Football downunder

1valchloesmall  Anne here, with a change of pace from books into an earthier and more vigorous pursuit. In the next couple of weeks my hometown will descend  into football frenzy. It happens every year. I'm talking Australian Rules football, not soccer, not rugby, not gridiron or gaelic or any other kind of football. It's a game all our own, born in 1859 in my home town, Melbourne when the first laws of the game were published by the Melbourne Football Club, and even though I'm no big footy fanatic, I think it's interesting. I hope you feel the same by the end of this blog.

It's a fast game, rough, dramatic and gladiatorial.  Click on this link to go to a smorgasbord of images that will give you an idea.

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 It's characterized by long kicks that can go 75-100 yards or more. (see the records here.) In fact many a young Australian football player has secured a place in a US university on his ability to kick an oval ball accurately over a long distance.

They also handball the ball (punch it) for long distances. Throwing isn't allowed. The most spectacular part is when they make high leaps to "take a mark" – ie catch the ball. Australian-rules-football1 

The phrase that's gone into football history is the commentator's expression "and the big men fly," for fly they seem to do. And come crashing down afterward.

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  You get a free kick if you can take a mark, and over time the players have developed techniques to leap higher and higher, even springboarding on their opponents' backs.

Images 

This cartoon shows the future of taking marks according to Nicholson, a local cartoonist. LOL

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 For a hundred years it was a Victorian (my state) League, and players from interstate migrated to Melbourne to play here. But as other states formed their own teams and entered the competition, the Victorian Football League became the Australian Football League — AFL and now it's a more national game. But only 6 of the 16 main clubs are from outside Victoria, so you can see that it's really still a Melbourne game. It's also the most attended and most watched sport in Australia.

It also breeds the most gorgeous footballers — tall, hunky and long-legged, whereas Rugby guys tend to be chunky and soccer boys whippy — but then I'm biased.

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Tonight the first semi-final of the season is being played between Geelong and Collingwood. The grand final is held on the last Saturday in September and on that Saturday afternoon the streets are quiet. Even people who don't watch football and don't care who wins (like me) will often gather at  friends' places to watch the match, and have a barbecue. 

Like beloved games in other countries, everyone has their own family traditions about football. People have fond memories of being taken as children to matches with their dad and grandad. I have a friend who's been going to the football ever since he can remember, and it's his tradition (with his childhood mates) to try to sneak in without paying β€” a kind of weekly challenge. It was a sad day when he realized he'd rather just pay than climb the fence and try to outrun the guards. πŸ˜‰

I didn't grow up in Melbourne, and for me, the football was a distant thing, even though my father was a "one eyed" Collingwood supporter (ie he couldn't see any other team.) My cousins were Geelong supporters, and they used to tape huge blue and white streamers to sticks every Friday night before the match and rain, hail or shine they'd stand behind the goal posts and wave those streamers every time a goal was scored. And if Geelong lost, everyone knew to steer clear of Uncle Tommy.

Footyaussie 

There's a poem about Aussie rules football, Life Cycle, by Bruce Dawe. It's satire mixed with affection, and starts:

When children are born in Victoria
they are wrapped in club-colours, laid in beribboned cots,
having already begun a lifetime's barracking.  

Carn, they cry, Carn … feebly at first
while parents playfully tussle with them
for possession of a rusk: Ah, he's a little Tiger! (And they are …)

Barracking means rooting for (a term that means something different in Australia ;) Carn is a corruption of "come on" so "Carn the Tigers" is cheering on the team of Richmond, whose colors are black and yellow.

And toward the end of the poem…

They will not grow old as those from the more northern States grow old,
for them it will always be three-quarter-time
with the scores level and the wind advantage in the final term,

But the dance forever the same – the elderly still
loyally crying Carn … Carn … (if feebly) unto the very end,
having seen in the six-foot recruit from Eaglehawk their hope of salvation

The whole poem is here if you're interested, but there are a lot of obscure local references you probably won't understand. 

You will, however, I'm sure, understand the whole ritual of the sporting grand final. So what's your favorite sport? Do you share sporting rituals with family or friends? Do you play? Or get sucked into watching it on TV? Or do you seek refuge in a quiet place with a good book? I must admit it's often a book for me, unless I'm with friends, and then I confess, I get sucked right in.

125 thoughts on “Football downunder”

  1. Anne, how topical. My husband is currently watching Collingwood v Geelong play (and Geelong isn’t going too well at present). I’m afraid I’m an Essendon supporter and we were far from good this year. After this game is over, my husband hopes to still be awake to watch the rugby game which will be broadcast later. He is an old ARL play from way back. I curl up in the same room with a good book just to keep him company, but most of the time I have no idea what’s going on, sorry to say.

    Reply
  2. Anne, how topical. My husband is currently watching Collingwood v Geelong play (and Geelong isn’t going too well at present). I’m afraid I’m an Essendon supporter and we were far from good this year. After this game is over, my husband hopes to still be awake to watch the rugby game which will be broadcast later. He is an old ARL play from way back. I curl up in the same room with a good book just to keep him company, but most of the time I have no idea what’s going on, sorry to say.

    Reply
  3. Anne, how topical. My husband is currently watching Collingwood v Geelong play (and Geelong isn’t going too well at present). I’m afraid I’m an Essendon supporter and we were far from good this year. After this game is over, my husband hopes to still be awake to watch the rugby game which will be broadcast later. He is an old ARL play from way back. I curl up in the same room with a good book just to keep him company, but most of the time I have no idea what’s going on, sorry to say.

    Reply
  4. Anne, how topical. My husband is currently watching Collingwood v Geelong play (and Geelong isn’t going too well at present). I’m afraid I’m an Essendon supporter and we were far from good this year. After this game is over, my husband hopes to still be awake to watch the rugby game which will be broadcast later. He is an old ARL play from way back. I curl up in the same room with a good book just to keep him company, but most of the time I have no idea what’s going on, sorry to say.

