Food, Still Glorious Food!

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

I've been crazily pulling together collections of my Christmas novellas, including a couple that have never been digitized before, so I decided to exercise Wench Prerogative and recycle an older blog with a bit of updating. When I wrote the original of this blog, it was almost Thanksgiving, so it did seem appropriate. 

I’d been ruminating on the differences between being a good cook and a good baker, and Thanksgiving is a good time to talk about that because family feasting is in the air. 

Most of us know the basics of cooking and baking, but mastery of the two skills does represent different personality types. A cook can be more improvisational.  If you lack mushrooms for that interesting chicken dish, you can probably do without, or maybe substitute bacon bits or something quite different. 

Pumpkin pieBakers, however, can’t generally improvise as much, at least not without courting disaster.  You can add chopped walnuts to a cookie recipe and it will probably be just fine, but fail to use have the basic ingredients—flour, eggs, baking powder, et al—and use them in the right order, may give results that aren't pretty, much less edible!  So following a recipe fairly carefully is advisable for baking, especially something complicated.

I always liked baking, mostly because I liked eating the results.  As a Yankee, I’m a pie person, as was my father.  (One definition of a Yankee is someone who eats pie for breakfast.  Guilty!  <G>)  My father used to pay me a bit of extra allowance for each pie I made, so Saturday nights, I’d make two for Sunday dinner. 

Julie and JuliaI’ve been meaning to watch the movie Julie and Julia,which is about Julie Powell, a frustrated young New Yorker who decided to jazz up her life by cooking her way through Julia Child’s landmark Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  She blogged about the results, and got a book and then a movie out of it. 

The movie, I understand, intertwines the life of young Julie (Amy Adams) with Julia Child’s, the latter life based on the book My Life in France, which was compiled by Julia Child’s nephew from her letters and memories.  I listened to that book in audio, and loved hearing Julia’s stories.

What struck me most about My Life in France, though, was the realization of how Mastering the Art of French Cookingmodern cook books are.  Yes, recipe books been around for a couple of centuries, but at the same time, cooking was also an apprenticeship system.  You trained with a professional cook, or much more often, learned from your mother.  If you bought a cookery book, it was usually more for the recipes and it was often assumed that you knew the techniques.  (For example:  “Elk Stew.  Take one elk. Skin and dress.  Make stew.”)

What made Mastering the Art of French Cooking so remarkable was the way Julia went through the steps of creating a classic French dish so she could describe exactly what was done.  She cooked each dish over and over and OVER until she could describe each step clearly.  All of a sudden people around the world could work their way through Classic French recipes, and learn a whole lot about good cooking in the process.

I’m one of the people who did exactly that.  The book had been out for several years when I picked up a copy.  I was living in England, and while I certainly didn’t Mylifeinfrancetry all the recipes, I learned how to make good stock by starting with bones and clumps of fresh herbs.  I made coq au vin and chocolate mousse, and beef burgundy and lots of other dishes, Julia Style. The food was labor intensive, but delicious as well as educational.

These days I can buy first rate croissants at the local bakery, but then they were a rare and exotic treat.  So I followed Julia’s instructions to make croissants, which required layering dough and butter, rolling, flattening, folding, rolling again.  There Croissantwere frequent resting periods in the refrigerator since the dough toughened too much to roll without more rest.  (I understood the resting part perfectly by the time I was done. <G>)

My croissants weren’t even remotely crescent shaped, but they had all the yummy flaky layers and were delicious.  It wasn’t until many years later that I realized how much what I know about cooking came from those forays into Julia Child.  (My mother had many interests but cooking was not on the list.  Hence, not much of an apprenticeship for me.)

These days, my cooking ambitions are to have tasty, reasonably healthy food with the minimum of effort.  Here’s an example of the kind of cooking I do now.  I love making soup, and have a whole file folder within my recipe folder which is just soup. 

My Easy but Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup was inspired by visiting the café at the fabulous Missouri Botanical Gardens with Pat Rice in October.  The cup of Italian Wedding Soup that I ordered used beef stock, not the more common chicken stock, and I loved the cute little round balls of Israeli couscous, which is a baked pasta about the size of a BB in its dry form. 

So I came home, threw this together, and found it good.  It’s inelegant because the bits of meatball are chopped from larger commercial ones rather than made individually, but it sure tastes good.  And I did mention easy, didn’t I?

Easy but Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup

Ingredients

4 quarts of beef stock
1 – 1 ½ lbs. pre-made Italian meatballs, cut into small pieces (Traditionally, Italian meatballs are made of a blend of beef, sausage, and veal.  My local grocer sells them cooked and made on the premises, but frozen bags should be in most supermarkets.  At least, they are in Baltimore, which has lots of Italians who like good food.)

about ¾ lb. of carrots, chopped fine.  (Not essential, but they add color.)

9 oz. package of fresh spinach, sliced.  (I sent it through the slicing attachment of my food processor.  Frozen chopped spinach would probably work pretty well, too.)

1-2 cups Israeli couscous or other small pasta like orzo  (but the little spherical bits of Israeli couscous look awfully cute.)  Vary quantity for desired thickness—two cups is a very thick, hearty soup.

Directions

1) In a big soup pot, bring beef broth to a boil and toss in chopped carrots and cut up meatballs.  Simmer half an hour or so until carrots are well cooked. 

2. Toss in pasta and sliced spinach and simmer for 10 or 15 minutes.  (Longer if you use a larger pasta that takes longer to cook; in that case, you might want to add the spinach a few minutes after the pasta.)

When all is tender, serve hot with grated Parmesan sprinkled on top.

Makes about 16 servings.  Good the first day, better the second. Freezes well.

So have a lovely Thanksgiving.  I hope you have a warm and rewarding time, abundant blessings to give thanks for, and not so much hassle that the holiday becomes stresful.

And if you have to do most of the work of preparing a feast—remember that you can always make a nice easy pot of soup at some later date. <G>

Cherry Pie

Do you like to cook and/or bake?  If so, what are some of your favorite dishes?

Mary Jo

145 thoughts on “Food, Still Glorious Food!”

  1. Great post, Mary Jo! I love to bake, especially around Christmas time. Each year I use my mother-in-law’s recipe for mince tarts, and it’s often hard to keep them until Christmas, as they’re a favorite of my daughter’s. Gingerbread is another family favorite, but I don’t save that one for Christmas, as it makes a great breakfast treat!

