Fantasy settings

Wow, this first week of blogging has been absolutely amazing!  We’ve had a fantastic response from readers, wonderfully intellectual posts on everything from history to writing, and I’m supposed to follow all this up with what?  I’m not an educator, a historian, or even a lit major.  I was a CPA for pity’s sake.  I can give you a history of the book publishing industry over the last twenty years if you’re looking for a way to cure insomnia, but intellectual ain’t me.

I’m currently writing Georgian era historicals because I like guys in tight pants and long hair.  <G>  (make note, find icons!)  I adore Johnny Depp’s pirate, earring and all.  Contrasts fascinate me, and they’re wonderfully easy to do when you have a smoky-eyed, steamy hero clothed in lace and buckskin, or a laid-back charmer with an engaging smile lounging about in leather jerkin and open linen with his cravat off.  And then there’s the virginal spinster who grabs that cravat and yanks the hero off his feet with a kiss so hot he doesn’t know what hit him.  Or the naïve maiden who bats her lashes and has the steamy hero stumbling over his boots. 

And to prove my lack of intellectual qualities, I have to admit that I love historical settings for love scenes, as well.  Everyone can make love in a shower stall.  How many of you can make love in a grotto dripping with moss and flowers?  A palace on a silk-covered chaise longue?  A ship with sails billowing on a moonlit sea? 

And since I’ve done all of the above at one time or another, I’ll soon be exploring new settings on a fantasy island where I get to make up the rules and the environment.  It will be set in the real world with real world problems and people, but wow, that island…  Hot as the volcano that created it. 

So what settings crank your fantasies?  And do I dare ask why?

Pat Rice

54 thoughts on “Fantasy settings”

  1. I just posted a very long comment and Blogger ate it. Will try to reconstruct.
    I love the Scarlet Pimpernel type of hero who is really a man of action under his wimpish/bookish/foppish surface. And I like magic, and intelligent animals bonded with humans. I don’t read historicals except for Regencies, as I prefer my history nonfictional. I’ve thrown too many bad historicals against the wall, snarling “Ninth-century Viking jarls did not name their daughters ‘Tiffany’!” I do like medieval-type settings for fantasy, but Regency and Georgian provide more entertaining backgrounds for social events, with salons, coffee houses, tea parties, and the like.
    I also like the novels set in classical times of Mary Renault, Robert Graves, Thomas Burnett Swann, and Richard L. Purtill. Since the Eleusinian Mysteries had only two rules for initiates–one must speak Greek, and not be guilty of murder–I think the three-day pilgrimage from Athens to Eleusis would be a wonderful setting for a murder mystery.
    I’d like to make two suggestions. One is to invite all here to http://forums.delphiforums.com/LunaticCafe to discuss romance with no holds barred (although we try to be reasonably polite, we’re honest if we don’t like something). We’ve had interesting discussions of MR. IMPOSSIBLE (everyone loved it), vampires, THESE OLD SHADES, and the worst possible romance novel title (which came out longer than a category romance). I’d particularly like to have your input on a thread I started called something like “Whaddaya Mean, You’re Really the Duke of Earl?” about characters in disguise and whether they can be forgiven for their deception.
    Also, maybe we could post some questions and once a month or so you could all answer them: stuff like your favorite reference books, how you respond to people who sneer at the romance genre, can you have a good story without a villain, what’s the capital of North Dakota…you know the sort of thing.

