Forbidden River

Hi, I'm Jo, and I like to put words together oddly. *G*

I'm not actually blogging about a forbidden river, though the two words do begin to conjure stories…..That's an interesting way to spark the imagination, actually.

Odd word pairings.

Randomly pick a noun and adjective and see what new ideas it sparks. Even "random spark" takes my mind somewhere. Or write a noun and then add an adjective that doesn't fit. "gruesome garden" "perfumed tractor" "leisurely labour"

I know, let's make this your challenge, should you choose to accept it. Do as I said — pick a noun, then an adjective that doesn't fit, and then share what story idea comes up. Don't worry, you don't have to write the story; only a sentence or so. For example, gruesome garden leads easily to a garden in which someone has been burying corpses, but it could be a garden where all the plants are poisonous. A perfumed tractor could belong to a Legally Blond sort of farmer, or perhaps it's used in the lavender fields of Provence.

Go for it. There's a prize for the one that delights me most — a copy of the reissue of Forbidden. Or, if you are willing to wait a few months, the reissue of Dragon's Bride or An Unwilling Bride. They're all books from my Company of Rogues world.

Forbidden For2011

The title still bugs me! I had a number in mind, though I can't remember what they were, but in 1994 single word titles were the rage and they insisted. I should have stood firm for Scandalous, even though there'd been a couple, but I let the publisher go with Forbidden because it hadn't been used. And found my book one of three Forbiddens that year!

I suppose it was "forbidden" for Serena to rape Francis — for that's what it amounts to — but the rest was pure scandal and social chaos.

Serena had been sold into marriage at fifteen, and to "Randy" Riverton, a disgusting older man who kept her at his country estate and used her as a sexual plaything. Now Riverton's dead, her brothers are planning a second sale, so Serena runs, determined never to stay free, even if it means becoming a courtesan. Far better than a married slave.

Ubnew On the road, she's helped by the gallant, and virginal, Francis Lord Middlethorpe, who's on the point of proposing marriage to the sadly crippled daughter of a duke…..

I have mixed feelings about the new cover. That does look like Serena, but she'd never be looking so provocatively at anyone. I like to think it portrays a time after the end of the book, when she and Francis are enjoying a provocative game. After all, why else would she be naked under her gown?

This is the cover for the new issue of An Unwilling Bride. I suppose it's runaway bride! And a very modern wedding dress with a zip down the back. But it's pretty, and there's plenty of white space for my name and the title.

Going Up The River Somewhere

I'm writing A Scandalous Countess at the moment (out next February) and Georgia, Dowager Countess of Maybury, aged twenty, is disgusted when her father forbids her to remove to London. She's dutifully spent her mourning year in rural Worcestershire, and she wants to get back to life. It's 1765, however, and to use the old phrase, the peasants are revolting — too complex a story for here — and so the best he'll offer is a visit to her dull sister, Winifred, who lives out of town, in Hammersmith.

A modern reader might say "Hammersmith!" in the same tone of disbelief as Georgia did, but for different reasons. Nowadays, Hammersmith isn't a particularly elegant place. Back in 1765 it was an acceptable retreat from the dirty city, but favoured by scholars and clergy. Before her husband's death, their retreat by the river had been in fashionable Chelsea.

Hofparl So when we had reason to go up to London, we took a boat trip from Westminster, right by the Houses of Parliament, to Kew, where the famous Kew Gardens are. (Click on any picture to see the full size view.)

Once out of central London, it's surprising how much green there is, and the Thames now is very clean and healthy. There is a wide range of birds living on its edges. I'll have a better idea of what Georgia sees when she travels by river from Hammersmith into Town, to the York Steps, near St. James's, where the completely ineligible but surprisingly appealing Lord Dracy awaits to escort her.

Here's Hammersmith today at the river side, where we can still see the Georgian houses. Hammersmith I'm  adding a couple of other pictures we took along the way.

But don't forget the contest. Put together those two jarring words and say what the phrase brings to mind.

I've created a couple of Amazon stores just for my books. If you want to see them all in one place, this is the American one.

And this is the British one.

All best wishes from Devon, where we're ready to start the rain dance. We haven't had rain for months. This is England?????

Bullsheadpan2

But it's good for getting into the mood of 1765, which was an unusually hot summer, perhaps inflaming tempers.

