Five Centuries of Style

Lotherton grand hallNicola here! A couple of weeks ago I went on a family visit to my native county of Yorkshire. It was a great opportunity to catch up with the places I used to love visiting as well as with family and friends. When I was a child one of my favourite local places was a house called Lotherton Hall near Leeds The name itself sounds exactly the sort of place you would find in a Bronte novel and I remember wandering through its rooms lapping up all the historical displays and soaking up the atmosphere. It was one of the places that fostered my love of history.

When I went back a few weeks ago I barely recognised the place. It now has a bird garden, a café and a shop, an adventure playground and beautifully landscaped gardens. It was an absolute delight rediscovering it.

Inside the house there was an exhibition called “Fashionable Yorkshire: Five Centuries of Style.” Each exhibit not only showed the clothes that women wore but through them gave an insight into the lives of those women. They reflected the period they were made in and provided an insight into the women’s place in society. Yorkshire women have always been renowned for their sense of style – my grandmother was a good example – so this was particularly fascinating.

The first exhibit was extraordinary. I wasn’t allowed to take a photo but here it is from MArgaret Layton Wikipedia. It’s a portrait from 1620 of a woman called Margaret Layton who had been a lady in waiting to Queen Anne, the wife of James I. In the picture she is wearing an embroidered jacket of linen stitched with silk and silver thread in a curling pattern of plants, flowers, insects and animals. In the display case next to the portrait is the actual jacket that Margaret had worn to have her portrait painted 400 years ago. I found this mind-blowing!

Quaker dressMove forward 100 years and there were some gowns worn by the ladies of the Priestman family, who were Quakers. Many Quakers rejected the fads of fashion and dressed plainly, without lace and trimmings. There was trouble in the Priestman family when the eldest daughter, Rebecca, attended a church meeting in a fashionable riding habit with a turned down collar. Her mother roundly scolded her to it and cut the collar off!

I’ve sneaked in another picture here from a different exhibition, at Cusworth Hall, because I loved it! It’s late Strawberry dress Regency and made me think of strawberries and cream!

During the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries many Yorkshire families moved up in society through making a fortune in trade. One such was the Illingworth family from Bradford who became prominent in local society in the Victorian era. Mary Illingworth’s clothes reflect this wealth and status with a dress from the Paris designer Worth. Another family, the Norths, were factory workers who rose to become amongst the richest families in the world through investment in mining. They bought a mansion in London and decorated both it and themselves in sumptuous style! Here is one of the Victorian gowns that was featured, made by Worth and worn by Mary for her daughter's wedding in 1881.

Worth DressOne other thing I noticed about the Victorian gowns was that they were significantly larger than the earlier ones and indeed later ones in the exhibition. Apparently this is because both ladies became rather imposing Victorian matrons as a result of their lavish lifestyle!

Bringing the exhibition into the 20th century were a number of items from the wardrobe of two working class Bags
girls of  the 1950s. They were extremely fashion conscious and the clothes are a mixture of ready-to-wear and home made garments, simple but very stylish. The bag and jewellery is from a 1950s wedding. By the 1950s mass-produced clothing was no longer seen as cheap and shoddy but instead was fashionable and desirable.

The whole exhibition was a fascinating walk through 500 years of fashion history and the women whose lives were reflected in the clothes. My favourite was the 17th century jacket but I would have loved to try a version of the Regency gown too! 

What would be your favourite century or decade of fashion style? Victorian bustles or 1960s miniskirt? Regency silk or Tudor ruffs? 

 

95 thoughts on “Five Centuries of Style”

  1. I love the 1870s. Some of the Georgian era is gorgeous, too, but the 1870s is my decade. It’s a time after the HUGE skirts, and before the awful hair with frizzy fringes that turned up soon after (what is it with “80s” decades and bad hair?!). Charles Worth was making his spectacular creations around then.
    Oh, and the Titanic era outfits. I lost interest in Downton Abbey once they left those years behind.

    Reply
  2. I love the 1870s. Some of the Georgian era is gorgeous, too, but the 1870s is my decade. It’s a time after the HUGE skirts, and before the awful hair with frizzy fringes that turned up soon after (what is it with “80s” decades and bad hair?!). Charles Worth was making his spectacular creations around then.
    Oh, and the Titanic era outfits. I lost interest in Downton Abbey once they left those years behind.