    Reply
  2. I just posted a very long comment and Blogger ate it. Will try to reconstruct.
    I love the Scarlet Pimpernel type of hero who is really a man of action under his wimpish/bookish/foppish surface. And I like magic, and intelligent animals bonded with humans. I don’t read historicals except for Regencies, as I prefer my history nonfictional. I’ve thrown too many bad historicals against the wall, snarling “Ninth-century Viking jarls did not name their daughters ‘Tiffany’!” I do like medieval-type settings for fantasy, but Regency and Georgian provide more entertaining backgrounds for social events, with salons, coffee houses, tea parties, and the like.
    I also like the novels set in classical times of Mary Renault, Robert Graves, Thomas Burnett Swann, and Richard L. Purtill. Since the Eleusinian Mysteries had only two rules for initiates–one must speak Greek, and not be guilty of murder–I think the three-day pilgrimage from Athens to Eleusis would be a wonderful setting for a murder mystery.
    I’d like to make two suggestions. One is to invite all here to http://forums.delphiforums.com/LunaticCafe to discuss romance with no holds barred (although we try to be reasonably polite, we’re honest if we don’t like something). We’ve had interesting discussions of MR. IMPOSSIBLE (everyone loved it), vampires, THESE OLD SHADES, and the worst possible romance novel title (which came out longer than a category romance). I’d particularly like to have your input on a thread I started called something like “Whaddaya Mean, You’re Really the Duke of Earl?” about characters in disguise and whether they can be forgiven for their deception.
    Also, maybe we could post some questions and once a month or so you could all answer them: stuff like your favorite reference books, how you respond to people who sneer at the romance genre, can you have a good story without a villain, what’s the capital of North Dakota…you know the sort of thing.

    Reply
  3. I just posted a very long comment and Blogger ate it. Will try to reconstruct.
    I love the Scarlet Pimpernel type of hero who is really a man of action under his wimpish/bookish/foppish surface. And I like magic, and intelligent animals bonded with humans. I don’t read historicals except for Regencies, as I prefer my history nonfictional. I’ve thrown too many bad historicals against the wall, snarling “Ninth-century Viking jarls did not name their daughters ‘Tiffany’!” I do like medieval-type settings for fantasy, but Regency and Georgian provide more entertaining backgrounds for social events, with salons, coffee houses, tea parties, and the like.
    I also like the novels set in classical times of Mary Renault, Robert Graves, Thomas Burnett Swann, and Richard L. Purtill. Since the Eleusinian Mysteries had only two rules for initiates–one must speak Greek, and not be guilty of murder–I think the three-day pilgrimage from Athens to Eleusis would be a wonderful setting for a murder mystery.
    I’d like to make two suggestions. One is to invite all here to http://forums.delphiforums.com/LunaticCafe to discuss romance with no holds barred (although we try to be reasonably polite, we’re honest if we don’t like something). We’ve had interesting discussions of MR. IMPOSSIBLE (everyone loved it), vampires, THESE OLD SHADES, and the worst possible romance novel title (which came out longer than a category romance). I’d particularly like to have your input on a thread I started called something like “Whaddaya Mean, You’re Really the Duke of Earl?” about characters in disguise and whether they can be forgiven for their deception.
    Also, maybe we could post some questions and once a month or so you could all answer them: stuff like your favorite reference books, how you respond to people who sneer at the romance genre, can you have a good story without a villain, what’s the capital of North Dakota…you know the sort of thing.

    Reply
  4. I love the idea of readers posting questions and the Wenches answering them. A Question of the Month thing. Wenches who are better at titles, please assist here!
    Loretta

    Reply
  5. I love the idea of readers posting questions and the Wenches answering them. A Question of the Month thing. Wenches who are better at titles, please assist here!
    Loretta

    Reply
  6. I love the idea of readers posting questions and the Wenches answering them. A Question of the Month thing. Wenches who are better at titles, please assist here!
    Loretta

    Reply
  7. Funny, Tal, that you should say that. I was reminded of Zorro at the Divas’ blog. I love the guys who wear masks–real or figurative–and pretend that they’re oh, so boring and innocent while they’re real tigers or foxes out for justice.
    Capital of ND. It was so far from where I used to live in Winnipeg. Umm, what could it be? Pierre? uhoh that’s SD. Bismarck, that’s it. Somebody must have been German to name the place that.
    Can relate to the Tiffanys of the Viking world. Now that’s where my real name would come in handy. After all, it is Scandinavian.
    Other fantasy times: I like medieval, meaning around 1000 or later. I think there is just too little known about the period around 400 to 1000 to get a halfway accurate picture. Moorish Spain may be one place.
    “Somewhere” I’d like to see more novels written about is Germany. I don’t know if others have noticed it, but Germany just does not have romances set in it. Is it still a holdover from the war or are we/they really that unromantic? Cecelia Holland has written at least one about the German Emperors who ruled most of the area down to Sicily. But other than that I don’t know of much. There are definitely more books written about Japan than about Germany and it’s always puzzled me. All the more Germanic area including Holland and Scandinavia after the Viking-Normans are bare. Anybody have any thoughts about that?

