Finishing A Book

W-DeskLady1

Pat here:

Anne blogged about starting a book a few weeks ago, while I was in the process of finishing one.  So in the interest of process analysis…

I never finish a book.  Really.  I can’t read the final printed product because I would still want to change things, and it would frustrate me no end that I couldn’t.  I apparently have a control freak hiding in my brainpan somewhere.  Don’t know where the gremlin is the rest of the time because control is generally not an issue for The Queen of Absentminded, but when it comes to my books…  I’m OC. (Right now, I'm making feverish changes to the final proofs of July's book)

I rewrite a manuscript the entire time I’m working on the first draft, so I can’t even say when the Mystic warrior
editorial process begins.  But the torture of finishing a book—to turn it into an editor—comes after I write the last word on the last page.  Sort of. At least at that point I know how the book ends so I can go back and link together all the bits and pieces that drifted from my fingers as I wrote.  At that point my Muse is whimpering under the bed so I turn on the editor and play with words, run spellchecks, hunt down my repetitive phrase syndrome, etc, until my Muse has slept and recovered.

I’ve already printed pages half a dozen times during the writing process, so at this stage, I create a mock galley from the manuscript—making it look like a finished book.  And then I try reading it as if I’m a new reader just opening the pages of a book I hope will transport me into another world.  I scribble and redline all over these pages and go back to the computer with a better idea of where I’ve left plot holes and how I need to build up character traits. Once I whack out all the unnecessary bits and enter all the revisions, the poor book has to sit and settle awhile. I’ve never understood how other writers can whip the last smoking page off the printer and shoot the whole thing off to New York.  I wish I could.

Of course, even after I’ve gone through my brilliant masterpiece for the millionth time and declared it Typewriter
finished, my editor will return with pages of revisions notes and I’ll rip half the scenes apart and rebuild and then go through the above process again. And again. Makes one wonder how I ever wrote those first books on a typewriter!

How do the other writers among us polish a book for editorial consumption?  Any handy tips for prying me out of my rut before I burn out all my brain cells?

But while my current WIP is simmering, waiting for the Muse to recover, I’m playing with electronic publishing.  Random House has compiled most of my contemporaries as e-books that may sell 25 books a year, so I’m not expecting much of this new venture.  I just have this image of libraries of the future existing on handheld gizmos we carry around with us, and I want to be ready for that day. Merely_magic
So MERELY MAGIC is now up at BelgraveHouse.com and RegencyReads.com and will eventually migrate to Fictionwise and maybe even Amazon, although I have issues with their idea of a fair share of proceeds.  Ultimately, the rest of the Magic series will appear in the same places. Since I don’t even own an e-reader, I can’t tell you about the reading experience, but learning the publishing ending of it has been enlightening!

How many of you have e-readers? What’s your experience been like? And I know some of you will have to have the printed book pried out of your cold, dead hands, but I’ve run out of walls for my books. How do you deal with the inventory problem?

60 thoughts on “Finishing A Book”

  1. I’ve resisted an e-reader so far, wanting the price to come way, way down. I’m also terrified I’d order more books at a quick click and spend money I don’t have. I think they’re great, and the future and all, but maybe I’m rooted too much in the past. 🙂
    Funny about books never being finished. My agent requested I change a couple of things, and while I was in there, I tweaked some more. The thought crossed my mind that if one of my books ever sells, I’ll be tweaking AGAIN.
    Do you ever get sick of reading your own stuff, Pat? I confess I cried and laughed at all the right places in my ms like someone else had written it!

    Reply
  2. I’ve resisted an e-reader so far, wanting the price to come way, way down. I’m also terrified I’d order more books at a quick click and spend money I don’t have. I think they’re great, and the future and all, but maybe I’m rooted too much in the past. 🙂
    Funny about books never being finished. My agent requested I change a couple of things, and while I was in there, I tweaked some more. The thought crossed my mind that if one of my books ever sells, I’ll be tweaking AGAIN.
    Do you ever get sick of reading your own stuff, Pat? I confess I cried and laughed at all the right places in my ms like someone else had written it!

    Reply
  3. I’ve resisted an e-reader so far, wanting the price to come way, way down. I’m also terrified I’d order more books at a quick click and spend money I don’t have. I think they’re great, and the future and all, but maybe I’m rooted too much in the past. 🙂
    Funny about books never being finished. My agent requested I change a couple of things, and while I was in there, I tweaked some more. The thought crossed my mind that if one of my books ever sells, I’ll be tweaking AGAIN.
    Do you ever get sick of reading your own stuff, Pat? I confess I cried and laughed at all the right places in my ms like someone else had written it!

    Reply
  4. I’ve resisted an e-reader so far, wanting the price to come way, way down. I’m also terrified I’d order more books at a quick click and spend money I don’t have. I think they’re great, and the future and all, but maybe I’m rooted too much in the past. 🙂
    Funny about books never being finished. My agent requested I change a couple of things, and while I was in there, I tweaked some more. The thought crossed my mind that if one of my books ever sells, I’ll be tweaking AGAIN.
    Do you ever get sick of reading your own stuff, Pat? I confess I cried and laughed at all the right places in my ms like someone else had written it!