    Reply
  5. Anne, how topical. My husband is currently watching Collingwood v Geelong play (and Geelong isn’t going too well at present). I’m afraid I’m an Essendon supporter and we were far from good this year. After this game is over, my husband hopes to still be awake to watch the rugby game which will be broadcast later. He is an old ARL play from way back. I curl up in the same room with a good book just to keep him company, but most of the time I have no idea what’s going on, sorry to say.

    Reply
  6. I have just remembered. I believe the term ‘to barrack’ comes from the fact that the early settlers/convicts/militia that came out to Sydney used to sit on the walls of Sydney Barracks and call out to the soldiers and others who were playing sports on the barrack parade ground. Thus barrackers.

    Reply
  7. I have just remembered. I believe the term ‘to barrack’ comes from the fact that the early settlers/convicts/militia that came out to Sydney used to sit on the walls of Sydney Barracks and call out to the soldiers and others who were playing sports on the barrack parade ground. Thus barrackers.

    Reply
  8. I have just remembered. I believe the term ‘to barrack’ comes from the fact that the early settlers/convicts/militia that came out to Sydney used to sit on the walls of Sydney Barracks and call out to the soldiers and others who were playing sports on the barrack parade ground. Thus barrackers.

    Reply
  9. I have just remembered. I believe the term ‘to barrack’ comes from the fact that the early settlers/convicts/militia that came out to Sydney used to sit on the walls of Sydney Barracks and call out to the soldiers and others who were playing sports on the barrack parade ground. Thus barrackers.

    Reply
  10. I have just remembered. I believe the term ‘to barrack’ comes from the fact that the early settlers/convicts/militia that came out to Sydney used to sit on the walls of Sydney Barracks and call out to the soldiers and others who were playing sports on the barrack parade ground. Thus barrackers.

    Reply
  11. Jenny, that’s me, too, reading a book while those who care watch. I do enjoy watching a spectacular goal or fabulous kick or mark but if you asked me to explain the rules I’d point you at google. But it’s not exactly a hardship watching a bunch of superbly fit young men in action.
    Of course in theory, if not aloud, I AM barracking for Collingwood. It’s a family thing.

    Reply
  12. Jenny, that’s me, too, reading a book while those who care watch. I do enjoy watching a spectacular goal or fabulous kick or mark but if you asked me to explain the rules I’d point you at google. But it’s not exactly a hardship watching a bunch of superbly fit young men in action.
    Of course in theory, if not aloud, I AM barracking for Collingwood. It’s a family thing.

    Reply
  13. Jenny, that’s me, too, reading a book while those who care watch. I do enjoy watching a spectacular goal or fabulous kick or mark but if you asked me to explain the rules I’d point you at google. But it’s not exactly a hardship watching a bunch of superbly fit young men in action.
    Of course in theory, if not aloud, I AM barracking for Collingwood. It’s a family thing.

    Reply
  14. Jenny, that’s me, too, reading a book while those who care watch. I do enjoy watching a spectacular goal or fabulous kick or mark but if you asked me to explain the rules I’d point you at google. But it’s not exactly a hardship watching a bunch of superbly fit young men in action.
    Of course in theory, if not aloud, I AM barracking for Collingwood. It’s a family thing.

    Reply
  15. Jenny, that’s me, too, reading a book while those who care watch. I do enjoy watching a spectacular goal or fabulous kick or mark but if you asked me to explain the rules I’d point you at google. But it’s not exactly a hardship watching a bunch of superbly fit young men in action.
    Of course in theory, if not aloud, I AM barracking for Collingwood. It’s a family thing.

    Reply
  16. In England I believe “barrack” means to shout abuse against the opposition, so you “barrack against” someone and it’s a negative thing.
    But we ask, “Who do you barrack for?’ meaning what team do you support.
    Ah, the English language, gotta love the variations.

    Reply
  17. In England I believe “barrack” means to shout abuse against the opposition, so you “barrack against” someone and it’s a negative thing.
    But we ask, “Who do you barrack for?’ meaning what team do you support.
    Ah, the English language, gotta love the variations.

    Reply
  18. In England I believe “barrack” means to shout abuse against the opposition, so you “barrack against” someone and it’s a negative thing.
    But we ask, “Who do you barrack for?’ meaning what team do you support.
    Ah, the English language, gotta love the variations.

    Reply
  19. In England I believe “barrack” means to shout abuse against the opposition, so you “barrack against” someone and it’s a negative thing.
    But we ask, “Who do you barrack for?’ meaning what team do you support.
    Ah, the English language, gotta love the variations.

    Reply
  20. In England I believe “barrack” means to shout abuse against the opposition, so you “barrack against” someone and it’s a negative thing.
    But we ask, “Who do you barrack for?’ meaning what team do you support.
    Ah, the English language, gotta love the variations.

    Reply
  21. Anne – what an excellent summary of our wonderful game. You’ve captured its essence for the unitiated … plus its always lovely just to watch those well built fellows fly.
    I agree, its a family thing. All my grandparents supported Hawthorn, as did my parents, siblings and I. And so, as I often tell my 7yo son, … its a genetic thing! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  22. Anne – what an excellent summary of our wonderful game. You’ve captured its essence for the unitiated … plus its always lovely just to watch those well built fellows fly.
    I agree, its a family thing. All my grandparents supported Hawthorn, as did my parents, siblings and I. And so, as I often tell my 7yo son, … its a genetic thing! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  23. Anne – what an excellent summary of our wonderful game. You’ve captured its essence for the unitiated … plus its always lovely just to watch those well built fellows fly.
    I agree, its a family thing. All my grandparents supported Hawthorn, as did my parents, siblings and I. And so, as I often tell my 7yo son, … its a genetic thing! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  24. Anne – what an excellent summary of our wonderful game. You’ve captured its essence for the unitiated … plus its always lovely just to watch those well built fellows fly.
    I agree, its a family thing. All my grandparents supported Hawthorn, as did my parents, siblings and I. And so, as I often tell my 7yo son, … its a genetic thing! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  25. Anne – what an excellent summary of our wonderful game. You’ve captured its essence for the unitiated … plus its always lovely just to watch those well built fellows fly.
    I agree, its a family thing. All my grandparents supported Hawthorn, as did my parents, siblings and I. And so, as I often tell my 7yo son, … its a genetic thing! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  26. What a great post, Anne. Here in Texas, our high school football season is underway. We have a group who support the Katy Tigers, the high school that all our kids (but not us!) went to. On any given Friday Night, our stadium can be packed with 6,000 people – on the home side alone! The reason for all this madness? Katy has won 6 Texas State Championships in 1959, 1997,2000, 2003, 2007 and 2008. Last year we went to the championship game but lost. So far this year we’re 2-0 and looking at another great season. When you hear the term “Friday Night Lights” coming out of Texas, that refers to the high school football games that are always a great draw for the community. In fact, when we were living in Malaysia, I’d get up at 7 a.m. to listen to the game being played back in Texas. I even have a photo of myself in “game gear” (game t-shirt, jewelry, etc.) in Bintan, Indonesia with a monkey sitting by my side. Yes, I’m a freak, but I do love it! GO TIGERS!!

