Feisty Females

Edith_layton2

It’s Edith!
It has lately been brought to my attention that readers, editors, and critics love "Feisty" females in Historical Romances.
Truthfully I’m not too fond of them. I think they’re faux, at least in Historical novels.
I believe in brave women, smart women and daring women, and have wrriten about them. But not “feisty” women.
I take that to mean women who stand up and speak their minds, no matter the circumstances and the odds against them.

I remember them well.
I saw them in my childhood in all those wonderful luridly TECHNICOLOR (tm*) movies. They were feisty, all right.

Thepirate2dlgThere was the heroine on the pirate ship, beating on the pirate’s manly chest and cursing him, as he held his saber to her lily-white throat. She’d spit at him, or bite him, or kick him. He’d laugh, showing his perfect pearly whites if he were the hero, (or rotting stumps, were he the villain) and say: “I like a woman with spirit!” if he was the hero. (Or, “I likes a female with spirit!” if he were the villain.)

On the castle battlements, the medieval heroine, her hair flying in streamers in the wind, would resist the villain, sometimes even with a sword, as he laughed, tossed away her weapon, clutched her to his chest and cried “At last, I have you, my proud beauty!”

In Westerns, there was the woman who fought back, hands, feet and revolver, who earned a: “Ah, a spitfire, ain’tcha?”

Etcetera, etcetera

That was feisty in the films.

In historical reality, feisty females in most previous eras did not have long or happy lives.
Women had no rights. They couldn’t vote. Couldn’t own property. They were themselves property. Which is not to say there were no feisty ones. If a woman had a title, money, and a large well-to-do influential family, she could have a big mouth and be feisty as all get out.
If she were a fishmonger, I suppose she could be as well.
But in most cases, if an average female behaved like a modern woman, she’d have been punished, or confined to Bedlam, or laughed at and scorned. There were even cruel “Scold’s bridles” used right here in the good old USA in Colonial times, used to lock the jaws of women whose husbands thought they spoke out too much.

So down through the ages women had to learn to plot, plan, be wily, and damned clever. That was the historical equivalent of feisty. It meant they had to hone their brains and be twice as smart as men. It earned them the reputation of being “catty” and devious, and good for them. They had to behave like modest meek creatures, but if they were bright and lucky, they got their way and won the day.

Hoorah for us today!!
But put a modern woman in historic times? I don’t think so.

At least that’s how I feel.
How do you, the Reader, feel about Feisty females in Historical Romances?
Want more?
Want less?
Do tell, I’m all ears.

* * *

I’m also all embarrassed.
Last time I posted here I asked readers to tell me which of my books had a dog on the cover. This proved, once and for all, that my readers are much smarter than I am.
LadyofspiritI was thinking of LADY OF SPIRIT, the book that Kim and Mary K. identified. There was a big black dog on the cover. He was a ghost dog who featured in the story.
I clean forgot the adorable beagle on the cover of A REGENCY CHRISTMAS CAROL, the anthology that Christy wrote to tell me about. Prizes to all! True, I had Bernese Mountain Dogs (but no beagles) in other Christmas stories – thanks for remembering them – but they were never shown on the covers.

So Winners: please to send me your snail mail addresses, and the pertinent book is yours!

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150 thoughts on “Feisty Females”

  1. I hate fiesty. to me, fiesty = idiot and I’m always sad the small one of wee mental powers doesn’t end up wrong side up in a ditch. Powerful is fine – and certainly some women carved out power of themselves and unconventional lifestyles to boot – life is complex. But fiesty? Fiesty makes me think of Titanic, a movie I really loathed, where the fiesty heroine causes everyone no end of trouble and sends her lover to his death, all because she can’t listen to even the tiniest bits of reality in the face of events. Fiesty women bug me. Smart women enthrall me. I am, as always, positive I speak only for the minority in that.

    Reply
  2. I hate fiesty. to me, fiesty = idiot and I’m always sad the small one of wee mental powers doesn’t end up wrong side up in a ditch. Powerful is fine – and certainly some women carved out power of themselves and unconventional lifestyles to boot – life is complex. But fiesty? Fiesty makes me think of Titanic, a movie I really loathed, where the fiesty heroine causes everyone no end of trouble and sends her lover to his death, all because she can’t listen to even the tiniest bits of reality in the face of events. Fiesty women bug me. Smart women enthrall me. I am, as always, positive I speak only for the minority in that.

    Reply
  3. I hate fiesty. to me, fiesty = idiot and I’m always sad the small one of wee mental powers doesn’t end up wrong side up in a ditch. Powerful is fine – and certainly some women carved out power of themselves and unconventional lifestyles to boot – life is complex. But fiesty? Fiesty makes me think of Titanic, a movie I really loathed, where the fiesty heroine causes everyone no end of trouble and sends her lover to his death, all because she can’t listen to even the tiniest bits of reality in the face of events. Fiesty women bug me. Smart women enthrall me. I am, as always, positive I speak only for the minority in that.

    Reply
  4. I hate fiesty. to me, fiesty = idiot and I’m always sad the small one of wee mental powers doesn’t end up wrong side up in a ditch. Powerful is fine – and certainly some women carved out power of themselves and unconventional lifestyles to boot – life is complex. But fiesty? Fiesty makes me think of Titanic, a movie I really loathed, where the fiesty heroine causes everyone no end of trouble and sends her lover to his death, all because she can’t listen to even the tiniest bits of reality in the face of events. Fiesty women bug me. Smart women enthrall me. I am, as always, positive I speak only for the minority in that.

    Reply
  5. I hate fiesty. to me, fiesty = idiot and I’m always sad the small one of wee mental powers doesn’t end up wrong side up in a ditch. Powerful is fine – and certainly some women carved out power of themselves and unconventional lifestyles to boot – life is complex. But fiesty? Fiesty makes me think of Titanic, a movie I really loathed, where the fiesty heroine causes everyone no end of trouble and sends her lover to his death, all because she can’t listen to even the tiniest bits of reality in the face of events. Fiesty women bug me. Smart women enthrall me. I am, as always, positive I speak only for the minority in that.

    Reply
  6. kalen – how awesome would a romance be where halfway through he dumps the fiesty one in favor of a sensible one? And not in the “Oh, it was you all along way” but in the “wow, she is a hot mess, my bad’ way – I spend a lot of romances wishing for just such a sharp left turn.

    Reply
  7. kalen – how awesome would a romance be where halfway through he dumps the fiesty one in favor of a sensible one? And not in the “Oh, it was you all along way” but in the “wow, she is a hot mess, my bad’ way – I spend a lot of romances wishing for just such a sharp left turn.

    Reply
  8. kalen – how awesome would a romance be where halfway through he dumps the fiesty one in favor of a sensible one? And not in the “Oh, it was you all along way” but in the “wow, she is a hot mess, my bad’ way – I spend a lot of romances wishing for just such a sharp left turn.

    Reply
  9. kalen – how awesome would a romance be where halfway through he dumps the fiesty one in favor of a sensible one? And not in the “Oh, it was you all along way” but in the “wow, she is a hot mess, my bad’ way – I spend a lot of romances wishing for just such a sharp left turn.

    Reply
  10. kalen – how awesome would a romance be where halfway through he dumps the fiesty one in favor of a sensible one? And not in the “Oh, it was you all along way” but in the “wow, she is a hot mess, my bad’ way – I spend a lot of romances wishing for just such a sharp left turn.