    Reply
  8. Funny, Tal, that you should say that. I was reminded of Zorro at the Divas’ blog. I love the guys who wear masks–real or figurative–and pretend that they’re oh, so boring and innocent while they’re real tigers or foxes out for justice.
    Capital of ND. It was so far from where I used to live in Winnipeg. Umm, what could it be? Pierre? uhoh that’s SD. Bismarck, that’s it. Somebody must have been German to name the place that.
    Can relate to the Tiffanys of the Viking world. Now that’s where my real name would come in handy. After all, it is Scandinavian.
    Other fantasy times: I like medieval, meaning around 1000 or later. I think there is just too little known about the period around 400 to 1000 to get a halfway accurate picture. Moorish Spain may be one place.
    “Somewhere” I’d like to see more novels written about is Germany. I don’t know if others have noticed it, but Germany just does not have romances set in it. Is it still a holdover from the war or are we/they really that unromantic? Cecelia Holland has written at least one about the German Emperors who ruled most of the area down to Sicily. But other than that I don’t know of much. There are definitely more books written about Japan than about Germany and it’s always puzzled me. All the more Germanic area including Holland and Scandinavia after the Viking-Normans are bare. Anybody have any thoughts about that?

    Reply
  9. Funny, Tal, that you should say that. I was reminded of Zorro at the Divas’ blog. I love the guys who wear masks–real or figurative–and pretend that they’re oh, so boring and innocent while they’re real tigers or foxes out for justice.
    Capital of ND. It was so far from where I used to live in Winnipeg. Umm, what could it be? Pierre? uhoh that’s SD. Bismarck, that’s it. Somebody must have been German to name the place that.
    Can relate to the Tiffanys of the Viking world. Now that’s where my real name would come in handy. After all, it is Scandinavian.
    Other fantasy times: I like medieval, meaning around 1000 or later. I think there is just too little known about the period around 400 to 1000 to get a halfway accurate picture. Moorish Spain may be one place.
    “Somewhere” I’d like to see more novels written about is Germany. I don’t know if others have noticed it, but Germany just does not have romances set in it. Is it still a holdover from the war or are we/they really that unromantic? Cecelia Holland has written at least one about the German Emperors who ruled most of the area down to Sicily. But other than that I don’t know of much. There are definitely more books written about Japan than about Germany and it’s always puzzled me. All the more Germanic area including Holland and Scandinavia after the Viking-Normans are bare. Anybody have any thoughts about that?

    Reply
  10. My friend and grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a trilogy based on the NIBELUNGENLIED:
    Wodan’s Children
    1. The Wolf and the Raven (1993)
    2. The Dragons of the Rhine (1995)
    3. The Lord of Horses (1996)

    Reply
  11. My friend and grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a trilogy based on the NIBELUNGENLIED:
    Wodan’s Children
    1. The Wolf and the Raven (1993)
    2. The Dragons of the Rhine (1995)
    3. The Lord of Horses (1996)

    Reply
  12. My friend and grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a trilogy based on the NIBELUNGENLIED:
    Wodan’s Children
    1. The Wolf and the Raven (1993)
    2. The Dragons of the Rhine (1995)
    3. The Lord of Horses (1996)

    Reply
  13. LOL! I love this group. Tiffany, snarf! I do try to do my research and stay within the parameters with which I’m most familiar, which tends to be Georgian/Regency in English settings. But these days, everyone wants sweet and light, and I’d rather explore some of the dark, so it slides down nicely with a bit of fantasy.
    And speaking of fantasy, Nina, that’s quite a dilly you have! There’s something to be said about combining reality and fantasy.
    As to the reason there aren’t more German novels, I’m not sure. I know in American publishing, they’d have a heart attack if we tried to write German settings in romance, simply because the American reader can’t relate to foreign-speaking countries. (I know, I know, we’re like one big backward island sometimes) And since most of us write what we know, and that isn’t Germany, it may be up to a German author to set the record straight.
    Pat Rice, off to investigate the enticing sounding forums

