Favorite Characters? Not hardly!

From Mary Jo

Cat_243_dover_2 Several days ago, a helpful Wenchling suggested a couple of blog topics to me.  One was “Who are your favorite characters in your books?”

I had two reactions:

A) I HATE when people ask me that (and it’s one of the most popular questions, right up there with “Where do you get your ideas?”)
B) It’s actually a good seed idea for a blog.  (“Can you say ‘cognitive dissonance,’ boys and girls?”)   

The reason I hate the question is because it’s real Sophie’s Choice territory—which of your children do you love best?  That’s as hard for me to answer as it would be for most parents. 

If pinned down about favorites, I’ll usually mention Reggie Davenport, the alcoholic hero of The Rake.  Certainly he was attractive and witty and tragic, and he did a lot for my career.  (Thanks, Reg!)  But I didn’t love him more than The_rake Stephen Kenyon, the terminally ill ducal hero of One Perfect Rose.  Or Kenneth Wilding, the battle scarred veteran and spy with an artist’s soul from River of Fire

Each character is special to me, and if I write them well, they are convincingly special to their partners.  I can’t write a hero or heroine without loving them, and that love is based on their individuality.  Characters must be both universal and unique. 

More than any other genre, romance is character based.  If the characters aren’t vivid and engaging, who bother to write them, much less read them?  I suspect that romance writers tend to personify things around us more than most. Witness the well-developed characters of the Wenches’ dolls, Cabbage Patch Kids, and Dscn0649_5stuffed animals.) 

Years ago, an editor told me she could usually guess which aspiring writers would become published because of the way they speak about their characters.  “The ones most likely to succeed talk about their characters as if they’re real people.”

My thought was “Of course my characters are real!  They just don’t happen to have bodies.”  Which probably proves the editor’s point. <g>

My characters are generally smarter and braver than I am, and my heroines may nDscn0614_4 ot always be beautiful but they all have great hair and skin. They are creatures of my imagination (unlike the cats in my books, which are always based on real cats). 

At the same time, they have traits that resonate within me, or I couldn’t make them convincing.  I am not half-Chinese and raised in a xenophobic culture like Troth, the heroine of The China Bride.  But who among us hasn’t felt like an outsider, awkward and unwanted?  (High school is pretty much guaranteed to produce such feelings!)

Projecting that sense of not belonging into a character brings her alive, and also makes her sympathetic.  Especially for the writer—once I’ve given my characters some of my own vulnerabilities, how can I not care about them? 

Even villains have to have traits that find some echo inside of me.  Not that I am a latent serial killer—when wasps get into the house, I capture them alive and release outdoors.  But selfishness, egotism, greed, anger—these are just about universal human traits.  (The Dalai Lama might be above such weakness.  But probably not.) 

As to villains in general—I tend to make mine operatically awful so I won’t mind killing them off.  If one has any redeeming characteristics—well, I might just have to make a hero out of him.  And then I’d have to fall in love with him.  <g>

Mary Jo

63 thoughts on “Favorite Characters? Not hardly!”

  1. You do know that that’s what Georgette Heyer did, right? She decided that the villain of THE BLACK MOTH was more interesting than the hero, so she wrote a different version of the story in THESE OLD SHADES and made him the hero.
    And of course Barbara Michaels (Elizabeth Peters) recycled John Smyth, the lesser villain in THE CAMELOT CAPER, into the hero of the Vicky Bliss series.
    I love your plush cat. What’s her name?

    Reply
  2. You do know that that’s what Georgette Heyer did, right? She decided that the villain of THE BLACK MOTH was more interesting than the hero, so she wrote a different version of the story in THESE OLD SHADES and made him the hero.
    And of course Barbara Michaels (Elizabeth Peters) recycled John Smyth, the lesser villain in THE CAMELOT CAPER, into the hero of the Vicky Bliss series.
    I love your plush cat. What’s her name?

    Reply
  3. You do know that that’s what Georgette Heyer did, right? She decided that the villain of THE BLACK MOTH was more interesting than the hero, so she wrote a different version of the story in THESE OLD SHADES and made him the hero.
    And of course Barbara Michaels (Elizabeth Peters) recycled John Smyth, the lesser villain in THE CAMELOT CAPER, into the hero of the Vicky Bliss series.
    I love your plush cat. What’s her name?