    Reply
  11. Feisty to me spells “sass without sense.” It’s just that kind of a word; I wouldn’t like it in a man or a dog either. It might be OK in a chipmunk. Chip and Dale spring to mind; feisty is Meant to take a pratfall.
    The worst thing about it is that it’s not only a cliche, it’s a cliche without any truth to it. I’ve never known anybody I would describe as “feisty.” I think maybe Damon Runyon made it up. Or Horatio Alger. Or maybe it’s just a crummy imitation of Shakespeare’s Kate or Chaucer’s Wife of Bath; sort of the Jerry Springer version.
    I think *guys* like the idea of a feisty female because they can imagine that they’re taming her. A guy I was dating in 1968 once said to me, “You’re cute when you’re mad.” Oddly enough, I was twice as mad after he said it. I wonder where he is now…

    Reply
  12. Feisty to me spells “sass without sense.” It’s just that kind of a word; I wouldn’t like it in a man or a dog either. It might be OK in a chipmunk. Chip and Dale spring to mind; feisty is Meant to take a pratfall.
    The worst thing about it is that it’s not only a cliche, it’s a cliche without any truth to it. I’ve never known anybody I would describe as “feisty.” I think maybe Damon Runyon made it up. Or Horatio Alger. Or maybe it’s just a crummy imitation of Shakespeare’s Kate or Chaucer’s Wife of Bath; sort of the Jerry Springer version.
    I think *guys* like the idea of a feisty female because they can imagine that they’re taming her. A guy I was dating in 1968 once said to me, “You’re cute when you’re mad.” Oddly enough, I was twice as mad after he said it. I wonder where he is now…

    Reply
  13. Feisty to me spells “sass without sense.” It’s just that kind of a word; I wouldn’t like it in a man or a dog either. It might be OK in a chipmunk. Chip and Dale spring to mind; feisty is Meant to take a pratfall.
    The worst thing about it is that it’s not only a cliche, it’s a cliche without any truth to it. I’ve never known anybody I would describe as “feisty.” I think maybe Damon Runyon made it up. Or Horatio Alger. Or maybe it’s just a crummy imitation of Shakespeare’s Kate or Chaucer’s Wife of Bath; sort of the Jerry Springer version.
    I think *guys* like the idea of a feisty female because they can imagine that they’re taming her. A guy I was dating in 1968 once said to me, “You’re cute when you’re mad.” Oddly enough, I was twice as mad after he said it. I wonder where he is now…

    Reply
  14. Feisty to me spells “sass without sense.” It’s just that kind of a word; I wouldn’t like it in a man or a dog either. It might be OK in a chipmunk. Chip and Dale spring to mind; feisty is Meant to take a pratfall.
    The worst thing about it is that it’s not only a cliche, it’s a cliche without any truth to it. I’ve never known anybody I would describe as “feisty.” I think maybe Damon Runyon made it up. Or Horatio Alger. Or maybe it’s just a crummy imitation of Shakespeare’s Kate or Chaucer’s Wife of Bath; sort of the Jerry Springer version.
    I think *guys* like the idea of a feisty female because they can imagine that they’re taming her. A guy I was dating in 1968 once said to me, “You’re cute when you’re mad.” Oddly enough, I was twice as mad after he said it. I wonder where he is now…

    Reply
  15. Feisty to me spells “sass without sense.” It’s just that kind of a word; I wouldn’t like it in a man or a dog either. It might be OK in a chipmunk. Chip and Dale spring to mind; feisty is Meant to take a pratfall.
    The worst thing about it is that it’s not only a cliche, it’s a cliche without any truth to it. I’ve never known anybody I would describe as “feisty.” I think maybe Damon Runyon made it up. Or Horatio Alger. Or maybe it’s just a crummy imitation of Shakespeare’s Kate or Chaucer’s Wife of Bath; sort of the Jerry Springer version.
    I think *guys* like the idea of a feisty female because they can imagine that they’re taming her. A guy I was dating in 1968 once said to me, “You’re cute when you’re mad.” Oddly enough, I was twice as mad after he said it. I wonder where he is now…

    Reply
  16. Elaine, you’re hilarious. Liz, write that book–I’d love to read it. Another vehement “no, thanks” from me on the fiesty heroine.
    I’ve pasted in some of the quotes the OED uses to demonstrate the meaning of feisty. Interesting that several of them relate back to troublesome animals or little children. Hmm.
    FROM THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
    1913 H. KEPHART: Feisty means when a feller’s allers wigglin’ about, wantin’ ever’body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes.
    1926 E. M. ROBERTS: That-there feisty bay mare jumped straight upwards and broke the tongue outen the plow.
    1965 ‘D. SHANNON’: Luther gets a little feisty after a few drinks, and he began to argue with him.
    1968 J. POTTS: He couldn’t shake her loose, she hung on to his arm, feisty as a terrier.

    Reply
  17. Elaine, you’re hilarious. Liz, write that book–I’d love to read it. Another vehement “no, thanks” from me on the fiesty heroine.
    I’ve pasted in some of the quotes the OED uses to demonstrate the meaning of feisty. Interesting that several of them relate back to troublesome animals or little children. Hmm.
    FROM THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
    1913 H. KEPHART: Feisty means when a feller’s allers wigglin’ about, wantin’ ever’body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes.
    1926 E. M. ROBERTS: That-there feisty bay mare jumped straight upwards and broke the tongue outen the plow.
    1965 ‘D. SHANNON’: Luther gets a little feisty after a few drinks, and he began to argue with him.
    1968 J. POTTS: He couldn’t shake her loose, she hung on to his arm, feisty as a terrier.

    Reply
  18. Elaine, you’re hilarious. Liz, write that book–I’d love to read it. Another vehement “no, thanks” from me on the fiesty heroine.
    I’ve pasted in some of the quotes the OED uses to demonstrate the meaning of feisty. Interesting that several of them relate back to troublesome animals or little children. Hmm.
    FROM THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
    1913 H. KEPHART: Feisty means when a feller’s allers wigglin’ about, wantin’ ever’body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes.
    1926 E. M. ROBERTS: That-there feisty bay mare jumped straight upwards and broke the tongue outen the plow.
    1965 ‘D. SHANNON’: Luther gets a little feisty after a few drinks, and he began to argue with him.
    1968 J. POTTS: He couldn’t shake her loose, she hung on to his arm, feisty as a terrier.

    Reply
  19. Elaine, you’re hilarious. Liz, write that book–I’d love to read it. Another vehement “no, thanks” from me on the fiesty heroine.
    I’ve pasted in some of the quotes the OED uses to demonstrate the meaning of feisty. Interesting that several of them relate back to troublesome animals or little children. Hmm.
    FROM THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
    1913 H. KEPHART: Feisty means when a feller’s allers wigglin’ about, wantin’ ever’body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes.
    1926 E. M. ROBERTS: That-there feisty bay mare jumped straight upwards and broke the tongue outen the plow.
    1965 ‘D. SHANNON’: Luther gets a little feisty after a few drinks, and he began to argue with him.
    1968 J. POTTS: He couldn’t shake her loose, she hung on to his arm, feisty as a terrier.

    Reply
  20. Elaine, you’re hilarious. Liz, write that book–I’d love to read it. Another vehement “no, thanks” from me on the fiesty heroine.
    I’ve pasted in some of the quotes the OED uses to demonstrate the meaning of feisty. Interesting that several of them relate back to troublesome animals or little children. Hmm.
    FROM THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
    1913 H. KEPHART: Feisty means when a feller’s allers wigglin’ about, wantin’ ever’body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes.
    1926 E. M. ROBERTS: That-there feisty bay mare jumped straight upwards and broke the tongue outen the plow.
    1965 ‘D. SHANNON’: Luther gets a little feisty after a few drinks, and he began to argue with him.
    1968 J. POTTS: He couldn’t shake her loose, she hung on to his arm, feisty as a terrier.

