Farewell Blues

Farewell-Blues-350x525Farewell Blues: An Interview with Maggie Robinson

By Mary Jo

MJP: I'm delighted to welcome Maggie Robinson here today.  She started out in historical romance and is now writing historical mysteries.  She's here to discuss her recent release, Farewell Blues, fourth and last of her historical mystery Lady Adelaide series. 

Maggie, I've been enthralled by this series ever since you first told me the premise for book one, Nobody's Sweetheart Now.  Will you explain the setup of the series?  And tell us about the men in Addie's life!

MR:  I’m delighted to be here! Ah, the set up. It sounds…a little crazy. But I’m reminded of this description of The Wizard of Oz: “Transported to a surreal landscape, a young girl kills the first person she meets, then teams up with three strangers to kill again.”

Boiled down to its basics, there’s a widowed marquess’s daughter, the ghost of her philandering yet fatally charming husband, and a handsome Anglo-Indian detective. They team up not to kill but find killers through four light-hearted cozy mysteries.  (Nobody's Sweetheart Now, Whose Sorry Now, Just Make Believe, and Farewell Blues.)

Scotland Yard’s Devenand Hunter has no idea he’s getting some sneaky beyond-the-grave Maggie2_SMassistance from repenting Rupert, who must redeem himself before he can worm his way into heaven. Lady Adelaide is the only one who can see Rupert, and believe me, she doesn’t want to! He was aggravating enough in life, but in death when he appears, someone else is about to die.

MJP:  Tell us more about the protagonist, Lady Adelaide Compton, and her character arc. 

MR: I’ll start by quoting Kirkus (blushing): “Robinson balances crime and romance, but her sharp heroine is the real prize.”

Addie starts off as a non-grieving widow who has had her self-confidence badly shattered by Great War flying ace Rupert. He died not over the skies of France, but wrapped around a dry-stone wall with his French mistress. Just when she thinks her normal life is resuming, Rupert turns up to act as an unwanted guardian angel, even though he doesn’t have his wings yet. During the course of the series, she blossoms from a sheltered, somewhat naïve aristocrat to a woman willing to break society’s rules and expectations.

Whos-Sorry-Now-300x450MJP: I'm sorry to say goodbye to these characters, but I thought you ended the series beautifully.  Did you have this ending in mind from the beginning, or did it form gradually over the course of the series?

MR: Thank you so much! I had nothing in mind in the beginning, LOL. I’m a total pantser, which is very tricky when you’re supposed to plot tightly for a mystery. But as a defrocked romance writer, I knew I had to get Dev and Addie together romantically somehow. I’d made it difficult for them and myself, since there was such a disparity in their “stations,” and class differences are alive and well to this day 100 years later. But I discovered Dev had been telling me all along where his heart lay, and without giving it away, I do think I solved their HEA pretty successfully. And I must thank you, Mary Jo, for reminding me to make Rupert grovel sufficiently at the end.

MJP: Do you have any interesting tidbits of research you'd like to mention?

MR: The 1920s seem high-gloss and full of mindless hijinks (and fabulous fashion), but beneath the veneer, the Great War left a lasting legacy. A generation of young men were Just-Make-Believe-250x375wiped out. Rupert’s lads in the Royal Flying Corps were known as the Suicide Club. After perhaps a total of a dozen hours of flight training, they flew without parachutes and had an average lifespan of eleven days on the front. Sugar was still rationed until right before Christmas 1920. The reaction to all this death and deprivation was a desperate wildness that wouldn’t wind down until the end of the decade with the Great Depression.

On a much lighter note, some of my favorite foods were invented then—Welch’s grape jelly (1924) and Peter Pan peanut butter (1928), for example. What would we do without a PB& J sandwich on Wonderbread (1921) washed down with some Kool-Aid (1927)?

MJP: Will you give us a brief taste of Farewell Blues?

MR:

Mount Street, London

A Monday morning toward the end of June, 1925

Mama was in gaol. Four words Lady Adelaide Compton never expected to string together. In fact, at the moment she could barely think or speak at all.

But the ghost of her dead husband Rupert was making up for Addie’s baffled brain and syllabic silence. He stormed about the bedroom of her London pied-à-terre, tying and untying his maroon foulard tie in frustration.

Addie had buried him in that tie in just short of a year and a half ago, and she had agonized over which one to choose—her late husband had been something of a clothes-horse, and she was spoilt for choice. She never expected to see the tie again (or Rupert, for that matter) once his coffin was ensconced in the Compton family crypt in Gloucestershire, and she was rather bored with it now. It was taking Rupert a veritable eternity to winkle his way into Heaven, even after performing several good deeds as reparation for his wicked ways on earth.

“I ask you, Addie, what have I done to deserve this?” he said, not waiting for an answer, for he probably knew exactly what she’d tell him, and at great length too. “It’s not my fault things ended the way they did on Saturday. I was so close to Heaven, sooo close. I could hear the trumpets and practically taste the clouds. Apricot custard with a dash of almond extract, by the way, in case you’re interested. Though I imagine yours might taste different. I understand Heaven is an individualized experience, but at this rate I’ll never find out! It’s so unfair! I solved your last case, didn’t I? Well, most of it. You would have been rid of me forever if your bloo—uh, blessed mother did not go and shoot the Duke of Rufford.”

This stirred Addie to speech. “She didn’t. She couldn’t have.”

Rupert collapsed on her bed. “Well, I suppose not if I’ve been summoned to your side again. Damn it, Addie! I know I was a cad when I was alive, but you must give me some credit for improving! Can’t you put in a good word somehow?”

“To whom would I speak?” asked Addie, genuinely curious. She said her bedtime prayers just like anybody else. Someone should have picked up the fact by now that she wished to be rid of her husband for good.

