to mysteries in contemporary settings, pre-Industrial Revolution historicals, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy, you can tell I was impressed. I normally wouldn’t touch a WWII setting with a ten foot pole. So glad I made an exception there. Michael Kitchen is a wonder of understated expression.
    Loved Murdoch Mysteries (especially the first 5 seasons), but the next best thing to Foyle for me, is the Australian series Dr. Blake Mysteries. The original and Australian version of Rake is amazingly clever but shows the worst of people including the hero (the rake of the piece, but in the modern day). Broadchurch is a British series that is very good, as is Grantchester, and Shetland. I am working on Garrow’s Law and George Gently on Netflix, as well as Janet King series 2. The Bridge/Bronn is a Danish and Swedish production with an autistic female protagonist which is excellent (more on the gory side if that’s an issue). Also Dicte is a Danish series I enjoyed.

    Reply
  107. I am convinced that Foyle’s War is literally the best series ever made. Since my taste in books and TV/movies runs to mysteries in contemporary settings, pre-Industrial Revolution historicals, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy, you can tell I was impressed. I normally wouldn’t touch a WWII setting with a ten foot pole. So glad I made an exception there. Michael Kitchen is a wonder of understated expression.
    Loved Murdoch Mysteries (especially the first 5 seasons), but the next best thing to Foyle for me, is the Australian series Dr. Blake Mysteries. The original and Australian version of Rake is amazingly clever but shows the worst of people including the hero (the rake of the piece, but in the modern day). Broadchurch is a British series that is very good, as is Grantchester, and Shetland. I am working on Garrow’s Law and George Gently on Netflix, as well as Janet King series 2. The Bridge/Bronn is a Danish and Swedish production with an autistic female protagonist which is excellent (more on the gory side if that’s an issue). Also Dicte is a Danish series I enjoyed.

    Reply
  108. I am convinced that Foyle’s War is literally the best series ever made. Since my taste in books and TV/movies runs to mysteries in contemporary settings, pre-Industrial Revolution historicals, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy, you can tell I was impressed. I normally wouldn’t touch a WWII setting with a ten foot pole. So glad I made an exception there. Michael Kitchen is a wonder of understated expression.
    Loved Murdoch Mysteries (especially the first 5 seasons), but the next best thing to Foyle for me, is the Australian series Dr. Blake Mysteries. The original and Australian version of Rake is amazingly clever but shows the worst of people including the hero (the rake of the piece, but in the modern day). Broadchurch is a British series that is very good, as is Grantchester, and Shetland. I am working on Garrow’s Law and George Gently on Netflix, as well as Janet King series 2. The Bridge/Bronn is a Danish and Swedish production with an autistic female protagonist which is excellent (more on the gory side if that’s an issue). Also Dicte is a Danish series I enjoyed.

    Reply
  109. I am convinced that Foyle’s War is literally the best series ever made. Since my taste in books and TV/movies runs to mysteries in contemporary settings, pre-Industrial Revolution historicals, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy, you can tell I was impressed. I normally wouldn’t touch a WWII setting with a ten foot pole. So glad I made an exception there. Michael Kitchen is a wonder of understated expression.
    Loved Murdoch Mysteries (especially the first 5 seasons), but the next best thing to Foyle for me, is the Australian series Dr. Blake Mysteries. The original and Australian version of Rake is amazingly clever but shows the worst of people including the hero (the rake of the piece, but in the modern day). Broadchurch is a British series that is very good, as is Grantchester, and Shetland. I am working on Garrow’s Law and George Gently on Netflix, as well as Janet King series 2. The Bridge/Bronn is a Danish and Swedish production with an autistic female protagonist which is excellent (more on the gory side if that’s an issue). Also Dicte is a Danish series I enjoyed.

    Reply
  110. I am convinced that Foyle’s War is literally the best series ever made. Since my taste in books and TV/movies runs to mysteries in contemporary settings, pre-Industrial Revolution historicals, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy, you can tell I was impressed. I normally wouldn’t touch a WWII setting with a ten foot pole. So glad I made an exception there. Michael Kitchen is a wonder of understated expression.
    Loved Murdoch Mysteries (especially the first 5 seasons), but the next best thing to Foyle for me, is the Australian series Dr. Blake Mysteries. The original and Australian version of Rake is amazingly clever but shows the worst of people including the hero (the rake of the piece, but in the modern day). Broadchurch is a British series that is very good, as is Grantchester, and Shetland. I am working on Garrow’s Law and George Gently on Netflix, as well as Janet King series 2. The Bridge/Bronn is a Danish and Swedish production with an autistic female protagonist which is excellent (more on the gory side if that’s an issue). Also Dicte is a Danish series I enjoyed.

    Reply

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