    Reply
  4. MaryJo —
    I do understand your equitable love for your characters. But know that we (readers) have preferences. At least I do.
    My favorite hero of your design, physically speaking, is Reggie. Then, bad boy, and ultimately interesting, is the Gypsy Earl (Thunder and Roses).

    Reply
  5. MaryJo —
    I do understand your equitable love for your characters. But know that we (readers) have preferences. At least I do.
    My favorite hero of your design, physically speaking, is Reggie. Then, bad boy, and ultimately interesting, is the Gypsy Earl (Thunder and Roses).

    Reply
  6. MaryJo —
    I do understand your equitable love for your characters. But know that we (readers) have preferences. At least I do.
    My favorite hero of your design, physically speaking, is Reggie. Then, bad boy, and ultimately interesting, is the Gypsy Earl (Thunder and Roses).

    Reply
  7. >> “…creatures of my imagination.”
    I love this! Gonna use it the next time I get the ‘eye roll’ from one of my many family members who is wondering if I’ve finally proven my rumored insanity.
    Personifying… I tend to personify everything. From facts and figures to people. It’s actually a memory tactic for me. I assign colors, animals, shapes, sounds and other more ephemeral things to people I know and facts I need to remember. Although there is an excellent chance I won’t remember the person’s name or where the fact came from. Oh well.
    Great answer to the ’hated’ question, btw. Of course you love them all. And each are wonderfully convincing and easy to relate to. But, like Cathy, I have favorites. Dominic Renbourne, (THE WILD CHILD) because he had to choose between two loves, Kyle (THE CHINA BRIDE) because he learned to see past his perceived future and write it anew, and Jack (THE MARRAGE SPELL) who learned the power of embracing who he really was. And of course there’s Gwynne (KISS OF FATE) who learned there’s pros and cons to being an enchantress, Troth (THE CHINA BRIDE) who discovered her beauty, both in and out and Abby (THE MARRIAGE SPELL) who saw what she wanted and went for it.
    Looking forward to the next one.
    –the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  8. >> “…creatures of my imagination.”
    I love this! Gonna use it the next time I get the ‘eye roll’ from one of my many family members who is wondering if I’ve finally proven my rumored insanity.
    Personifying… I tend to personify everything. From facts and figures to people. It’s actually a memory tactic for me. I assign colors, animals, shapes, sounds and other more ephemeral things to people I know and facts I need to remember. Although there is an excellent chance I won’t remember the person’s name or where the fact came from. Oh well.
    Great answer to the ’hated’ question, btw. Of course you love them all. And each are wonderfully convincing and easy to relate to. But, like Cathy, I have favorites. Dominic Renbourne, (THE WILD CHILD) because he had to choose between two loves, Kyle (THE CHINA BRIDE) because he learned to see past his perceived future and write it anew, and Jack (THE MARRAGE SPELL) who learned the power of embracing who he really was. And of course there’s Gwynne (KISS OF FATE) who learned there’s pros and cons to being an enchantress, Troth (THE CHINA BRIDE) who discovered her beauty, both in and out and Abby (THE MARRIAGE SPELL) who saw what she wanted and went for it.
    Looking forward to the next one.
    –the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  9. >> “…creatures of my imagination.”
    I love this! Gonna use it the next time I get the ‘eye roll’ from one of my many family members who is wondering if I’ve finally proven my rumored insanity.
    Personifying… I tend to personify everything. From facts and figures to people. It’s actually a memory tactic for me. I assign colors, animals, shapes, sounds and other more ephemeral things to people I know and facts I need to remember. Although there is an excellent chance I won’t remember the person’s name or where the fact came from. Oh well.
    Great answer to the ’hated’ question, btw. Of course you love them all. And each are wonderfully convincing and easy to relate to. But, like Cathy, I have favorites. Dominic Renbourne, (THE WILD CHILD) because he had to choose between two loves, Kyle (THE CHINA BRIDE) because he learned to see past his perceived future and write it anew, and Jack (THE MARRAGE SPELL) who learned the power of embracing who he really was. And of course there’s Gwynne (KISS OF FATE) who learned there’s pros and cons to being an enchantress, Troth (THE CHINA BRIDE) who discovered her beauty, both in and out and Abby (THE MARRIAGE SPELL) who saw what she wanted and went for it.
    Looking forward to the next one.
    –the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  10. I love Reggie Davenport! One of my all time favs. But then, like Heyer and so many others, I’m a sucker for a reformed bad boy. THESE OLD SHADES and THE DEVIL’S CUB (about the son of the reformed bad boy hero of TOS) are two of my all time favorite Heyer books.
    I recently read an entry in a contest that I gave a near perfect score to, but I had to confess in the comment section that I really, really wanted the villain to turn out to be the hero . . . in fact, I plotted the whole story out in my head. He was that real. By chance I got to meet the writer in Atlanta and she and I had a good laugh over my obviously defective romantic impulses. LOL!