MJP:  Are you working on something new?

MR: I am! I’ve finished the first book of another 1920s-era cozy mystery heavily influenced by Auntie Mame, and have begun the second. No release date yet. Mum’s the word, LOL.

MJP:  Will you be giving away a copy to a commenter before midnight tomorrow?

MR:  I have a signed trade paperback of Farewell Blues for one commenter. (Or, if you Farewell-Blues-350x525prefer, a download of one of the earlier books in the series.)

Some think of the 1920s as the first really modern age. If you could time-travel back to the Twenties, what would you do? Shop at Chanel’s atelier in Paris? Motor through Mayfair on a scavenger hunt with the Bright Young People? Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club? Swim with Scott and Zelda on the French Riviera? Take tea with debut author Agatha Christie? Paint with Pablo? The possibilities are endless!

MJP: It's been lovely to have you here, Maggie, and I'm looking forward to what you write next!

135 thoughts on “Farewell Blues”

  1. I would visit as many of the Unesco World Heritage sites in Europe as possible, before they are run over by the crowds and soak up the atmosphere. Ever since I’ve been to the Alhambra and couldn’t really see a thing due to the masses of people being ushered through there, I wished to be rich enough for private visits. But I suppose time travel would work just as well.
    Provided of course I do not end up as one of the millions of jobless people in the nineteen-twenties. In that case, I’d rather not go and will wait for the millions to suddenly materialize, which is just as likely to happen 😉
    No need to consider me for the draw, I can get my own copies, shipping would be too difficult anyway.

    Reply
  2. I would visit as many of the Unesco World Heritage sites in Europe as possible, before they are run over by the crowds and soak up the atmosphere. Ever since I’ve been to the Alhambra and couldn’t really see a thing due to the masses of people being ushered through there, I wished to be rich enough for private visits. But I suppose time travel would work just as well.
    Provided of course I do not end up as one of the millions of jobless people in the nineteen-twenties. In that case, I’d rather not go and will wait for the millions to suddenly materialize, which is just as likely to happen 😉
    No need to consider me for the draw, I can get my own copies, shipping would be too difficult anyway.

    Reply
  3. I would visit as many of the Unesco World Heritage sites in Europe as possible, before they are run over by the crowds and soak up the atmosphere. Ever since I’ve been to the Alhambra and couldn’t really see a thing due to the masses of people being ushered through there, I wished to be rich enough for private visits. But I suppose time travel would work just as well.
    Provided of course I do not end up as one of the millions of jobless people in the nineteen-twenties. In that case, I’d rather not go and will wait for the millions to suddenly materialize, which is just as likely to happen 😉
    No need to consider me for the draw, I can get my own copies, shipping would be too difficult anyway.

    Reply
  4. I would visit as many of the Unesco World Heritage sites in Europe as possible, before they are run over by the crowds and soak up the atmosphere. Ever since I’ve been to the Alhambra and couldn’t really see a thing due to the masses of people being ushered through there, I wished to be rich enough for private visits. But I suppose time travel would work just as well.
    Provided of course I do not end up as one of the millions of jobless people in the nineteen-twenties. In that case, I’d rather not go and will wait for the millions to suddenly materialize, which is just as likely to happen 😉
    No need to consider me for the draw, I can get my own copies, shipping would be too difficult anyway.

    Reply
  5. I would visit as many of the Unesco World Heritage sites in Europe as possible, before they are run over by the crowds and soak up the atmosphere. Ever since I’ve been to the Alhambra and couldn’t really see a thing due to the masses of people being ushered through there, I wished to be rich enough for private visits. But I suppose time travel would work just as well.
    Provided of course I do not end up as one of the millions of jobless people in the nineteen-twenties. In that case, I’d rather not go and will wait for the millions to suddenly materialize, which is just as likely to happen 😉
    No need to consider me for the draw, I can get my own copies, shipping would be too difficult anyway.

    Reply
  6. I was born in 1927, so I don’t need to go back, it was alive and fresh in the conversations between mother, her sisters, and her friends.

    Reply
  7. I was born in 1927, so I don’t need to go back, it was alive and fresh in the conversations between mother, her sisters, and her friends.

    Reply
  8. I was born in 1927, so I don’t need to go back, it was alive and fresh in the conversations between mother, her sisters, and her friends.

    Reply
  9. I was born in 1927, so I don’t need to go back, it was alive and fresh in the conversations between mother, her sisters, and her friends.

    Reply
  10. I was born in 1927, so I don’t need to go back, it was alive and fresh in the conversations between mother, her sisters, and her friends.

    Reply
  11. Yes, we’re going to ignore ugly realities when we time-travel, and have lots of money to ease our way, LOL. I know what you mean about crowds. We visited the Sistine Chapel a few years ago and it was not the experience I was hoping for.

    Reply
  12. Yes, we’re going to ignore ugly realities when we time-travel, and have lots of money to ease our way, LOL. I know what you mean about crowds. We visited the Sistine Chapel a few years ago and it was not the experience I was hoping for.

    Reply
  13. Yes, we’re going to ignore ugly realities when we time-travel, and have lots of money to ease our way, LOL. I know what you mean about crowds. We visited the Sistine Chapel a few years ago and it was not the experience I was hoping for.

    Reply
  14. Yes, we’re going to ignore ugly realities when we time-travel, and have lots of money to ease our way, LOL. I know what you mean about crowds. We visited the Sistine Chapel a few years ago and it was not the experience I was hoping for.

    Reply
  15. Yes, we’re going to ignore ugly realities when we time-travel, and have lots of money to ease our way, LOL. I know what you mean about crowds. We visited the Sistine Chapel a few years ago and it was not the experience I was hoping for.