Nearkew3

Jo

80 thoughts on “Forbidden River”

  1. Hi Jo, When a romance author is as best-selling and well-regarded as you, surely publishers let you have more of a say about your new covers? If you don’t think the picture portrays YOUR heroine and/or hero accurately, surely they take that on board? (I appreciate that it is difference when an unknown author starts out in the mass Market, but does it never change?) That said, a lot of the covers on your recent ( new or re-issued) books have looked very good indeed. Sally (PS, As for a Regency dress with a zipper…..)

    Reply
  2. Hi Jo, When a romance author is as best-selling and well-regarded as you, surely publishers let you have more of a say about your new covers? If you don’t think the picture portrays YOUR heroine and/or hero accurately, surely they take that on board? (I appreciate that it is difference when an unknown author starts out in the mass Market, but does it never change?) That said, a lot of the covers on your recent ( new or re-issued) books have looked very good indeed. Sally (PS, As for a Regency dress with a zipper…..)

    Reply
  3. Hi Jo, When a romance author is as best-selling and well-regarded as you, surely publishers let you have more of a say about your new covers? If you don’t think the picture portrays YOUR heroine and/or hero accurately, surely they take that on board? (I appreciate that it is difference when an unknown author starts out in the mass Market, but does it never change?) That said, a lot of the covers on your recent ( new or re-issued) books have looked very good indeed. Sally (PS, As for a Regency dress with a zipper…..)

    Reply
  4. Hi Jo, When a romance author is as best-selling and well-regarded as you, surely publishers let you have more of a say about your new covers? If you don’t think the picture portrays YOUR heroine and/or hero accurately, surely they take that on board? (I appreciate that it is difference when an unknown author starts out in the mass Market, but does it never change?) That said, a lot of the covers on your recent ( new or re-issued) books have looked very good indeed. Sally (PS, As for a Regency dress with a zipper…..)

    Reply
  5. Hi Jo, When a romance author is as best-selling and well-regarded as you, surely publishers let you have more of a say about your new covers? If you don’t think the picture portrays YOUR heroine and/or hero accurately, surely they take that on board? (I appreciate that it is difference when an unknown author starts out in the mass Market, but does it never change?) That said, a lot of the covers on your recent ( new or re-issued) books have looked very good indeed. Sally (PS, As for a Regency dress with a zipper…..)

    Reply
  6. Hi Sally, yes, these days I get quite a bit of input into my covers, but when a book is being reissued by a former publisher,not really.
    But New York art departments have a thing about brides. They immediately want to put the heroine in a fairytale wedding dress. They have reason, because a lot of readers are instantly drawn to that. I do wish they’d photoshop out the zip, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  7. Hi Sally, yes, these days I get quite a bit of input into my covers, but when a book is being reissued by a former publisher,not really.
    But New York art departments have a thing about brides. They immediately want to put the heroine in a fairytale wedding dress. They have reason, because a lot of readers are instantly drawn to that. I do wish they’d photoshop out the zip, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  8. Hi Sally, yes, these days I get quite a bit of input into my covers, but when a book is being reissued by a former publisher,not really.
    But New York art departments have a thing about brides. They immediately want to put the heroine in a fairytale wedding dress. They have reason, because a lot of readers are instantly drawn to that. I do wish they’d photoshop out the zip, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  9. Hi Sally, yes, these days I get quite a bit of input into my covers, but when a book is being reissued by a former publisher,not really.
    But New York art departments have a thing about brides. They immediately want to put the heroine in a fairytale wedding dress. They have reason, because a lot of readers are instantly drawn to that. I do wish they’d photoshop out the zip, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  10. Hi Sally, yes, these days I get quite a bit of input into my covers, but when a book is being reissued by a former publisher,not really.
    But New York art departments have a thing about brides. They immediately want to put the heroine in a fairytale wedding dress. They have reason, because a lot of readers are instantly drawn to that. I do wish they’d photoshop out the zip, though.
    Jo

    Reply
  11. I’ll give the title thing a shot: Languid Destiny, the story of a woman who sleeps late and the man who would love her if only he could bother to get moving before nuncheon.
    Jo, I’m happy to see that your older titles are being re-issued. Over the years I’ve managed to track down used copies, but a few of them are in ragged shape, so I’ll be on the lookout for the new ones. I’ll ignore the out of context cover items 🙂
    Also, I recently finished reading An Unlikely Countess and enjoyed it very much. One set of my g-g-g-grandparents were a tailor and seamstress people from North Riding; the book gave me a little look into what their lives may have been like.