    Reply
  11. I love Reggie Davenport! One of my all time favs. But then, like Heyer and so many others, I’m a sucker for a reformed bad boy. THESE OLD SHADES and THE DEVIL’S CUB (about the son of the reformed bad boy hero of TOS) are two of my all time favorite Heyer books.
    I recently read an entry in a contest that I gave a near perfect score to, but I had to confess in the comment section that I really, really wanted the villain to turn out to be the hero . . . in fact, I plotted the whole story out in my head. He was that real. By chance I got to meet the writer in Atlanta and she and I had a good laugh over my obviously defective romantic impulses. LOL!

    Reply
  12. I love Reggie Davenport! One of my all time favs. But then, like Heyer and so many others, I’m a sucker for a reformed bad boy. THESE OLD SHADES and THE DEVIL’S CUB (about the son of the reformed bad boy hero of TOS) are two of my all time favorite Heyer books.
    I recently read an entry in a contest that I gave a near perfect score to, but I had to confess in the comment section that I really, really wanted the villain to turn out to be the hero . . . in fact, I plotted the whole story out in my head. He was that real. By chance I got to meet the writer in Atlanta and she and I had a good laugh over my obviously defective romantic impulses. LOL!

    Reply
  13. I remember reading an interview many years ago where MJP gave special mention to Robin/Robert in ANGEL ROGUE because he was closest in personality to her “paramour” (her word, not mine)at the time.
    I was re-reading THUNDER & ROSES about 3 weeks ago and it struck me again how Nicky seems one of MJP’s more well-adjusted, light-hearted heroes despite all the betrayals in his past. It makes him a standout among MJP’s heroes IMO. Of course, Clare was no slouch either. 😉 She is probably my fav heroine of MJP’s and part of what makes T&R such a winner.It is such a fabulous, fabulous book and of course, the beginning of the epochal Fallen Angels series.
    Besides THUNDER & ROSES, my fav MJP novel is UNCOMMON VOWS. I have a soft spot for obsessive heroes and the powerful motif of the chalice for Adrian’s soul stayed with me through the years. I was thrilled with the reference to Adrian and Meriel in THE WILD CHILD.

    Reply
  14. I remember reading an interview many years ago where MJP gave special mention to Robin/Robert in ANGEL ROGUE because he was closest in personality to her “paramour” (her word, not mine)at the time.
    I was re-reading THUNDER & ROSES about 3 weeks ago and it struck me again how Nicky seems one of MJP’s more well-adjusted, light-hearted heroes despite all the betrayals in his past. It makes him a standout among MJP’s heroes IMO. Of course, Clare was no slouch either. 😉 She is probably my fav heroine of MJP’s and part of what makes T&R such a winner.It is such a fabulous, fabulous book and of course, the beginning of the epochal Fallen Angels series.
    Besides THUNDER & ROSES, my fav MJP novel is UNCOMMON VOWS. I have a soft spot for obsessive heroes and the powerful motif of the chalice for Adrian’s soul stayed with me through the years. I was thrilled with the reference to Adrian and Meriel in THE WILD CHILD.

    Reply
  15. I remember reading an interview many years ago where MJP gave special mention to Robin/Robert in ANGEL ROGUE because he was closest in personality to her “paramour” (her word, not mine)at the time.
    I was re-reading THUNDER & ROSES about 3 weeks ago and it struck me again how Nicky seems one of MJP’s more well-adjusted, light-hearted heroes despite all the betrayals in his past. It makes him a standout among MJP’s heroes IMO. Of course, Clare was no slouch either. 😉 She is probably my fav heroine of MJP’s and part of what makes T&R such a winner.It is such a fabulous, fabulous book and of course, the beginning of the epochal Fallen Angels series.
    Besides THUNDER & ROSES, my fav MJP novel is UNCOMMON VOWS. I have a soft spot for obsessive heroes and the powerful motif of the chalice for Adrian’s soul stayed with me through the years. I was thrilled with the reference to Adrian and Meriel in THE WILD CHILD.