    Reply
  27. What a great post, Anne. Here in Texas, our high school football season is underway. We have a group who support the Katy Tigers, the high school that all our kids (but not us!) went to. On any given Friday Night, our stadium can be packed with 6,000 people – on the home side alone! The reason for all this madness? Katy has won 6 Texas State Championships in 1959, 1997,2000, 2003, 2007 and 2008. Last year we went to the championship game but lost. So far this year we’re 2-0 and looking at another great season. When you hear the term “Friday Night Lights” coming out of Texas, that refers to the high school football games that are always a great draw for the community. In fact, when we were living in Malaysia, I’d get up at 7 a.m. to listen to the game being played back in Texas. I even have a photo of myself in “game gear” (game t-shirt, jewelry, etc.) in Bintan, Indonesia with a monkey sitting by my side. Yes, I’m a freak, but I do love it! GO TIGERS!!

    Reply
  28. What a great post, Anne. Here in Texas, our high school football season is underway. We have a group who support the Katy Tigers, the high school that all our kids (but not us!) went to. On any given Friday Night, our stadium can be packed with 6,000 people – on the home side alone! The reason for all this madness? Katy has won 6 Texas State Championships in 1959, 1997,2000, 2003, 2007 and 2008. Last year we went to the championship game but lost. So far this year we’re 2-0 and looking at another great season. When you hear the term “Friday Night Lights” coming out of Texas, that refers to the high school football games that are always a great draw for the community. In fact, when we were living in Malaysia, I’d get up at 7 a.m. to listen to the game being played back in Texas. I even have a photo of myself in “game gear” (game t-shirt, jewelry, etc.) in Bintan, Indonesia with a monkey sitting by my side. Yes, I’m a freak, but I do love it! GO TIGERS!!

    Reply
  29. What a great post, Anne. Here in Texas, our high school football season is underway. We have a group who support the Katy Tigers, the high school that all our kids (but not us!) went to. On any given Friday Night, our stadium can be packed with 6,000 people – on the home side alone! The reason for all this madness? Katy has won 6 Texas State Championships in 1959, 1997,2000, 2003, 2007 and 2008. Last year we went to the championship game but lost. So far this year we’re 2-0 and looking at another great season. When you hear the term “Friday Night Lights” coming out of Texas, that refers to the high school football games that are always a great draw for the community. In fact, when we were living in Malaysia, I’d get up at 7 a.m. to listen to the game being played back in Texas. I even have a photo of myself in “game gear” (game t-shirt, jewelry, etc.) in Bintan, Indonesia with a monkey sitting by my side. Yes, I’m a freak, but I do love it! GO TIGERS!!

    Reply
  30. What a great post, Anne. Here in Texas, our high school football season is underway. We have a group who support the Katy Tigers, the high school that all our kids (but not us!) went to. On any given Friday Night, our stadium can be packed with 6,000 people – on the home side alone! The reason for all this madness? Katy has won 6 Texas State Championships in 1959, 1997,2000, 2003, 2007 and 2008. Last year we went to the championship game but lost. So far this year we’re 2-0 and looking at another great season. When you hear the term “Friday Night Lights” coming out of Texas, that refers to the high school football games that are always a great draw for the community. In fact, when we were living in Malaysia, I’d get up at 7 a.m. to listen to the game being played back in Texas. I even have a photo of myself in “game gear” (game t-shirt, jewelry, etc.) in Bintan, Indonesia with a monkey sitting by my side. Yes, I’m a freak, but I do love it! GO TIGERS!!

    Reply
  31. I love football but after 2 years in Queensland I cannot help myself falling in love with your type of football. My regret is now I cannot watch it from my country.

    Reply
  32. I love football but after 2 years in Queensland I cannot help myself falling in love with your type of football. My regret is now I cannot watch it from my country.

    Reply
  33. I love football but after 2 years in Queensland I cannot help myself falling in love with your type of football. My regret is now I cannot watch it from my country.

    Reply
  34. I love football but after 2 years in Queensland I cannot help myself falling in love with your type of football. My regret is now I cannot watch it from my country.

    Reply
  35. I love football but after 2 years in Queensland I cannot help myself falling in love with your type of football. My regret is now I cannot watch it from my country.

    Reply
  36. What a great post !! I would LOVE to see a game of real Aussie football! We learned to be “real” football (as in English soccer) fans when were kids living in England. My brother still displays his Manchester United scarf on the wall of his den in Calera, Alabama.
    Of course, here in the South, college football is a religion and as the college my nephew attends – the University of Alabama is defending national champion this year it looks to be an intense year. My 75 year old Mom is a huge Alabama fan and it is beyond entertaining to watch her watch a game on the telly.
    I love to watch Rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football – sports where good looking, muscled men are showing off those muscles. Shallow? Perhaps.
    But my favorite sports involve horses – show jumping, horse racing, steeplechasing. Love it! Again – powerful creatures with muscles.
    And one of the my favorite sports to watch in person is fly ball. Anyone who says dogs can’t be athletes hasn’t seen a fly ball competition.