    Reply
  12. I’ll give the title thing a shot: Languid Destiny, the story of a woman who sleeps late and the man who would love her if only he could bother to get moving before nuncheon.
    Jo, I’m happy to see that your older titles are being re-issued. Over the years I’ve managed to track down used copies, but a few of them are in ragged shape, so I’ll be on the lookout for the new ones. I’ll ignore the out of context cover items 🙂
    Also, I recently finished reading An Unlikely Countess and enjoyed it very much. One set of my g-g-g-grandparents were a tailor and seamstress people from North Riding; the book gave me a little look into what their lives may have been like.

    Reply
  13. I’ll give the title thing a shot: Languid Destiny, the story of a woman who sleeps late and the man who would love her if only he could bother to get moving before nuncheon.
    Jo, I’m happy to see that your older titles are being re-issued. Over the years I’ve managed to track down used copies, but a few of them are in ragged shape, so I’ll be on the lookout for the new ones. I’ll ignore the out of context cover items 🙂
    Also, I recently finished reading An Unlikely Countess and enjoyed it very much. One set of my g-g-g-grandparents were a tailor and seamstress people from North Riding; the book gave me a little look into what their lives may have been like.

    Reply
  14. I’ll give the title thing a shot: Languid Destiny, the story of a woman who sleeps late and the man who would love her if only he could bother to get moving before nuncheon.
    Jo, I’m happy to see that your older titles are being re-issued. Over the years I’ve managed to track down used copies, but a few of them are in ragged shape, so I’ll be on the lookout for the new ones. I’ll ignore the out of context cover items 🙂
    Also, I recently finished reading An Unlikely Countess and enjoyed it very much. One set of my g-g-g-grandparents were a tailor and seamstress people from North Riding; the book gave me a little look into what their lives may have been like.

    Reply
  15. I’ll give the title thing a shot: Languid Destiny, the story of a woman who sleeps late and the man who would love her if only he could bother to get moving before nuncheon.
    Jo, I’m happy to see that your older titles are being re-issued. Over the years I’ve managed to track down used copies, but a few of them are in ragged shape, so I’ll be on the lookout for the new ones. I’ll ignore the out of context cover items 🙂
    Also, I recently finished reading An Unlikely Countess and enjoyed it very much. One set of my g-g-g-grandparents were a tailor and seamstress people from North Riding; the book gave me a little look into what their lives may have been like.

    Reply
  16. This got my creative juices flowing! Before I take a shot – I hate the modern dress covers. I have several editions of yours with the “classy object” covers. They were so much nicer.
    The Bountiful Bridge:
    Josephine, Countess of Keele, approached the bridge with purpose. Only those close enough to see her face would note the trepidation in her eyes and the gnawing of her lower lip. She stepped into one of the outcrops in the centre and paused to lean over the low parapet.
    ” What did one do now” she thought. Out of the corner of her eye an old woman approached using a tall stick to pull herself along. She came up behind Jo and said
    “what do you ask of the bridge child?”
    Jo turned slowly and regarded the woman for a while before answering
    “I have been married for 6 months now and there is no sign of a child quickening within me.”
    “How many times does your husband visit your chamber?” replied the crone.
    Jo eyes widened “Why would my husband visit my chamber?”
    The crone sighed, this would be a difficult problem for even her powers to solve.
    The bridge picture in my mind is Essex Bridge in Staffordshire.

    Reply
  17. This got my creative juices flowing! Before I take a shot – I hate the modern dress covers. I have several editions of yours with the “classy object” covers. They were so much nicer.
    The Bountiful Bridge:
    Josephine, Countess of Keele, approached the bridge with purpose. Only those close enough to see her face would note the trepidation in her eyes and the gnawing of her lower lip. She stepped into one of the outcrops in the centre and paused to lean over the low parapet.
    ” What did one do now” she thought. Out of the corner of her eye an old woman approached using a tall stick to pull herself along. She came up behind Jo and said
    “what do you ask of the bridge child?”
    Jo turned slowly and regarded the woman for a while before answering
    “I have been married for 6 months now and there is no sign of a child quickening within me.”
    “How many times does your husband visit your chamber?” replied the crone.
    Jo eyes widened “Why would my husband visit my chamber?”
    The crone sighed, this would be a difficult problem for even her powers to solve.
    The bridge picture in my mind is Essex Bridge in Staffordshire.