    Reply
  5. I’ve resisted an e-reader so far, wanting the price to come way, way down. I’m also terrified I’d order more books at a quick click and spend money I don’t have. I think they’re great, and the future and all, but maybe I’m rooted too much in the past. 🙂
    Funny about books never being finished. My agent requested I change a couple of things, and while I was in there, I tweaked some more. The thought crossed my mind that if one of my books ever sells, I’ll be tweaking AGAIN.
    Do you ever get sick of reading your own stuff, Pat? I confess I cried and laughed at all the right places in my ms like someone else had written it!

    Reply
  6. Hey Prof. Pat! No e-reader here. Give me paper. I spend far too much time staring at a monitor, already
    To the writing/ripping/writing process… I seem to have been cut from a similar die, so I haven’t any help to offer. But I do feel less alone, now. 🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  7. Hey Prof. Pat! No e-reader here. Give me paper. I spend far too much time staring at a monitor, already
    To the writing/ripping/writing process… I seem to have been cut from a similar die, so I haven’t any help to offer. But I do feel less alone, now. 🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  8. Hey Prof. Pat! No e-reader here. Give me paper. I spend far too much time staring at a monitor, already
    To the writing/ripping/writing process… I seem to have been cut from a similar die, so I haven’t any help to offer. But I do feel less alone, now. 🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  9. Hey Prof. Pat! No e-reader here. Give me paper. I spend far too much time staring at a monitor, already
    To the writing/ripping/writing process… I seem to have been cut from a similar die, so I haven’t any help to offer. But I do feel less alone, now. 🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  10. Hey Prof. Pat! No e-reader here. Give me paper. I spend far too much time staring at a monitor, already
    To the writing/ripping/writing process… I seem to have been cut from a similar die, so I haven’t any help to offer. But I do feel less alone, now. 🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  11. Yeah, I get very sick of reading my stuff. I’m having a hard time getting through these page proofs because I really can’t change much. And I’m not crying and laughing so I figure it stinks.
    Glad you feel less alone, Nina! There’s a whole world of obsessives out here, ha ha, hee hee, ho ho.

    Reply
  12. Yeah, I get very sick of reading my stuff. I’m having a hard time getting through these page proofs because I really can’t change much. And I’m not crying and laughing so I figure it stinks.
    Glad you feel less alone, Nina! There’s a whole world of obsessives out here, ha ha, hee hee, ho ho.

    Reply
  13. Yeah, I get very sick of reading my stuff. I’m having a hard time getting through these page proofs because I really can’t change much. And I’m not crying and laughing so I figure it stinks.
    Glad you feel less alone, Nina! There’s a whole world of obsessives out here, ha ha, hee hee, ho ho.

    Reply
  14. Yeah, I get very sick of reading my stuff. I’m having a hard time getting through these page proofs because I really can’t change much. And I’m not crying and laughing so I figure it stinks.
    Glad you feel less alone, Nina! There’s a whole world of obsessives out here, ha ha, hee hee, ho ho.

    Reply
  15. Yeah, I get very sick of reading my stuff. I’m having a hard time getting through these page proofs because I really can’t change much. And I’m not crying and laughing so I figure it stinks.
    Glad you feel less alone, Nina! There’s a whole world of obsessives out here, ha ha, hee hee, ho ho.

    Reply
  16. I’m not against the e-reader in concept and love the idea of the additional functionality (searches, etc), but when it comes down to it I love paper and ink too much to give them up. As NinaP says, I spend my workday staring at a computer monitor and don’t want to spend even more time ruining my eyes.
    As for physical inventory, I’m at a loss. We renovated our house two years ago and somehow wound up with even less space for bookcases — a definite negative as far as I’m concerned (although I can’t seem to convince my husband that it’s reason enough to move). The bookcases we do have contain two rows of books on each shelf, and there are many, many books that don’t have a home in a book case but live in boxes. The boxes that hold copier paper are perfect for books. I try to store them alphabetically by author and then label the outside of the boxes A-C and so on, but it’s not a perfect system and I still dream of putting them all on display. Someday, I hope.

    Reply
  17. I’m not against the e-reader in concept and love the idea of the additional functionality (searches, etc), but when it comes down to it I love paper and ink too much to give them up. As NinaP says, I spend my workday staring at a computer monitor and don’t want to spend even more time ruining my eyes.
    As for physical inventory, I’m at a loss. We renovated our house two years ago and somehow wound up with even less space for bookcases — a definite negative as far as I’m concerned (although I can’t seem to convince my husband that it’s reason enough to move). The bookcases we do have contain two rows of books on each shelf, and there are many, many books that don’t have a home in a book case but live in boxes. The boxes that hold copier paper are perfect for books. I try to store them alphabetically by author and then label the outside of the boxes A-C and so on, but it’s not a perfect system and I still dream of putting them all on display. Someday, I hope.