    Reply
  21. The thing I dislike most is that those women start out as feisty and end up domesticated. I always feel a message underneath, the “let’s teach her a lesson”. Of course, feisty also spells imature and stupid to me. I am sure there have always been women who spoke their minds, but it is plain stupid to speak your mind when attact by a pirate with a sword. TSTL really! I do not think, consequently, that women today are feisty or that a feisty heroine is a modern heroine in a historical setting (Sorry!)… it seems the feistyness is really just a way to get the heroine in trouble, so the hero can save her. I really dislike this plot device. Even if the status of women in the past left everything to be desired, why do modern day writers set their heroines up as incompetent, stupid and feisty creatures? It really puzzles me..
    LizA getting off her soapbox, embarrassed…

    Reply
  22. The thing I dislike most is that those women start out as feisty and end up domesticated. I always feel a message underneath, the “let’s teach her a lesson”. Of course, feisty also spells imature and stupid to me. I am sure there have always been women who spoke their minds, but it is plain stupid to speak your mind when attact by a pirate with a sword. TSTL really! I do not think, consequently, that women today are feisty or that a feisty heroine is a modern heroine in a historical setting (Sorry!)… it seems the feistyness is really just a way to get the heroine in trouble, so the hero can save her. I really dislike this plot device. Even if the status of women in the past left everything to be desired, why do modern day writers set their heroines up as incompetent, stupid and feisty creatures? It really puzzles me..
    LizA getting off her soapbox, embarrassed…

    Reply
  23. The thing I dislike most is that those women start out as feisty and end up domesticated. I always feel a message underneath, the “let’s teach her a lesson”. Of course, feisty also spells imature and stupid to me. I am sure there have always been women who spoke their minds, but it is plain stupid to speak your mind when attact by a pirate with a sword. TSTL really! I do not think, consequently, that women today are feisty or that a feisty heroine is a modern heroine in a historical setting (Sorry!)… it seems the feistyness is really just a way to get the heroine in trouble, so the hero can save her. I really dislike this plot device. Even if the status of women in the past left everything to be desired, why do modern day writers set their heroines up as incompetent, stupid and feisty creatures? It really puzzles me..
    LizA getting off her soapbox, embarrassed…

    Reply
  24. The thing I dislike most is that those women start out as feisty and end up domesticated. I always feel a message underneath, the “let’s teach her a lesson”. Of course, feisty also spells imature and stupid to me. I am sure there have always been women who spoke their minds, but it is plain stupid to speak your mind when attact by a pirate with a sword. TSTL really! I do not think, consequently, that women today are feisty or that a feisty heroine is a modern heroine in a historical setting (Sorry!)… it seems the feistyness is really just a way to get the heroine in trouble, so the hero can save her. I really dislike this plot device. Even if the status of women in the past left everything to be desired, why do modern day writers set their heroines up as incompetent, stupid and feisty creatures? It really puzzles me..
    LizA getting off her soapbox, embarrassed…

    Reply
  25. The thing I dislike most is that those women start out as feisty and end up domesticated. I always feel a message underneath, the “let’s teach her a lesson”. Of course, feisty also spells imature and stupid to me. I am sure there have always been women who spoke their minds, but it is plain stupid to speak your mind when attact by a pirate with a sword. TSTL really! I do not think, consequently, that women today are feisty or that a feisty heroine is a modern heroine in a historical setting (Sorry!)… it seems the feistyness is really just a way to get the heroine in trouble, so the hero can save her. I really dislike this plot device. Even if the status of women in the past left everything to be desired, why do modern day writers set their heroines up as incompetent, stupid and feisty creatures? It really puzzles me..
    LizA getting off her soapbox, embarrassed…

    Reply
  26. LOL! I needed a good laugh on a rainy day. I always thought Melanie ought to get Rhett instead of Scarlett. He should have had more sense.
    But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone. She may kick the hero in the shins at the outset to save herself. Later, she learns she doesn’t have to kick anymore because she has a partner to rely on. So I’m not totally against “feisty,” depending on circumstances.

    Reply
  27. LOL! I needed a good laugh on a rainy day. I always thought Melanie ought to get Rhett instead of Scarlett. He should have had more sense.
    But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone. She may kick the hero in the shins at the outset to save herself. Later, she learns she doesn’t have to kick anymore because she has a partner to rely on. So I’m not totally against “feisty,” depending on circumstances.

    Reply
  28. LOL! I needed a good laugh on a rainy day. I always thought Melanie ought to get Rhett instead of Scarlett. He should have had more sense.
    But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone. She may kick the hero in the shins at the outset to save herself. Later, she learns she doesn’t have to kick anymore because she has a partner to rely on. So I’m not totally against “feisty,” depending on circumstances.

    Reply
  29. LOL! I needed a good laugh on a rainy day. I always thought Melanie ought to get Rhett instead of Scarlett. He should have had more sense.
    But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone. She may kick the hero in the shins at the outset to save herself. Later, she learns she doesn’t have to kick anymore because she has a partner to rely on. So I’m not totally against “feisty,” depending on circumstances.

    Reply
  30. LOL! I needed a good laugh on a rainy day. I always thought Melanie ought to get Rhett instead of Scarlett. He should have had more sense.
    But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone. She may kick the hero in the shins at the outset to save herself. Later, she learns she doesn’t have to kick anymore because she has a partner to rely on. So I’m not totally against “feisty,” depending on circumstances.

    Reply
  31. Okay: I have always disliked the American word ‘feisty’, and by one of those extraordinary coincidences that happen in real life, I happened to look up its origins on the Online Etymological Dictionary today – before I had seen this blog:
    “FEISTY
    1896, Amer.Eng. from feist “small dog,” from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 “small dog,” short for fysting curre “stinking cur,” attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten “break wind” (1440), related to O.E. fisting “stink.” The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as “a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs.” Cf. also Dan. fise “to blow, to fart,” and obs. Eng. askefise, lit. “fire-blower, ash-blower,” from an unrecorded O.N. source, used in M.E. for a kind of bellows, but orig. “a term of reproach among northern nations for an unwarlike fellow who stayed at home in the chimney corner” [O.E.D.]”
    Bet even those of you who think ‘feisty’ is good will feel a bit differently about it now!
    😉 😀 😀

    Reply
  32. Okay: I have always disliked the American word ‘feisty’, and by one of those extraordinary coincidences that happen in real life, I happened to look up its origins on the Online Etymological Dictionary today – before I had seen this blog:
    “FEISTY
    1896, Amer.Eng. from feist “small dog,” from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 “small dog,” short for fysting curre “stinking cur,” attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten “break wind” (1440), related to O.E. fisting “stink.” The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as “a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs.” Cf. also Dan. fise “to blow, to fart,” and obs. Eng. askefise, lit. “fire-blower, ash-blower,” from an unrecorded O.N. source, used in M.E. for a kind of bellows, but orig. “a term of reproach among northern nations for an unwarlike fellow who stayed at home in the chimney corner” [O.E.D.]”
    Bet even those of you who think ‘feisty’ is good will feel a bit differently about it now!
    😉 😀 😀

    Reply
  33. Okay: I have always disliked the American word ‘feisty’, and by one of those extraordinary coincidences that happen in real life, I happened to look up its origins on the Online Etymological Dictionary today – before I had seen this blog:
    “FEISTY
    1896, Amer.Eng. from feist “small dog,” from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 “small dog,” short for fysting curre “stinking cur,” attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten “break wind” (1440), related to O.E. fisting “stink.” The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as “a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs.” Cf. also Dan. fise “to blow, to fart,” and obs. Eng. askefise, lit. “fire-blower, ash-blower,” from an unrecorded O.N. source, used in M.E. for a kind of bellows, but orig. “a term of reproach among northern nations for an unwarlike fellow who stayed at home in the chimney corner” [O.E.D.]”
    Bet even those of you who think ‘feisty’ is good will feel a bit differently about it now!
    😉 😀 😀

    Reply
  34. Okay: I have always disliked the American word ‘feisty’, and by one of those extraordinary coincidences that happen in real life, I happened to look up its origins on the Online Etymological Dictionary today – before I had seen this blog:
    “FEISTY
    1896, Amer.Eng. from feist “small dog,” from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 “small dog,” short for fysting curre “stinking cur,” attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten “break wind” (1440), related to O.E. fisting “stink.” The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as “a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs.” Cf. also Dan. fise “to blow, to fart,” and obs. Eng. askefise, lit. “fire-blower, ash-blower,” from an unrecorded O.N. source, used in M.E. for a kind of bellows, but orig. “a term of reproach among northern nations for an unwarlike fellow who stayed at home in the chimney corner” [O.E.D.]”
    Bet even those of you who think ‘feisty’ is good will feel a bit differently about it now!
    😉 😀 😀