    Reply
  16. Oh, I really liked Nobody’s Sweetheart Now. Sounds like I need to catch up on this series fast. Historical mystery with a bit of romance is my favorite.
    I am not a club person at all (huge introvert here) but if I were time traveling, being in some kind of jazz club or the like would be really fun – for a short period of time. 🙂

    Reply
  17. Oh, I really liked Nobody’s Sweetheart Now. Sounds like I need to catch up on this series fast. Historical mystery with a bit of romance is my favorite.
    I am not a club person at all (huge introvert here) but if I were time traveling, being in some kind of jazz club or the like would be really fun – for a short period of time. 🙂

    Reply
  18. Oh, I really liked Nobody’s Sweetheart Now. Sounds like I need to catch up on this series fast. Historical mystery with a bit of romance is my favorite.
    I am not a club person at all (huge introvert here) but if I were time traveling, being in some kind of jazz club or the like would be really fun – for a short period of time. 🙂

    Reply
  19. Oh, I really liked Nobody’s Sweetheart Now. Sounds like I need to catch up on this series fast. Historical mystery with a bit of romance is my favorite.
    I am not a club person at all (huge introvert here) but if I were time traveling, being in some kind of jazz club or the like would be really fun – for a short period of time. 🙂

    Reply
  20. Oh, I really liked Nobody’s Sweetheart Now. Sounds like I need to catch up on this series fast. Historical mystery with a bit of romance is my favorite.
    I am not a club person at all (huge introvert here) but if I were time traveling, being in some kind of jazz club or the like would be really fun – for a short period of time. 🙂

    Reply
  21. Thank you, Mary Jo and Maggie, for a wonderful interview. Hmm, what would I do if I visited the twenties? It would be neat to meet my grandmothers as young women in 1925 when they were 25 and 20 and see who they were then; we’ll overlook the pesky matter of my having to learn Dutch and Hungarian.

    Reply
  22. Thank you, Mary Jo and Maggie, for a wonderful interview. Hmm, what would I do if I visited the twenties? It would be neat to meet my grandmothers as young women in 1925 when they were 25 and 20 and see who they were then; we’ll overlook the pesky matter of my having to learn Dutch and Hungarian.

    Reply
  23. Thank you, Mary Jo and Maggie, for a wonderful interview. Hmm, what would I do if I visited the twenties? It would be neat to meet my grandmothers as young women in 1925 when they were 25 and 20 and see who they were then; we’ll overlook the pesky matter of my having to learn Dutch and Hungarian.

    Reply
  24. Thank you, Mary Jo and Maggie, for a wonderful interview. Hmm, what would I do if I visited the twenties? It would be neat to meet my grandmothers as young women in 1925 when they were 25 and 20 and see who they were then; we’ll overlook the pesky matter of my having to learn Dutch and Hungarian.

    Reply
  25. Thank you, Mary Jo and Maggie, for a wonderful interview. Hmm, what would I do if I visited the twenties? It would be neat to meet my grandmothers as young women in 1925 when they were 25 and 20 and see who they were then; we’ll overlook the pesky matter of my having to learn Dutch and Hungarian.

    Reply
  26. If I could travel back to the 1920s I would first choose Melbourne Cricket ground in 1928 to watch Don Bradman score his first century against England. I would then come back to Europe in 1927 to the fifth Solvay conference on the new Quantum theory. I would love to be a fly on the wall during discussions between Bohr and Einstein. That conference had 29 attendees and more than half became Nobel Laureates. The atmosphere must have been electric with excitement!
    Maggie, your Lady Adelaide Mysteries are available as audios in the UK and I have book 1 ‘Nobody’s sweetheart Now’ on my TBR. I love that you set your plots in the English Cotswolds (an area that I know well) and spent time staying at Painswick while writing some of your books. I will be watching for any errors though, when I listen to the audio
    Any prospect for audios of your other books eg Cotswold Confidential, any time soon?
    PS
    “But as a defrocked romance writer” Would you care to expand on that a little?

    Reply
  27. If I could travel back to the 1920s I would first choose Melbourne Cricket ground in 1928 to watch Don Bradman score his first century against England. I would then come back to Europe in 1927 to the fifth Solvay conference on the new Quantum theory. I would love to be a fly on the wall during discussions between Bohr and Einstein. That conference had 29 attendees and more than half became Nobel Laureates. The atmosphere must have been electric with excitement!
    Maggie, your Lady Adelaide Mysteries are available as audios in the UK and I have book 1 ‘Nobody’s sweetheart Now’ on my TBR. I love that you set your plots in the English Cotswolds (an area that I know well) and spent time staying at Painswick while writing some of your books. I will be watching for any errors though, when I listen to the audio
    Any prospect for audios of your other books eg Cotswold Confidential, any time soon?
    PS
    “But as a defrocked romance writer” Would you care to expand on that a little?

    Reply
  28. If I could travel back to the 1920s I would first choose Melbourne Cricket ground in 1928 to watch Don Bradman score his first century against England. I would then come back to Europe in 1927 to the fifth Solvay conference on the new Quantum theory. I would love to be a fly on the wall during discussions between Bohr and Einstein. That conference had 29 attendees and more than half became Nobel Laureates. The atmosphere must have been electric with excitement!
    Maggie, your Lady Adelaide Mysteries are available as audios in the UK and I have book 1 ‘Nobody’s sweetheart Now’ on my TBR. I love that you set your plots in the English Cotswolds (an area that I know well) and spent time staying at Painswick while writing some of your books. I will be watching for any errors though, when I listen to the audio
    Any prospect for audios of your other books eg Cotswold Confidential, any time soon?
    PS
    “But as a defrocked romance writer” Would you care to expand on that a little?