    Reply
  2. Great post, Mary Jo! I love to bake, especially around Christmas time. Each year I use my mother-in-law’s recipe for mince tarts, and it’s often hard to keep them until Christmas, as they’re a favorite of my daughter’s. Gingerbread is another family favorite, but I don’t save that one for Christmas, as it makes a great breakfast treat!

    Reply
  3. Great post, Mary Jo! I love to bake, especially around Christmas time. Each year I use my mother-in-law’s recipe for mince tarts, and it’s often hard to keep them until Christmas, as they’re a favorite of my daughter’s. Gingerbread is another family favorite, but I don’t save that one for Christmas, as it makes a great breakfast treat!

    Reply
  4. Great post, Mary Jo! I love to bake, especially around Christmas time. Each year I use my mother-in-law’s recipe for mince tarts, and it’s often hard to keep them until Christmas, as they’re a favorite of my daughter’s. Gingerbread is another family favorite, but I don’t save that one for Christmas, as it makes a great breakfast treat!

    Reply
  5. Great post, Mary Jo! I love to bake, especially around Christmas time. Each year I use my mother-in-law’s recipe for mince tarts, and it’s often hard to keep them until Christmas, as they’re a favorite of my daughter’s. Gingerbread is another family favorite, but I don’t save that one for Christmas, as it makes a great breakfast treat!

    Reply
  6. I prefer to cook rather than bake. Although, when I do bake, it’s fresh bread, not sweets. I love a good pot of soup, too, and your Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup is going to accompany some fresh bread this weekend!

    Reply
  7. I prefer to cook rather than bake. Although, when I do bake, it’s fresh bread, not sweets. I love a good pot of soup, too, and your Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup is going to accompany some fresh bread this weekend!

    Reply
  8. I prefer to cook rather than bake. Although, when I do bake, it’s fresh bread, not sweets. I love a good pot of soup, too, and your Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup is going to accompany some fresh bread this weekend!

    Reply
  9. I prefer to cook rather than bake. Although, when I do bake, it’s fresh bread, not sweets. I love a good pot of soup, too, and your Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup is going to accompany some fresh bread this weekend!

    Reply
  10. I prefer to cook rather than bake. Although, when I do bake, it’s fresh bread, not sweets. I love a good pot of soup, too, and your Inelegant Italian Wedding Soup is going to accompany some fresh bread this weekend!

    Reply
  11. One good thing about baking disasters is that they can become treasured family stories. Like the time my 12-year-old nephew decided to make a lemon meringue pie and mistook the salt for sugar. Or the time I made cinnamon buns but grabbed the jar of pate spice instead of the jar of cinnamon sugar.
    Fortunately we all like to laugh.

    Reply
  12. One good thing about baking disasters is that they can become treasured family stories. Like the time my 12-year-old nephew decided to make a lemon meringue pie and mistook the salt for sugar. Or the time I made cinnamon buns but grabbed the jar of pate spice instead of the jar of cinnamon sugar.
    Fortunately we all like to laugh.

    Reply
  13. One good thing about baking disasters is that they can become treasured family stories. Like the time my 12-year-old nephew decided to make a lemon meringue pie and mistook the salt for sugar. Or the time I made cinnamon buns but grabbed the jar of pate spice instead of the jar of cinnamon sugar.
    Fortunately we all like to laugh.

    Reply
  14. One good thing about baking disasters is that they can become treasured family stories. Like the time my 12-year-old nephew decided to make a lemon meringue pie and mistook the salt for sugar. Or the time I made cinnamon buns but grabbed the jar of pate spice instead of the jar of cinnamon sugar.
    Fortunately we all like to laugh.

    Reply
  15. One good thing about baking disasters is that they can become treasured family stories. Like the time my 12-year-old nephew decided to make a lemon meringue pie and mistook the salt for sugar. Or the time I made cinnamon buns but grabbed the jar of pate spice instead of the jar of cinnamon sugar.
    Fortunately we all like to laugh.

    Reply
  16. I’m not a cook or a baker. My specialty is boiled hotdogs. I love eating a home cooked but I do not enjoy preparing one.
    And yet there are several cooking shows on the Food Network that I love to watch (Barefoot Contessa is my favorite). It took me a while to figure out why I enjoyed them, but I think it is because it takes me back to a time I was a small child. I would sit on a high stool and watch my mother prepare the family meal. I get the same feeling of peace and contentment that I had then.

    Reply
  17. I’m not a cook or a baker. My specialty is boiled hotdogs. I love eating a home cooked but I do not enjoy preparing one.
    And yet there are several cooking shows on the Food Network that I love to watch (Barefoot Contessa is my favorite). It took me a while to figure out why I enjoyed them, but I think it is because it takes me back to a time I was a small child. I would sit on a high stool and watch my mother prepare the family meal. I get the same feeling of peace and contentment that I had then.

    Reply
  18. I’m not a cook or a baker. My specialty is boiled hotdogs. I love eating a home cooked but I do not enjoy preparing one.
    And yet there are several cooking shows on the Food Network that I love to watch (Barefoot Contessa is my favorite). It took me a while to figure out why I enjoyed them, but I think it is because it takes me back to a time I was a small child. I would sit on a high stool and watch my mother prepare the family meal. I get the same feeling of peace and contentment that I had then.

    Reply
  19. I’m not a cook or a baker. My specialty is boiled hotdogs. I love eating a home cooked but I do not enjoy preparing one.
    And yet there are several cooking shows on the Food Network that I love to watch (Barefoot Contessa is my favorite). It took me a while to figure out why I enjoyed them, but I think it is because it takes me back to a time I was a small child. I would sit on a high stool and watch my mother prepare the family meal. I get the same feeling of peace and contentment that I had then.

    Reply
  20. I’m not a cook or a baker. My specialty is boiled hotdogs. I love eating a home cooked but I do not enjoy preparing one.
    And yet there are several cooking shows on the Food Network that I love to watch (Barefoot Contessa is my favorite). It took me a while to figure out why I enjoyed them, but I think it is because it takes me back to a time I was a small child. I would sit on a high stool and watch my mother prepare the family meal. I get the same feeling of peace and contentment that I had then.