    Reply
  37. What a great post !! I would LOVE to see a game of real Aussie football! We learned to be “real” football (as in English soccer) fans when were kids living in England. My brother still displays his Manchester United scarf on the wall of his den in Calera, Alabama.
    Of course, here in the South, college football is a religion and as the college my nephew attends – the University of Alabama is defending national champion this year it looks to be an intense year. My 75 year old Mom is a huge Alabama fan and it is beyond entertaining to watch her watch a game on the telly.
    I love to watch Rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football – sports where good looking, muscled men are showing off those muscles. Shallow? Perhaps.
    But my favorite sports involve horses – show jumping, horse racing, steeplechasing. Love it! Again – powerful creatures with muscles.
    And one of the my favorite sports to watch in person is fly ball. Anyone who says dogs can’t be athletes hasn’t seen a fly ball competition.

    Reply
  38. What a great post !! I would LOVE to see a game of real Aussie football! We learned to be “real” football (as in English soccer) fans when were kids living in England. My brother still displays his Manchester United scarf on the wall of his den in Calera, Alabama.
    Of course, here in the South, college football is a religion and as the college my nephew attends – the University of Alabama is defending national champion this year it looks to be an intense year. My 75 year old Mom is a huge Alabama fan and it is beyond entertaining to watch her watch a game on the telly.
    I love to watch Rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football – sports where good looking, muscled men are showing off those muscles. Shallow? Perhaps.
    But my favorite sports involve horses – show jumping, horse racing, steeplechasing. Love it! Again – powerful creatures with muscles.
    And one of the my favorite sports to watch in person is fly ball. Anyone who says dogs can’t be athletes hasn’t seen a fly ball competition.

    Reply
  39. What a great post !! I would LOVE to see a game of real Aussie football! We learned to be “real” football (as in English soccer) fans when were kids living in England. My brother still displays his Manchester United scarf on the wall of his den in Calera, Alabama.
    Of course, here in the South, college football is a religion and as the college my nephew attends – the University of Alabama is defending national champion this year it looks to be an intense year. My 75 year old Mom is a huge Alabama fan and it is beyond entertaining to watch her watch a game on the telly.
    I love to watch Rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football – sports where good looking, muscled men are showing off those muscles. Shallow? Perhaps.
    But my favorite sports involve horses – show jumping, horse racing, steeplechasing. Love it! Again – powerful creatures with muscles.
    And one of the my favorite sports to watch in person is fly ball. Anyone who says dogs can’t be athletes hasn’t seen a fly ball competition.

    Reply
  40. What a great post !! I would LOVE to see a game of real Aussie football! We learned to be “real” football (as in English soccer) fans when were kids living in England. My brother still displays his Manchester United scarf on the wall of his den in Calera, Alabama.
    Of course, here in the South, college football is a religion and as the college my nephew attends – the University of Alabama is defending national champion this year it looks to be an intense year. My 75 year old Mom is a huge Alabama fan and it is beyond entertaining to watch her watch a game on the telly.
    I love to watch Rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football – sports where good looking, muscled men are showing off those muscles. Shallow? Perhaps.
    But my favorite sports involve horses – show jumping, horse racing, steeplechasing. Love it! Again – powerful creatures with muscles.
    And one of the my favorite sports to watch in person is fly ball. Anyone who says dogs can’t be athletes hasn’t seen a fly ball competition.

    Reply
  41. Hockey is our sport (I’m proudly Canadian) but I tend to read while the husband watches! Although, my stepson started to play rugby last spring, and for the first time I actually enjoyed watching a sporting event! I’m still somewhat fuzzy on the rules but enjoy it wholeheartedly!

    Reply
  42. Hockey is our sport (I’m proudly Canadian) but I tend to read while the husband watches! Although, my stepson started to play rugby last spring, and for the first time I actually enjoyed watching a sporting event! I’m still somewhat fuzzy on the rules but enjoy it wholeheartedly!

    Reply
  43. Hockey is our sport (I’m proudly Canadian) but I tend to read while the husband watches! Although, my stepson started to play rugby last spring, and for the first time I actually enjoyed watching a sporting event! I’m still somewhat fuzzy on the rules but enjoy it wholeheartedly!

    Reply
  44. Hockey is our sport (I’m proudly Canadian) but I tend to read while the husband watches! Although, my stepson started to play rugby last spring, and for the first time I actually enjoyed watching a sporting event! I’m still somewhat fuzzy on the rules but enjoy it wholeheartedly!

    Reply
  45. Hockey is our sport (I’m proudly Canadian) but I tend to read while the husband watches! Although, my stepson started to play rugby last spring, and for the first time I actually enjoyed watching a sporting event! I’m still somewhat fuzzy on the rules but enjoy it wholeheartedly!

    Reply
  46. Carol, thanks for dropping in — glad you enjoyed the post. I think the pictures conveyed most of the excitement of the sport. πŸ˜‰
    MJ I love the sound of your high school matches and the huge community support for them. It’s not quite the same here, though in the country football is very popular and the local teams get great support.
    Loved the image of you in your football gear in Malaysia. Did you know my parents lived in Penang for a few years? My dad ran the RAAF school there.

    Reply
  47. Carol, thanks for dropping in — glad you enjoyed the post. I think the pictures conveyed most of the excitement of the sport. πŸ˜‰
    MJ I love the sound of your high school matches and the huge community support for them. It’s not quite the same here, though in the country football is very popular and the local teams get great support.
    Loved the image of you in your football gear in Malaysia. Did you know my parents lived in Penang for a few years? My dad ran the RAAF school there.

    Reply
  48. Carol, thanks for dropping in — glad you enjoyed the post. I think the pictures conveyed most of the excitement of the sport. πŸ˜‰
    MJ I love the sound of your high school matches and the huge community support for them. It’s not quite the same here, though in the country football is very popular and the local teams get great support.
    Loved the image of you in your football gear in Malaysia. Did you know my parents lived in Penang for a few years? My dad ran the RAAF school there.

    Reply
  49. Carol, thanks for dropping in — glad you enjoyed the post. I think the pictures conveyed most of the excitement of the sport. πŸ˜‰
    MJ I love the sound of your high school matches and the huge community support for them. It’s not quite the same here, though in the country football is very popular and the local teams get great support.
    Loved the image of you in your football gear in Malaysia. Did you know my parents lived in Penang for a few years? My dad ran the RAAF school there.