    Reply
  29. If I could travel back to the 1920s I would first choose Melbourne Cricket ground in 1928 to watch Don Bradman score his first century against England. I would then come back to Europe in 1927 to the fifth Solvay conference on the new Quantum theory. I would love to be a fly on the wall during discussions between Bohr and Einstein. That conference had 29 attendees and more than half became Nobel Laureates. The atmosphere must have been electric with excitement!
    Maggie, your Lady Adelaide Mysteries are available as audios in the UK and I have book 1 ‘Nobody’s sweetheart Now’ on my TBR. I love that you set your plots in the English Cotswolds (an area that I know well) and spent time staying at Painswick while writing some of your books. I will be watching for any errors though, when I listen to the audio
    Any prospect for audios of your other books eg Cotswold Confidential, any time soon?
    PS
    “But as a defrocked romance writer” Would you care to expand on that a little?

    Reply
  30. If I could travel back to the 1920s I would first choose Melbourne Cricket ground in 1928 to watch Don Bradman score his first century against England. I would then come back to Europe in 1927 to the fifth Solvay conference on the new Quantum theory. I would love to be a fly on the wall during discussions between Bohr and Einstein. That conference had 29 attendees and more than half became Nobel Laureates. The atmosphere must have been electric with excitement!
    Maggie, your Lady Adelaide Mysteries are available as audios in the UK and I have book 1 ‘Nobody’s sweetheart Now’ on my TBR. I love that you set your plots in the English Cotswolds (an area that I know well) and spent time staying at Painswick while writing some of your books. I will be watching for any errors though, when I listen to the audio
    Any prospect for audios of your other books eg Cotswold Confidential, any time soon?
    PS
    “But as a defrocked romance writer” Would you care to expand on that a little?

    Reply
  31. I have to thank the Word Wenches for cluing me in on this series a year or so ago. I absolutely love it! If I were living in the 1920’s, presumably with money, I’d buy a really snazzy car first thing. And then I would travel, unchaperoned! The Great War blew apart so many social customs and mores. I’m obviously learning toward the light and frivolous. Assuming I’m rich I think I would need to help fund groups that are helping soldiers and their families through hard times.

    Reply
  32. I have to thank the Word Wenches for cluing me in on this series a year or so ago. I absolutely love it! If I were living in the 1920’s, presumably with money, I’d buy a really snazzy car first thing. And then I would travel, unchaperoned! The Great War blew apart so many social customs and mores. I’m obviously learning toward the light and frivolous. Assuming I’m rich I think I would need to help fund groups that are helping soldiers and their families through hard times.

    Reply
  33. I have to thank the Word Wenches for cluing me in on this series a year or so ago. I absolutely love it! If I were living in the 1920’s, presumably with money, I’d buy a really snazzy car first thing. And then I would travel, unchaperoned! The Great War blew apart so many social customs and mores. I’m obviously learning toward the light and frivolous. Assuming I’m rich I think I would need to help fund groups that are helping soldiers and their families through hard times.

    Reply
  34. I have to thank the Word Wenches for cluing me in on this series a year or so ago. I absolutely love it! If I were living in the 1920’s, presumably with money, I’d buy a really snazzy car first thing. And then I would travel, unchaperoned! The Great War blew apart so many social customs and mores. I’m obviously learning toward the light and frivolous. Assuming I’m rich I think I would need to help fund groups that are helping soldiers and their families through hard times.

    Reply
  35. I have to thank the Word Wenches for cluing me in on this series a year or so ago. I absolutely love it! If I were living in the 1920’s, presumably with money, I’d buy a really snazzy car first thing. And then I would travel, unchaperoned! The Great War blew apart so many social customs and mores. I’m obviously learning toward the light and frivolous. Assuming I’m rich I think I would need to help fund groups that are helping soldiers and their families through hard times.

    Reply
  36. I absolutely love these books and I’m so sad the adventure is ending. I have the first three in the matching (& cute) trade paperback size so I need Farewell Blues for my set. (Of course!) If I could time travel back to the 20’s, I’d definitely Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club with Addie. Maybe Dev & Rupert will join us!

    Reply
  37. I absolutely love these books and I’m so sad the adventure is ending. I have the first three in the matching (& cute) trade paperback size so I need Farewell Blues for my set. (Of course!) If I could time travel back to the 20’s, I’d definitely Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club with Addie. Maybe Dev & Rupert will join us!

    Reply
  38. I absolutely love these books and I’m so sad the adventure is ending. I have the first three in the matching (& cute) trade paperback size so I need Farewell Blues for my set. (Of course!) If I could time travel back to the 20’s, I’d definitely Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club with Addie. Maybe Dev & Rupert will join us!

    Reply
  39. I absolutely love these books and I’m so sad the adventure is ending. I have the first three in the matching (& cute) trade paperback size so I need Farewell Blues for my set. (Of course!) If I could time travel back to the 20’s, I’d definitely Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club with Addie. Maybe Dev & Rupert will join us!

    Reply
  40. I absolutely love these books and I’m so sad the adventure is ending. I have the first three in the matching (& cute) trade paperback size so I need Farewell Blues for my set. (Of course!) If I could time travel back to the 20’s, I’d definitely Sip a Sidecar in a smoky jazz club with Addie. Maybe Dev & Rupert will join us!

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Misti! I thought I didn’t really like jazz until I listened to music from the 20s. Completely unlike cool modern jazz and much more fun! But like you, I’d need to leave early and get in my PJs, LOL.