    Reply
  14. LOL! I love this group. Tiffany, snarf! I do try to do my research and stay within the parameters with which I’m most familiar, which tends to be Georgian/Regency in English settings. But these days, everyone wants sweet and light, and I’d rather explore some of the dark, so it slides down nicely with a bit of fantasy.
    And speaking of fantasy, Nina, that’s quite a dilly you have! There’s something to be said about combining reality and fantasy.
    As to the reason there aren’t more German novels, I’m not sure. I know in American publishing, they’d have a heart attack if we tried to write German settings in romance, simply because the American reader can’t relate to foreign-speaking countries. (I know, I know, we’re like one big backward island sometimes) And since most of us write what we know, and that isn’t Germany, it may be up to a German author to set the record straight.
    Pat Rice, off to investigate the enticing sounding forums

    Reply
  15. LOL! I love this group. Tiffany, snarf! I do try to do my research and stay within the parameters with which I’m most familiar, which tends to be Georgian/Regency in English settings. But these days, everyone wants sweet and light, and I’d rather explore some of the dark, so it slides down nicely with a bit of fantasy.
    And speaking of fantasy, Nina, that’s quite a dilly you have! There’s something to be said about combining reality and fantasy.
    As to the reason there aren’t more German novels, I’m not sure. I know in American publishing, they’d have a heart attack if we tried to write German settings in romance, simply because the American reader can’t relate to foreign-speaking countries. (I know, I know, we’re like one big backward island sometimes) And since most of us write what we know, and that isn’t Germany, it may be up to a German author to set the record straight.
    Pat Rice, off to investigate the enticing sounding forums

    Reply
  16. What settings crank my fantasies, and why? Wow, Pat, dangerous question! I loved the recent discussion about the popularity of Regency settings, and I have to say that anything-Regency does it for me.
    I love a Georgian setting for its opulence and mannerisms, but it’s the Regency era that seems more accessible to me. And I just adore those tight tight breeches with little coats that barely cover the butt.
    Regency clothing set off the male and female figures more, or at least it seemed to have less layers. I think clothing plays such a wonderful role in helping us define our characters.
    One thing that I adore is hats on men and women. I used to have a boss who was an older man–from another era, really, and he wore a hat to work. He was always impeccably dressed and his hats were exquisite. I was only 23 at the time, and I thought his hat was sexy and distinguished (I’m talking about the hat, not the man, who was definitely NOT sexy!)
    I love a pretty bonnet framing a woman’s face, and a man with his hat set at a rakish angle makes me swoon. I salivate at the mention of a Fedora. A tricorn, a Musketeer hat with a huge feather, a Stetson–even a pirate’s bandana–can set my heart atwitter. Baseball caps worn backwards do not.
    Am I the only one who wishes hats came back in style for men and women? Are there others who love hats as I do? I confess to wearing hats at times, though nothing flamboyant. Straw hats in summer, usually, and I like to decorate them with scarves or a small feather. How about the Wenches–do any of you wear hats? ~Sherrie, who thinks she should design a Whipmeister hat

    Reply
  17. What settings crank my fantasies, and why? Wow, Pat, dangerous question! I loved the recent discussion about the popularity of Regency settings, and I have to say that anything-Regency does it for me.
    I love a Georgian setting for its opulence and mannerisms, but it’s the Regency era that seems more accessible to me. And I just adore those tight tight breeches with little coats that barely cover the butt.
    Regency clothing set off the male and female figures more, or at least it seemed to have less layers. I think clothing plays such a wonderful role in helping us define our characters.
    One thing that I adore is hats on men and women. I used to have a boss who was an older man–from another era, really, and he wore a hat to work. He was always impeccably dressed and his hats were exquisite. I was only 23 at the time, and I thought his hat was sexy and distinguished (I’m talking about the hat, not the man, who was definitely NOT sexy!)
    I love a pretty bonnet framing a woman’s face, and a man with his hat set at a rakish angle makes me swoon. I salivate at the mention of a Fedora. A tricorn, a Musketeer hat with a huge feather, a Stetson–even a pirate’s bandana–can set my heart atwitter. Baseball caps worn backwards do not.
    Am I the only one who wishes hats came back in style for men and women? Are there others who love hats as I do? I confess to wearing hats at times, though nothing flamboyant. Straw hats in summer, usually, and I like to decorate them with scarves or a small feather. How about the Wenches–do any of you wear hats? ~Sherrie, who thinks she should design a Whipmeister hat