    Reply
  50. Carol, thanks for dropping in — glad you enjoyed the post. I think the pictures conveyed most of the excitement of the sport. πŸ˜‰
    MJ I love the sound of your high school matches and the huge community support for them. It’s not quite the same here, though in the country football is very popular and the local teams get great support.
    Loved the image of you in your football gear in Malaysia. Did you know my parents lived in Penang for a few years? My dad ran the RAAF school there.

    Reply
  51. May, they used to show aussie rules football on US TV, but I’m not sure if they do it anymore. I know some Canadian friends of mine who developed a taste for it used to watch it at some ungodly hour of the early morning.
    You’d think there would be some way you could watch it on the internet, don’t you?
    Friends of mine in Queenslander are huge fans of Rugby and follow the Townsville Cowboys. They do have Aussie Rules up there but rugby is probably the main game

    Reply
  52. May, they used to show aussie rules football on US TV, but I’m not sure if they do it anymore. I know some Canadian friends of mine who developed a taste for it used to watch it at some ungodly hour of the early morning.
    You’d think there would be some way you could watch it on the internet, don’t you?
    Friends of mine in Queenslander are huge fans of Rugby and follow the Townsville Cowboys. They do have Aussie Rules up there but rugby is probably the main game

    Reply
  53. May, they used to show aussie rules football on US TV, but I’m not sure if they do it anymore. I know some Canadian friends of mine who developed a taste for it used to watch it at some ungodly hour of the early morning.
    You’d think there would be some way you could watch it on the internet, don’t you?
    Friends of mine in Queenslander are huge fans of Rugby and follow the Townsville Cowboys. They do have Aussie Rules up there but rugby is probably the main game

    Reply
  54. May, they used to show aussie rules football on US TV, but I’m not sure if they do it anymore. I know some Canadian friends of mine who developed a taste for it used to watch it at some ungodly hour of the early morning.
    You’d think there would be some way you could watch it on the internet, don’t you?
    Friends of mine in Queenslander are huge fans of Rugby and follow the Townsville Cowboys. They do have Aussie Rules up there but rugby is probably the main game

    Reply
  55. May, they used to show aussie rules football on US TV, but I’m not sure if they do it anymore. I know some Canadian friends of mine who developed a taste for it used to watch it at some ungodly hour of the early morning.
    You’d think there would be some way you could watch it on the internet, don’t you?
    Friends of mine in Queenslander are huge fans of Rugby and follow the Townsville Cowboys. They do have Aussie Rules up there but rugby is probably the main game

    Reply
  56. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. )
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  57. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. )
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  58. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. )
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  59. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. )
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  60. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. )
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  61. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. *G*)
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  62. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. *G*)
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  63. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. *G*)
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  64. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. *G*)
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  65. Anne, what fun! Up till now, all I knew about Australian rules football is that it features gorgeous hunks in skimpy outfits. Now I now a bit about the game as well. (BTW, the mayhem consultant read your post before I did. *G*)
    Most sports bore me, but American football I actively dislike. But I do fancy the image of listening to a game in Indonesia with a monkey by one’s side.

    Reply
  66. Louisa, soccer is a lovely game to watch.
    Yesterday when i was looking for a youtube to show I came across this comment, which I thought was spot on:
    “Soccer is perfection and control for most of the game. Chaos andο»Ώ confusion can lead to a goal.
    For AFL, chaos and confusion is the bulk of the game. But, for a few moments, there is perfection and control – that’s what will lead to a goal!
    I think that’s what MAKES it appealing.”
    I think I’m lucky to live in a country where they have 3 strong codes of football. The English brought us rugby, we also made up our own code, and in the last 30 years european immigration brought us soccer.
    And the women’s sport of netball, which is also huge here, is the most actively participated in sport in the country, played by girls and their mothers.

    Reply
  67. Louisa, soccer is a lovely game to watch.
    Yesterday when i was looking for a youtube to show I came across this comment, which I thought was spot on:
    “Soccer is perfection and control for most of the game. Chaos andο»Ώ confusion can lead to a goal.
    For AFL, chaos and confusion is the bulk of the game. But, for a few moments, there is perfection and control – that’s what will lead to a goal!
    I think that’s what MAKES it appealing.”
    I think I’m lucky to live in a country where they have 3 strong codes of football. The English brought us rugby, we also made up our own code, and in the last 30 years european immigration brought us soccer.
    And the women’s sport of netball, which is also huge here, is the most actively participated in sport in the country, played by girls and their mothers.

    Reply
  68. Louisa, soccer is a lovely game to watch.
    Yesterday when i was looking for a youtube to show I came across this comment, which I thought was spot on:
    “Soccer is perfection and control for most of the game. Chaos andο»Ώ confusion can lead to a goal.
    For AFL, chaos and confusion is the bulk of the game. But, for a few moments, there is perfection and control – that’s what will lead to a goal!
    I think that’s what MAKES it appealing.”
    I think I’m lucky to live in a country where they have 3 strong codes of football. The English brought us rugby, we also made up our own code, and in the last 30 years european immigration brought us soccer.
    And the women’s sport of netball, which is also huge here, is the most actively participated in sport in the country, played by girls and their mothers.

    Reply
  69. Louisa, soccer is a lovely game to watch.
    Yesterday when i was looking for a youtube to show I came across this comment, which I thought was spot on:
    “Soccer is perfection and control for most of the game. Chaos andο»Ώ confusion can lead to a goal.
    For AFL, chaos and confusion is the bulk of the game. But, for a few moments, there is perfection and control – that’s what will lead to a goal!
    I think that’s what MAKES it appealing.”
    I think I’m lucky to live in a country where they have 3 strong codes of football. The English brought us rugby, we also made up our own code, and in the last 30 years european immigration brought us soccer.
    And the women’s sport of netball, which is also huge here, is the most actively participated in sport in the country, played by girls and their mothers.