    Reply
  18. I’m not against the e-reader in concept and love the idea of the additional functionality (searches, etc), but when it comes down to it I love paper and ink too much to give them up. As NinaP says, I spend my workday staring at a computer monitor and don’t want to spend even more time ruining my eyes.
    As for physical inventory, I’m at a loss. We renovated our house two years ago and somehow wound up with even less space for bookcases — a definite negative as far as I’m concerned (although I can’t seem to convince my husband that it’s reason enough to move). The bookcases we do have contain two rows of books on each shelf, and there are many, many books that don’t have a home in a book case but live in boxes. The boxes that hold copier paper are perfect for books. I try to store them alphabetically by author and then label the outside of the boxes A-C and so on, but it’s not a perfect system and I still dream of putting them all on display. Someday, I hope.

    Reply
  19. I’m not against the e-reader in concept and love the idea of the additional functionality (searches, etc), but when it comes down to it I love paper and ink too much to give them up. As NinaP says, I spend my workday staring at a computer monitor and don’t want to spend even more time ruining my eyes.
    As for physical inventory, I’m at a loss. We renovated our house two years ago and somehow wound up with even less space for bookcases — a definite negative as far as I’m concerned (although I can’t seem to convince my husband that it’s reason enough to move). The bookcases we do have contain two rows of books on each shelf, and there are many, many books that don’t have a home in a book case but live in boxes. The boxes that hold copier paper are perfect for books. I try to store them alphabetically by author and then label the outside of the boxes A-C and so on, but it’s not a perfect system and I still dream of putting them all on display. Someday, I hope.

    Reply
  20. I’m not against the e-reader in concept and love the idea of the additional functionality (searches, etc), but when it comes down to it I love paper and ink too much to give them up. As NinaP says, I spend my workday staring at a computer monitor and don’t want to spend even more time ruining my eyes.
    As for physical inventory, I’m at a loss. We renovated our house two years ago and somehow wound up with even less space for bookcases — a definite negative as far as I’m concerned (although I can’t seem to convince my husband that it’s reason enough to move). The bookcases we do have contain two rows of books on each shelf, and there are many, many books that don’t have a home in a book case but live in boxes. The boxes that hold copier paper are perfect for books. I try to store them alphabetically by author and then label the outside of the boxes A-C and so on, but it’s not a perfect system and I still dream of putting them all on display. Someday, I hope.

    Reply
  21. Well, here’s the story from someone who’s e-pubbed. I also do NOT own an ereader. I’ve bought books from epubs in PDF format. And I still buy a lot of paper.
    My two stories, each just over 20,000 words computer e-count (what the RWA calls novellas) are with an e-pub.
    Everything is done with email and Microsoft Word. I send email query letters. They look just like any other query letter, except they’re email. The queries are formal and in standard English. Just because it’s email, does NOT mean the query can be casual.
    As for the manuscript, I send it in RTF format as an email attachment, formatted as in the submission guidelines. The editor edits it with Track Changes on, so I can see her edits. I take a copy of the file she returns, and make my edits, also with Track Changes on. When I’m done, I take another fresh copy of the editors’s original and put all my changes into that copy.
    In the meantime, the cover artist has created a cover. She sends me three jpegs of the cover, a small, medium, and a large.
    As for the editing, I’ve done three passes on both stories. I’m glad they let me. The stories improved with the editing.
    After the editing comes the galleys, which is a PDF file with the cover, publisher page, dedication, etc. e-pubs have the same format as print pubs.
    If I find any errors in the galleys, I write them up in a email to the editor, saying on p.xx has this error. The editor will return the galleys again, and I check if the errors are fixed. Then I wait for the release date. And hope I sell a few copies.
    One story is out now. I’m waiting for the galleys on the second.
    I put an awful lot of effort into those stories, and if I sell 25 copies, I’ll consider myself lucky.
    You’re right, Pat, you won’t sell much in e-pub. I don’t know what the future of e-pub is. Right now, I think I’m crazy. 🙂 (that’s supposed to be a smiley face!)

    Reply
  22. Well, here’s the story from someone who’s e-pubbed. I also do NOT own an ereader. I’ve bought books from epubs in PDF format. And I still buy a lot of paper.
    My two stories, each just over 20,000 words computer e-count (what the RWA calls novellas) are with an e-pub.
    Everything is done with email and Microsoft Word. I send email query letters. They look just like any other query letter, except they’re email. The queries are formal and in standard English. Just because it’s email, does NOT mean the query can be casual.
    As for the manuscript, I send it in RTF format as an email attachment, formatted as in the submission guidelines. The editor edits it with Track Changes on, so I can see her edits. I take a copy of the file she returns, and make my edits, also with Track Changes on. When I’m done, I take another fresh copy of the editors’s original and put all my changes into that copy.
    In the meantime, the cover artist has created a cover. She sends me three jpegs of the cover, a small, medium, and a large.
    As for the editing, I’ve done three passes on both stories. I’m glad they let me. The stories improved with the editing.
    After the editing comes the galleys, which is a PDF file with the cover, publisher page, dedication, etc. e-pubs have the same format as print pubs.
    If I find any errors in the galleys, I write them up in a email to the editor, saying on p.xx has this error. The editor will return the galleys again, and I check if the errors are fixed. Then I wait for the release date. And hope I sell a few copies.
    One story is out now. I’m waiting for the galleys on the second.
    I put an awful lot of effort into those stories, and if I sell 25 copies, I’ll consider myself lucky.
    You’re right, Pat, you won’t sell much in e-pub. I don’t know what the future of e-pub is. Right now, I think I’m crazy. 🙂 (that’s supposed to be a smiley face!)