    Reply
  35. Okay: I have always disliked the American word ‘feisty’, and by one of those extraordinary coincidences that happen in real life, I happened to look up its origins on the Online Etymological Dictionary today – before I had seen this blog:
    “FEISTY
    1896, Amer.Eng. from feist “small dog,” from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 “small dog,” short for fysting curre “stinking cur,” attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten “break wind” (1440), related to O.E. fisting “stink.” The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as “a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs.” Cf. also Dan. fise “to blow, to fart,” and obs. Eng. askefise, lit. “fire-blower, ash-blower,” from an unrecorded O.N. source, used in M.E. for a kind of bellows, but orig. “a term of reproach among northern nations for an unwarlike fellow who stayed at home in the chimney corner” [O.E.D.]”
    Bet even those of you who think ‘feisty’ is good will feel a bit differently about it now!
    😉 😀 😀

    Reply
  36. “But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone.”
    Me too, and that’s a kind of feisty I can cheer for. And I have a soft spot a mile wide for warrior women as long as they’re presented in an at least somewhat historically plausible way–Teresa is by far my favorite of the women in the Sharpe series, for example.

    Reply
  37. “But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone.”
    Me too, and that’s a kind of feisty I can cheer for. And I have a soft spot a mile wide for warrior women as long as they’re presented in an at least somewhat historically plausible way–Teresa is by far my favorite of the women in the Sharpe series, for example.

    Reply
  38. “But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone.”
    Me too, and that’s a kind of feisty I can cheer for. And I have a soft spot a mile wide for warrior women as long as they’re presented in an at least somewhat historically plausible way–Teresa is by far my favorite of the women in the Sharpe series, for example.

    Reply
  39. “But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone.”
    Me too, and that’s a kind of feisty I can cheer for. And I have a soft spot a mile wide for warrior women as long as they’re presented in an at least somewhat historically plausible way–Teresa is by far my favorite of the women in the Sharpe series, for example.

    Reply
  40. “But I can also think of “feisty” as the American cowgirl sort, trying to survive in a man’s world and not taking any guff from anyone.”
    Me too, and that’s a kind of feisty I can cheer for. And I have a soft spot a mile wide for warrior women as long as they’re presented in an at least somewhat historically plausible way–Teresa is by far my favorite of the women in the Sharpe series, for example.

    Reply
  41. Teresa in the Sharpe series, yes! Smart, wicked, and CAPABLE.
    I think a lot of real women out there had to be all those things just to get by in the world. Women like Boudicca, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth I, Sarah Churchill, Mrs. Fitzherbert, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Skittles, Lily Langtree, Queen Victoria.
    The “feisty” ones likely didn’t live long enough to breed, and isn’t that a blessing?
    And Liz, I’d LOVE to read a book where the hero figured out the girl he’d set his eye on was dumber than his hound and then left her flat.

    Reply
  42. Teresa in the Sharpe series, yes! Smart, wicked, and CAPABLE.
    I think a lot of real women out there had to be all those things just to get by in the world. Women like Boudicca, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth I, Sarah Churchill, Mrs. Fitzherbert, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Skittles, Lily Langtree, Queen Victoria.
    The “feisty” ones likely didn’t live long enough to breed, and isn’t that a blessing?
    And Liz, I’d LOVE to read a book where the hero figured out the girl he’d set his eye on was dumber than his hound and then left her flat.

    Reply
  43. Teresa in the Sharpe series, yes! Smart, wicked, and CAPABLE.
    I think a lot of real women out there had to be all those things just to get by in the world. Women like Boudicca, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth I, Sarah Churchill, Mrs. Fitzherbert, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Skittles, Lily Langtree, Queen Victoria.
    The “feisty” ones likely didn’t live long enough to breed, and isn’t that a blessing?
    And Liz, I’d LOVE to read a book where the hero figured out the girl he’d set his eye on was dumber than his hound and then left her flat.

    Reply
  44. Teresa in the Sharpe series, yes! Smart, wicked, and CAPABLE.
    I think a lot of real women out there had to be all those things just to get by in the world. Women like Boudicca, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth I, Sarah Churchill, Mrs. Fitzherbert, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Skittles, Lily Langtree, Queen Victoria.
    The “feisty” ones likely didn’t live long enough to breed, and isn’t that a blessing?
    And Liz, I’d LOVE to read a book where the hero figured out the girl he’d set his eye on was dumber than his hound and then left her flat.

    Reply
  45. Teresa in the Sharpe series, yes! Smart, wicked, and CAPABLE.
    I think a lot of real women out there had to be all those things just to get by in the world. Women like Boudicca, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth I, Sarah Churchill, Mrs. Fitzherbert, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Skittles, Lily Langtree, Queen Victoria.
    The “feisty” ones likely didn’t live long enough to breed, and isn’t that a blessing?
    And Liz, I’d LOVE to read a book where the hero figured out the girl he’d set his eye on was dumber than his hound and then left her flat.

    Reply
  46. I generally do not like fiesty heroines. I most often think of them as immature, rash, and irresponsible. However, I do like the clever and deliberate heroines(sometimes even those that are manipulative), who use those characteristics to achieve their goals. Throughout history women have been at a disadvantage and I like characters who use their intelligence to level the playing field. Fiesty often makes me want to close a book, but clever – well, that’s a different story.

    Reply
  47. I generally do not like fiesty heroines. I most often think of them as immature, rash, and irresponsible. However, I do like the clever and deliberate heroines(sometimes even those that are manipulative), who use those characteristics to achieve their goals. Throughout history women have been at a disadvantage and I like characters who use their intelligence to level the playing field. Fiesty often makes me want to close a book, but clever – well, that’s a different story.

    Reply
  48. I generally do not like fiesty heroines. I most often think of them as immature, rash, and irresponsible. However, I do like the clever and deliberate heroines(sometimes even those that are manipulative), who use those characteristics to achieve their goals. Throughout history women have been at a disadvantage and I like characters who use their intelligence to level the playing field. Fiesty often makes me want to close a book, but clever – well, that’s a different story.

    Reply
  49. I generally do not like fiesty heroines. I most often think of them as immature, rash, and irresponsible. However, I do like the clever and deliberate heroines(sometimes even those that are manipulative), who use those characteristics to achieve their goals. Throughout history women have been at a disadvantage and I like characters who use their intelligence to level the playing field. Fiesty often makes me want to close a book, but clever – well, that’s a different story.

    Reply
  50. I generally do not like fiesty heroines. I most often think of them as immature, rash, and irresponsible. However, I do like the clever and deliberate heroines(sometimes even those that are manipulative), who use those characteristics to achieve their goals. Throughout history women have been at a disadvantage and I like characters who use their intelligence to level the playing field. Fiesty often makes me want to close a book, but clever – well, that’s a different story.