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Misti! I thought I didn’t really like jazz until I listened to music from the 20s. Completely unlike cool modern jazz and much more fun! But like you, I’d need to leave early and get in my PJs, LOL.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Misti! I thought I didn’t really like jazz until I listened to music from the 20s. Completely unlike cool modern jazz and much more fun! But like you, I’d need to leave early and get in my PJs, LOL.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Misti! I thought I didn’t really like jazz until I listened to music from the 20s. Completely unlike cool modern jazz and much more fun! But like you, I’d need to leave early and get in my PJs, LOL.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Misti! I thought I didn’t really like jazz until I listened to music from the 20s. Completely unlike cool modern jazz and much more fun! But like you, I’d need to leave early and get in my PJs, LOL.

    Reply
  46. Ha, the narrator is an English actress, and she changed some pronunciations, which came as a surprise, LOL. I was thinking Brooton for Addie’s mother’s name (Lady Broughton), and Gemma says Browton. Live and learn.
    I don’t think there are audio plans for any of my other books. I have to say I get a little freaked out when I hear someone else reading them!
    Maybe instead of defrocked, I should have said reformed. It’s much more fun to kill people than make them kiss. 😉

    Reply
  47. Ha, the narrator is an English actress, and she changed some pronunciations, which came as a surprise, LOL. I was thinking Brooton for Addie’s mother’s name (Lady Broughton), and Gemma says Browton. Live and learn.
    I don’t think there are audio plans for any of my other books. I have to say I get a little freaked out when I hear someone else reading them!
    Maybe instead of defrocked, I should have said reformed. It’s much more fun to kill people than make them kiss. 😉

    Reply
  48. Ha, the narrator is an English actress, and she changed some pronunciations, which came as a surprise, LOL. I was thinking Brooton for Addie’s mother’s name (Lady Broughton), and Gemma says Browton. Live and learn.
    I don’t think there are audio plans for any of my other books. I have to say I get a little freaked out when I hear someone else reading them!
    Maybe instead of defrocked, I should have said reformed. It’s much more fun to kill people than make them kiss. 😉

    Reply
  49. Ha, the narrator is an English actress, and she changed some pronunciations, which came as a surprise, LOL. I was thinking Brooton for Addie’s mother’s name (Lady Broughton), and Gemma says Browton. Live and learn.
    I don’t think there are audio plans for any of my other books. I have to say I get a little freaked out when I hear someone else reading them!
    Maybe instead of defrocked, I should have said reformed. It’s much more fun to kill people than make them kiss. 😉

    Reply
  50. Ha, the narrator is an English actress, and she changed some pronunciations, which came as a surprise, LOL. I was thinking Brooton for Addie’s mother’s name (Lady Broughton), and Gemma says Browton. Live and learn.
    I don’t think there are audio plans for any of my other books. I have to say I get a little freaked out when I hear someone else reading them!
    Maybe instead of defrocked, I should have said reformed. It’s much more fun to kill people than make them kiss. 😉

    Reply
  51. Pat, thank you so much for the wonderful reviews of this series that you’ve left online. I absolutely loved writing these books. And it doesn’t surprise me that you’d be kind and want to help the men who returned shattered by the horror of the Great War. The decade was such a mix of highs and lows, great for a writer, but must have been pretty tough to live through.

    Reply
  52. Pat, thank you so much for the wonderful reviews of this series that you’ve left online. I absolutely loved writing these books. And it doesn’t surprise me that you’d be kind and want to help the men who returned shattered by the horror of the Great War. The decade was such a mix of highs and lows, great for a writer, but must have been pretty tough to live through.

    Reply
  53. Pat, thank you so much for the wonderful reviews of this series that you’ve left online. I absolutely loved writing these books. And it doesn’t surprise me that you’d be kind and want to help the men who returned shattered by the horror of the Great War. The decade was such a mix of highs and lows, great for a writer, but must have been pretty tough to live through.

    Reply
  54. Pat, thank you so much for the wonderful reviews of this series that you’ve left online. I absolutely loved writing these books. And it doesn’t surprise me that you’d be kind and want to help the men who returned shattered by the horror of the Great War. The decade was such a mix of highs and lows, great for a writer, but must have been pretty tough to live through.

    Reply
  55. Pat, thank you so much for the wonderful reviews of this series that you’ve left online. I absolutely loved writing these books. And it doesn’t surprise me that you’d be kind and want to help the men who returned shattered by the horror of the Great War. The decade was such a mix of highs and lows, great for a writer, but must have been pretty tough to live through.

    Reply
  56. I missed earlier recommendations of this series, but am pleased to read this post and interview; the series sounds like fun, so I will find it.
    I’m not a great fan of the ’20s, with everyone struggling to overcome the losses and privation of the Great War. Assuming that I were wealthy and well-educated, I think I’d buy a fast car and travel to the interesting historic sites and new archeological digs

    Reply
  57. I missed earlier recommendations of this series, but am pleased to read this post and interview; the series sounds like fun, so I will find it.
    I’m not a great fan of the ’20s, with everyone struggling to overcome the losses and privation of the Great War. Assuming that I were wealthy and well-educated, I think I’d buy a fast car and travel to the interesting historic sites and new archeological digs

    Reply
  58. I missed earlier recommendations of this series, but am pleased to read this post and interview; the series sounds like fun, so I will find it.
    I’m not a great fan of the ’20s, with everyone struggling to overcome the losses and privation of the Great War. Assuming that I were wealthy and well-educated, I think I’d buy a fast car and travel to the interesting historic sites and new archeological digs

    Reply
  59. I missed earlier recommendations of this series, but am pleased to read this post and interview; the series sounds like fun, so I will find it.
    I’m not a great fan of the ’20s, with everyone struggling to overcome the losses and privation of the Great War. Assuming that I were wealthy and well-educated, I think I’d buy a fast car and travel to the interesting historic sites and new archeological digs