    Reply
  21. Oooh, English style mince pies! I discovered them when I moved to Oxford. Little and crumbly pastried, and so much better than large American mince pies.
    I’m with you on gingerbread–it’s a great breakfast treat, and far too tasty to have only at the holidays.

    Reply
  22. Oooh, English style mince pies! I discovered them when I moved to Oxford. Little and crumbly pastried, and so much better than large American mince pies.
    I’m with you on gingerbread–it’s a great breakfast treat, and far too tasty to have only at the holidays.

    Reply
  23. Oooh, English style mince pies! I discovered them when I moved to Oxford. Little and crumbly pastried, and so much better than large American mince pies.
    I’m with you on gingerbread–it’s a great breakfast treat, and far too tasty to have only at the holidays.

    Reply
  24. Oooh, English style mince pies! I discovered them when I moved to Oxford. Little and crumbly pastried, and so much better than large American mince pies.
    I’m with you on gingerbread–it’s a great breakfast treat, and far too tasty to have only at the holidays.

    Reply
  25. Oooh, English style mince pies! I discovered them when I moved to Oxford. Little and crumbly pastried, and so much better than large American mince pies.
    I’m with you on gingerbread–it’s a great breakfast treat, and far too tasty to have only at the holidays.

    Reply
  26. Kathy R, I hope you enjoy my simplified Italian Wedding Soup. Now that I think of it, I haven’t mad a batch lately. It’s time. Being served with fresh bread always makes a soup taste better. *G*

    Reply
  27. Kathy R, I hope you enjoy my simplified Italian Wedding Soup. Now that I think of it, I haven’t mad a batch lately. It’s time. Being served with fresh bread always makes a soup taste better. *G*

    Reply
  28. Kathy R, I hope you enjoy my simplified Italian Wedding Soup. Now that I think of it, I haven’t mad a batch lately. It’s time. Being served with fresh bread always makes a soup taste better. *G*

    Reply
  29. Kathy R, I hope you enjoy my simplified Italian Wedding Soup. Now that I think of it, I haven’t mad a batch lately. It’s time. Being served with fresh bread always makes a soup taste better. *G*

    Reply
  30. Kathy R, I hope you enjoy my simplified Italian Wedding Soup. Now that I think of it, I haven’t mad a batch lately. It’s time. Being served with fresh bread always makes a soup taste better. *G*

    Reply
  31. Mary T, what a lovely image of you perced on your stool and absorbing all that family and kitchen warmth. Luckily, there are now lots of options for eating these days so cooking is no longer mandatory.

    Reply
  32. Mary T, what a lovely image of you perced on your stool and absorbing all that family and kitchen warmth. Luckily, there are now lots of options for eating these days so cooking is no longer mandatory.

    Reply
  33. Mary T, what a lovely image of you perced on your stool and absorbing all that family and kitchen warmth. Luckily, there are now lots of options for eating these days so cooking is no longer mandatory.

    Reply
  34. Mary T, what a lovely image of you perced on your stool and absorbing all that family and kitchen warmth. Luckily, there are now lots of options for eating these days so cooking is no longer mandatory.

    Reply
  35. Mary T, what a lovely image of you perced on your stool and absorbing all that family and kitchen warmth. Luckily, there are now lots of options for eating these days so cooking is no longer mandatory.

    Reply
  36. I like to cook more than bake, and the dishes I make most tend to be variations of the recipes my grandmother taught me to cook when I was a teenager–beef stew, split pea soup with ham, and pot roast. Good solid comfort food. Love your soup recipe, and I think I will be adding those ingredients to my weekly grocery list. Here in Michigan it is perfect soup weather right now!

    Reply
  37. I like to cook more than bake, and the dishes I make most tend to be variations of the recipes my grandmother taught me to cook when I was a teenager–beef stew, split pea soup with ham, and pot roast. Good solid comfort food. Love your soup recipe, and I think I will be adding those ingredients to my weekly grocery list. Here in Michigan it is perfect soup weather right now!

    Reply
  38. I like to cook more than bake, and the dishes I make most tend to be variations of the recipes my grandmother taught me to cook when I was a teenager–beef stew, split pea soup with ham, and pot roast. Good solid comfort food. Love your soup recipe, and I think I will be adding those ingredients to my weekly grocery list. Here in Michigan it is perfect soup weather right now!

    Reply
  39. I like to cook more than bake, and the dishes I make most tend to be variations of the recipes my grandmother taught me to cook when I was a teenager–beef stew, split pea soup with ham, and pot roast. Good solid comfort food. Love your soup recipe, and I think I will be adding those ingredients to my weekly grocery list. Here in Michigan it is perfect soup weather right now!

    Reply
  40. I like to cook more than bake, and the dishes I make most tend to be variations of the recipes my grandmother taught me to cook when I was a teenager–beef stew, split pea soup with ham, and pot roast. Good solid comfort food. Love your soup recipe, and I think I will be adding those ingredients to my weekly grocery list. Here in Michigan it is perfect soup weather right now!

    Reply
  41. I’m kind of middle of the road when it comes to baking and cooking – I can do both but I’m no expert. And you are so right, most people like one or the other best.
    As for experimenting…I have experimented with bean dishes but that is about it. Well, eggs and vegetable soup to a certain degree.
    There are some people I know who CAN experiment wildly with baked goods and end up with edible results. And they aren’t professionals. They even have dreams about baked goods and then set out to create what they dreamed up. It is always fascinating to read about those adventures.
    After I left home I used to make lots of different cookies for Christmas and chose 3 or 4 new recipes to try each year (as well as the old standby’s). But….as each of my sisters left home and they TOO started making lots of things and we all took them to the same event….it became overwhelming.

    Reply
  42. I’m kind of middle of the road when it comes to baking and cooking – I can do both but I’m no expert. And you are so right, most people like one or the other best.
    As for experimenting…I have experimented with bean dishes but that is about it. Well, eggs and vegetable soup to a certain degree.
    There are some people I know who CAN experiment wildly with baked goods and end up with edible results. And they aren’t professionals. They even have dreams about baked goods and then set out to create what they dreamed up. It is always fascinating to read about those adventures.
    After I left home I used to make lots of different cookies for Christmas and chose 3 or 4 new recipes to try each year (as well as the old standby’s). But….as each of my sisters left home and they TOO started making lots of things and we all took them to the same event….it became overwhelming.