    Reply
  51. Fun topic, Edith! I’m another who doesn’t much like the idea of the “feisty” heroine (aka TSTL), and I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.
    Give me the wily survivor any day. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  52. Fun topic, Edith! I’m another who doesn’t much like the idea of the “feisty” heroine (aka TSTL), and I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.
    Give me the wily survivor any day. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  53. Fun topic, Edith! I’m another who doesn’t much like the idea of the “feisty” heroine (aka TSTL), and I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.
    Give me the wily survivor any day. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  54. Fun topic, Edith! I’m another who doesn’t much like the idea of the “feisty” heroine (aka TSTL), and I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.
    Give me the wily survivor any day. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  55. Fun topic, Edith! I’m another who doesn’t much like the idea of the “feisty” heroine (aka TSTL), and I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.
    Give me the wily survivor any day. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  56. “I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.”
    That is a perfectly accurate perception, in view of the word’s origins as given in the etymological note I posted above. It was clearly a derogatory term at first. I never saw the word at all till about 25 years ago – which was when I started reading American romance novels. Hmm. There may be a connection there…
    🙂

    Reply
  57. “I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.”
    That is a perfectly accurate perception, in view of the word’s origins as given in the etymological note I posted above. It was clearly a derogatory term at first. I never saw the word at all till about 25 years ago – which was when I started reading American romance novels. Hmm. There may be a connection there…
    🙂

    Reply
  58. “I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.”
    That is a perfectly accurate perception, in view of the word’s origins as given in the etymological note I posted above. It was clearly a derogatory term at first. I never saw the word at all till about 25 years ago – which was when I started reading American romance novels. Hmm. There may be a connection there…
    🙂

    Reply
  59. “I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.”
    That is a perfectly accurate perception, in view of the word’s origins as given in the etymological note I posted above. It was clearly a derogatory term at first. I never saw the word at all till about 25 years ago – which was when I started reading American romance novels. Hmm. There may be a connection there…
    🙂

    Reply
  60. “I don’t like the word itself. It sounds trivializing and dismissive.”
    That is a perfectly accurate perception, in view of the word’s origins as given in the etymological note I posted above. It was clearly a derogatory term at first. I never saw the word at all till about 25 years ago – which was when I started reading American romance novels. Hmm. There may be a connection there…
    🙂

    Reply
  61. hmm. i was going to say ‘depends on your definition of feisty’ but agtigress’ post just blew that out of the water. i’m certainly not going to describe my baby girl as feisty anytime soon…
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? 🙂

    Reply
  62. hmm. i was going to say ‘depends on your definition of feisty’ but agtigress’ post just blew that out of the water. i’m certainly not going to describe my baby girl as feisty anytime soon…
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? 🙂

    Reply
  63. hmm. i was going to say ‘depends on your definition of feisty’ but agtigress’ post just blew that out of the water. i’m certainly not going to describe my baby girl as feisty anytime soon…
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? 🙂

    Reply
  64. hmm. i was going to say ‘depends on your definition of feisty’ but agtigress’ post just blew that out of the water. i’m certainly not going to describe my baby girl as feisty anytime soon…
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? 🙂

    Reply
  65. hmm. i was going to say ‘depends on your definition of feisty’ but agtigress’ post just blew that out of the water. i’m certainly not going to describe my baby girl as feisty anytime soon…
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? 🙂

    Reply
  66. >>
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? :)>>
    Yes indeedy, Maya! I apologize for my lateitude, but I was going to send it out with the others I must get to the PO this week.
    Please to kiindly ensure I have the right address by sending it to me email.
    And again, thanks and hoorah for you!

    Reply
  67. >>
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? :)>>
    Yes indeedy, Maya! I apologize for my lateitude, but I was going to send it out with the others I must get to the PO this week.
    Please to kiindly ensure I have the right address by sending it to me email.
    And again, thanks and hoorah for you!

    Reply
  68. >>
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? :)>>
    Yes indeedy, Maya! I apologize for my lateitude, but I was going to send it out with the others I must get to the PO this week.
    Please to kiindly ensure I have the right address by sending it to me email.
    And again, thanks and hoorah for you!

    Reply
  69. >>
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? :)>>
    Yes indeedy, Maya! I apologize for my lateitude, but I was going to send it out with the others I must get to the PO this week.
    Please to kiindly ensure I have the right address by sending it to me email.
    And again, thanks and hoorah for you!

    Reply
  70. >>
    btw – do blog topic suggesters get books. too? :)>>
    Yes indeedy, Maya! I apologize for my lateitude, but I was going to send it out with the others I must get to the PO this week.
    Please to kiindly ensure I have the right address by sending it to me email.
    And again, thanks and hoorah for you!

    Reply
  71. So I’m recovering and people are bringing me books by authors I Do Not Read and I figure hey, I’m high, I’ll give it a go – By the second line I know I’m not going to finish the book, but I say give it another page – and there, on page two is the following copyrighted by the not named here author’s line –
    “Friends and those who were fond of her called her fiesty.”
    Proof I can just give up now and the universe works in ways mysterious indeed.

    Reply
  72. So I’m recovering and people are bringing me books by authors I Do Not Read and I figure hey, I’m high, I’ll give it a go – By the second line I know I’m not going to finish the book, but I say give it another page – and there, on page two is the following copyrighted by the not named here author’s line –
    “Friends and those who were fond of her called her fiesty.”
    Proof I can just give up now and the universe works in ways mysterious indeed.

    Reply
  73. So I’m recovering and people are bringing me books by authors I Do Not Read and I figure hey, I’m high, I’ll give it a go – By the second line I know I’m not going to finish the book, but I say give it another page – and there, on page two is the following copyrighted by the not named here author’s line –
    “Friends and those who were fond of her called her fiesty.”
    Proof I can just give up now and the universe works in ways mysterious indeed.

    Reply
  74. So I’m recovering and people are bringing me books by authors I Do Not Read and I figure hey, I’m high, I’ll give it a go – By the second line I know I’m not going to finish the book, but I say give it another page – and there, on page two is the following copyrighted by the not named here author’s line –
    “Friends and those who were fond of her called her fiesty.”
    Proof I can just give up now and the universe works in ways mysterious indeed.

    Reply
  75. So I’m recovering and people are bringing me books by authors I Do Not Read and I figure hey, I’m high, I’ll give it a go – By the second line I know I’m not going to finish the book, but I say give it another page – and there, on page two is the following copyrighted by the not named here author’s line –
    “Friends and those who were fond of her called her fiesty.”
    Proof I can just give up now and the universe works in ways mysterious indeed.

    Reply
  76. What a great post, Edith! I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough. The heroine had just escaped from her evil relations, transported her desperately ill sister to London by herself, and confronted a room full of strange men to ask for help. Unfortunately, I had her struggling to suppress a few tears under the strain of it all. That, apparently, constitutes a weak heroine in the Regency period. I guess she should have grabbed a pistol from the wall and threatened to shoot everybody unless they helped her! Sigh.

    Reply
  77. What a great post, Edith! I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough. The heroine had just escaped from her evil relations, transported her desperately ill sister to London by herself, and confronted a room full of strange men to ask for help. Unfortunately, I had her struggling to suppress a few tears under the strain of it all. That, apparently, constitutes a weak heroine in the Regency period. I guess she should have grabbed a pistol from the wall and threatened to shoot everybody unless they helped her! Sigh.

    Reply
  78. What a great post, Edith! I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough. The heroine had just escaped from her evil relations, transported her desperately ill sister to London by herself, and confronted a room full of strange men to ask for help. Unfortunately, I had her struggling to suppress a few tears under the strain of it all. That, apparently, constitutes a weak heroine in the Regency period. I guess she should have grabbed a pistol from the wall and threatened to shoot everybody unless they helped her! Sigh.

    Reply
  79. What a great post, Edith! I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough. The heroine had just escaped from her evil relations, transported her desperately ill sister to London by herself, and confronted a room full of strange men to ask for help. Unfortunately, I had her struggling to suppress a few tears under the strain of it all. That, apparently, constitutes a weak heroine in the Regency period. I guess she should have grabbed a pistol from the wall and threatened to shoot everybody unless they helped her! Sigh.

    Reply
  80. What a great post, Edith! I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough. The heroine had just escaped from her evil relations, transported her desperately ill sister to London by herself, and confronted a room full of strange men to ask for help. Unfortunately, I had her struggling to suppress a few tears under the strain of it all. That, apparently, constitutes a weak heroine in the Regency period. I guess she should have grabbed a pistol from the wall and threatened to shoot everybody unless they helped her! Sigh.