    Reply
  3. I love the 1870s. Some of the Georgian era is gorgeous, too, but the 1870s is my decade. It’s a time after the HUGE skirts, and before the awful hair with frizzy fringes that turned up soon after (what is it with “80s” decades and bad hair?!). Charles Worth was making his spectacular creations around then.
    Oh, and the Titanic era outfits. I lost interest in Downton Abbey once they left those years behind.

    Reply
  4. I love the 1870s. Some of the Georgian era is gorgeous, too, but the 1870s is my decade. It’s a time after the HUGE skirts, and before the awful hair with frizzy fringes that turned up soon after (what is it with “80s” decades and bad hair?!). Charles Worth was making his spectacular creations around then.
    Oh, and the Titanic era outfits. I lost interest in Downton Abbey once they left those years behind.

    Reply
  5. I love the 1870s. Some of the Georgian era is gorgeous, too, but the 1870s is my decade. It’s a time after the HUGE skirts, and before the awful hair with frizzy fringes that turned up soon after (what is it with “80s” decades and bad hair?!). Charles Worth was making his spectacular creations around then.
    Oh, and the Titanic era outfits. I lost interest in Downton Abbey once they left those years behind.

    Reply
  6. My all time favorite era for clothing styles would be from about 1890 through 1910. I even love the ridiculously large hats they wore. Can you imagine sitting behind one of those in church or anywhere else?
    In my own youth (1960s & 70s) I wore many a mini skirt and loved them, although some of them were sooooooo short that I couldn’t help by feel self-conscious. I never was a fan of bell bottoms and hip huggers. Low waist jeans are back in style now, but in my opinion, it is not a look many can pull off.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  7. My all time favorite era for clothing styles would be from about 1890 through 1910. I even love the ridiculously large hats they wore. Can you imagine sitting behind one of those in church or anywhere else?
    In my own youth (1960s & 70s) I wore many a mini skirt and loved them, although some of them were sooooooo short that I couldn’t help by feel self-conscious. I never was a fan of bell bottoms and hip huggers. Low waist jeans are back in style now, but in my opinion, it is not a look many can pull off.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  8. My all time favorite era for clothing styles would be from about 1890 through 1910. I even love the ridiculously large hats they wore. Can you imagine sitting behind one of those in church or anywhere else?
    In my own youth (1960s & 70s) I wore many a mini skirt and loved them, although some of them were sooooooo short that I couldn’t help by feel self-conscious. I never was a fan of bell bottoms and hip huggers. Low waist jeans are back in style now, but in my opinion, it is not a look many can pull off.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  9. My all time favorite era for clothing styles would be from about 1890 through 1910. I even love the ridiculously large hats they wore. Can you imagine sitting behind one of those in church or anywhere else?
    In my own youth (1960s & 70s) I wore many a mini skirt and loved them, although some of them were sooooooo short that I couldn’t help by feel self-conscious. I never was a fan of bell bottoms and hip huggers. Low waist jeans are back in style now, but in my opinion, it is not a look many can pull off.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  10. My all time favorite era for clothing styles would be from about 1890 through 1910. I even love the ridiculously large hats they wore. Can you imagine sitting behind one of those in church or anywhere else?
    In my own youth (1960s & 70s) I wore many a mini skirt and loved them, although some of them were sooooooo short that I couldn’t help by feel self-conscious. I never was a fan of bell bottoms and hip huggers. Low waist jeans are back in style now, but in my opinion, it is not a look many can pull off.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  11. I love Regency dresses. The high waist and the more simple styling (vs. before and after) are just lovely. I have several sundresses that have a similar mindset. Also, the 1940’s and 50’s with the lovely dresses that were a wearable length, women wearing slacks (yay!) and the hats. If I could pick a time period to dress from for the rest of my life, it would probably be the 1950’s.

    Reply
  12. I love Regency dresses. The high waist and the more simple styling (vs. before and after) are just lovely. I have several sundresses that have a similar mindset. Also, the 1940’s and 50’s with the lovely dresses that were a wearable length, women wearing slacks (yay!) and the hats. If I could pick a time period to dress from for the rest of my life, it would probably be the 1950’s.