    Reply
  43. I’m kind of middle of the road when it comes to baking and cooking – I can do both but I’m no expert. And you are so right, most people like one or the other best.
    As for experimenting…I have experimented with bean dishes but that is about it. Well, eggs and vegetable soup to a certain degree.
    There are some people I know who CAN experiment wildly with baked goods and end up with edible results. And they aren’t professionals. They even have dreams about baked goods and then set out to create what they dreamed up. It is always fascinating to read about those adventures.
    After I left home I used to make lots of different cookies for Christmas and chose 3 or 4 new recipes to try each year (as well as the old standby’s). But….as each of my sisters left home and they TOO started making lots of things and we all took them to the same event….it became overwhelming.

    Reply
  44. I’m kind of middle of the road when it comes to baking and cooking – I can do both but I’m no expert. And you are so right, most people like one or the other best.
    As for experimenting…I have experimented with bean dishes but that is about it. Well, eggs and vegetable soup to a certain degree.
    There are some people I know who CAN experiment wildly with baked goods and end up with edible results. And they aren’t professionals. They even have dreams about baked goods and then set out to create what they dreamed up. It is always fascinating to read about those adventures.
    After I left home I used to make lots of different cookies for Christmas and chose 3 or 4 new recipes to try each year (as well as the old standby’s). But….as each of my sisters left home and they TOO started making lots of things and we all took them to the same event….it became overwhelming.

    Reply
  45. I’m kind of middle of the road when it comes to baking and cooking – I can do both but I’m no expert. And you are so right, most people like one or the other best.
    As for experimenting…I have experimented with bean dishes but that is about it. Well, eggs and vegetable soup to a certain degree.
    There are some people I know who CAN experiment wildly with baked goods and end up with edible results. And they aren’t professionals. They even have dreams about baked goods and then set out to create what they dreamed up. It is always fascinating to read about those adventures.
    After I left home I used to make lots of different cookies for Christmas and chose 3 or 4 new recipes to try each year (as well as the old standby’s). But….as each of my sisters left home and they TOO started making lots of things and we all took them to the same event….it became overwhelming.

    Reply
  46. I really enjoyed Julia’s book and for anybody who likes to read about behind-the-scenes cooking and the lives of those cooking, I loved Jacques Pepin’s “The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen” and “Heat: An Amateur’s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany” by Bill Buford. Pepin is my go-to for cooking and, well, life in general, I guess. Such a nice, grounded man. What I’ve learned from all my reading is that the great cuisines of the world came from poverty; people used what they had on hand. So it’s really not a hobby, so much as a survival skill. And with such great benefits. : )

    Reply
  47. I really enjoyed Julia’s book and for anybody who likes to read about behind-the-scenes cooking and the lives of those cooking, I loved Jacques Pepin’s “The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen” and “Heat: An Amateur’s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany” by Bill Buford. Pepin is my go-to for cooking and, well, life in general, I guess. Such a nice, grounded man. What I’ve learned from all my reading is that the great cuisines of the world came from poverty; people used what they had on hand. So it’s really not a hobby, so much as a survival skill. And with such great benefits. : )

    Reply
  48. I really enjoyed Julia’s book and for anybody who likes to read about behind-the-scenes cooking and the lives of those cooking, I loved Jacques Pepin’s “The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen” and “Heat: An Amateur’s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany” by Bill Buford. Pepin is my go-to for cooking and, well, life in general, I guess. Such a nice, grounded man. What I’ve learned from all my reading is that the great cuisines of the world came from poverty; people used what they had on hand. So it’s really not a hobby, so much as a survival skill. And with such great benefits. : )

    Reply
  49. I really enjoyed Julia’s book and for anybody who likes to read about behind-the-scenes cooking and the lives of those cooking, I loved Jacques Pepin’s “The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen” and “Heat: An Amateur’s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany” by Bill Buford. Pepin is my go-to for cooking and, well, life in general, I guess. Such a nice, grounded man. What I’ve learned from all my reading is that the great cuisines of the world came from poverty; people used what they had on hand. So it’s really not a hobby, so much as a survival skill. And with such great benefits. : )

    Reply
  50. I really enjoyed Julia’s book and for anybody who likes to read about behind-the-scenes cooking and the lives of those cooking, I loved Jacques Pepin’s “The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen” and “Heat: An Amateur’s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany” by Bill Buford. Pepin is my go-to for cooking and, well, life in general, I guess. Such a nice, grounded man. What I’ve learned from all my reading is that the great cuisines of the world came from poverty; people used what they had on hand. So it’s really not a hobby, so much as a survival skill. And with such great benefits. : )

    Reply
  51. Boiled hot dogs are the only real way to make them, imo. And if you’re making several batches (I don’t know, maybe a sports thing?), using the same water over and over just makes them better. I don’t know how IKEA makes theirs, but they sure taste close to that.

    Reply
  52. Boiled hot dogs are the only real way to make them, imo. And if you’re making several batches (I don’t know, maybe a sports thing?), using the same water over and over just makes them better. I don’t know how IKEA makes theirs, but they sure taste close to that.

    Reply
  53. Boiled hot dogs are the only real way to make them, imo. And if you’re making several batches (I don’t know, maybe a sports thing?), using the same water over and over just makes them better. I don’t know how IKEA makes theirs, but they sure taste close to that.

    Reply
  54. Boiled hot dogs are the only real way to make them, imo. And if you’re making several batches (I don’t know, maybe a sports thing?), using the same water over and over just makes them better. I don’t know how IKEA makes theirs, but they sure taste close to that.

    Reply
  55. Boiled hot dogs are the only real way to make them, imo. And if you’re making several batches (I don’t know, maybe a sports thing?), using the same water over and over just makes them better. I don’t know how IKEA makes theirs, but they sure taste close to that.

    Reply
  56. My DH is a baker, which is wonderful- home made bread (YUM!) It came naturally to him because of his chemistry training. He likes to weigh everything in grams and follow the recipes exactly. He gets very good results but even following the recipe there is room for art in the shaping and decorating. I’m more of a cook, but confess that I’m scared of altering the recipes too much. Some substitutions are OK but some really don’t work!
    a family story about baking gone wrong: One birthday my mom made a chocolate cake from a new recipe. We were never sure what happened but it was so moist that it fell to pieces when trying to ice it. We still ate it because it was tasty, but we called it “the scrambled cake.”