    Reply
  18. This got my creative juices flowing! Before I take a shot – I hate the modern dress covers. I have several editions of yours with the “classy object” covers. They were so much nicer.
    The Bountiful Bridge:
    Josephine, Countess of Keele, approached the bridge with purpose. Only those close enough to see her face would note the trepidation in her eyes and the gnawing of her lower lip. She stepped into one of the outcrops in the centre and paused to lean over the low parapet.
    ” What did one do now” she thought. Out of the corner of her eye an old woman approached using a tall stick to pull herself along. She came up behind Jo and said
    “what do you ask of the bridge child?”
    Jo turned slowly and regarded the woman for a while before answering
    “I have been married for 6 months now and there is no sign of a child quickening within me.”
    “How many times does your husband visit your chamber?” replied the crone.
    Jo eyes widened “Why would my husband visit my chamber?”
    The crone sighed, this would be a difficult problem for even her powers to solve.
    The bridge picture in my mind is Essex Bridge in Staffordshire.

    Reply
  19. This got my creative juices flowing! Before I take a shot – I hate the modern dress covers. I have several editions of yours with the “classy object” covers. They were so much nicer.
    The Bountiful Bridge:
    Josephine, Countess of Keele, approached the bridge with purpose. Only those close enough to see her face would note the trepidation in her eyes and the gnawing of her lower lip. She stepped into one of the outcrops in the centre and paused to lean over the low parapet.
    ” What did one do now” she thought. Out of the corner of her eye an old woman approached using a tall stick to pull herself along. She came up behind Jo and said
    “what do you ask of the bridge child?”
    Jo turned slowly and regarded the woman for a while before answering
    “I have been married for 6 months now and there is no sign of a child quickening within me.”
    “How many times does your husband visit your chamber?” replied the crone.
    Jo eyes widened “Why would my husband visit my chamber?”
    The crone sighed, this would be a difficult problem for even her powers to solve.
    The bridge picture in my mind is Essex Bridge in Staffordshire.

    Reply
  20. This got my creative juices flowing! Before I take a shot – I hate the modern dress covers. I have several editions of yours with the “classy object” covers. They were so much nicer.
    The Bountiful Bridge:
    Josephine, Countess of Keele, approached the bridge with purpose. Only those close enough to see her face would note the trepidation in her eyes and the gnawing of her lower lip. She stepped into one of the outcrops in the centre and paused to lean over the low parapet.
    ” What did one do now” she thought. Out of the corner of her eye an old woman approached using a tall stick to pull herself along. She came up behind Jo and said
    “what do you ask of the bridge child?”
    Jo turned slowly and regarded the woman for a while before answering
    “I have been married for 6 months now and there is no sign of a child quickening within me.”
    “How many times does your husband visit your chamber?” replied the crone.
    Jo eyes widened “Why would my husband visit my chamber?”
    The crone sighed, this would be a difficult problem for even her powers to solve.
    The bridge picture in my mind is Essex Bridge in Staffordshire.

    Reply
  21. Jo
    Love the pictures very nice and it is always good for us readers to have older books that we have missed getting re issued YAY.
    I am not very good at these games but I will have a go
    Giggling mop
    Hopeful that the mop will clean all the floors in my house while I sit and read LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  22. Jo
    Love the pictures very nice and it is always good for us readers to have older books that we have missed getting re issued YAY.
    I am not very good at these games but I will have a go
    Giggling mop
    Hopeful that the mop will clean all the floors in my house while I sit and read LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  23. Jo
    Love the pictures very nice and it is always good for us readers to have older books that we have missed getting re issued YAY.
    I am not very good at these games but I will have a go
    Giggling mop
    Hopeful that the mop will clean all the floors in my house while I sit and read LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  24. Jo
    Love the pictures very nice and it is always good for us readers to have older books that we have missed getting re issued YAY.
    I am not very good at these games but I will have a go
    Giggling mop
    Hopeful that the mop will clean all the floors in my house while I sit and read LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  25. Jo
    Love the pictures very nice and it is always good for us readers to have older books that we have missed getting re issued YAY.
    I am not very good at these games but I will have a go
    Giggling mop
    Hopeful that the mop will clean all the floors in my house while I sit and read LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  26. Karen, good try! I’m glad you enjoyed Unlikely Countess, and North Yorkshire produces rugged stock.
    LOL, Sue. I think I remember a little bridge over water at Keele.
    Helen, the giggling mop makes me think of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. I think we’d all like a mop like that!
    Jo