    Reply
  18. What settings crank my fantasies, and why? Wow, Pat, dangerous question! I loved the recent discussion about the popularity of Regency settings, and I have to say that anything-Regency does it for me.
    I love a Georgian setting for its opulence and mannerisms, but it’s the Regency era that seems more accessible to me. And I just adore those tight tight breeches with little coats that barely cover the butt.
    Regency clothing set off the male and female figures more, or at least it seemed to have less layers. I think clothing plays such a wonderful role in helping us define our characters.
    One thing that I adore is hats on men and women. I used to have a boss who was an older man–from another era, really, and he wore a hat to work. He was always impeccably dressed and his hats were exquisite. I was only 23 at the time, and I thought his hat was sexy and distinguished (I’m talking about the hat, not the man, who was definitely NOT sexy!)
    I love a pretty bonnet framing a woman’s face, and a man with his hat set at a rakish angle makes me swoon. I salivate at the mention of a Fedora. A tricorn, a Musketeer hat with a huge feather, a Stetson–even a pirate’s bandana–can set my heart atwitter. Baseball caps worn backwards do not.
    Am I the only one who wishes hats came back in style for men and women? Are there others who love hats as I do? I confess to wearing hats at times, though nothing flamboyant. Straw hats in summer, usually, and I like to decorate them with scarves or a small feather. How about the Wenches–do any of you wear hats? ~Sherrie, who thinks she should design a Whipmeister hat

    Reply
  19. Sherrie, I fell madly in love with the hats in the Ascot scene in MY FAIR LADY! Edwardian hats were gorgeous.
    I remember a Regency a couple of decades ago in which the heroine was the English widow of a German princeling, being courted by both her husband’s rakish cousin, with dubious intentions, and a proper English lord. The rake got her! And, of course, proposed.
    Most of the book was set at the Congress of Vienna (a setting that is the exception to “no German sites” and used more than once) and had quite a lot of gossip about the diplomats.
    Does anyone recognize this and know the title and author?

    Reply
  20. Sherrie, I fell madly in love with the hats in the Ascot scene in MY FAIR LADY! Edwardian hats were gorgeous.
    I remember a Regency a couple of decades ago in which the heroine was the English widow of a German princeling, being courted by both her husband’s rakish cousin, with dubious intentions, and a proper English lord. The rake got her! And, of course, proposed.
    Most of the book was set at the Congress of Vienna (a setting that is the exception to “no German sites” and used more than once) and had quite a lot of gossip about the diplomats.
    Does anyone recognize this and know the title and author?

    Reply
  21. Sherrie, I fell madly in love with the hats in the Ascot scene in MY FAIR LADY! Edwardian hats were gorgeous.
    I remember a Regency a couple of decades ago in which the heroine was the English widow of a German princeling, being courted by both her husband’s rakish cousin, with dubious intentions, and a proper English lord. The rake got her! And, of course, proposed.
    Most of the book was set at the Congress of Vienna (a setting that is the exception to “no German sites” and used more than once) and had quite a lot of gossip about the diplomats.
    Does anyone recognize this and know the title and author?

    Reply
  22. I adore hats! I have a complete collection of them, and so does my husband, although his tends toward the low-crowned Stetson variety. But he does have a really cool suede beret and a couple of summer straw fedoras, along with the usual baseball caps, of course.
    I favor the simple, too—a nice straw with a pretty scarf.
    The Quizzing Glass! Cool. Would those only be Regency related questions then?
    Pat

    Reply
  23. I adore hats! I have a complete collection of them, and so does my husband, although his tends toward the low-crowned Stetson variety. But he does have a really cool suede beret and a couple of summer straw fedoras, along with the usual baseball caps, of course.
    I favor the simple, too—a nice straw with a pretty scarf.
    The Quizzing Glass! Cool. Would those only be Regency related questions then?
    Pat

    Reply
  24. I adore hats! I have a complete collection of them, and so does my husband, although his tends toward the low-crowned Stetson variety. But he does have a really cool suede beret and a couple of summer straw fedoras, along with the usual baseball caps, of course.
    I favor the simple, too—a nice straw with a pretty scarf.
    The Quizzing Glass! Cool. Would those only be Regency related questions then?
    Pat

    Reply
  25. If you choose to call the Question of the Month column “The Quizzing Glass,” I don’t see that it means that the questions have to relate only to the Regency, any more than calling yourselves “wenches” means that you have to wear low-cut blouses and serve ale in taverns.