    Reply
  81. Aww, Liz. I hope you speedily recover from whatever it is that vexed you.
    bestest,
    Edith. who has never ever been called ‘feisty’ and hopes she never ever will be.

    Reply
  82. Aww, Liz. I hope you speedily recover from whatever it is that vexed you.
    bestest,
    Edith. who has never ever been called ‘feisty’ and hopes she never ever will be.

    Reply
  83. Aww, Liz. I hope you speedily recover from whatever it is that vexed you.
    bestest,
    Edith. who has never ever been called ‘feisty’ and hopes she never ever will be.

    Reply
  84. Aww, Liz. I hope you speedily recover from whatever it is that vexed you.
    bestest,
    Edith. who has never ever been called ‘feisty’ and hopes she never ever will be.

    Reply
  85. Aww, Liz. I hope you speedily recover from whatever it is that vexed you.
    bestest,
    Edith. who has never ever been called ‘feisty’ and hopes she never ever will be.

    Reply
  86. I always pass on books that have heroines described as fiesty-it has always seemed to me to mean someone who breaks the rules, mouths off, and thinks her behavior is cute- probably Paris Hilton thinks of herself as fiesty… I really like the heroine who manages to cleverly find a way to win within the rules- Jo beverley’s first book, Lord Wraybournes Betrothed, had a great example in Jane- and Jane Eyre is the same-and Maddy in “Flowers From the Storm” and several Georgette Heyer heroines also spring to mind- give me a woman who knows how to work the system!

    Reply
  87. I always pass on books that have heroines described as fiesty-it has always seemed to me to mean someone who breaks the rules, mouths off, and thinks her behavior is cute- probably Paris Hilton thinks of herself as fiesty… I really like the heroine who manages to cleverly find a way to win within the rules- Jo beverley’s first book, Lord Wraybournes Betrothed, had a great example in Jane- and Jane Eyre is the same-and Maddy in “Flowers From the Storm” and several Georgette Heyer heroines also spring to mind- give me a woman who knows how to work the system!

    Reply
  88. I always pass on books that have heroines described as fiesty-it has always seemed to me to mean someone who breaks the rules, mouths off, and thinks her behavior is cute- probably Paris Hilton thinks of herself as fiesty… I really like the heroine who manages to cleverly find a way to win within the rules- Jo beverley’s first book, Lord Wraybournes Betrothed, had a great example in Jane- and Jane Eyre is the same-and Maddy in “Flowers From the Storm” and several Georgette Heyer heroines also spring to mind- give me a woman who knows how to work the system!

    Reply
  89. I always pass on books that have heroines described as fiesty-it has always seemed to me to mean someone who breaks the rules, mouths off, and thinks her behavior is cute- probably Paris Hilton thinks of herself as fiesty… I really like the heroine who manages to cleverly find a way to win within the rules- Jo beverley’s first book, Lord Wraybournes Betrothed, had a great example in Jane- and Jane Eyre is the same-and Maddy in “Flowers From the Storm” and several Georgette Heyer heroines also spring to mind- give me a woman who knows how to work the system!

    Reply
  90. I always pass on books that have heroines described as fiesty-it has always seemed to me to mean someone who breaks the rules, mouths off, and thinks her behavior is cute- probably Paris Hilton thinks of herself as fiesty… I really like the heroine who manages to cleverly find a way to win within the rules- Jo beverley’s first book, Lord Wraybournes Betrothed, had a great example in Jane- and Jane Eyre is the same-and Maddy in “Flowers From the Storm” and several Georgette Heyer heroines also spring to mind- give me a woman who knows how to work the system!

    Reply
  91. ***I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough***
    The judge could just be “not one of you million” as Sabrina Jeffries says, but I’d take a look at what kind of image the character is projecting and try to find ways to show that she’s being silently strong. That she has a solid, competent core. Though “feisty” is not what you’re after, maybe the judge thought she was too weak to be interesting?
    I try to find something useful in the crapshoot . . .
    I got told over and over that my hero was too wimpy. *sigh* I disagreed 100%. He was the strong, silent type. The kind of man who wasn’t intimidated by a strong woman, who didn’t need to put her in her place. I raged to all my friends. How could the judges and agents and editors not *get* this? Eventually I rewrote him, changing just really small things (basically I made his physical gestures “harder”) and the perception swung around (so much so that one of my friends accused me of caving in to the “alpha craze” LOL!).
    Hugs on the contest hell.

    Reply
  92. ***I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough***
    The judge could just be “not one of you million” as Sabrina Jeffries says, but I’d take a look at what kind of image the character is projecting and try to find ways to show that she’s being silently strong. That she has a solid, competent core. Though “feisty” is not what you’re after, maybe the judge thought she was too weak to be interesting?
    I try to find something useful in the crapshoot . . .
    I got told over and over that my hero was too wimpy. *sigh* I disagreed 100%. He was the strong, silent type. The kind of man who wasn’t intimidated by a strong woman, who didn’t need to put her in her place. I raged to all my friends. How could the judges and agents and editors not *get* this? Eventually I rewrote him, changing just really small things (basically I made his physical gestures “harder”) and the perception swung around (so much so that one of my friends accused me of caving in to the “alpha craze” LOL!).
    Hugs on the contest hell.

    Reply
  93. ***I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough***
    The judge could just be “not one of you million” as Sabrina Jeffries says, but I’d take a look at what kind of image the character is projecting and try to find ways to show that she’s being silently strong. That she has a solid, competent core. Though “feisty” is not what you’re after, maybe the judge thought she was too weak to be interesting?
    I try to find something useful in the crapshoot . . .
    I got told over and over that my hero was too wimpy. *sigh* I disagreed 100%. He was the strong, silent type. The kind of man who wasn’t intimidated by a strong woman, who didn’t need to put her in her place. I raged to all my friends. How could the judges and agents and editors not *get* this? Eventually I rewrote him, changing just really small things (basically I made his physical gestures “harder”) and the perception swung around (so much so that one of my friends accused me of caving in to the “alpha craze” LOL!).
    Hugs on the contest hell.

    Reply
  94. ***I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough***
    The judge could just be “not one of you million” as Sabrina Jeffries says, but I’d take a look at what kind of image the character is projecting and try to find ways to show that she’s being silently strong. That she has a solid, competent core. Though “feisty” is not what you’re after, maybe the judge thought she was too weak to be interesting?
    I try to find something useful in the crapshoot . . .
    I got told over and over that my hero was too wimpy. *sigh* I disagreed 100%. He was the strong, silent type. The kind of man who wasn’t intimidated by a strong woman, who didn’t need to put her in her place. I raged to all my friends. How could the judges and agents and editors not *get* this? Eventually I rewrote him, changing just really small things (basically I made his physical gestures “harder”) and the perception swung around (so much so that one of my friends accused me of caving in to the “alpha craze” LOL!).
    Hugs on the contest hell.

    Reply
  95. ***I just got slammed in a contest by a judge who said my heroine wasn’t feisty enough***
    The judge could just be “not one of you million” as Sabrina Jeffries says, but I’d take a look at what kind of image the character is projecting and try to find ways to show that she’s being silently strong. That she has a solid, competent core. Though “feisty” is not what you’re after, maybe the judge thought she was too weak to be interesting?
    I try to find something useful in the crapshoot . . .
    I got told over and over that my hero was too wimpy. *sigh* I disagreed 100%. He was the strong, silent type. The kind of man who wasn’t intimidated by a strong woman, who didn’t need to put her in her place. I raged to all my friends. How could the judges and agents and editors not *get* this? Eventually I rewrote him, changing just really small things (basically I made his physical gestures “harder”) and the perception swung around (so much so that one of my friends accused me of caving in to the “alpha craze” LOL!).
    Hugs on the contest hell.