    Reply
  16. Nicholas from THUNDER AND ROSES, definitely my favorite hero, and he and Clare made such a great couple. Being short and stubborn, I like to read about women who are like me. It makes me feel less odd…even though I create dialogue in my stories by talking to myself…
    But then again, Robin from ANGEL ROGUE was a favorite and so was Ian from VEILS OF SILK and Stephen Kenyon nearly made me cry.
    I loved Troth. Being Irish/Japanese, it was interesting to see a character who was so close to my own background–certainly closer than most characters are. And I related to Troth’s sentiment that a meal isn’t a meal without some rice on hand.

    Reply
  17. Nicholas from THUNDER AND ROSES, definitely my favorite hero, and he and Clare made such a great couple. Being short and stubborn, I like to read about women who are like me. It makes me feel less odd…even though I create dialogue in my stories by talking to myself…
    But then again, Robin from ANGEL ROGUE was a favorite and so was Ian from VEILS OF SILK and Stephen Kenyon nearly made me cry.
    I loved Troth. Being Irish/Japanese, it was interesting to see a character who was so close to my own background–certainly closer than most characters are. And I related to Troth’s sentiment that a meal isn’t a meal without some rice on hand.

    Reply
  18. Nicholas from THUNDER AND ROSES, definitely my favorite hero, and he and Clare made such a great couple. Being short and stubborn, I like to read about women who are like me. It makes me feel less odd…even though I create dialogue in my stories by talking to myself…
    But then again, Robin from ANGEL ROGUE was a favorite and so was Ian from VEILS OF SILK and Stephen Kenyon nearly made me cry.
    I loved Troth. Being Irish/Japanese, it was interesting to see a character who was so close to my own background–certainly closer than most characters are. And I related to Troth’s sentiment that a meal isn’t a meal without some rice on hand.

    Reply
  19. From Mary Jo:
    Georgette Heyer definitely proves that the appeal of bad boys is not a recent phenomenon. 🙂
    Tal, the stuffed kitty is Senior. She came into my life a few months back at almost exactly the same time as a little motherless stuffed kitten, orange. So they became Senior and Junior, the latter usually being found tucked under Senior’s left paw.
    While authors more or less need to love their characters equally, readers can of course have their favorites–as few or as many as they like. I’m glad to see so many of my heroes have left an impression. And yes, Robin is still the one most like the paramour. 🙂
    While I love the heroes from an authorly perspective, I must admit that if I had to live with one, I’d go for one of the more laidback guys–Stephen rather than Michael, Robin before Peregrine. Or maybe Kenneth would be good–as a crazed creative painter, he’d probably be tolerant of a writer. 🙂 There remarkably mellow Nicholas would also be a good choice.
    Though the two Meriels, from centuries apart but the same bloodline, had a lot of similarities, their heroes were quite different. All part of the fun.
    Annrei, I’m glad that Troth’s mixed heritage spoke to you. In our increasingly diversified world, I like seeing a wider range of characters in books. And I do my small bit to contribute to that. 🙂 (BTW, in the DRAGON LOVERS anthology that will be out in January, half-Japanese author Karen Harbaugh sets her her story in Japan. You might want to look for it.)
    Mary Jo, getting back to work

    Reply
  20. From Mary Jo:
    Georgette Heyer definitely proves that the appeal of bad boys is not a recent phenomenon. 🙂
    Tal, the stuffed kitty is Senior. She came into my life a few months back at almost exactly the same time as a little motherless stuffed kitten, orange. So they became Senior and Junior, the latter usually being found tucked under Senior’s left paw.
    While authors more or less need to love their characters equally, readers can of course have their favorites–as few or as many as they like. I’m glad to see so many of my heroes have left an impression. And yes, Robin is still the one most like the paramour. 🙂
    While I love the heroes from an authorly perspective, I must admit that if I had to live with one, I’d go for one of the more laidback guys–Stephen rather than Michael, Robin before Peregrine. Or maybe Kenneth would be good–as a crazed creative painter, he’d probably be tolerant of a writer. 🙂 There remarkably mellow Nicholas would also be a good choice.
    Though the two Meriels, from centuries apart but the same bloodline, had a lot of similarities, their heroes were quite different. All part of the fun.
    Annrei, I’m glad that Troth’s mixed heritage spoke to you. In our increasingly diversified world, I like seeing a wider range of characters in books. And I do my small bit to contribute to that. 🙂 (BTW, in the DRAGON LOVERS anthology that will be out in January, half-Japanese author Karen Harbaugh sets her her story in Japan. You might want to look for it.)
    Mary Jo, getting back to work