    Reply
  23. Well, here’s the story from someone who’s e-pubbed. I also do NOT own an ereader. I’ve bought books from epubs in PDF format. And I still buy a lot of paper.
    My two stories, each just over 20,000 words computer e-count (what the RWA calls novellas) are with an e-pub.
    Everything is done with email and Microsoft Word. I send email query letters. They look just like any other query letter, except they’re email. The queries are formal and in standard English. Just because it’s email, does NOT mean the query can be casual.
    As for the manuscript, I send it in RTF format as an email attachment, formatted as in the submission guidelines. The editor edits it with Track Changes on, so I can see her edits. I take a copy of the file she returns, and make my edits, also with Track Changes on. When I’m done, I take another fresh copy of the editors’s original and put all my changes into that copy.
    In the meantime, the cover artist has created a cover. She sends me three jpegs of the cover, a small, medium, and a large.
    As for the editing, I’ve done three passes on both stories. I’m glad they let me. The stories improved with the editing.
    After the editing comes the galleys, which is a PDF file with the cover, publisher page, dedication, etc. e-pubs have the same format as print pubs.
    If I find any errors in the galleys, I write them up in a email to the editor, saying on p.xx has this error. The editor will return the galleys again, and I check if the errors are fixed. Then I wait for the release date. And hope I sell a few copies.
    One story is out now. I’m waiting for the galleys on the second.
    I put an awful lot of effort into those stories, and if I sell 25 copies, I’ll consider myself lucky.
    You’re right, Pat, you won’t sell much in e-pub. I don’t know what the future of e-pub is. Right now, I think I’m crazy. 🙂 (that’s supposed to be a smiley face!)

    Reply
  24. Well, here’s the story from someone who’s e-pubbed. I also do NOT own an ereader. I’ve bought books from epubs in PDF format. And I still buy a lot of paper.
    My two stories, each just over 20,000 words computer e-count (what the RWA calls novellas) are with an e-pub.
    Everything is done with email and Microsoft Word. I send email query letters. They look just like any other query letter, except they’re email. The queries are formal and in standard English. Just because it’s email, does NOT mean the query can be casual.
    As for the manuscript, I send it in RTF format as an email attachment, formatted as in the submission guidelines. The editor edits it with Track Changes on, so I can see her edits. I take a copy of the file she returns, and make my edits, also with Track Changes on. When I’m done, I take another fresh copy of the editors’s original and put all my changes into that copy.
    In the meantime, the cover artist has created a cover. She sends me three jpegs of the cover, a small, medium, and a large.
    As for the editing, I’ve done three passes on both stories. I’m glad they let me. The stories improved with the editing.
    After the editing comes the galleys, which is a PDF file with the cover, publisher page, dedication, etc. e-pubs have the same format as print pubs.
    If I find any errors in the galleys, I write them up in a email to the editor, saying on p.xx has this error. The editor will return the galleys again, and I check if the errors are fixed. Then I wait for the release date. And hope I sell a few copies.
    One story is out now. I’m waiting for the galleys on the second.
    I put an awful lot of effort into those stories, and if I sell 25 copies, I’ll consider myself lucky.
    You’re right, Pat, you won’t sell much in e-pub. I don’t know what the future of e-pub is. Right now, I think I’m crazy. 🙂 (that’s supposed to be a smiley face!)

    Reply
  25. Well, here’s the story from someone who’s e-pubbed. I also do NOT own an ereader. I’ve bought books from epubs in PDF format. And I still buy a lot of paper.
    My two stories, each just over 20,000 words computer e-count (what the RWA calls novellas) are with an e-pub.
    Everything is done with email and Microsoft Word. I send email query letters. They look just like any other query letter, except they’re email. The queries are formal and in standard English. Just because it’s email, does NOT mean the query can be casual.
    As for the manuscript, I send it in RTF format as an email attachment, formatted as in the submission guidelines. The editor edits it with Track Changes on, so I can see her edits. I take a copy of the file she returns, and make my edits, also with Track Changes on. When I’m done, I take another fresh copy of the editors’s original and put all my changes into that copy.
    In the meantime, the cover artist has created a cover. She sends me three jpegs of the cover, a small, medium, and a large.
    As for the editing, I’ve done three passes on both stories. I’m glad they let me. The stories improved with the editing.
    After the editing comes the galleys, which is a PDF file with the cover, publisher page, dedication, etc. e-pubs have the same format as print pubs.
    If I find any errors in the galleys, I write them up in a email to the editor, saying on p.xx has this error. The editor will return the galleys again, and I check if the errors are fixed. Then I wait for the release date. And hope I sell a few copies.
    One story is out now. I’m waiting for the galleys on the second.
    I put an awful lot of effort into those stories, and if I sell 25 copies, I’ll consider myself lucky.
    You’re right, Pat, you won’t sell much in e-pub. I don’t know what the future of e-pub is. Right now, I think I’m crazy. 🙂 (that’s supposed to be a smiley face!)