    Reply
  60. I missed earlier recommendations of this series, but am pleased to read this post and interview; the series sounds like fun, so I will find it.
    I’m not a great fan of the ’20s, with everyone struggling to overcome the losses and privation of the Great War. Assuming that I were wealthy and well-educated, I think I’d buy a fast car and travel to the interesting historic sites and new archeological digs

    Reply
  61. This is great timing, because I just got a copy of Nobody’s Sweetheart Now, and I’m looking forward to the whole seris! Did you have movies like Blithe Spirit and Topper in mind when you came up with the idea of Rupert being a ghost?
    If I was back in the 1920’s I would definitely visit some jazz clubs, in New Orleans and Berlin. And I would visit some architectural masterpieces that no longer exist, like the Crystal Palace in London, and New York Penn Station.

    Reply
  62. This is great timing, because I just got a copy of Nobody’s Sweetheart Now, and I’m looking forward to the whole seris! Did you have movies like Blithe Spirit and Topper in mind when you came up with the idea of Rupert being a ghost?
    If I was back in the 1920’s I would definitely visit some jazz clubs, in New Orleans and Berlin. And I would visit some architectural masterpieces that no longer exist, like the Crystal Palace in London, and New York Penn Station.

    Reply
  63. This is great timing, because I just got a copy of Nobody’s Sweetheart Now, and I’m looking forward to the whole seris! Did you have movies like Blithe Spirit and Topper in mind when you came up with the idea of Rupert being a ghost?
    If I was back in the 1920’s I would definitely visit some jazz clubs, in New Orleans and Berlin. And I would visit some architectural masterpieces that no longer exist, like the Crystal Palace in London, and New York Penn Station.

    Reply
  64. This is great timing, because I just got a copy of Nobody’s Sweetheart Now, and I’m looking forward to the whole seris! Did you have movies like Blithe Spirit and Topper in mind when you came up with the idea of Rupert being a ghost?
    If I was back in the 1920’s I would definitely visit some jazz clubs, in New Orleans and Berlin. And I would visit some architectural masterpieces that no longer exist, like the Crystal Palace in London, and New York Penn Station.

    Reply
  65. This is great timing, because I just got a copy of Nobody’s Sweetheart Now, and I’m looking forward to the whole seris! Did you have movies like Blithe Spirit and Topper in mind when you came up with the idea of Rupert being a ghost?
    If I was back in the 1920’s I would definitely visit some jazz clubs, in New Orleans and Berlin. And I would visit some architectural masterpieces that no longer exist, like the Crystal Palace in London, and New York Penn Station.

    Reply
  66. Are you a mind reader? LOL. Topper and Blithe Spirit were exactly what I was going for. Although this series is set in the 1920s, I’m a huge fan of the screwball comedies of the 30s, and I think that seeped in!
    I often think of buildings that were destroyed or lost through neglect. I know how impossible and expensive they are to preserve, but it’s painful nonetheless to see them vanish. I am a total sucker for the shows where they restore abandoned country estates. Wouldn’t want to dust them though!

    Reply
  67. Are you a mind reader? LOL. Topper and Blithe Spirit were exactly what I was going for. Although this series is set in the 1920s, I’m a huge fan of the screwball comedies of the 30s, and I think that seeped in!
    I often think of buildings that were destroyed or lost through neglect. I know how impossible and expensive they are to preserve, but it’s painful nonetheless to see them vanish. I am a total sucker for the shows where they restore abandoned country estates. Wouldn’t want to dust them though!

    Reply
  68. Are you a mind reader? LOL. Topper and Blithe Spirit were exactly what I was going for. Although this series is set in the 1920s, I’m a huge fan of the screwball comedies of the 30s, and I think that seeped in!
    I often think of buildings that were destroyed or lost through neglect. I know how impossible and expensive they are to preserve, but it’s painful nonetheless to see them vanish. I am a total sucker for the shows where they restore abandoned country estates. Wouldn’t want to dust them though!

    Reply
  69. Are you a mind reader? LOL. Topper and Blithe Spirit were exactly what I was going for. Although this series is set in the 1920s, I’m a huge fan of the screwball comedies of the 30s, and I think that seeped in!
    I often think of buildings that were destroyed or lost through neglect. I know how impossible and expensive they are to preserve, but it’s painful nonetheless to see them vanish. I am a total sucker for the shows where they restore abandoned country estates. Wouldn’t want to dust them though!

    Reply
  70. Are you a mind reader? LOL. Topper and Blithe Spirit were exactly what I was going for. Although this series is set in the 1920s, I’m a huge fan of the screwball comedies of the 30s, and I think that seeped in!
    I often think of buildings that were destroyed or lost through neglect. I know how impossible and expensive they are to preserve, but it’s painful nonetheless to see them vanish. I am a total sucker for the shows where they restore abandoned country estates. Wouldn’t want to dust them though!

    Reply
  71. Rupert was addicted to speed, and he left Addie 8 cars in which to tootle around in. So you might borrow one of hers!
    You are so right about the poverty and unhappiness, and I never even mentioned the crime which sprung up. I guess no decade is without its drawbacks.

    Reply
  72. Rupert was addicted to speed, and he left Addie 8 cars in which to tootle around in. So you might borrow one of hers!
    You are so right about the poverty and unhappiness, and I never even mentioned the crime which sprung up. I guess no decade is without its drawbacks.

    Reply
  73. Rupert was addicted to speed, and he left Addie 8 cars in which to tootle around in. So you might borrow one of hers!
    You are so right about the poverty and unhappiness, and I never even mentioned the crime which sprung up. I guess no decade is without its drawbacks.