    Reply
  27. Karen, good try! I’m glad you enjoyed Unlikely Countess, and North Yorkshire produces rugged stock.
    LOL, Sue. I think I remember a little bridge over water at Keele.
    Helen, the giggling mop makes me think of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. I think we’d all like a mop like that!
    Jo

    Reply
  28. Karen, good try! I’m glad you enjoyed Unlikely Countess, and North Yorkshire produces rugged stock.
    LOL, Sue. I think I remember a little bridge over water at Keele.
    Helen, the giggling mop makes me think of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. I think we’d all like a mop like that!
    Jo

    Reply
  29. Karen, good try! I’m glad you enjoyed Unlikely Countess, and North Yorkshire produces rugged stock.
    LOL, Sue. I think I remember a little bridge over water at Keele.
    Helen, the giggling mop makes me think of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. I think we’d all like a mop like that!
    Jo

    Reply
  30. Karen, good try! I’m glad you enjoyed Unlikely Countess, and North Yorkshire produces rugged stock.
    LOL, Sue. I think I remember a little bridge over water at Keele.
    Helen, the giggling mop makes me think of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. I think we’d all like a mop like that!
    Jo

    Reply
  31. “Unwritten Letters”: A young woman finds letters addressed to her deceased mother in a handwriting she’s sure she’s seen before, but the pages are blank. Was the letter writer thwarted before he/she could lay pen to paper? If so, why were they saved? Or are they written in invisible ink?

    Reply
  32. “Unwritten Letters”: A young woman finds letters addressed to her deceased mother in a handwriting she’s sure she’s seen before, but the pages are blank. Was the letter writer thwarted before he/she could lay pen to paper? If so, why were they saved? Or are they written in invisible ink?

    Reply
  33. “Unwritten Letters”: A young woman finds letters addressed to her deceased mother in a handwriting she’s sure she’s seen before, but the pages are blank. Was the letter writer thwarted before he/she could lay pen to paper? If so, why were they saved? Or are they written in invisible ink?

    Reply
  34. “Unwritten Letters”: A young woman finds letters addressed to her deceased mother in a handwriting she’s sure she’s seen before, but the pages are blank. Was the letter writer thwarted before he/she could lay pen to paper? If so, why were they saved? Or are they written in invisible ink?

    Reply
  35. “Unwritten Letters”: A young woman finds letters addressed to her deceased mother in a handwriting she’s sure she’s seen before, but the pages are blank. Was the letter writer thwarted before he/she could lay pen to paper? If so, why were they saved? Or are they written in invisible ink?

    Reply
  36. “Forbidden zippers.”
    The Fae were noted for the sumptuousness of their clothing, but since cold iron seared their moon pale flesh, zippers could not be used. Indeed, all zippers were forbidden in Faerie after the appalling trouser zipper accident that gelded a randy member of the queen’s guard.
    I’ll go away now….

    Reply
  37. “Forbidden zippers.”
    The Fae were noted for the sumptuousness of their clothing, but since cold iron seared their moon pale flesh, zippers could not be used. Indeed, all zippers were forbidden in Faerie after the appalling trouser zipper accident that gelded a randy member of the queen’s guard.
    I’ll go away now….

    Reply
  38. “Forbidden zippers.”
    The Fae were noted for the sumptuousness of their clothing, but since cold iron seared their moon pale flesh, zippers could not be used. Indeed, all zippers were forbidden in Faerie after the appalling trouser zipper accident that gelded a randy member of the queen’s guard.
    I’ll go away now….

    Reply
  39. “Forbidden zippers.”
    The Fae were noted for the sumptuousness of their clothing, but since cold iron seared their moon pale flesh, zippers could not be used. Indeed, all zippers were forbidden in Faerie after the appalling trouser zipper accident that gelded a randy member of the queen’s guard.
    I’ll go away now….