    Reply
  13. I love Regency dresses. The high waist and the more simple styling (vs. before and after) are just lovely. I have several sundresses that have a similar mindset. Also, the 1940’s and 50’s with the lovely dresses that were a wearable length, women wearing slacks (yay!) and the hats. If I could pick a time period to dress from for the rest of my life, it would probably be the 1950’s.

    Reply
  14. I love Regency dresses. The high waist and the more simple styling (vs. before and after) are just lovely. I have several sundresses that have a similar mindset. Also, the 1940’s and 50’s with the lovely dresses that were a wearable length, women wearing slacks (yay!) and the hats. If I could pick a time period to dress from for the rest of my life, it would probably be the 1950’s.

    Reply
  15. I love Regency dresses. The high waist and the more simple styling (vs. before and after) are just lovely. I have several sundresses that have a similar mindset. Also, the 1940’s and 50’s with the lovely dresses that were a wearable length, women wearing slacks (yay!) and the hats. If I could pick a time period to dress from for the rest of my life, it would probably be the 1950’s.

    Reply
  16. Forgot to comment on the post! *facepalm* I adore history so would just adore this exhibit. To think they managed to maintain that LINEN jacket for 400 years is mind boggling. Lovely photos!

    Reply
  17. Forgot to comment on the post! *facepalm* I adore history so would just adore this exhibit. To think they managed to maintain that LINEN jacket for 400 years is mind boggling. Lovely photos!

    Reply
  18. Forgot to comment on the post! *facepalm* I adore history so would just adore this exhibit. To think they managed to maintain that LINEN jacket for 400 years is mind boggling. Lovely photos!

    Reply
  19. Forgot to comment on the post! *facepalm* I adore history so would just adore this exhibit. To think they managed to maintain that LINEN jacket for 400 years is mind boggling. Lovely photos!

    Reply
  20. Forgot to comment on the post! *facepalm* I adore history so would just adore this exhibit. To think they managed to maintain that LINEN jacket for 400 years is mind boggling. Lovely photos!

    Reply
  21. Haha! I hadn’t made the 80s and bad hair connection before now, Sonya!I love those Titanic era outfits as well. I did some research into them for one of my books and it was fascinating.

    Reply
  22. Haha! I hadn’t made the 80s and bad hair connection before now, Sonya!I love those Titanic era outfits as well. I did some research into them for one of my books and it was fascinating.

    Reply
  23. Haha! I hadn’t made the 80s and bad hair connection before now, Sonya!I love those Titanic era outfits as well. I did some research into them for one of my books and it was fascinating.

    Reply
  24. Haha! I hadn’t made the 80s and bad hair connection before now, Sonya!I love those Titanic era outfits as well. I did some research into them for one of my books and it was fascinating.

    Reply
  25. Haha! I hadn’t made the 80s and bad hair connection before now, Sonya!I love those Titanic era outfits as well. I did some research into them for one of my books and it was fascinating.

    Reply
  26. Hi Mary, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I think the same about the hats when I see some of things people wear to the races these days. You wouldn’t want to get stuck behind them!
    I can’t cope with the low waisted jeans either. Anything too low I keep trying to drag back up!

    Reply
  27. Hi Mary, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I think the same about the hats when I see some of things people wear to the races these days. You wouldn’t want to get stuck behind them!
    I can’t cope with the low waisted jeans either. Anything too low I keep trying to drag back up!

    Reply
  28. Hi Mary, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I think the same about the hats when I see some of things people wear to the races these days. You wouldn’t want to get stuck behind them!
    I can’t cope with the low waisted jeans either. Anything too low I keep trying to drag back up!

    Reply
  29. Hi Mary, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I think the same about the hats when I see some of things people wear to the races these days. You wouldn’t want to get stuck behind them!
    I can’t cope with the low waisted jeans either. Anything too low I keep trying to drag back up!

    Reply
  30. Hi Mary, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I think the same about the hats when I see some of things people wear to the races these days. You wouldn’t want to get stuck behind them!
    I can’t cope with the low waisted jeans either. Anything too low I keep trying to drag back up!