    Reply
  70. Louisa, soccer is a lovely game to watch.
    Yesterday when i was looking for a youtube to show I came across this comment, which I thought was spot on:
    “Soccer is perfection and control for most of the game. Chaos andο»Ώ confusion can lead to a goal.
    For AFL, chaos and confusion is the bulk of the game. But, for a few moments, there is perfection and control – that’s what will lead to a goal!
    I think that’s what MAKES it appealing.”
    I think I’m lucky to live in a country where they have 3 strong codes of football. The English brought us rugby, we also made up our own code, and in the last 30 years european immigration brought us soccer.
    And the women’s sport of netball, which is also huge here, is the most actively participated in sport in the country, played by girls and their mothers.

    Reply
  71. Isobel, rugby is pretty impressive, I agree.
    Jana, I played hockey until I finished university, and it’s pretty big here. My brother and older sister also played it. And the young guys in the house next door to me all have “I heart hockey” stickers on their cars and play every weekend in winter.
    But hockey to you means ice-hockey, doesn’t it? I’ve never seen a game on ice except in movies — it looks very fast and dramatic.”

    Reply
  72. Isobel, rugby is pretty impressive, I agree.
    Jana, I played hockey until I finished university, and it’s pretty big here. My brother and older sister also played it. And the young guys in the house next door to me all have “I heart hockey” stickers on their cars and play every weekend in winter.
    But hockey to you means ice-hockey, doesn’t it? I’ve never seen a game on ice except in movies — it looks very fast and dramatic.”

    Reply
  73. Isobel, rugby is pretty impressive, I agree.
    Jana, I played hockey until I finished university, and it’s pretty big here. My brother and older sister also played it. And the young guys in the house next door to me all have “I heart hockey” stickers on their cars and play every weekend in winter.
    But hockey to you means ice-hockey, doesn’t it? I’ve never seen a game on ice except in movies — it looks very fast and dramatic.”

    Reply
  74. Isobel, rugby is pretty impressive, I agree.
    Jana, I played hockey until I finished university, and it’s pretty big here. My brother and older sister also played it. And the young guys in the house next door to me all have “I heart hockey” stickers on their cars and play every weekend in winter.
    But hockey to you means ice-hockey, doesn’t it? I’ve never seen a game on ice except in movies — it looks very fast and dramatic.”

    Reply
  75. Isobel, rugby is pretty impressive, I agree.
    Jana, I played hockey until I finished university, and it’s pretty big here. My brother and older sister also played it. And the young guys in the house next door to me all have “I heart hockey” stickers on their cars and play every weekend in winter.
    But hockey to you means ice-hockey, doesn’t it? I’ve never seen a game on ice except in movies — it looks very fast and dramatic.”

    Reply
  76. Fabulous post about our great game! I am a Crows supporter so no finals for us this week, but I will be cheering for the Bulldogs tonight! Carn the Doggies!
    After spending 5 years living in the UK for 5 years I gained an appreciation for the world game (soccer) and so I can be often found up late on a Saturday watching Premier League football!

    Reply
  77. Fabulous post about our great game! I am a Crows supporter so no finals for us this week, but I will be cheering for the Bulldogs tonight! Carn the Doggies!
    After spending 5 years living in the UK for 5 years I gained an appreciation for the world game (soccer) and so I can be often found up late on a Saturday watching Premier League football!

    Reply
  78. Fabulous post about our great game! I am a Crows supporter so no finals for us this week, but I will be cheering for the Bulldogs tonight! Carn the Doggies!
    After spending 5 years living in the UK for 5 years I gained an appreciation for the world game (soccer) and so I can be often found up late on a Saturday watching Premier League football!

    Reply
  79. Fabulous post about our great game! I am a Crows supporter so no finals for us this week, but I will be cheering for the Bulldogs tonight! Carn the Doggies!
    After spending 5 years living in the UK for 5 years I gained an appreciation for the world game (soccer) and so I can be often found up late on a Saturday watching Premier League football!

    Reply
  80. Fabulous post about our great game! I am a Crows supporter so no finals for us this week, but I will be cheering for the Bulldogs tonight! Carn the Doggies!
    After spending 5 years living in the UK for 5 years I gained an appreciation for the world game (soccer) and so I can be often found up late on a Saturday watching Premier League football!

    Reply
  81. Marg, I gained an appreciation for soccer when I first started teaching in a high school that was 90% boys of European background. Those boys were soccer fanatics. At morning recess (when the sports cupboard wasn’t opened) they used to squash an empty milk carton and use it as a ball and the skill with which they’d kick it around and bounce it off their heads was amazing.
    They’d also have long humorous arguments with me about how it wasn’t called soccer, it was football, the ONLY game in the WORLD. LOL

    Reply
  82. Marg, I gained an appreciation for soccer when I first started teaching in a high school that was 90% boys of European background. Those boys were soccer fanatics. At morning recess (when the sports cupboard wasn’t opened) they used to squash an empty milk carton and use it as a ball and the skill with which they’d kick it around and bounce it off their heads was amazing.
    They’d also have long humorous arguments with me about how it wasn’t called soccer, it was football, the ONLY game in the WORLD. LOL

    Reply
  83. Marg, I gained an appreciation for soccer when I first started teaching in a high school that was 90% boys of European background. Those boys were soccer fanatics. At morning recess (when the sports cupboard wasn’t opened) they used to squash an empty milk carton and use it as a ball and the skill with which they’d kick it around and bounce it off their heads was amazing.
    They’d also have long humorous arguments with me about how it wasn’t called soccer, it was football, the ONLY game in the WORLD. LOL

    Reply
  84. Marg, I gained an appreciation for soccer when I first started teaching in a high school that was 90% boys of European background. Those boys were soccer fanatics. At morning recess (when the sports cupboard wasn’t opened) they used to squash an empty milk carton and use it as a ball and the skill with which they’d kick it around and bounce it off their heads was amazing.
    They’d also have long humorous arguments with me about how it wasn’t called soccer, it was football, the ONLY game in the WORLD. LOL

    Reply
  85. Marg, I gained an appreciation for soccer when I first started teaching in a high school that was 90% boys of European background. Those boys were soccer fanatics. At morning recess (when the sports cupboard wasn’t opened) they used to squash an empty milk carton and use it as a ball and the skill with which they’d kick it around and bounce it off their heads was amazing.
    They’d also have long humorous arguments with me about how it wasn’t called soccer, it was football, the ONLY game in the WORLD. LOL

    Reply
  86. Oh, this is such a fun post, Anne! Being the Wench Jock, I confess to being a big sports fan. I enjoy watching lots of different ones, and actually have watched Aussie Rules football, which is a hoot. (You have to LOVE the shorts!)
    I just enjoyed the U. S. Open tennis, and am now gearing up for the Ryder Cup golf matches (which is Europe vs. the U. S., which is being played in Wales.) And then football season as started, and the Yankees are headed for post-season . . . so sports is often on the tv here.