    Reply
  40. “Forbidden zippers.”
    The Fae were noted for the sumptuousness of their clothing, but since cold iron seared their moon pale flesh, zippers could not be used. Indeed, all zippers were forbidden in Faerie after the appalling trouser zipper accident that gelded a randy member of the queen’s guard.
    I’ll go away now….

    Reply
  41. I love word games like this one! My first novel grew from a writing exercise in which I was given four words and told to construct a scene around them.
    And I do love odd pairings.
    Mary Jo, I am cracking up at the trouser zipper accident! You should write that book!
    How about The Obedient Rebel?
    The story of a young lady who appears to be an obedient, well-mannered daughter, but is actually the leader of a revolt among her father’s tenants?
    The Obnoxious Charmer
    The story of a lord who is so charming he makes our heroine nauseous!
    The Important Nobody
    Our hero has pass through life in the ton as a nobody, he simply isn’t important enough to be noticed by society UNTIL a rumor starts that he is a vital adviser to Prinny. Suddenly everyone wants to know him!

    Reply
  42. I love word games like this one! My first novel grew from a writing exercise in which I was given four words and told to construct a scene around them.
    And I do love odd pairings.
    Mary Jo, I am cracking up at the trouser zipper accident! You should write that book!
    How about The Obedient Rebel?
    The story of a young lady who appears to be an obedient, well-mannered daughter, but is actually the leader of a revolt among her father’s tenants?
    The Obnoxious Charmer
    The story of a lord who is so charming he makes our heroine nauseous!
    The Important Nobody
    Our hero has pass through life in the ton as a nobody, he simply isn’t important enough to be noticed by society UNTIL a rumor starts that he is a vital adviser to Prinny. Suddenly everyone wants to know him!

    Reply
  43. I love word games like this one! My first novel grew from a writing exercise in which I was given four words and told to construct a scene around them.
    And I do love odd pairings.
    Mary Jo, I am cracking up at the trouser zipper accident! You should write that book!
    How about The Obedient Rebel?
    The story of a young lady who appears to be an obedient, well-mannered daughter, but is actually the leader of a revolt among her father’s tenants?
    The Obnoxious Charmer
    The story of a lord who is so charming he makes our heroine nauseous!
    The Important Nobody
    Our hero has pass through life in the ton as a nobody, he simply isn’t important enough to be noticed by society UNTIL a rumor starts that he is a vital adviser to Prinny. Suddenly everyone wants to know him!

    Reply
  44. I love word games like this one! My first novel grew from a writing exercise in which I was given four words and told to construct a scene around them.
    And I do love odd pairings.
    Mary Jo, I am cracking up at the trouser zipper accident! You should write that book!
    How about The Obedient Rebel?
    The story of a young lady who appears to be an obedient, well-mannered daughter, but is actually the leader of a revolt among her father’s tenants?
    The Obnoxious Charmer
    The story of a lord who is so charming he makes our heroine nauseous!
    The Important Nobody
    Our hero has pass through life in the ton as a nobody, he simply isn’t important enough to be noticed by society UNTIL a rumor starts that he is a vital adviser to Prinny. Suddenly everyone wants to know him!

    Reply
  45. I love word games like this one! My first novel grew from a writing exercise in which I was given four words and told to construct a scene around them.
    And I do love odd pairings.
    Mary Jo, I am cracking up at the trouser zipper accident! You should write that book!
    How about The Obedient Rebel?
    The story of a young lady who appears to be an obedient, well-mannered daughter, but is actually the leader of a revolt among her father’s tenants?
    The Obnoxious Charmer
    The story of a lord who is so charming he makes our heroine nauseous!
    The Important Nobody
    Our hero has pass through life in the ton as a nobody, he simply isn’t important enough to be noticed by society UNTIL a rumor starts that he is a vital adviser to Prinny. Suddenly everyone wants to know him!

    Reply
  46. The Rapids orrents of Lazy River
    Where the heroine finds herself up a lazy river without a you know what.
    Funny and witty suggestions and thanks for a giggling Sunday!

    Reply
  47. The Rapids orrents of Lazy River
    Where the heroine finds herself up a lazy river without a you know what.
    Funny and witty suggestions and thanks for a giggling Sunday!