    Reply
  21. From Mary Jo:
    Georgette Heyer definitely proves that the appeal of bad boys is not a recent phenomenon. 🙂
    Tal, the stuffed kitty is Senior. She came into my life a few months back at almost exactly the same time as a little motherless stuffed kitten, orange. So they became Senior and Junior, the latter usually being found tucked under Senior’s left paw.
    While authors more or less need to love their characters equally, readers can of course have their favorites–as few or as many as they like. I’m glad to see so many of my heroes have left an impression. And yes, Robin is still the one most like the paramour. 🙂
    While I love the heroes from an authorly perspective, I must admit that if I had to live with one, I’d go for one of the more laidback guys–Stephen rather than Michael, Robin before Peregrine. Or maybe Kenneth would be good–as a crazed creative painter, he’d probably be tolerant of a writer. 🙂 There remarkably mellow Nicholas would also be a good choice.
    Though the two Meriels, from centuries apart but the same bloodline, had a lot of similarities, their heroes were quite different. All part of the fun.
    Annrei, I’m glad that Troth’s mixed heritage spoke to you. In our increasingly diversified world, I like seeing a wider range of characters in books. And I do my small bit to contribute to that. 🙂 (BTW, in the DRAGON LOVERS anthology that will be out in January, half-Japanese author Karen Harbaugh sets her her story in Japan. You might want to look for it.)
    Mary Jo, getting back to work

    Reply
  22. Reggie Davenport is not only my favorite MJP hero, he is one of my all-time heroes from a romance. But Nicholas, Michael, Stephen, Robin, and Kenzie Scott are also among my favorites. These are all heroes whose stories I continue to reread, a good test, I think, of their complexity.
    And I am already fascinated by Ashby and hoping that he gets his own story before too long. 🙂

    Reply
  23. Reggie Davenport is not only my favorite MJP hero, he is one of my all-time heroes from a romance. But Nicholas, Michael, Stephen, Robin, and Kenzie Scott are also among my favorites. These are all heroes whose stories I continue to reread, a good test, I think, of their complexity.
    And I am already fascinated by Ashby and hoping that he gets his own story before too long. 🙂

    Reply
  24. Reggie Davenport is not only my favorite MJP hero, he is one of my all-time heroes from a romance. But Nicholas, Michael, Stephen, Robin, and Kenzie Scott are also among my favorites. These are all heroes whose stories I continue to reread, a good test, I think, of their complexity.
    And I am already fascinated by Ashby and hoping that he gets his own story before too long. 🙂

    Reply
  25. All this talk of Georgette Heyer got me to rummaging around on the ‘Net about her, and I hit a small but quite lovely jackpot! I had never looked for a bibliography of her works before, but found one today that mentioned several works of hers that I hadn’t heard of before. One published short story was only in a book published as a fund raiser for the Red Cross in 1939. A little more rummaging, and I found it free online!
    http://www.richmondreview.co.uk/library/heyer01.html
    As for favorite characters… it’s hard for me to say. All the Word Wenches have wonderful characters that I’ve enjoyed. I think for me it’s more a class of character. My favorites tend to be the intensely alpha, sardonic men over 30 with hidden-for-only-the-heroine-to-find-softness paired with very feminine and self-possessed women over 23 who find that leaning on a man who loves you is a very good thing even if sometimes it really really annoys you.
    And while it touches me to read about characters who have significant challenges to overcome (illness, fortune reversals, betrayals, etc), I want them to rise like a Phoenix at the end. I’m not in any way disparaging her writing, but I stopped reading Danielle Steele because I was so sad for her characters that their eventual happy resolution wasn’t enough to lift me out of the sadness. Mary Balogh has pushed hard against that threshold for me a few times, although I love most of her work. It’s a personal taste thing; both women are obviously very talented. It’s just hard to explain without using examples.
    I guess I don’t mind if the characters begin in the shadows, as long as they leave them behind by the end. And if the changes wrought by the shadows refine like a furnace refines gold rather than scar like acid.