    Reply
  26. I’m in the other camp, Pat. I love the e-editing; for me it’s so much easier to read editorial notes when they’re not scribbled cryptically in blue pencil, and easier, too, to make my own changes known in return. In fact, I’m such a computer-convert now that the first and only hard copy I have of a ms. is the printed book. Don’t miss those leaning stacks of print-outs one bit, or having to pay for paper, printer ink, and shipping.
    As for the question of revision and rewriting — I’m afraid I’m in the other camp there, too. Did you mean me when you mentioned authors who printed out the final page directly into the FedEx box? (back in the old days of sending printed manuscripts, anyway.)
    I’m a first-draft-final-copy writer. I’ve found that for me, rewriting tends to drag me down, and the words lose their freshness. I know it’s like the flying trapeze without the net and really bad things can happen if I’m not careful — but ahh, the creative thrill of winging it in a one-draft!*g*
    But that’s just me. I suspect there are a LOT more (and more sane) writers like you and Nina…

    Reply
  27. I’m in the other camp, Pat. I love the e-editing; for me it’s so much easier to read editorial notes when they’re not scribbled cryptically in blue pencil, and easier, too, to make my own changes known in return. In fact, I’m such a computer-convert now that the first and only hard copy I have of a ms. is the printed book. Don’t miss those leaning stacks of print-outs one bit, or having to pay for paper, printer ink, and shipping.
    As for the question of revision and rewriting — I’m afraid I’m in the other camp there, too. Did you mean me when you mentioned authors who printed out the final page directly into the FedEx box? (back in the old days of sending printed manuscripts, anyway.)
    I’m a first-draft-final-copy writer. I’ve found that for me, rewriting tends to drag me down, and the words lose their freshness. I know it’s like the flying trapeze without the net and really bad things can happen if I’m not careful — but ahh, the creative thrill of winging it in a one-draft!*g*
    But that’s just me. I suspect there are a LOT more (and more sane) writers like you and Nina…

    Reply
  28. I’m in the other camp, Pat. I love the e-editing; for me it’s so much easier to read editorial notes when they’re not scribbled cryptically in blue pencil, and easier, too, to make my own changes known in return. In fact, I’m such a computer-convert now that the first and only hard copy I have of a ms. is the printed book. Don’t miss those leaning stacks of print-outs one bit, or having to pay for paper, printer ink, and shipping.
    As for the question of revision and rewriting — I’m afraid I’m in the other camp there, too. Did you mean me when you mentioned authors who printed out the final page directly into the FedEx box? (back in the old days of sending printed manuscripts, anyway.)
    I’m a first-draft-final-copy writer. I’ve found that for me, rewriting tends to drag me down, and the words lose their freshness. I know it’s like the flying trapeze without the net and really bad things can happen if I’m not careful — but ahh, the creative thrill of winging it in a one-draft!*g*
    But that’s just me. I suspect there are a LOT more (and more sane) writers like you and Nina…

    Reply
  29. I’m in the other camp, Pat. I love the e-editing; for me it’s so much easier to read editorial notes when they’re not scribbled cryptically in blue pencil, and easier, too, to make my own changes known in return. In fact, I’m such a computer-convert now that the first and only hard copy I have of a ms. is the printed book. Don’t miss those leaning stacks of print-outs one bit, or having to pay for paper, printer ink, and shipping.
    As for the question of revision and rewriting — I’m afraid I’m in the other camp there, too. Did you mean me when you mentioned authors who printed out the final page directly into the FedEx box? (back in the old days of sending printed manuscripts, anyway.)
    I’m a first-draft-final-copy writer. I’ve found that for me, rewriting tends to drag me down, and the words lose their freshness. I know it’s like the flying trapeze without the net and really bad things can happen if I’m not careful — but ahh, the creative thrill of winging it in a one-draft!*g*
    But that’s just me. I suspect there are a LOT more (and more sane) writers like you and Nina…

    Reply
  30. I’m in the other camp, Pat. I love the e-editing; for me it’s so much easier to read editorial notes when they’re not scribbled cryptically in blue pencil, and easier, too, to make my own changes known in return. In fact, I’m such a computer-convert now that the first and only hard copy I have of a ms. is the printed book. Don’t miss those leaning stacks of print-outs one bit, or having to pay for paper, printer ink, and shipping.
    As for the question of revision and rewriting — I’m afraid I’m in the other camp there, too. Did you mean me when you mentioned authors who printed out the final page directly into the FedEx box? (back in the old days of sending printed manuscripts, anyway.)
    I’m a first-draft-final-copy writer. I’ve found that for me, rewriting tends to drag me down, and the words lose their freshness. I know it’s like the flying trapeze without the net and really bad things can happen if I’m not careful — but ahh, the creative thrill of winging it in a one-draft!*g*
    But that’s just me. I suspect there are a LOT more (and more sane) writers like you and Nina…