    Reply
  26. If you choose to call the Question of the Month column “The Quizzing Glass,” I don’t see that it means that the questions have to relate only to the Regency, any more than calling yourselves “wenches” means that you have to wear low-cut blouses and serve ale in taverns.

    Reply
  27. If you choose to call the Question of the Month column “The Quizzing Glass,” I don’t see that it means that the questions have to relate only to the Regency, any more than calling yourselves “wenches” means that you have to wear low-cut blouses and serve ale in taverns.

    Reply
  28. “The Quizzing Glass” is the name of the newsletter put out by the Beau Monde chapter of RWA. Don’t know if that would be a conflict, but I thought I’d mention it, FWIW.
    Back to hats: I’m glad to know I’m not the only one who loves them. I used to have a favorite straw hat that my horse got hold of and ate!
    My favorite hat now is also straw (or maybe straw-like?) that I paid big bucks for. You can roll it up and pack it in your suitcase and when you go to wear it, the thing pops back into its original shape. I wear hats when gardening, and have a comfortable and disreputable straw job that is well ventilated (translation: holey). I’m sure no self-respecting Regency lady would be caught dead wearing it!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  29. “The Quizzing Glass” is the name of the newsletter put out by the Beau Monde chapter of RWA. Don’t know if that would be a conflict, but I thought I’d mention it, FWIW.
    Back to hats: I’m glad to know I’m not the only one who loves them. I used to have a favorite straw hat that my horse got hold of and ate!
    My favorite hat now is also straw (or maybe straw-like?) that I paid big bucks for. You can roll it up and pack it in your suitcase and when you go to wear it, the thing pops back into its original shape. I wear hats when gardening, and have a comfortable and disreputable straw job that is well ventilated (translation: holey). I’m sure no self-respecting Regency lady would be caught dead wearing it!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  30. “The Quizzing Glass” is the name of the newsletter put out by the Beau Monde chapter of RWA. Don’t know if that would be a conflict, but I thought I’d mention it, FWIW.
    Back to hats: I’m glad to know I’m not the only one who loves them. I used to have a favorite straw hat that my horse got hold of and ate!
    My favorite hat now is also straw (or maybe straw-like?) that I paid big bucks for. You can roll it up and pack it in your suitcase and when you go to wear it, the thing pops back into its original shape. I wear hats when gardening, and have a comfortable and disreputable straw job that is well ventilated (translation: holey). I’m sure no self-respecting Regency lady would be caught dead wearing it!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  31. My Panama hat finally got a hole in the lid from rolling it up and carting it around so much.
    I used to have a wonderful denim wide-brimmed hat when I was in college, until a former friend trashed it because it attracted too much attention.
    Pat

    Reply
  32. My Panama hat finally got a hole in the lid from rolling it up and carting it around so much.
    I used to have a wonderful denim wide-brimmed hat when I was in college, until a former friend trashed it because it attracted too much attention.
    Pat

    Reply
  33. My Panama hat finally got a hole in the lid from rolling it up and carting it around so much.
    I used to have a wonderful denim wide-brimmed hat when I was in college, until a former friend trashed it because it attracted too much attention.
    Pat

    Reply
  34. Dare I answer?
    SHANNA’s Caribbean island home of Los Camellos still floats my boat. Gosh, who wouldn’t want to imagine themself a tall, spoiled blonde living on a sub-tropical island–in a mansion no less–swimming in the warm waters. Oh yeah, she and her hero “did it” on a tall ship, another island, in a coach in England, and in America… I’ll write an island story myself someday… as soon as one comes to me.
    Were we talking about locations or men? I forget.
    Cathy, who also digs on Johnny Depp the surly pirate… and Steven Tyler from Aerosmith, and Brad Pitt (but only in Legends of the Fall)… I married a rock star, don’tcha know.