    Reply
  26. All this talk of Georgette Heyer got me to rummaging around on the ‘Net about her, and I hit a small but quite lovely jackpot! I had never looked for a bibliography of her works before, but found one today that mentioned several works of hers that I hadn’t heard of before. One published short story was only in a book published as a fund raiser for the Red Cross in 1939. A little more rummaging, and I found it free online!
    http://www.richmondreview.co.uk/library/heyer01.html
    As for favorite characters… it’s hard for me to say. All the Word Wenches have wonderful characters that I’ve enjoyed. I think for me it’s more a class of character. My favorites tend to be the intensely alpha, sardonic men over 30 with hidden-for-only-the-heroine-to-find-softness paired with very feminine and self-possessed women over 23 who find that leaning on a man who loves you is a very good thing even if sometimes it really really annoys you.
    And while it touches me to read about characters who have significant challenges to overcome (illness, fortune reversals, betrayals, etc), I want them to rise like a Phoenix at the end. I’m not in any way disparaging her writing, but I stopped reading Danielle Steele because I was so sad for her characters that their eventual happy resolution wasn’t enough to lift me out of the sadness. Mary Balogh has pushed hard against that threshold for me a few times, although I love most of her work. It’s a personal taste thing; both women are obviously very talented. It’s just hard to explain without using examples.
    I guess I don’t mind if the characters begin in the shadows, as long as they leave them behind by the end. And if the changes wrought by the shadows refine like a furnace refines gold rather than scar like acid.

    Reply
  27. All this talk of Georgette Heyer got me to rummaging around on the ‘Net about her, and I hit a small but quite lovely jackpot! I had never looked for a bibliography of her works before, but found one today that mentioned several works of hers that I hadn’t heard of before. One published short story was only in a book published as a fund raiser for the Red Cross in 1939. A little more rummaging, and I found it free online!
    http://www.richmondreview.co.uk/library/heyer01.html
    As for favorite characters… it’s hard for me to say. All the Word Wenches have wonderful characters that I’ve enjoyed. I think for me it’s more a class of character. My favorites tend to be the intensely alpha, sardonic men over 30 with hidden-for-only-the-heroine-to-find-softness paired with very feminine and self-possessed women over 23 who find that leaning on a man who loves you is a very good thing even if sometimes it really really annoys you.
    And while it touches me to read about characters who have significant challenges to overcome (illness, fortune reversals, betrayals, etc), I want them to rise like a Phoenix at the end. I’m not in any way disparaging her writing, but I stopped reading Danielle Steele because I was so sad for her characters that their eventual happy resolution wasn’t enough to lift me out of the sadness. Mary Balogh has pushed hard against that threshold for me a few times, although I love most of her work. It’s a personal taste thing; both women are obviously very talented. It’s just hard to explain without using examples.
    I guess I don’t mind if the characters begin in the shadows, as long as they leave them behind by the end. And if the changes wrought by the shadows refine like a furnace refines gold rather than scar like acid.

    Reply
  28. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  29. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  30. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  31. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  32. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  33. Wylene, Ashby might get his own story, but that hasn’t been decided yet. I have some ideas in mind for him, though. 🙂
    Susannac, thanks so much for the URL to the Heyer story! The relationship development was a bit light, but the story was fun, with lots of signature Heyer touches.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  34. I’m pretty sure the Heyer short story is included in PISTOLS FOR TWO; but I’m not absolutely certain, as the plots of her short stories are awfully similar.
    Don’t you believe that she somehow, perhaps in a previous incarnation, MUST have been a member of the Four-in-Hand Club and driven a curricle hell-for-leather up the Great North Road?

    Reply
  35. I’m pretty sure the Heyer short story is included in PISTOLS FOR TWO; but I’m not absolutely certain, as the plots of her short stories are awfully similar.
    Don’t you believe that she somehow, perhaps in a previous incarnation, MUST have been a member of the Four-in-Hand Club and driven a curricle hell-for-leather up the Great North Road?

    Reply
  36. I’m pretty sure the Heyer short story is included in PISTOLS FOR TWO; but I’m not absolutely certain, as the plots of her short stories are awfully similar.
    Don’t you believe that she somehow, perhaps in a previous incarnation, MUST have been a member of the Four-in-Hand Club and driven a curricle hell-for-leather up the Great North Road?

    Reply

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