    Reply
  31. Thanks so much, Stephanie. Yes, when I saw the jacket I think I just stood staring at it for ages because I couldn’t believe it had survived in such good condition.
    I agree the Regency dresses are gorgeous but I don’t think the style would have suited me. I have a photo of my mother from the 50s in one of those glamorous dresses and she looks like a film star!

    Reply
  32. Thanks so much, Stephanie. Yes, when I saw the jacket I think I just stood staring at it for ages because I couldn’t believe it had survived in such good condition.
    I agree the Regency dresses are gorgeous but I don’t think the style would have suited me. I have a photo of my mother from the 50s in one of those glamorous dresses and she looks like a film star!

    Reply
  33. Thanks so much, Stephanie. Yes, when I saw the jacket I think I just stood staring at it for ages because I couldn’t believe it had survived in such good condition.
    I agree the Regency dresses are gorgeous but I don’t think the style would have suited me. I have a photo of my mother from the 50s in one of those glamorous dresses and she looks like a film star!

    Reply
  34. Thanks so much, Stephanie. Yes, when I saw the jacket I think I just stood staring at it for ages because I couldn’t believe it had survived in such good condition.
    I agree the Regency dresses are gorgeous but I don’t think the style would have suited me. I have a photo of my mother from the 50s in one of those glamorous dresses and she looks like a film star!

    Reply
  35. Thanks so much, Stephanie. Yes, when I saw the jacket I think I just stood staring at it for ages because I couldn’t believe it had survived in such good condition.
    I agree the Regency dresses are gorgeous but I don’t think the style would have suited me. I have a photo of my mother from the 50s in one of those glamorous dresses and she looks like a film star!

    Reply
  36. I love the 1850-60’s with the big dresses. I even chose a similar style for my wedding gown, it made me feel like Scarlet O’Hara from Gone With the Wind (not my favourite story, but Oh! The wardrobe!).

    Reply
  37. I love the 1850-60’s with the big dresses. I even chose a similar style for my wedding gown, it made me feel like Scarlet O’Hara from Gone With the Wind (not my favourite story, but Oh! The wardrobe!).

    Reply
  38. I love the 1850-60’s with the big dresses. I even chose a similar style for my wedding gown, it made me feel like Scarlet O’Hara from Gone With the Wind (not my favourite story, but Oh! The wardrobe!).

    Reply
  39. I love the 1850-60’s with the big dresses. I even chose a similar style for my wedding gown, it made me feel like Scarlet O’Hara from Gone With the Wind (not my favourite story, but Oh! The wardrobe!).

    Reply
  40. I love the 1850-60’s with the big dresses. I even chose a similar style for my wedding gown, it made me feel like Scarlet O’Hara from Gone With the Wind (not my favourite story, but Oh! The wardrobe!).

    Reply
  41. Regency all the way for me Nicola. I love the era and the clothes and the history of that time. It’s amazing how long these clothes have lasted. My daughter would be in her element here. She’s doing fashion design at the moment. Mind you some of it is pretty outlandish (to me anyway).
    Great post.

    Reply
  42. Regency all the way for me Nicola. I love the era and the clothes and the history of that time. It’s amazing how long these clothes have lasted. My daughter would be in her element here. She’s doing fashion design at the moment. Mind you some of it is pretty outlandish (to me anyway).
    Great post.

    Reply
  43. Regency all the way for me Nicola. I love the era and the clothes and the history of that time. It’s amazing how long these clothes have lasted. My daughter would be in her element here. She’s doing fashion design at the moment. Mind you some of it is pretty outlandish (to me anyway).
    Great post.

    Reply
  44. Regency all the way for me Nicola. I love the era and the clothes and the history of that time. It’s amazing how long these clothes have lasted. My daughter would be in her element here. She’s doing fashion design at the moment. Mind you some of it is pretty outlandish (to me anyway).
    Great post.

    Reply
  45. Regency all the way for me Nicola. I love the era and the clothes and the history of that time. It’s amazing how long these clothes have lasted. My daughter would be in her element here. She’s doing fashion design at the moment. Mind you some of it is pretty outlandish (to me anyway).
    Great post.