    Reply
  87. Oh, this is such a fun post, Anne! Being the Wench Jock, I confess to being a big sports fan. I enjoy watching lots of different ones, and actually have watched Aussie Rules football, which is a hoot. (You have to LOVE the shorts!)
    I just enjoyed the U. S. Open tennis, and am now gearing up for the Ryder Cup golf matches (which is Europe vs. the U. S., which is being played in Wales.) And then football season as started, and the Yankees are headed for post-season . . . so sports is often on the tv here.

    Reply
  88. Oh, this is such a fun post, Anne! Being the Wench Jock, I confess to being a big sports fan. I enjoy watching lots of different ones, and actually have watched Aussie Rules football, which is a hoot. (You have to LOVE the shorts!)
    I just enjoyed the U. S. Open tennis, and am now gearing up for the Ryder Cup golf matches (which is Europe vs. the U. S., which is being played in Wales.) And then football season as started, and the Yankees are headed for post-season . . . so sports is often on the tv here.

    Reply
  89. Oh, this is such a fun post, Anne! Being the Wench Jock, I confess to being a big sports fan. I enjoy watching lots of different ones, and actually have watched Aussie Rules football, which is a hoot. (You have to LOVE the shorts!)
    I just enjoyed the U. S. Open tennis, and am now gearing up for the Ryder Cup golf matches (which is Europe vs. the U. S., which is being played in Wales.) And then football season as started, and the Yankees are headed for post-season . . . so sports is often on the tv here.

    Reply
  90. Oh, this is such a fun post, Anne! Being the Wench Jock, I confess to being a big sports fan. I enjoy watching lots of different ones, and actually have watched Aussie Rules football, which is a hoot. (You have to LOVE the shorts!)
    I just enjoyed the U. S. Open tennis, and am now gearing up for the Ryder Cup golf matches (which is Europe vs. the U. S., which is being played in Wales.) And then football season as started, and the Yankees are headed for post-season . . . so sports is often on the tv here.

    Reply
  91. I found Australian Rules football by accident on our local TV station. I was fascinated, the field is huge, makes US. sports look like the are played by little kids.I watch just about every sport but NASCAR. But you have to admit a sport with gorgeous men in shorts and referees in suits and white hats has it trumped. For those on the east coast (and in Denver) some local public stations carry AFL games. Here is my local station. http://www.mhznetworks.org/schedule/
    And CE/AP — go Yankees (I still have my Mickey Mantle bat day bat).

    Reply
  92. I found Australian Rules football by accident on our local TV station. I was fascinated, the field is huge, makes US. sports look like the are played by little kids.I watch just about every sport but NASCAR. But you have to admit a sport with gorgeous men in shorts and referees in suits and white hats has it trumped. For those on the east coast (and in Denver) some local public stations carry AFL games. Here is my local station. http://www.mhznetworks.org/schedule/
    And CE/AP — go Yankees (I still have my Mickey Mantle bat day bat).

    Reply
  93. I found Australian Rules football by accident on our local TV station. I was fascinated, the field is huge, makes US. sports look like the are played by little kids.I watch just about every sport but NASCAR. But you have to admit a sport with gorgeous men in shorts and referees in suits and white hats has it trumped. For those on the east coast (and in Denver) some local public stations carry AFL games. Here is my local station. http://www.mhznetworks.org/schedule/
    And CE/AP — go Yankees (I still have my Mickey Mantle bat day bat).

    Reply
  94. I found Australian Rules football by accident on our local TV station. I was fascinated, the field is huge, makes US. sports look like the are played by little kids.I watch just about every sport but NASCAR. But you have to admit a sport with gorgeous men in shorts and referees in suits and white hats has it trumped. For those on the east coast (and in Denver) some local public stations carry AFL games. Here is my local station. http://www.mhznetworks.org/schedule/
    And CE/AP — go Yankees (I still have my Mickey Mantle bat day bat).

    Reply
  95. I found Australian Rules football by accident on our local TV station. I was fascinated, the field is huge, makes US. sports look like the are played by little kids.I watch just about every sport but NASCAR. But you have to admit a sport with gorgeous men in shorts and referees in suits and white hats has it trumped. For those on the east coast (and in Denver) some local public stations carry AFL games. Here is my local station. http://www.mhznetworks.org/schedule/
    And CE/AP — go Yankees (I still have my Mickey Mantle bat day bat).