    Reply
  57. My DH is a baker, which is wonderful- home made bread (YUM!) It came naturally to him because of his chemistry training. He likes to weigh everything in grams and follow the recipes exactly. He gets very good results but even following the recipe there is room for art in the shaping and decorating. I’m more of a cook, but confess that I’m scared of altering the recipes too much. Some substitutions are OK but some really don’t work!
    a family story about baking gone wrong: One birthday my mom made a chocolate cake from a new recipe. We were never sure what happened but it was so moist that it fell to pieces when trying to ice it. We still ate it because it was tasty, but we called it “the scrambled cake.”

    Reply
  58. My DH is a baker, which is wonderful- home made bread (YUM!) It came naturally to him because of his chemistry training. He likes to weigh everything in grams and follow the recipes exactly. He gets very good results but even following the recipe there is room for art in the shaping and decorating. I’m more of a cook, but confess that I’m scared of altering the recipes too much. Some substitutions are OK but some really don’t work!
    a family story about baking gone wrong: One birthday my mom made a chocolate cake from a new recipe. We were never sure what happened but it was so moist that it fell to pieces when trying to ice it. We still ate it because it was tasty, but we called it “the scrambled cake.”

    Reply
  59. My DH is a baker, which is wonderful- home made bread (YUM!) It came naturally to him because of his chemistry training. He likes to weigh everything in grams and follow the recipes exactly. He gets very good results but even following the recipe there is room for art in the shaping and decorating. I’m more of a cook, but confess that I’m scared of altering the recipes too much. Some substitutions are OK but some really don’t work!
    a family story about baking gone wrong: One birthday my mom made a chocolate cake from a new recipe. We were never sure what happened but it was so moist that it fell to pieces when trying to ice it. We still ate it because it was tasty, but we called it “the scrambled cake.”

    Reply
  60. My DH is a baker, which is wonderful- home made bread (YUM!) It came naturally to him because of his chemistry training. He likes to weigh everything in grams and follow the recipes exactly. He gets very good results but even following the recipe there is room for art in the shaping and decorating. I’m more of a cook, but confess that I’m scared of altering the recipes too much. Some substitutions are OK but some really don’t work!
    a family story about baking gone wrong: One birthday my mom made a chocolate cake from a new recipe. We were never sure what happened but it was so moist that it fell to pieces when trying to ice it. We still ate it because it was tasty, but we called it “the scrambled cake.”

    Reply
  61. I’m more a baker than a cook, but I think that’s because I love sugar. Reading this is making me think if I’m going to take a day at Christmas to make butterhorns. They’re flakey like a croissant, but they have a yeasty taste. The problem is that you let the dough raise twice and then let the little horns raise (adding another hour) before putting them in the oven. Once, I had them not raise because I killed too much of the yeast with scalded milk, and my Mom until she had her stroke would ask me if I had let the milk cool down.

    Reply
  62. I’m more a baker than a cook, but I think that’s because I love sugar. Reading this is making me think if I’m going to take a day at Christmas to make butterhorns. They’re flakey like a croissant, but they have a yeasty taste. The problem is that you let the dough raise twice and then let the little horns raise (adding another hour) before putting them in the oven. Once, I had them not raise because I killed too much of the yeast with scalded milk, and my Mom until she had her stroke would ask me if I had let the milk cool down.

    Reply
  63. I’m more a baker than a cook, but I think that’s because I love sugar. Reading this is making me think if I’m going to take a day at Christmas to make butterhorns. They’re flakey like a croissant, but they have a yeasty taste. The problem is that you let the dough raise twice and then let the little horns raise (adding another hour) before putting them in the oven. Once, I had them not raise because I killed too much of the yeast with scalded milk, and my Mom until she had her stroke would ask me if I had let the milk cool down.

    Reply
  64. I’m more a baker than a cook, but I think that’s because I love sugar. Reading this is making me think if I’m going to take a day at Christmas to make butterhorns. They’re flakey like a croissant, but they have a yeasty taste. The problem is that you let the dough raise twice and then let the little horns raise (adding another hour) before putting them in the oven. Once, I had them not raise because I killed too much of the yeast with scalded milk, and my Mom until she had her stroke would ask me if I had let the milk cool down.

    Reply
  65. I’m more a baker than a cook, but I think that’s because I love sugar. Reading this is making me think if I’m going to take a day at Christmas to make butterhorns. They’re flakey like a croissant, but they have a yeasty taste. The problem is that you let the dough raise twice and then let the little horns raise (adding another hour) before putting them in the oven. Once, I had them not raise because I killed too much of the yeast with scalded milk, and my Mom until she had her stroke would ask me if I had let the milk cool down.

    Reply
  66. I can both cook and bake, but basically I’m a cook; my younger daughter is a natural baker.
    I enjoy trying new recipes and experimenting with creating foods I’ve eaten elsewhere.
    Julia Child’s volumes on French cuisine were indeed revolutionary at the time, but they were preceded by two other cookbooks that aided people to learn to cook without apprenticeship: Fanny Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook — which introduced standardized measures — and Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking. Julia Child gives appreciative references to these two cookbook creators in her “The Way to Cook” cookbook.
    You liked the soup from the Missouri Botanical Gardens which you have shared with us; so perhaps I should mention that Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis.

    Reply
  67. I can both cook and bake, but basically I’m a cook; my younger daughter is a natural baker.
    I enjoy trying new recipes and experimenting with creating foods I’ve eaten elsewhere.
    Julia Child’s volumes on French cuisine were indeed revolutionary at the time, but they were preceded by two other cookbooks that aided people to learn to cook without apprenticeship: Fanny Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook — which introduced standardized measures — and Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking. Julia Child gives appreciative references to these two cookbook creators in her “The Way to Cook” cookbook.
    You liked the soup from the Missouri Botanical Gardens which you have shared with us; so perhaps I should mention that Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis.