    Reply
  31. I’m in the third ‘camp’ if you will. I’m still waiting to submit a finished manuscript to an *editor*. So far, I haven’t made it past one full and a couple partials that have been looked at. But I do know many authors who say the same thing. Years after they’ve seen their story come full circle, they’d still go back and make changes if they could.
    I semi-edit as I go, then go back through the whole and revise and tie up any lose ends, (plot holes are the bane of my existence, whether they be mine, or someone I’m reading) so my hope is never to have any. Then it sits for a week at least, before I can go through it again. Any sooner and there are too many things I don’t catch.
    And that’s it for me! Well, except for waiting for that one agent who says she/he can’t live without representing it 😛

    Reply
  32. I’m in the third ‘camp’ if you will. I’m still waiting to submit a finished manuscript to an *editor*. So far, I haven’t made it past one full and a couple partials that have been looked at. But I do know many authors who say the same thing. Years after they’ve seen their story come full circle, they’d still go back and make changes if they could.
    I semi-edit as I go, then go back through the whole and revise and tie up any lose ends, (plot holes are the bane of my existence, whether they be mine, or someone I’m reading) so my hope is never to have any. Then it sits for a week at least, before I can go through it again. Any sooner and there are too many things I don’t catch.
    And that’s it for me! Well, except for waiting for that one agent who says she/he can’t live without representing it 😛

    Reply
  33. I’m in the third ‘camp’ if you will. I’m still waiting to submit a finished manuscript to an *editor*. So far, I haven’t made it past one full and a couple partials that have been looked at. But I do know many authors who say the same thing. Years after they’ve seen their story come full circle, they’d still go back and make changes if they could.
    I semi-edit as I go, then go back through the whole and revise and tie up any lose ends, (plot holes are the bane of my existence, whether they be mine, or someone I’m reading) so my hope is never to have any. Then it sits for a week at least, before I can go through it again. Any sooner and there are too many things I don’t catch.
    And that’s it for me! Well, except for waiting for that one agent who says she/he can’t live without representing it 😛

    Reply
  34. I’m in the third ‘camp’ if you will. I’m still waiting to submit a finished manuscript to an *editor*. So far, I haven’t made it past one full and a couple partials that have been looked at. But I do know many authors who say the same thing. Years after they’ve seen their story come full circle, they’d still go back and make changes if they could.
    I semi-edit as I go, then go back through the whole and revise and tie up any lose ends, (plot holes are the bane of my existence, whether they be mine, or someone I’m reading) so my hope is never to have any. Then it sits for a week at least, before I can go through it again. Any sooner and there are too many things I don’t catch.
    And that’s it for me! Well, except for waiting for that one agent who says she/he can’t live without representing it 😛

    Reply
  35. I’m in the third ‘camp’ if you will. I’m still waiting to submit a finished manuscript to an *editor*. So far, I haven’t made it past one full and a couple partials that have been looked at. But I do know many authors who say the same thing. Years after they’ve seen their story come full circle, they’d still go back and make changes if they could.
    I semi-edit as I go, then go back through the whole and revise and tie up any lose ends, (plot holes are the bane of my existence, whether they be mine, or someone I’m reading) so my hope is never to have any. Then it sits for a week at least, before I can go through it again. Any sooner and there are too many things I don’t catch.
    And that’s it for me! Well, except for waiting for that one agent who says she/he can’t live without representing it 😛

    Reply
  36. I hear ya, Susan, about the boxes of books. I had to relegate my American History references to the basement, but my problem is compounded by those towering stacks of papers Sue Scott is talking about. Twenty-five years of copyedits and galleys have to go somewhere.
    Thanks for a good breakdown of the e-book process, Linda! I guess you can think of it as a paid apprenticeship. These days, the market is so tight that you have to be perfect to sell, so you’re learning how to be perfect.
    Theo, my total sympathies. I know experienced published authors who can’t crack the editorial nut these days. You might as well keep buying lottery tickets while you’re at it.
    SS–I wasn’t talking about you specifically but you’re not alone. And I drool in envy at your process.

    Reply
  37. I hear ya, Susan, about the boxes of books. I had to relegate my American History references to the basement, but my problem is compounded by those towering stacks of papers Sue Scott is talking about. Twenty-five years of copyedits and galleys have to go somewhere.
    Thanks for a good breakdown of the e-book process, Linda! I guess you can think of it as a paid apprenticeship. These days, the market is so tight that you have to be perfect to sell, so you’re learning how to be perfect.
    Theo, my total sympathies. I know experienced published authors who can’t crack the editorial nut these days. You might as well keep buying lottery tickets while you’re at it.
    SS–I wasn’t talking about you specifically but you’re not alone. And I drool in envy at your process.

    Reply
  38. I hear ya, Susan, about the boxes of books. I had to relegate my American History references to the basement, but my problem is compounded by those towering stacks of papers Sue Scott is talking about. Twenty-five years of copyedits and galleys have to go somewhere.
    Thanks for a good breakdown of the e-book process, Linda! I guess you can think of it as a paid apprenticeship. These days, the market is so tight that you have to be perfect to sell, so you’re learning how to be perfect.
    Theo, my total sympathies. I know experienced published authors who can’t crack the editorial nut these days. You might as well keep buying lottery tickets while you’re at it.
    SS–I wasn’t talking about you specifically but you’re not alone. And I drool in envy at your process.