    Reply
  96. I think there is a certain level of feistyness (is that even a word?) that is acceptable for an historical setting. A lot of agents and pub houses seem to be looking for feisty, probably to attract a younger group of women. the next generation of romance readers, if you will. But that’s a whole other topic.
    I like to write intelligent women that are strong but not feisty. I would not put a modern woman in an historical setting. Even though I write paranormal and it’s got all those otherworldly elements anyways, I just can’t do that when I know it’s wrong. And you made many good points about women being locked away for being to forward and independent. It’s a roundabout argument…lol

    Reply
  97. I think there is a certain level of feistyness (is that even a word?) that is acceptable for an historical setting. A lot of agents and pub houses seem to be looking for feisty, probably to attract a younger group of women. the next generation of romance readers, if you will. But that’s a whole other topic.
    I like to write intelligent women that are strong but not feisty. I would not put a modern woman in an historical setting. Even though I write paranormal and it’s got all those otherworldly elements anyways, I just can’t do that when I know it’s wrong. And you made many good points about women being locked away for being to forward and independent. It’s a roundabout argument…lol

    Reply
  98. I think there is a certain level of feistyness (is that even a word?) that is acceptable for an historical setting. A lot of agents and pub houses seem to be looking for feisty, probably to attract a younger group of women. the next generation of romance readers, if you will. But that’s a whole other topic.
    I like to write intelligent women that are strong but not feisty. I would not put a modern woman in an historical setting. Even though I write paranormal and it’s got all those otherworldly elements anyways, I just can’t do that when I know it’s wrong. And you made many good points about women being locked away for being to forward and independent. It’s a roundabout argument…lol

    Reply
  99. I think there is a certain level of feistyness (is that even a word?) that is acceptable for an historical setting. A lot of agents and pub houses seem to be looking for feisty, probably to attract a younger group of women. the next generation of romance readers, if you will. But that’s a whole other topic.
    I like to write intelligent women that are strong but not feisty. I would not put a modern woman in an historical setting. Even though I write paranormal and it’s got all those otherworldly elements anyways, I just can’t do that when I know it’s wrong. And you made many good points about women being locked away for being to forward and independent. It’s a roundabout argument…lol

    Reply
  100. I think there is a certain level of feistyness (is that even a word?) that is acceptable for an historical setting. A lot of agents and pub houses seem to be looking for feisty, probably to attract a younger group of women. the next generation of romance readers, if you will. But that’s a whole other topic.
    I like to write intelligent women that are strong but not feisty. I would not put a modern woman in an historical setting. Even though I write paranormal and it’s got all those otherworldly elements anyways, I just can’t do that when I know it’s wrong. And you made many good points about women being locked away for being to forward and independent. It’s a roundabout argument…lol

    Reply
  101. Oh, dear. Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth. And when one substitutes the heroine for the terrier . . . the image is cringe-inducing!
    I think a historical heroine can be strong and capable without tossing her head, stamping her little feet, and beating her tiny fists upon the hero’s broad chest. One of my favorite Regency heroines is Georgette Heyer’s Sophy Stanton-Lacy. Masterful and self-assured beyond a doubt, but feisty? Not so much, thank goodness!

    Reply
  102. Oh, dear. Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth. And when one substitutes the heroine for the terrier . . . the image is cringe-inducing!
    I think a historical heroine can be strong and capable without tossing her head, stamping her little feet, and beating her tiny fists upon the hero’s broad chest. One of my favorite Regency heroines is Georgette Heyer’s Sophy Stanton-Lacy. Masterful and self-assured beyond a doubt, but feisty? Not so much, thank goodness!

    Reply
  103. Oh, dear. Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth. And when one substitutes the heroine for the terrier . . . the image is cringe-inducing!
    I think a historical heroine can be strong and capable without tossing her head, stamping her little feet, and beating her tiny fists upon the hero’s broad chest. One of my favorite Regency heroines is Georgette Heyer’s Sophy Stanton-Lacy. Masterful and self-assured beyond a doubt, but feisty? Not so much, thank goodness!

    Reply
  104. Oh, dear. Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth. And when one substitutes the heroine for the terrier . . . the image is cringe-inducing!
    I think a historical heroine can be strong and capable without tossing her head, stamping her little feet, and beating her tiny fists upon the hero’s broad chest. One of my favorite Regency heroines is Georgette Heyer’s Sophy Stanton-Lacy. Masterful and self-assured beyond a doubt, but feisty? Not so much, thank goodness!

    Reply
  105. Oh, dear. Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth. And when one substitutes the heroine for the terrier . . . the image is cringe-inducing!
    I think a historical heroine can be strong and capable without tossing her head, stamping her little feet, and beating her tiny fists upon the hero’s broad chest. One of my favorite Regency heroines is Georgette Heyer’s Sophy Stanton-Lacy. Masterful and self-assured beyond a doubt, but feisty? Not so much, thank goodness!

    Reply
  106. Stephanie wrote: “Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth.”
    And, don’t forget, emitting noxious vapours the while! A feist was not merely a small cur, but a *stinking*, windy small cur.
    😀
    Incidentally, an American breed of small terrier, closely related to the Jack Russell and Fox Terrier types, and formerly known as the Rat Terrier, is now officially known as the ‘Feist’. I suspect that those who settled on the name, knowing it to be traditional for a small, active dog, did not realise that it its etymology is based not on courage, tenacity, boldness or any of those things, but on the habit of breaking wind.
    I do love etymology. One learns such a lot.

    Reply
  107. Stephanie wrote: “Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth.”
    And, don’t forget, emitting noxious vapours the while! A feist was not merely a small cur, but a *stinking*, windy small cur.
    😀
    Incidentally, an American breed of small terrier, closely related to the Jack Russell and Fox Terrier types, and formerly known as the Rat Terrier, is now officially known as the ‘Feist’. I suspect that those who settled on the name, knowing it to be traditional for a small, active dog, did not realise that it its etymology is based not on courage, tenacity, boldness or any of those things, but on the habit of breaking wind.
    I do love etymology. One learns such a lot.

    Reply
  108. Stephanie wrote: “Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth.”
    And, don’t forget, emitting noxious vapours the while! A feist was not merely a small cur, but a *stinking*, windy small cur.
    😀
    Incidentally, an American breed of small terrier, closely related to the Jack Russell and Fox Terrier types, and formerly known as the Rat Terrier, is now officially known as the ‘Feist’. I suspect that those who settled on the name, knowing it to be traditional for a small, active dog, did not realise that it its etymology is based not on courage, tenacity, boldness or any of those things, but on the habit of breaking wind.
    I do love etymology. One learns such a lot.

    Reply
  109. Stephanie wrote: “Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth.”
    And, don’t forget, emitting noxious vapours the while! A feist was not merely a small cur, but a *stinking*, windy small cur.
    😀
    Incidentally, an American breed of small terrier, closely related to the Jack Russell and Fox Terrier types, and formerly known as the Rat Terrier, is now officially known as the ‘Feist’. I suspect that those who settled on the name, knowing it to be traditional for a small, active dog, did not realise that it its etymology is based not on courage, tenacity, boldness or any of those things, but on the habit of breaking wind.
    I do love etymology. One learns such a lot.

    Reply
  110. Stephanie wrote: “Now I shall never be able to read the word “feisty” without imagining a yappy Jack Russell terrier frantically hanging onto someone’s trouser leg by the teeth.”
    And, don’t forget, emitting noxious vapours the while! A feist was not merely a small cur, but a *stinking*, windy small cur.
    😀
    Incidentally, an American breed of small terrier, closely related to the Jack Russell and Fox Terrier types, and formerly known as the Rat Terrier, is now officially known as the ‘Feist’. I suspect that those who settled on the name, knowing it to be traditional for a small, active dog, did not realise that it its etymology is based not on courage, tenacity, boldness or any of those things, but on the habit of breaking wind.
    I do love etymology. One learns such a lot.

    Reply
  111. Thanks for the great advice, Kalen. I’m looking at the little things that could influence a reader’s perception, like gestures and body language. I try to remind myself that if one reader is reacting that way to my heroine, so could others.