    Reply
  74. Rupert was addicted to speed, and he left Addie 8 cars in which to tootle around in. So you might borrow one of hers!
    You are so right about the poverty and unhappiness, and I never even mentioned the crime which sprung up. I guess no decade is without its drawbacks.

    Reply
  75. Rupert was addicted to speed, and he left Addie 8 cars in which to tootle around in. So you might borrow one of hers!
    You are so right about the poverty and unhappiness, and I never even mentioned the crime which sprung up. I guess no decade is without its drawbacks.

    Reply
  76. Time travel to the 1920’s would be an adventure. I would drive in a fashionable sports car and experience the beauty and picturesque countryside with a picnic. I would revel in the pastoral areas and perhaps stay there permanently.

    Reply
  77. Time travel to the 1920’s would be an adventure. I would drive in a fashionable sports car and experience the beauty and picturesque countryside with a picnic. I would revel in the pastoral areas and perhaps stay there permanently.

    Reply
  78. Time travel to the 1920’s would be an adventure. I would drive in a fashionable sports car and experience the beauty and picturesque countryside with a picnic. I would revel in the pastoral areas and perhaps stay there permanently.

    Reply
  79. Time travel to the 1920’s would be an adventure. I would drive in a fashionable sports car and experience the beauty and picturesque countryside with a picnic. I would revel in the pastoral areas and perhaps stay there permanently.

    Reply
  80. Time travel to the 1920’s would be an adventure. I would drive in a fashionable sports car and experience the beauty and picturesque countryside with a picnic. I would revel in the pastoral areas and perhaps stay there permanently.

    Reply
  81. The 1920’s were when my parents were born and I wish that I could find out more about their lives during the depression and how they managed. My trip would take me to many locales that had not as yet been exploited.

    Reply
  82. The 1920’s were when my parents were born and I wish that I could find out more about their lives during the depression and how they managed. My trip would take me to many locales that had not as yet been exploited.

    Reply
  83. The 1920’s were when my parents were born and I wish that I could find out more about their lives during the depression and how they managed. My trip would take me to many locales that had not as yet been exploited.

    Reply
  84. The 1920’s were when my parents were born and I wish that I could find out more about their lives during the depression and how they managed. My trip would take me to many locales that had not as yet been exploited.

    Reply
  85. The 1920’s were when my parents were born and I wish that I could find out more about their lives during the depression and how they managed. My trip would take me to many locales that had not as yet been exploited.

    Reply
  86. First of all, I must thank Ms Robinson for this series. I have been telling everyone I know how wonderful the books are. Addie and Dev are lovely. And to be honest, I loved Rupert. He was absolutely honest about who he was. And although he wanted to get into heaven, he did not have many regrets about his past actions.
    I loved the characters, the plot the atmosphere. I loved the entire series….and I thank you.
    If I went back in time to the 20’s….I would want to have the body I had a few years ago…it was slimmer than the one I have now…I want to wear those dresses. I want to be slinky. I want to look like I know what I am doing in a jazz club. I want to see some baseball games. I want to drive a car that allows me to feel the wind all around me. I want to dance as though there were no tomorrow. And maybe I could accidentally run into Douglas Fairbanks while I was visiting Hollywood.
    Thanks for the interview and most of all thanks for this series which blew me away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  87. First of all, I must thank Ms Robinson for this series. I have been telling everyone I know how wonderful the books are. Addie and Dev are lovely. And to be honest, I loved Rupert. He was absolutely honest about who he was. And although he wanted to get into heaven, he did not have many regrets about his past actions.
    I loved the characters, the plot the atmosphere. I loved the entire series….and I thank you.
    If I went back in time to the 20’s….I would want to have the body I had a few years ago…it was slimmer than the one I have now…I want to wear those dresses. I want to be slinky. I want to look like I know what I am doing in a jazz club. I want to see some baseball games. I want to drive a car that allows me to feel the wind all around me. I want to dance as though there were no tomorrow. And maybe I could accidentally run into Douglas Fairbanks while I was visiting Hollywood.
    Thanks for the interview and most of all thanks for this series which blew me away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  88. First of all, I must thank Ms Robinson for this series. I have been telling everyone I know how wonderful the books are. Addie and Dev are lovely. And to be honest, I loved Rupert. He was absolutely honest about who he was. And although he wanted to get into heaven, he did not have many regrets about his past actions.
    I loved the characters, the plot the atmosphere. I loved the entire series….and I thank you.
    If I went back in time to the 20’s….I would want to have the body I had a few years ago…it was slimmer than the one I have now…I want to wear those dresses. I want to be slinky. I want to look like I know what I am doing in a jazz club. I want to see some baseball games. I want to drive a car that allows me to feel the wind all around me. I want to dance as though there were no tomorrow. And maybe I could accidentally run into Douglas Fairbanks while I was visiting Hollywood.
    Thanks for the interview and most of all thanks for this series which blew me away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  89. First of all, I must thank Ms Robinson for this series. I have been telling everyone I know how wonderful the books are. Addie and Dev are lovely. And to be honest, I loved Rupert. He was absolutely honest about who he was. And although he wanted to get into heaven, he did not have many regrets about his past actions.
    I loved the characters, the plot the atmosphere. I loved the entire series….and I thank you.
    If I went back in time to the 20’s….I would want to have the body I had a few years ago…it was slimmer than the one I have now…I want to wear those dresses. I want to be slinky. I want to look like I know what I am doing in a jazz club. I want to see some baseball games. I want to drive a car that allows me to feel the wind all around me. I want to dance as though there were no tomorrow. And maybe I could accidentally run into Douglas Fairbanks while I was visiting Hollywood.
    Thanks for the interview and most of all thanks for this series which blew me away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  90. First of all, I must thank Ms Robinson for this series. I have been telling everyone I know how wonderful the books are. Addie and Dev are lovely. And to be honest, I loved Rupert. He was absolutely honest about who he was. And although he wanted to get into heaven, he did not have many regrets about his past actions.
    I loved the characters, the plot the atmosphere. I loved the entire series….and I thank you.
    If I went back in time to the 20’s….I would want to have the body I had a few years ago…it was slimmer than the one I have now…I want to wear those dresses. I want to be slinky. I want to look like I know what I am doing in a jazz club. I want to see some baseball games. I want to drive a car that allows me to feel the wind all around me. I want to dance as though there were no tomorrow. And maybe I could accidentally run into Douglas Fairbanks while I was visiting Hollywood.
    Thanks for the interview and most of all thanks for this series which blew me away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  91. Annette, you’ve rendered me speechless! Thank you so much! The series was the most fun I’ve had writing so far.
    I think the dropped waist dresses of the 20s might conceal what needs to be concealed and we’d all look slinky, LOL. But so many of them were sleeveless. If I could find a sleeved bathing suit, I’d buy it!