    Reply
  48. The Rapids orrents of Lazy River
    Where the heroine finds herself up a lazy river without a you know what.
    Funny and witty suggestions and thanks for a giggling Sunday!

    Reply
  49. The Rapids orrents of Lazy River
    Where the heroine finds herself up a lazy river without a you know what.
    Funny and witty suggestions and thanks for a giggling Sunday!

    Reply
  50. The Rapids orrents of Lazy River
    Where the heroine finds herself up a lazy river without a you know what.
    Funny and witty suggestions and thanks for a giggling Sunday!

    Reply
  51. Posthumous Marriage. A man marries a woman he has compromised, only to discover that the woman he thinks he married died months earlier.

    Reply
  52. Posthumous Marriage. A man marries a woman he has compromised, only to discover that the woman he thinks he married died months earlier.

    Reply
  53. Posthumous Marriage. A man marries a woman he has compromised, only to discover that the woman he thinks he married died months earlier.

    Reply
  54. Posthumous Marriage. A man marries a woman he has compromised, only to discover that the woman he thinks he married died months earlier.

    Reply
  55. Posthumous Marriage. A man marries a woman he has compromised, only to discover that the woman he thinks he married died months earlier.

    Reply
  56. I love the creative challenge, but I’m struggling with it. “Dry sea” popped up: but Coleridge has taken that one! Fun post–thanks.

    Reply
  57. I love the creative challenge, but I’m struggling with it. “Dry sea” popped up: but Coleridge has taken that one! Fun post–thanks.

    Reply
  58. I love the creative challenge, but I’m struggling with it. “Dry sea” popped up: but Coleridge has taken that one! Fun post–thanks.

    Reply
  59. I love the creative challenge, but I’m struggling with it. “Dry sea” popped up: but Coleridge has taken that one! Fun post–thanks.

    Reply
  60. I love the creative challenge, but I’m struggling with it. “Dry sea” popped up: but Coleridge has taken that one! Fun post–thanks.

    Reply
  61. Jo –
    Let me introduce you to Falling High, the story of a country maiden who rescues a prince in the forest.
    She shelters him from the falling sleet and snow while the sun shines, protects him from hungry wolves and introduces him to the glorious local countryside where a magical waterfall whick flows up instead of down.
    Caught up in the magic surrounding him the prince falls to his knees and begs her to reutrn with him to the magical kingdom of Up is Down. Once they arrive they marry before his happy subjects and live happily ever after.

    Reply
  62. Jo –
    Let me introduce you to Falling High, the story of a country maiden who rescues a prince in the forest.
    She shelters him from the falling sleet and snow while the sun shines, protects him from hungry wolves and introduces him to the glorious local countryside where a magical waterfall whick flows up instead of down.
    Caught up in the magic surrounding him the prince falls to his knees and begs her to reutrn with him to the magical kingdom of Up is Down. Once they arrive they marry before his happy subjects and live happily ever after.

    Reply
  63. Jo –
    Let me introduce you to Falling High, the story of a country maiden who rescues a prince in the forest.
    She shelters him from the falling sleet and snow while the sun shines, protects him from hungry wolves and introduces him to the glorious local countryside where a magical waterfall whick flows up instead of down.
    Caught up in the magic surrounding him the prince falls to his knees and begs her to reutrn with him to the magical kingdom of Up is Down. Once they arrive they marry before his happy subjects and live happily ever after.

    Reply
  64. Jo –
    Let me introduce you to Falling High, the story of a country maiden who rescues a prince in the forest.
    She shelters him from the falling sleet and snow while the sun shines, protects him from hungry wolves and introduces him to the glorious local countryside where a magical waterfall whick flows up instead of down.
    Caught up in the magic surrounding him the prince falls to his knees and begs her to reutrn with him to the magical kingdom of Up is Down. Once they arrive they marry before his happy subjects and live happily ever after.

    Reply
  65. Jo –
    Let me introduce you to Falling High, the story of a country maiden who rescues a prince in the forest.
    She shelters him from the falling sleet and snow while the sun shines, protects him from hungry wolves and introduces him to the glorious local countryside where a magical waterfall whick flows up instead of down.
    Caught up in the magic surrounding him the prince falls to his knees and begs her to reutrn with him to the magical kingdom of Up is Down. Once they arrive they marry before his happy subjects and live happily ever after.

    Reply

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