    Reply
  39. I hear ya, Susan, about the boxes of books. I had to relegate my American History references to the basement, but my problem is compounded by those towering stacks of papers Sue Scott is talking about. Twenty-five years of copyedits and galleys have to go somewhere.
    Thanks for a good breakdown of the e-book process, Linda! I guess you can think of it as a paid apprenticeship. These days, the market is so tight that you have to be perfect to sell, so you’re learning how to be perfect.
    Theo, my total sympathies. I know experienced published authors who can’t crack the editorial nut these days. You might as well keep buying lottery tickets while you’re at it.
    SS–I wasn’t talking about you specifically but you’re not alone. And I drool in envy at your process.

    Reply
  40. I hear ya, Susan, about the boxes of books. I had to relegate my American History references to the basement, but my problem is compounded by those towering stacks of papers Sue Scott is talking about. Twenty-five years of copyedits and galleys have to go somewhere.
    Thanks for a good breakdown of the e-book process, Linda! I guess you can think of it as a paid apprenticeship. These days, the market is so tight that you have to be perfect to sell, so you’re learning how to be perfect.
    Theo, my total sympathies. I know experienced published authors who can’t crack the editorial nut these days. You might as well keep buying lottery tickets while you’re at it.
    SS–I wasn’t talking about you specifically but you’re not alone. And I drool in envy at your process.

    Reply
  41. But…but…I never win with lottery tickets! O_O
    That’s okay. I’ll just keep writing, because whether they ever see the ‘light of day’ or not, I do it first for me. Having the chance for others to read and maybe like my stories a little is a plus, but not the reason I write. 😀
    I meant to comment that I must have 20 huge rubbermaid boxes down the basement (yes, I learned when our old basement flooded) full of books. Novels, research books, study guides, how-to’s…the list goes on. Not including the three double bookshelves I have up here. But I just can’t seem to give up the feel of a real book in my hands. So I keep collecting them. Soon we’ll have to move into the barn because the only available room in the house will be taken up by books…

    Reply
  42. But…but…I never win with lottery tickets! O_O
    That’s okay. I’ll just keep writing, because whether they ever see the ‘light of day’ or not, I do it first for me. Having the chance for others to read and maybe like my stories a little is a plus, but not the reason I write. 😀
    I meant to comment that I must have 20 huge rubbermaid boxes down the basement (yes, I learned when our old basement flooded) full of books. Novels, research books, study guides, how-to’s…the list goes on. Not including the three double bookshelves I have up here. But I just can’t seem to give up the feel of a real book in my hands. So I keep collecting them. Soon we’ll have to move into the barn because the only available room in the house will be taken up by books…

    Reply
  43. But…but…I never win with lottery tickets! O_O
    That’s okay. I’ll just keep writing, because whether they ever see the ‘light of day’ or not, I do it first for me. Having the chance for others to read and maybe like my stories a little is a plus, but not the reason I write. 😀
    I meant to comment that I must have 20 huge rubbermaid boxes down the basement (yes, I learned when our old basement flooded) full of books. Novels, research books, study guides, how-to’s…the list goes on. Not including the three double bookshelves I have up here. But I just can’t seem to give up the feel of a real book in my hands. So I keep collecting them. Soon we’ll have to move into the barn because the only available room in the house will be taken up by books…

    Reply
  44. But…but…I never win with lottery tickets! O_O
    That’s okay. I’ll just keep writing, because whether they ever see the ‘light of day’ or not, I do it first for me. Having the chance for others to read and maybe like my stories a little is a plus, but not the reason I write. 😀
    I meant to comment that I must have 20 huge rubbermaid boxes down the basement (yes, I learned when our old basement flooded) full of books. Novels, research books, study guides, how-to’s…the list goes on. Not including the three double bookshelves I have up here. But I just can’t seem to give up the feel of a real book in my hands. So I keep collecting them. Soon we’ll have to move into the barn because the only available room in the house will be taken up by books…

    Reply
  45. But…but…I never win with lottery tickets! O_O
    That’s okay. I’ll just keep writing, because whether they ever see the ‘light of day’ or not, I do it first for me. Having the chance for others to read and maybe like my stories a little is a plus, but not the reason I write. 😀
    I meant to comment that I must have 20 huge rubbermaid boxes down the basement (yes, I learned when our old basement flooded) full of books. Novels, research books, study guides, how-to’s…the list goes on. Not including the three double bookshelves I have up here. But I just can’t seem to give up the feel of a real book in my hands. So I keep collecting them. Soon we’ll have to move into the barn because the only available room in the house will be taken up by books…

    Reply
  46. Know the feeling, Theo. But I just spent the morning researching through lovely 1847 volumes on Google Books and thinking maybbe I really ought to sell the reference library… But I can’t. I just can’t. I know exactly where to find things in my lovely old books.

    Reply
  47. Know the feeling, Theo. But I just spent the morning researching through lovely 1847 volumes on Google Books and thinking maybbe I really ought to sell the reference library… But I can’t. I just can’t. I know exactly where to find things in my lovely old books.