    Reply
  112. Thanks for the great advice, Kalen. I’m looking at the little things that could influence a reader’s perception, like gestures and body language. I try to remind myself that if one reader is reacting that way to my heroine, so could others.

    Reply
  113. Thanks for the great advice, Kalen. I’m looking at the little things that could influence a reader’s perception, like gestures and body language. I try to remind myself that if one reader is reacting that way to my heroine, so could others.

    Reply
  114. Thanks for the great advice, Kalen. I’m looking at the little things that could influence a reader’s perception, like gestures and body language. I try to remind myself that if one reader is reacting that way to my heroine, so could others.

    Reply
  115. Thanks for the great advice, Kalen. I’m looking at the little things that could influence a reader’s perception, like gestures and body language. I try to remind myself that if one reader is reacting that way to my heroine, so could others.

    Reply
  116. I hope I’m not late… I stay AWAY from the word fiesty or redheads…I can’t take it… I refuse to buy books with redheads(my mother is a redhead, nothing agaianst them) but every other book has one on the cover..Loretta’s Jessica is the perfect heroine , I think, she didn’t run away from her feelings, she realised she cared and went for it…I love books now that have the hero/heroine work together through out instead of staying apart denying their feelings up until the last chapter, it’s sooo refreshing to find a book,where its just different…
    Tal

    Reply
  117. I hope I’m not late… I stay AWAY from the word fiesty or redheads…I can’t take it… I refuse to buy books with redheads(my mother is a redhead, nothing agaianst them) but every other book has one on the cover..Loretta’s Jessica is the perfect heroine , I think, she didn’t run away from her feelings, she realised she cared and went for it…I love books now that have the hero/heroine work together through out instead of staying apart denying their feelings up until the last chapter, it’s sooo refreshing to find a book,where its just different…
    Tal

    Reply
  118. I hope I’m not late… I stay AWAY from the word fiesty or redheads…I can’t take it… I refuse to buy books with redheads(my mother is a redhead, nothing agaianst them) but every other book has one on the cover..Loretta’s Jessica is the perfect heroine , I think, she didn’t run away from her feelings, she realised she cared and went for it…I love books now that have the hero/heroine work together through out instead of staying apart denying their feelings up until the last chapter, it’s sooo refreshing to find a book,where its just different…
    Tal

    Reply
  119. I hope I’m not late… I stay AWAY from the word fiesty or redheads…I can’t take it… I refuse to buy books with redheads(my mother is a redhead, nothing agaianst them) but every other book has one on the cover..Loretta’s Jessica is the perfect heroine , I think, she didn’t run away from her feelings, she realised she cared and went for it…I love books now that have the hero/heroine work together through out instead of staying apart denying their feelings up until the last chapter, it’s sooo refreshing to find a book,where its just different…
    Tal

    Reply
  120. I hope I’m not late… I stay AWAY from the word fiesty or redheads…I can’t take it… I refuse to buy books with redheads(my mother is a redhead, nothing agaianst them) but every other book has one on the cover..Loretta’s Jessica is the perfect heroine , I think, she didn’t run away from her feelings, she realised she cared and went for it…I love books now that have the hero/heroine work together through out instead of staying apart denying their feelings up until the last chapter, it’s sooo refreshing to find a book,where its just different…
    Tal

    Reply
  121. I don’t like the word “feisty” either-it’s too cliched. And really, it’s historically inaccurate, just as Ms. Layton says-women who were feisty didn’t stand a chance in society. I believe there was nobilty, steeliness, arrogance, grace, submissiveness, and of course some feistiness, but how many women would have given their repuations-and their futures-just to raise a little hell?

    Reply
  122. I don’t like the word “feisty” either-it’s too cliched. And really, it’s historically inaccurate, just as Ms. Layton says-women who were feisty didn’t stand a chance in society. I believe there was nobilty, steeliness, arrogance, grace, submissiveness, and of course some feistiness, but how many women would have given their repuations-and their futures-just to raise a little hell?

    Reply
  123. I don’t like the word “feisty” either-it’s too cliched. And really, it’s historically inaccurate, just as Ms. Layton says-women who were feisty didn’t stand a chance in society. I believe there was nobilty, steeliness, arrogance, grace, submissiveness, and of course some feistiness, but how many women would have given their repuations-and their futures-just to raise a little hell?

    Reply
  124. I don’t like the word “feisty” either-it’s too cliched. And really, it’s historically inaccurate, just as Ms. Layton says-women who were feisty didn’t stand a chance in society. I believe there was nobilty, steeliness, arrogance, grace, submissiveness, and of course some feistiness, but how many women would have given their repuations-and their futures-just to raise a little hell?

    Reply
  125. I don’t like the word “feisty” either-it’s too cliched. And really, it’s historically inaccurate, just as Ms. Layton says-women who were feisty didn’t stand a chance in society. I believe there was nobilty, steeliness, arrogance, grace, submissiveness, and of course some feistiness, but how many women would have given their repuations-and their futures-just to raise a little hell?

    Reply
  126. The comments are too funny. My nickname is Feisty. Why? I’m intelligent with a mind of my own. It’s my life and my choice how I live it. I’ve had many an obstacle and refused to let it block my way. The larger the block the harder I work to surpass it. I see life as a wonderful challenge and the only person capable of holding me back is me. I’m too feisty to let that happen.

    Reply
  127. The comments are too funny. My nickname is Feisty. Why? I’m intelligent with a mind of my own. It’s my life and my choice how I live it. I’ve had many an obstacle and refused to let it block my way. The larger the block the harder I work to surpass it. I see life as a wonderful challenge and the only person capable of holding me back is me. I’m too feisty to let that happen.

    Reply
  128. The comments are too funny. My nickname is Feisty. Why? I’m intelligent with a mind of my own. It’s my life and my choice how I live it. I’ve had many an obstacle and refused to let it block my way. The larger the block the harder I work to surpass it. I see life as a wonderful challenge and the only person capable of holding me back is me. I’m too feisty to let that happen.

    Reply
  129. The comments are too funny. My nickname is Feisty. Why? I’m intelligent with a mind of my own. It’s my life and my choice how I live it. I’ve had many an obstacle and refused to let it block my way. The larger the block the harder I work to surpass it. I see life as a wonderful challenge and the only person capable of holding me back is me. I’m too feisty to let that happen.

    Reply
  130. The comments are too funny. My nickname is Feisty. Why? I’m intelligent with a mind of my own. It’s my life and my choice how I live it. I’ve had many an obstacle and refused to let it block my way. The larger the block the harder I work to surpass it. I see life as a wonderful challenge and the only person capable of holding me back is me. I’m too feisty to let that happen.

    Reply
  131. Would any of you consider Elizabeth Bennet feisty? How about Jane Austen? How is one feisty without sensibility and intelligence? The women above had the confidence, wit and tenacity to live life on their terms. That is my definition of ‘Feisty.’

    Reply
  132. Would any of you consider Elizabeth Bennet feisty? How about Jane Austen? How is one feisty without sensibility and intelligence? The women above had the confidence, wit and tenacity to live life on their terms. That is my definition of ‘Feisty.’

    Reply
  133. Would any of you consider Elizabeth Bennet feisty? How about Jane Austen? How is one feisty without sensibility and intelligence? The women above had the confidence, wit and tenacity to live life on their terms. That is my definition of ‘Feisty.’

    Reply
  134. Would any of you consider Elizabeth Bennet feisty? How about Jane Austen? How is one feisty without sensibility and intelligence? The women above had the confidence, wit and tenacity to live life on their terms. That is my definition of ‘Feisty.’

    Reply
  135. Would any of you consider Elizabeth Bennet feisty? How about Jane Austen? How is one feisty without sensibility and intelligence? The women above had the confidence, wit and tenacity to live life on their terms. That is my definition of ‘Feisty.’

    Reply

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