    Reply
  68. I can both cook and bake, but basically I’m a cook; my younger daughter is a natural baker.
    I enjoy trying new recipes and experimenting with creating foods I’ve eaten elsewhere.
    Julia Child’s volumes on French cuisine were indeed revolutionary at the time, but they were preceded by two other cookbooks that aided people to learn to cook without apprenticeship: Fanny Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook — which introduced standardized measures — and Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking. Julia Child gives appreciative references to these two cookbook creators in her “The Way to Cook” cookbook.
    You liked the soup from the Missouri Botanical Gardens which you have shared with us; so perhaps I should mention that Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis.

    Reply
  69. I can both cook and bake, but basically I’m a cook; my younger daughter is a natural baker.
    I enjoy trying new recipes and experimenting with creating foods I’ve eaten elsewhere.
    Julia Child’s volumes on French cuisine were indeed revolutionary at the time, but they were preceded by two other cookbooks that aided people to learn to cook without apprenticeship: Fanny Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook — which introduced standardized measures — and Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking. Julia Child gives appreciative references to these two cookbook creators in her “The Way to Cook” cookbook.
    You liked the soup from the Missouri Botanical Gardens which you have shared with us; so perhaps I should mention that Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis.

    Reply
  70. I can both cook and bake, but basically I’m a cook; my younger daughter is a natural baker.
    I enjoy trying new recipes and experimenting with creating foods I’ve eaten elsewhere.
    Julia Child’s volumes on French cuisine were indeed revolutionary at the time, but they were preceded by two other cookbooks that aided people to learn to cook without apprenticeship: Fanny Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook — which introduced standardized measures — and Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking. Julia Child gives appreciative references to these two cookbook creators in her “The Way to Cook” cookbook.
    You liked the soup from the Missouri Botanical Gardens which you have shared with us; so perhaps I should mention that Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis.

    Reply
  71. I cook and bake, and have done so from childhood. I am a pie lover, and always looking for new recipes. My family was European, so they made a lot of tortes and kuchens and yeast coffee cakes but never American style pies. So I had to teach myself out of a cookbook.
    Julia is a little too fussy for me but Jacques Pepin is my idol. “Everyday Cooking With Jacques Pepin” is a favorite, because it’s simple food he eats at home with his family.
    I also bake bread, but my favorite is the very easy famous “no knead bread” recipe.
    Martha Rose Shulman is a great cook whose recipes have never let me down, she has some books out but you can also find her recipes in her New York Times column.

    Reply
  72. I cook and bake, and have done so from childhood. I am a pie lover, and always looking for new recipes. My family was European, so they made a lot of tortes and kuchens and yeast coffee cakes but never American style pies. So I had to teach myself out of a cookbook.
    Julia is a little too fussy for me but Jacques Pepin is my idol. “Everyday Cooking With Jacques Pepin” is a favorite, because it’s simple food he eats at home with his family.
    I also bake bread, but my favorite is the very easy famous “no knead bread” recipe.
    Martha Rose Shulman is a great cook whose recipes have never let me down, she has some books out but you can also find her recipes in her New York Times column.

    Reply
  73. I cook and bake, and have done so from childhood. I am a pie lover, and always looking for new recipes. My family was European, so they made a lot of tortes and kuchens and yeast coffee cakes but never American style pies. So I had to teach myself out of a cookbook.
    Julia is a little too fussy for me but Jacques Pepin is my idol. “Everyday Cooking With Jacques Pepin” is a favorite, because it’s simple food he eats at home with his family.
    I also bake bread, but my favorite is the very easy famous “no knead bread” recipe.
    Martha Rose Shulman is a great cook whose recipes have never let me down, she has some books out but you can also find her recipes in her New York Times column.

    Reply
  74. I cook and bake, and have done so from childhood. I am a pie lover, and always looking for new recipes. My family was European, so they made a lot of tortes and kuchens and yeast coffee cakes but never American style pies. So I had to teach myself out of a cookbook.
    Julia is a little too fussy for me but Jacques Pepin is my idol. “Everyday Cooking With Jacques Pepin” is a favorite, because it’s simple food he eats at home with his family.
    I also bake bread, but my favorite is the very easy famous “no knead bread” recipe.
    Martha Rose Shulman is a great cook whose recipes have never let me down, she has some books out but you can also find her recipes in her New York Times column.

    Reply
  75. I cook and bake, and have done so from childhood. I am a pie lover, and always looking for new recipes. My family was European, so they made a lot of tortes and kuchens and yeast coffee cakes but never American style pies. So I had to teach myself out of a cookbook.
    Julia is a little too fussy for me but Jacques Pepin is my idol. “Everyday Cooking With Jacques Pepin” is a favorite, because it’s simple food he eats at home with his family.
    I also bake bread, but my favorite is the very easy famous “no knead bread” recipe.
    Martha Rose Shulman is a great cook whose recipes have never let me down, she has some books out but you can also find her recipes in her New York Times column.

    Reply
  76. Michele–
    I hadn’t really thought about it, but you’re so right–the great cuisines do come from poverty and using what ingredients were available.
    I’m thinking I need to get a Pepin cookbook…

    Reply
  77. Michele–
    I hadn’t really thought about it, but you’re so right–the great cuisines do come from poverty and using what ingredients were available.
    I’m thinking I need to get a Pepin cookbook…

    Reply
  78. Michele–
    I hadn’t really thought about it, but you’re so right–the great cuisines do come from poverty and using what ingredients were available.
    I’m thinking I need to get a Pepin cookbook…

    Reply
  79. Michele–
    I hadn’t really thought about it, but you’re so right–the great cuisines do come from poverty and using what ingredients were available.
    I’m thinking I need to get a Pepin cookbook…

    Reply
  80. Michele–
    I hadn’t really thought about it, but you’re so right–the great cuisines do come from poverty and using what ingredients were available.
    I’m thinking I need to get a Pepin cookbook…

    Reply
  81. LOL, Kathy K! As was said above, failures can be some of the best memories. Like you, I’m cautious about variations. The first time I make a recipe, I follow the directions pretty carefully to establish a baseline of what the dish should be like.

    Reply
  82. LOL, Kathy K! As was said above, failures can be some of the best memories. Like you, I’m cautious about variations. The first time I make a recipe, I follow the directions pretty carefully to establish a baseline of what the dish should be like.

    Reply
  83. LOL, Kathy K! As was said above, failures can be some of the best memories. Like you, I’m cautious about variations. The first time I make a recipe, I follow the directions pretty carefully to establish a baseline of what the dish should be like.