    Reply
  46. WOW – think I might have to have one of those closets which are big enough to be an actual room. I like the Regency period when dresses were more free flowing and skimmed the body. I love the Art Nouveau period when the clothes were soft and flowy. (I think I see a pattern here.) I love the Art Deco designs from the 1930’s and early 40’s, but would not like the big shoulder pads. I loved wearing the fashions in the 60’s. I loved it all, from the boots to the hair. (I was much slimmer then.)
    For me, fashion is something that is a barometer of the world at the time. Thank you for this post, absolutely fascinating.

    Reply
  47. WOW – think I might have to have one of those closets which are big enough to be an actual room. I like the Regency period when dresses were more free flowing and skimmed the body. I love the Art Nouveau period when the clothes were soft and flowy. (I think I see a pattern here.) I love the Art Deco designs from the 1930’s and early 40’s, but would not like the big shoulder pads. I loved wearing the fashions in the 60’s. I loved it all, from the boots to the hair. (I was much slimmer then.)
    For me, fashion is something that is a barometer of the world at the time. Thank you for this post, absolutely fascinating.

    Reply
  48. WOW – think I might have to have one of those closets which are big enough to be an actual room. I like the Regency period when dresses were more free flowing and skimmed the body. I love the Art Nouveau period when the clothes were soft and flowy. (I think I see a pattern here.) I love the Art Deco designs from the 1930’s and early 40’s, but would not like the big shoulder pads. I loved wearing the fashions in the 60’s. I loved it all, from the boots to the hair. (I was much slimmer then.)
    For me, fashion is something that is a barometer of the world at the time. Thank you for this post, absolutely fascinating.

    Reply
  49. WOW – think I might have to have one of those closets which are big enough to be an actual room. I like the Regency period when dresses were more free flowing and skimmed the body. I love the Art Nouveau period when the clothes were soft and flowy. (I think I see a pattern here.) I love the Art Deco designs from the 1930’s and early 40’s, but would not like the big shoulder pads. I loved wearing the fashions in the 60’s. I loved it all, from the boots to the hair. (I was much slimmer then.)
    For me, fashion is something that is a barometer of the world at the time. Thank you for this post, absolutely fascinating.

    Reply
  50. WOW – think I might have to have one of those closets which are big enough to be an actual room. I like the Regency period when dresses were more free flowing and skimmed the body. I love the Art Nouveau period when the clothes were soft and flowy. (I think I see a pattern here.) I love the Art Deco designs from the 1930’s and early 40’s, but would not like the big shoulder pads. I loved wearing the fashions in the 60’s. I loved it all, from the boots to the hair. (I was much slimmer then.)
    For me, fashion is something that is a barometer of the world at the time. Thank you for this post, absolutely fascinating.

    Reply
  51. I’m not strong on fashion, although I admire individual outfits I see in portraits or book covers.
    I was just beginning to my “career” in classroom teaching when Christian Dior introduced the “New Look”; I loved my off-the-rack versions of those crinolines! Very feminine, yet I could work with 5-year-olds while wearing them!
    I am also proud to have been a member of the generation of high-school girls who went to the boys/mens department, bought their jeans, rolled up the pants and introduced women to a comfortable wear they have never discarded! (And have, in fact, much improved on.)

    Reply
  52. I’m not strong on fashion, although I admire individual outfits I see in portraits or book covers.
    I was just beginning to my “career” in classroom teaching when Christian Dior introduced the “New Look”; I loved my off-the-rack versions of those crinolines! Very feminine, yet I could work with 5-year-olds while wearing them!
    I am also proud to have been a member of the generation of high-school girls who went to the boys/mens department, bought their jeans, rolled up the pants and introduced women to a comfortable wear they have never discarded! (And have, in fact, much improved on.)

    Reply
  53. I’m not strong on fashion, although I admire individual outfits I see in portraits or book covers.
    I was just beginning to my “career” in classroom teaching when Christian Dior introduced the “New Look”; I loved my off-the-rack versions of those crinolines! Very feminine, yet I could work with 5-year-olds while wearing them!
    I am also proud to have been a member of the generation of high-school girls who went to the boys/mens department, bought their jeans, rolled up the pants and introduced women to a comfortable wear they have never discarded! (And have, in fact, much improved on.)