    Reply
  35. Dare I answer?
    SHANNA’s Caribbean island home of Los Camellos still floats my boat. Gosh, who wouldn’t want to imagine themself a tall, spoiled blonde living on a sub-tropical island–in a mansion no less–swimming in the warm waters. Oh yeah, she and her hero “did it” on a tall ship, another island, in a coach in England, and in America… I’ll write an island story myself someday… as soon as one comes to me.
    Were we talking about locations or men? I forget.
    Cathy, who also digs on Johnny Depp the surly pirate… and Steven Tyler from Aerosmith, and Brad Pitt (but only in Legends of the Fall)… I married a rock star, don’tcha know.

    Reply
  36. Dare I answer?
    SHANNA’s Caribbean island home of Los Camellos still floats my boat. Gosh, who wouldn’t want to imagine themself a tall, spoiled blonde living on a sub-tropical island–in a mansion no less–swimming in the warm waters. Oh yeah, she and her hero “did it” on a tall ship, another island, in a coach in England, and in America… I’ll write an island story myself someday… as soon as one comes to me.
    Were we talking about locations or men? I forget.
    Cathy, who also digs on Johnny Depp the surly pirate… and Steven Tyler from Aerosmith, and Brad Pitt (but only in Legends of the Fall)… I married a rock star, don’tcha know.

    Reply
  37. Sherrie,
    I have the same, squishable straw hat (Eric Javits). I bought two, one in a rose color and one in aqua. I have a big, old fashioned staw hat, which I love. Great hats are a bit costly, but not more than a handbag and I enjoy the hat more. If you go to my website: http://www.catherinescott.net and click on personal photos, you’ll see my daughter wearing my good hats in Tuscany.

    Reply
  38. Sherrie,
    I have the same, squishable straw hat (Eric Javits). I bought two, one in a rose color and one in aqua. I have a big, old fashioned staw hat, which I love. Great hats are a bit costly, but not more than a handbag and I enjoy the hat more. If you go to my website: http://www.catherinescott.net and click on personal photos, you’ll see my daughter wearing my good hats in Tuscany.

    Reply
  39. Sherrie,
    I have the same, squishable straw hat (Eric Javits). I bought two, one in a rose color and one in aqua. I have a big, old fashioned staw hat, which I love. Great hats are a bit costly, but not more than a handbag and I enjoy the hat more. If you go to my website: http://www.catherinescott.net and click on personal photos, you’ll see my daughter wearing my good hats in Tuscany.

    Reply
  40. From Pat:
    Tropical islands, yes, yes, yes! I’ve managed to do one or two over the years, but my Mystic Island books have solved my problem of how to do tropical islands in England. Conjure one imaginary island with volcano…

    Reply
  41. From Pat:
    Tropical islands, yes, yes, yes! I’ve managed to do one or two over the years, but my Mystic Island books have solved my problem of how to do tropical islands in England. Conjure one imaginary island with volcano…

    Reply
  42. From Pat:
    Tropical islands, yes, yes, yes! I’ve managed to do one or two over the years, but my Mystic Island books have solved my problem of how to do tropical islands in England. Conjure one imaginary island with volcano…

    Reply
  43. The Edwardian era, hands down. I adore the clothing and hairstyle of both the men and the women and I LOVE how there are so many things we’d consider to be “modern” or post WWI or WWII that existed during the years 1901-1914(the vacumn cleaner, a primitive form of the television, etc), and the growing independence of women, the increased mobility of people, and I can go on and on!

    Reply
  44. The Edwardian era, hands down. I adore the clothing and hairstyle of both the men and the women and I LOVE how there are so many things we’d consider to be “modern” or post WWI or WWII that existed during the years 1901-1914(the vacumn cleaner, a primitive form of the television, etc), and the growing independence of women, the increased mobility of people, and I can go on and on!

    Reply
  45. The Edwardian era, hands down. I adore the clothing and hairstyle of both the men and the women and I LOVE how there are so many things we’d consider to be “modern” or post WWI or WWII that existed during the years 1901-1914(the vacumn cleaner, a primitive form of the television, etc), and the growing independence of women, the increased mobility of people, and I can go on and on!

    Reply

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