    Reply
  92. Annette, you’ve rendered me speechless! Thank you so much! The series was the most fun I’ve had writing so far.
    I think the dropped waist dresses of the 20s might conceal what needs to be concealed and we’d all look slinky, LOL. But so many of them were sleeveless. If I could find a sleeved bathing suit, I’d buy it!

    Reply
  93. Annette, you’ve rendered me speechless! Thank you so much! The series was the most fun I’ve had writing so far.
    I think the dropped waist dresses of the 20s might conceal what needs to be concealed and we’d all look slinky, LOL. But so many of them were sleeveless. If I could find a sleeved bathing suit, I’d buy it!

    Reply
  94. Annette, you’ve rendered me speechless! Thank you so much! The series was the most fun I’ve had writing so far.
    I think the dropped waist dresses of the 20s might conceal what needs to be concealed and we’d all look slinky, LOL. But so many of them were sleeveless. If I could find a sleeved bathing suit, I’d buy it!

    Reply
  95. Annette, you’ve rendered me speechless! Thank you so much! The series was the most fun I’ve had writing so far.
    I think the dropped waist dresses of the 20s might conceal what needs to be concealed and we’d all look slinky, LOL. But so many of them were sleeveless. If I could find a sleeved bathing suit, I’d buy it!

    Reply
  96. Sharon, my mother was born in 1921, and I have so many questions I wished I’d asked her. I do know she never spoke of World War II. She was Viennese and what she saw before, during, and after the war was pretty traumatic. She met my GI dad in the Vienna Woods, and here I am!

    Reply
  97. Sharon, my mother was born in 1921, and I have so many questions I wished I’d asked her. I do know she never spoke of World War II. She was Viennese and what she saw before, during, and after the war was pretty traumatic. She met my GI dad in the Vienna Woods, and here I am!

    Reply
  98. Sharon, my mother was born in 1921, and I have so many questions I wished I’d asked her. I do know she never spoke of World War II. She was Viennese and what she saw before, during, and after the war was pretty traumatic. She met my GI dad in the Vienna Woods, and here I am!

    Reply
  99. Sharon, my mother was born in 1921, and I have so many questions I wished I’d asked her. I do know she never spoke of World War II. She was Viennese and what she saw before, during, and after the war was pretty traumatic. She met my GI dad in the Vienna Woods, and here I am!

    Reply
  100. Sharon, my mother was born in 1921, and I have so many questions I wished I’d asked her. I do know she never spoke of World War II. She was Viennese and what she saw before, during, and after the war was pretty traumatic. She met my GI dad in the Vienna Woods, and here I am!

    Reply
  101. Reading this captivating series has allowed me to experience life in the 1920’s. To enjoy the era which is a favorite of mine, the jazz clubs, the lifestyle, the clothing, and the entertainment all would be unforgettable. When I read this I have taken a trip back in time. What an escape and fun, fun and more fun. Carefree and a real bubble at least for the time. Thank you for your creativity and amazing talent.

    Reply
  102. Reading this captivating series has allowed me to experience life in the 1920’s. To enjoy the era which is a favorite of mine, the jazz clubs, the lifestyle, the clothing, and the entertainment all would be unforgettable. When I read this I have taken a trip back in time. What an escape and fun, fun and more fun. Carefree and a real bubble at least for the time. Thank you for your creativity and amazing talent.

    Reply
  103. Reading this captivating series has allowed me to experience life in the 1920’s. To enjoy the era which is a favorite of mine, the jazz clubs, the lifestyle, the clothing, and the entertainment all would be unforgettable. When I read this I have taken a trip back in time. What an escape and fun, fun and more fun. Carefree and a real bubble at least for the time. Thank you for your creativity and amazing talent.

    Reply
  104. Reading this captivating series has allowed me to experience life in the 1920’s. To enjoy the era which is a favorite of mine, the jazz clubs, the lifestyle, the clothing, and the entertainment all would be unforgettable. When I read this I have taken a trip back in time. What an escape and fun, fun and more fun. Carefree and a real bubble at least for the time. Thank you for your creativity and amazing talent.

    Reply
  105. Reading this captivating series has allowed me to experience life in the 1920’s. To enjoy the era which is a favorite of mine, the jazz clubs, the lifestyle, the clothing, and the entertainment all would be unforgettable. When I read this I have taken a trip back in time. What an escape and fun, fun and more fun. Carefree and a real bubble at least for the time. Thank you for your creativity and amazing talent.

    Reply

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