    Reply
  96. Anne
    What a great post my sister is a mad Sydney Swans supporter and I guess living in Sydney they would be my team but here in our house we follow rugby league and our team West Tigers are into the pelimenary final against the dragons next week to hopefully win a spot in the grand final on Oct 3rd and we have everything crossed. I watch a fair bit of sport on TV because I can read at the same time we are also mad cricket watchers as well and love soccer they are so skillfull with that round ball.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  97. Anne
    What a great post my sister is a mad Sydney Swans supporter and I guess living in Sydney they would be my team but here in our house we follow rugby league and our team West Tigers are into the pelimenary final against the dragons next week to hopefully win a spot in the grand final on Oct 3rd and we have everything crossed. I watch a fair bit of sport on TV because I can read at the same time we are also mad cricket watchers as well and love soccer they are so skillfull with that round ball.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  98. Anne
    What a great post my sister is a mad Sydney Swans supporter and I guess living in Sydney they would be my team but here in our house we follow rugby league and our team West Tigers are into the pelimenary final against the dragons next week to hopefully win a spot in the grand final on Oct 3rd and we have everything crossed. I watch a fair bit of sport on TV because I can read at the same time we are also mad cricket watchers as well and love soccer they are so skillfull with that round ball.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  99. Anne
    What a great post my sister is a mad Sydney Swans supporter and I guess living in Sydney they would be my team but here in our house we follow rugby league and our team West Tigers are into the pelimenary final against the dragons next week to hopefully win a spot in the grand final on Oct 3rd and we have everything crossed. I watch a fair bit of sport on TV because I can read at the same time we are also mad cricket watchers as well and love soccer they are so skillfull with that round ball.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  100. Anne
    What a great post my sister is a mad Sydney Swans supporter and I guess living in Sydney they would be my team but here in our house we follow rugby league and our team West Tigers are into the pelimenary final against the dragons next week to hopefully win a spot in the grand final on Oct 3rd and we have everything crossed. I watch a fair bit of sport on TV because I can read at the same time we are also mad cricket watchers as well and love soccer they are so skillfull with that round ball.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  101. “I see hot dudes in tiny outfits, running around and being aggressive. I am happy.”
    Yup, in a nutshell, Zoe, that’s the view of many Aussie women. LOL
    Cara/Andrea, yes, I thought you’d love it. I’m quite partial to the sleeveless tops, myself. πŸ˜‰
    Lyn S thanks so much for posting the url of the TV station that shows Aussie Rules football. I’m sure a few readers will be able to get it and enjoy it — even if it does look strange.

    Reply
  102. “I see hot dudes in tiny outfits, running around and being aggressive. I am happy.”
    Yup, in a nutshell, Zoe, that’s the view of many Aussie women. LOL
    Cara/Andrea, yes, I thought you’d love it. I’m quite partial to the sleeveless tops, myself. πŸ˜‰
    Lyn S thanks so much for posting the url of the TV station that shows Aussie Rules football. I’m sure a few readers will be able to get it and enjoy it — even if it does look strange.

    Reply
  103. “I see hot dudes in tiny outfits, running around and being aggressive. I am happy.”
    Yup, in a nutshell, Zoe, that’s the view of many Aussie women. LOL
    Cara/Andrea, yes, I thought you’d love it. I’m quite partial to the sleeveless tops, myself. πŸ˜‰
    Lyn S thanks so much for posting the url of the TV station that shows Aussie Rules football. I’m sure a few readers will be able to get it and enjoy it — even if it does look strange.

    Reply
  104. “I see hot dudes in tiny outfits, running around and being aggressive. I am happy.”
    Yup, in a nutshell, Zoe, that’s the view of many Aussie women. LOL
    Cara/Andrea, yes, I thought you’d love it. I’m quite partial to the sleeveless tops, myself. πŸ˜‰
    Lyn S thanks so much for posting the url of the TV station that shows Aussie Rules football. I’m sure a few readers will be able to get it and enjoy it — even if it does look strange.

    Reply
  105. “I see hot dudes in tiny outfits, running around and being aggressive. I am happy.”
    Yup, in a nutshell, Zoe, that’s the view of many Aussie women. LOL
    Cara/Andrea, yes, I thought you’d love it. I’m quite partial to the sleeveless tops, myself. πŸ˜‰
    Lyn S thanks so much for posting the url of the TV station that shows Aussie Rules football. I’m sure a few readers will be able to get it and enjoy it — even if it does look strange.

    Reply
  106. Helen, I have no opinion of Rugby and no knowledge of the NSW teams, but I hope your team wins.
    My dad was a mad cricket fan (and player) and he used to endanger our family regularly; every time he drove past a cricket oval he couldn’t help but glance across.
    My childhood summers featured lonnnng car trips where we kids were not allowed to make a sound because the cricket was on the radio. The only time I didn’t mind was when we were playing the West Indies — those West Indian commentators and their beautiful accents. I could listen to them read the phone book and still be happy.

    Reply
  107. Helen, I have no opinion of Rugby and no knowledge of the NSW teams, but I hope your team wins.
    My dad was a mad cricket fan (and player) and he used to endanger our family regularly; every time he drove past a cricket oval he couldn’t help but glance across.
    My childhood summers featured lonnnng car trips where we kids were not allowed to make a sound because the cricket was on the radio. The only time I didn’t mind was when we were playing the West Indies — those West Indian commentators and their beautiful accents. I could listen to them read the phone book and still be happy.

    Reply
  108. Helen, I have no opinion of Rugby and no knowledge of the NSW teams, but I hope your team wins.
    My dad was a mad cricket fan (and player) and he used to endanger our family regularly; every time he drove past a cricket oval he couldn’t help but glance across.
    My childhood summers featured lonnnng car trips where we kids were not allowed to make a sound because the cricket was on the radio. The only time I didn’t mind was when we were playing the West Indies — those West Indian commentators and their beautiful accents. I could listen to them read the phone book and still be happy.

    Reply
  109. Helen, I have no opinion of Rugby and no knowledge of the NSW teams, but I hope your team wins.
    My dad was a mad cricket fan (and player) and he used to endanger our family regularly; every time he drove past a cricket oval he couldn’t help but glance across.
    My childhood summers featured lonnnng car trips where we kids were not allowed to make a sound because the cricket was on the radio. The only time I didn’t mind was when we were playing the West Indies — those West Indian commentators and their beautiful accents. I could listen to them read the phone book and still be happy.

    Reply
  110. Helen, I have no opinion of Rugby and no knowledge of the NSW teams, but I hope your team wins.
    My dad was a mad cricket fan (and player) and he used to endanger our family regularly; every time he drove past a cricket oval he couldn’t help but glance across.
    My childhood summers featured lonnnng car trips where we kids were not allowed to make a sound because the cricket was on the radio. The only time I didn’t mind was when we were playing the West Indies — those West Indian commentators and their beautiful accents. I could listen to them read the phone book and still be happy.

    Reply

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