    Reply
  54. I’m not strong on fashion, although I admire individual outfits I see in portraits or book covers.
    I was just beginning to my “career” in classroom teaching when Christian Dior introduced the “New Look”; I loved my off-the-rack versions of those crinolines! Very feminine, yet I could work with 5-year-olds while wearing them!
    I am also proud to have been a member of the generation of high-school girls who went to the boys/mens department, bought their jeans, rolled up the pants and introduced women to a comfortable wear they have never discarded! (And have, in fact, much improved on.)

    Reply
  55. I’m not strong on fashion, although I admire individual outfits I see in portraits or book covers.
    I was just beginning to my “career” in classroom teaching when Christian Dior introduced the “New Look”; I loved my off-the-rack versions of those crinolines! Very feminine, yet I could work with 5-year-olds while wearing them!
    I am also proud to have been a member of the generation of high-school girls who went to the boys/mens department, bought their jeans, rolled up the pants and introduced women to a comfortable wear they have never discarded! (And have, in fact, much improved on.)

    Reply
  56. I like the 1920s with the tailored style of exquisite fabrics with no corsets and just a chemise, underwear, half-slip, garter belt and stockings. The shoes had a low heel and were beautifully made.
    So much more freedom to move and dance.

    Reply
  57. I like the 1920s with the tailored style of exquisite fabrics with no corsets and just a chemise, underwear, half-slip, garter belt and stockings. The shoes had a low heel and were beautifully made.
    So much more freedom to move and dance.

    Reply
  58. I like the 1920s with the tailored style of exquisite fabrics with no corsets and just a chemise, underwear, half-slip, garter belt and stockings. The shoes had a low heel and were beautifully made.
    So much more freedom to move and dance.

    Reply
  59. I like the 1920s with the tailored style of exquisite fabrics with no corsets and just a chemise, underwear, half-slip, garter belt and stockings. The shoes had a low heel and were beautifully made.
    So much more freedom to move and dance.

    Reply
  60. I like the 1920s with the tailored style of exquisite fabrics with no corsets and just a chemise, underwear, half-slip, garter belt and stockings. The shoes had a low heel and were beautifully made.
    So much more freedom to move and dance.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, Annette. Yes, I do think that you see so much for contemporary culture reflected in fashion as well as the lives of the people who wore it. Fashion history is such a interesting subject!

    Reply
  62. Thanks, Annette. Yes, I do think that you see so much for contemporary culture reflected in fashion as well as the lives of the people who wore it. Fashion history is such a interesting subject!

    Reply
  63. Thanks, Annette. Yes, I do think that you see so much for contemporary culture reflected in fashion as well as the lives of the people who wore it. Fashion history is such a interesting subject!

    Reply
  64. Thanks, Annette. Yes, I do think that you see so much for contemporary culture reflected in fashion as well as the lives of the people who wore it. Fashion history is such a interesting subject!

    Reply
  65. Thanks, Annette. Yes, I do think that you see so much for contemporary culture reflected in fashion as well as the lives of the people who wore it. Fashion history is such a interesting subject!

    Reply
  66. Gosh, I bet the fashion design course is fascinating, Teresa, as well as being maybe a bit way out to our eyes! I used to work with an art and Design College and loved the meetings of the fashion courses. They introduced me to so many designs and styles and ideas that I would never otherwise have seen!

    Reply
  67. Gosh, I bet the fashion design course is fascinating, Teresa, as well as being maybe a bit way out to our eyes! I used to work with an art and Design College and loved the meetings of the fashion courses. They introduced me to so many designs and styles and ideas that I would never otherwise have seen!

    Reply
  68. Gosh, I bet the fashion design course is fascinating, Teresa, as well as being maybe a bit way out to our eyes! I used to work with an art and Design College and loved the meetings of the fashion courses. They introduced me to so many designs and styles and ideas that I would never otherwise have seen!

    Reply
  69. Gosh, I bet the fashion design course is fascinating, Teresa, as well as being maybe a bit way out to our eyes! I used to work with an art and Design College and loved the meetings of the fashion courses. They introduced me to so many designs and styles and ideas that I would never otherwise have seen!

    Reply
  70. Gosh, I bet the fashion design course is fascinating, Teresa, as well as being maybe a bit way out to our eyes! I used to work with an art and Design College and loved the meetings of the fashion courses. They introduced me to so many designs and styles and ideas that I would never otherwise have seen!

    Reply

Leave a Comment