    Reply
  48. Know the feeling, Theo. But I just spent the morning researching through lovely 1847 volumes on Google Books and thinking maybbe I really ought to sell the reference library… But I can’t. I just can’t. I know exactly where to find things in my lovely old books.

    Reply
  49. Know the feeling, Theo. But I just spent the morning researching through lovely 1847 volumes on Google Books and thinking maybbe I really ought to sell the reference library… But I can’t. I just can’t. I know exactly where to find things in my lovely old books.

    Reply
  50. Know the feeling, Theo. But I just spent the morning researching through lovely 1847 volumes on Google Books and thinking maybbe I really ought to sell the reference library… But I can’t. I just can’t. I know exactly where to find things in my lovely old books.

    Reply
  51. I tried using Google books. I kept wanting to cross check things but couldn’t remember where I’d been in the book. By the time I had page numbers written all over a notebook, I didn’t have a clue what anything went to anymore 🙁
    I’ll keep my old books. I just got one yesterday printed in 1882. Imagine the history that book could tell me if it could talk. Somehow, I just don’t get that connection with ebooks of any kind…

    Reply
  52. I tried using Google books. I kept wanting to cross check things but couldn’t remember where I’d been in the book. By the time I had page numbers written all over a notebook, I didn’t have a clue what anything went to anymore 🙁
    I’ll keep my old books. I just got one yesterday printed in 1882. Imagine the history that book could tell me if it could talk. Somehow, I just don’t get that connection with ebooks of any kind…

    Reply
  53. I tried using Google books. I kept wanting to cross check things but couldn’t remember where I’d been in the book. By the time I had page numbers written all over a notebook, I didn’t have a clue what anything went to anymore 🙁
    I’ll keep my old books. I just got one yesterday printed in 1882. Imagine the history that book could tell me if it could talk. Somehow, I just don’t get that connection with ebooks of any kind…

    Reply
  54. I tried using Google books. I kept wanting to cross check things but couldn’t remember where I’d been in the book. By the time I had page numbers written all over a notebook, I didn’t have a clue what anything went to anymore 🙁
    I’ll keep my old books. I just got one yesterday printed in 1882. Imagine the history that book could tell me if it could talk. Somehow, I just don’t get that connection with ebooks of any kind…

    Reply
  55. I tried using Google books. I kept wanting to cross check things but couldn’t remember where I’d been in the book. By the time I had page numbers written all over a notebook, I didn’t have a clue what anything went to anymore 🙁
    I’ll keep my old books. I just got one yesterday printed in 1882. Imagine the history that book could tell me if it could talk. Somehow, I just don’t get that connection with ebooks of any kind…

    Reply
  56. Pat, I’m the same when it comes to editing — it’s constant and never-ending, and because I *always* see something I want to change, I almost never reread my books, either. I added in ‘almost’ there, because when my novella was reissued recently I actually read it. First one ever. It’s more than 7 years since I wrote it, so maybe that’s the trick, because I didn’t go into edit mode at all.
    As for e-books, I don’t have an e-reader — I spend enough time staring at a screen, but I can see the day coming when I’ll succumb. The idea of traveling with a small library in one small gadget is very appealing.

    Reply
  57. Pat, I’m the same when it comes to editing — it’s constant and never-ending, and because I *always* see something I want to change, I almost never reread my books, either. I added in ‘almost’ there, because when my novella was reissued recently I actually read it. First one ever. It’s more than 7 years since I wrote it, so maybe that’s the trick, because I didn’t go into edit mode at all.
    As for e-books, I don’t have an e-reader — I spend enough time staring at a screen, but I can see the day coming when I’ll succumb. The idea of traveling with a small library in one small gadget is very appealing.

    Reply
  58. Pat, I’m the same when it comes to editing — it’s constant and never-ending, and because I *always* see something I want to change, I almost never reread my books, either. I added in ‘almost’ there, because when my novella was reissued recently I actually read it. First one ever. It’s more than 7 years since I wrote it, so maybe that’s the trick, because I didn’t go into edit mode at all.
    As for e-books, I don’t have an e-reader — I spend enough time staring at a screen, but I can see the day coming when I’ll succumb. The idea of traveling with a small library in one small gadget is very appealing.

    Reply
  59. Pat, I’m the same when it comes to editing — it’s constant and never-ending, and because I *always* see something I want to change, I almost never reread my books, either. I added in ‘almost’ there, because when my novella was reissued recently I actually read it. First one ever. It’s more than 7 years since I wrote it, so maybe that’s the trick, because I didn’t go into edit mode at all.
    As for e-books, I don’t have an e-reader — I spend enough time staring at a screen, but I can see the day coming when I’ll succumb. The idea of traveling with a small library in one small gadget is very appealing.

    Reply
  60. Pat, I’m the same when it comes to editing — it’s constant and never-ending, and because I *always* see something I want to change, I almost never reread my books, either. I added in ‘almost’ there, because when my novella was reissued recently I actually read it. First one ever. It’s more than 7 years since I wrote it, so maybe that’s the trick, because I didn’t go into edit mode at all.
    As for e-books, I don’t have an e-reader — I spend enough time staring at a screen, but I can see the day coming when I’ll succumb. The idea of traveling with a small library in one small gadget is very appealing.

    Reply

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