    Reply
  84. LOL, Kathy K! As was said above, failures can be some of the best memories. Like you, I’m cautious about variations. The first time I make a recipe, I follow the directions pretty carefully to establish a baseline of what the dish should be like.

    Reply
  85. LOL, Kathy K! As was said above, failures can be some of the best memories. Like you, I’m cautious about variations. The first time I make a recipe, I follow the directions pretty carefully to establish a baseline of what the dish should be like.

    Reply
  86. Sue McCormick–
    When I was in high school, my mother gave my sister and me copies of the most recent edition of the JOY OF COOKING. There have been more editions since, but I still have my original. Later I bought a Fanny Farmer cookbook. Both of them concentrated on sensible approaches to the food most people made, and they were very clear and comprehensive.
    I didn’t know Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis! But she does seem like a sensible Midwesterner, so that does make sense.

    Reply
  87. Sue McCormick–
    When I was in high school, my mother gave my sister and me copies of the most recent edition of the JOY OF COOKING. There have been more editions since, but I still have my original. Later I bought a Fanny Farmer cookbook. Both of them concentrated on sensible approaches to the food most people made, and they were very clear and comprehensive.
    I didn’t know Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis! But she does seem like a sensible Midwesterner, so that does make sense.

    Reply
  88. Sue McCormick–
    When I was in high school, my mother gave my sister and me copies of the most recent edition of the JOY OF COOKING. There have been more editions since, but I still have my original. Later I bought a Fanny Farmer cookbook. Both of them concentrated on sensible approaches to the food most people made, and they were very clear and comprehensive.
    I didn’t know Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis! But she does seem like a sensible Midwesterner, so that does make sense.

    Reply
  89. Sue McCormick–
    When I was in high school, my mother gave my sister and me copies of the most recent edition of the JOY OF COOKING. There have been more editions since, but I still have my original. Later I bought a Fanny Farmer cookbook. Both of them concentrated on sensible approaches to the food most people made, and they were very clear and comprehensive.
    I didn’t know Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis! But she does seem like a sensible Midwesterner, so that does make sense.

    Reply
  90. Sue McCormick–
    When I was in high school, my mother gave my sister and me copies of the most recent edition of the JOY OF COOKING. There have been more editions since, but I still have my original. Later I bought a Fanny Farmer cookbook. Both of them concentrated on sensible approaches to the food most people made, and they were very clear and comprehensive.
    I didn’t know Irma Rombauer was from St. Louis! But she does seem like a sensible Midwesterner, so that does make sense.

    Reply
  91. Your soup sounds winter wonderful.
    My local market (Gelson’s) has a hot soup bar that often has something called Italian Wedding Soup, but I don’t know if it’s the same thing. I see Italian sausage, spinach, a bit of carrot and something like orzo or pearl pasta, in a base of chicken stock.
    They also do a similar soup using ground turkey bits and kale instead of the sausage and pasta. Both perfect for a rainy day. Next time I’ll remember to put the parmesan on them 🙂

    Reply
  92. Your soup sounds winter wonderful.
    My local market (Gelson’s) has a hot soup bar that often has something called Italian Wedding Soup, but I don’t know if it’s the same thing. I see Italian sausage, spinach, a bit of carrot and something like orzo or pearl pasta, in a base of chicken stock.
    They also do a similar soup using ground turkey bits and kale instead of the sausage and pasta. Both perfect for a rainy day. Next time I’ll remember to put the parmesan on them 🙂

    Reply
  93. Your soup sounds winter wonderful.
    My local market (Gelson’s) has a hot soup bar that often has something called Italian Wedding Soup, but I don’t know if it’s the same thing. I see Italian sausage, spinach, a bit of carrot and something like orzo or pearl pasta, in a base of chicken stock.
    They also do a similar soup using ground turkey bits and kale instead of the sausage and pasta. Both perfect for a rainy day. Next time I’ll remember to put the parmesan on them 🙂

    Reply
  94. Your soup sounds winter wonderful.
    My local market (Gelson’s) has a hot soup bar that often has something called Italian Wedding Soup, but I don’t know if it’s the same thing. I see Italian sausage, spinach, a bit of carrot and something like orzo or pearl pasta, in a base of chicken stock.
    They also do a similar soup using ground turkey bits and kale instead of the sausage and pasta. Both perfect for a rainy day. Next time I’ll remember to put the parmesan on them 🙂

    Reply
  95. Your soup sounds winter wonderful.
    My local market (Gelson’s) has a hot soup bar that often has something called Italian Wedding Soup, but I don’t know if it’s the same thing. I see Italian sausage, spinach, a bit of carrot and something like orzo or pearl pasta, in a base of chicken stock.
    They also do a similar soup using ground turkey bits and kale instead of the sausage and pasta. Both perfect for a rainy day. Next time I’ll remember to put the parmesan on them 🙂

    Reply
  96. Janice–
    I think that Italian wedding soup is one of those traditional dishes with a lot of variations, so Gelson’s soup and mine are undoubtedly cousins. The versions I’ve seen have tiny little hand made meatballs, which is why my lazy version has cut up Italian meatballs, but Italian sausage would be lovely, too. I really need to make another batch!

    Reply
  97. Janice–
    I think that Italian wedding soup is one of those traditional dishes with a lot of variations, so Gelson’s soup and mine are undoubtedly cousins. The versions I’ve seen have tiny little hand made meatballs, which is why my lazy version has cut up Italian meatballs, but Italian sausage would be lovely, too. I really need to make another batch!

    Reply
  98. Janice–
    I think that Italian wedding soup is one of those traditional dishes with a lot of variations, so Gelson’s soup and mine are undoubtedly cousins. The versions I’ve seen have tiny little hand made meatballs, which is why my lazy version has cut up Italian meatballs, but Italian sausage would be lovely, too. I really need to make another batch!

    Reply
  99. Janice–
    I think that Italian wedding soup is one of those traditional dishes with a lot of variations, so Gelson’s soup and mine are undoubtedly cousins. The versions I’ve seen have tiny little hand made meatballs, which is why my lazy version has cut up Italian meatballs, but Italian sausage would be lovely, too. I really need to make another batch!

    Reply
  100. Janice–
    I think that Italian wedding soup is one of those traditional dishes with a lot of variations, so Gelson’s soup and mine are undoubtedly cousins. The versions I’ve seen have tiny little hand made meatballs, which is why my lazy version has cut up Italian meatballs, but Italian sausage would be lovely, too. I really need to make another batch!

    Reply
  101. Love it Lillian! I sincerely hope your nephew didn’t let that ruin his interest in baking or cooking after that. My son (now grown) loves to cook and the best part of the holidays or get-togethers is cooking along with him or other family and friends.
    Our favorite disaster story is the time I forgot to put baking powder in the cornbread recipe I swore I knew by heart. I did and I do know it by heart, I guess I just got distracted. You could have bounced it off the floor like a rubber ball, hilarious! 🙂

    Reply
  102. Love it Lillian! I sincerely hope your nephew didn’t let that ruin his interest in baking or cooking after that. My son (now grown) loves to cook and the best part of the holidays or get-togethers is cooking along with him or other family and friends.
    Our favorite disaster story is the time I forgot to put baking powder in the cornbread recipe I swore I knew by heart. I did and I do know it by heart, I guess I just got distracted. You could have bounced it off the floor like a rubber ball, hilarious! 🙂

    Reply
  103. Love it Lillian! I sincerely hope your nephew didn’t let that ruin his interest in baking or cooking after that. My son (now grown) loves to cook and the best part of the holidays or get-togethers is cooking along with him or other family and friends.
    Our favorite disaster story is the time I forgot to put baking powder in the cornbread recipe I swore I knew by heart. I did and I do know it by heart, I guess I just got distracted. You could have bounced it off the floor like a rubber ball, hilarious! 🙂

    Reply
  104. Love it Lillian! I sincerely hope your nephew didn’t let that ruin his interest in baking or cooking after that. My son (now grown) loves to cook and the best part of the holidays or get-togethers is cooking along with him or other family and friends.
    Our favorite disaster story is the time I forgot to put baking powder in the cornbread recipe I swore I knew by heart. I did and I do know it by heart, I guess I just got distracted. You could have bounced it off the floor like a rubber ball, hilarious! 🙂

    Reply
  105. Love it Lillian! I sincerely hope your nephew didn’t let that ruin his interest in baking or cooking after that. My son (now grown) loves to cook and the best part of the holidays or get-togethers is cooking along with him or other family and friends.
    Our favorite disaster story is the time I forgot to put baking powder in the cornbread recipe I swore I knew by heart. I did and I do know it by heart, I guess I just got distracted. You could have bounced it off the floor like a rubber ball, hilarious! 🙂

    Reply
  106. Your ‘Lazy’ Italian Wedding Soup is going in my file. My husband loves soups of every kind and I’m always looking for something new to add to my repertoire. I’ve seen recipes for IWS but felt daunted by making all those teeny weeny meatballs, cutting up the bigger frozen ones….pretty clever!
    Don’t you just love having lunch at places like the botanical gardens? We’re very big museum visitors (and botanical gardens) in our family and the second best thing about these visits is the unique and lovely things they offer on the Museum cafe menu. I’m not a savage, the art is of course the number one best. 🙂
    I’ve learned so much about cooking many different cuisines from watching cooks on TV. I used to watch Julia Child years ago on the local PBS back before we had cable. Oh that dates me!
    Time to start planning Thanksgiving dinner.

    Reply
  107. Your ‘Lazy’ Italian Wedding Soup is going in my file. My husband loves soups of every kind and I’m always looking for something new to add to my repertoire. I’ve seen recipes for IWS but felt daunted by making all those teeny weeny meatballs, cutting up the bigger frozen ones….pretty clever!
    Don’t you just love having lunch at places like the botanical gardens? We’re very big museum visitors (and botanical gardens) in our family and the second best thing about these visits is the unique and lovely things they offer on the Museum cafe menu. I’m not a savage, the art is of course the number one best. 🙂
    I’ve learned so much about cooking many different cuisines from watching cooks on TV. I used to watch Julia Child years ago on the local PBS back before we had cable. Oh that dates me!
    Time to start planning Thanksgiving dinner.

    Reply
  108. Your ‘Lazy’ Italian Wedding Soup is going in my file. My husband loves soups of every kind and I’m always looking for something new to add to my repertoire. I’ve seen recipes for IWS but felt daunted by making all those teeny weeny meatballs, cutting up the bigger frozen ones….pretty clever!
    Don’t you just love having lunch at places like the botanical gardens? We’re very big museum visitors (and botanical gardens) in our family and the second best thing about these visits is the unique and lovely things they offer on the Museum cafe menu. I’m not a savage, the art is of course the number one best. 🙂
    I’ve learned so much about cooking many different cuisines from watching cooks on TV. I used to watch Julia Child years ago on the local PBS back before we had cable. Oh that dates me!
    Time to start planning Thanksgiving dinner.

    Reply
  109. Your ‘Lazy’ Italian Wedding Soup is going in my file. My husband loves soups of every kind and I’m always looking for something new to add to my repertoire. I’ve seen recipes for IWS but felt daunted by making all those teeny weeny meatballs, cutting up the bigger frozen ones….pretty clever!
    Don’t you just love having lunch at places like the botanical gardens? We’re very big museum visitors (and botanical gardens) in our family and the second best thing about these visits is the unique and lovely things they offer on the Museum cafe menu. I’m not a savage, the art is of course the number one best. 🙂
    I’ve learned so much about cooking many different cuisines from watching cooks on TV. I used to watch Julia Child years ago on the local PBS back before we had cable. Oh that dates me!
    Time to start planning Thanksgiving dinner.

    Reply
  110. Your ‘Lazy’ Italian Wedding Soup is going in my file. My husband loves soups of every kind and I’m always looking for something new to add to my repertoire. I’ve seen recipes for IWS but felt daunted by making all those teeny weeny meatballs, cutting up the bigger frozen ones….pretty clever!
    Don’t you just love having lunch at places like the botanical gardens? We’re very big museum visitors (and botanical gardens) in our family and the second best thing about these visits is the unique and lovely things they offer on the Museum cafe menu. I’m not a savage, the art is of course the number one best. 🙂
    I’ve learned so much about cooking many different cuisines from watching cooks on TV. I used to watch Julia Child years ago on the local PBS back before we had cable. Oh that dates me!
    Time to start planning Thanksgiving dinner.

    Reply

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