Fantastic History

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Susanna here.

I don’t read much fiction while I’m writing, so I don’t always have anything to offer for our monthly “What We’re Reading” posts, but I’ve been trying to tidy my files and I came across a not-so-old piece in which I was asked to choose five of my favorite historical fantasy novels.

This is one of my favorite genres to read in, so choosing a handful of titles was hard. Since I know a lot of other writers working in this category, I tried to keep my recommendations unbiased by only choosing books by writers from outside my own group of friends (although I’ve met Meljean Brook at conferences over the years, and might have waxed rhapsodic over her stories more than a few times…).

Here are five of the books I love best, in that sub-genre.


ThieftakerTHIEFTAKER by D.B. Jackson

This is one of those books I bought solely because I fell in love with the cover, and then when I sat down to read it I found myself falling in love with this richly mysterious version of pre-revolutionary Boston, and with thieftaker Ethan Kaille, a man with a murky past whose varied skills as a conjurer, while they do help him solve crimes and catch criminals, don’t always endear him to his fellow colonists, who view any use of magic with suspicion and wouldn’t hesitate to hang a man for witchcraft. In his Thieftaker chronicles, blending real history with intrigue and spellcasting, Jackson’s created compelling historical noir, with a twist.

Stardust gaimanSTARDUST by Neil Gaiman

I absolutely love this book. I came to it backwards, by watching the film first, but Gaiman’s incredible prose and the magic he weaves with his words quickly put this one onto my keeper shelf. Stardust had me from the first line: “There was once a young man who wished to gain his Heart’s Desire.” Reading this tale of young Tristan Thorn coming of age as he journeys to capture and bring back a fallen star, crossing the forbidden gap in the wall that divides his Victorian village from what lies beyond in the world of the fae, is as close as I’ve come to reliving those long-ago days of my childhood when I’d take the red book of fairy tales down from its shelf, wrap myself in a blanket, and lose myself wholly in wonder. It’s definitely a fairy tale for adults, touched with darkness, sex, and violence, but… Did I already say I love this book? Trust me on this one. Read it.

DragonHIS MAJESTY'S DRAGON by Naomi Novik

This was the book that reminded me how much I really liked fantasy. I’d fallen out of reading it for a number of years, until I bought His Majesty's Dragon on sale and got swept up in the richly realized world of the Napoleonic Wars…with fighting dragons used as living airships, closely bonded to their ‘aviators’—officers they imprint on at hatching. When Captain Will Laurence captures a French frigate that happens to be carrying a rare dragon egg, he chooses the man that the dragon will imprint on—only the dragon, as Laurence will learn, has a mind of his own. This book is the first in a series that follows the wartime adventures of Laurence and his dragon, Temeraire. It’s a favourite of mine that I recommend often.

Heart of steelHEART OF STEEL by Meljean Brook

I was wowed by the first in the Iron Seas series, The Iron Duke—steampunk Victorian England with truly superlative worldbuilding—in which, as a side event to the main story, an airship captain named Yasmeen tossed an adventurer named Archimedes right over the rails of her ship into dangerous outlands infested with zombies, and left him there. In Heart of Steel, Archimedes is back with a hidden agenda, and he and Yasmeen forge an often uneasy alliance to follow a dangerous path to a treasure. I’m a sucker for a treasure-hunting road-trip tale told well, and this one didn’t disappoint me once. I highly recommend it.

TheHouseOnTheStrandTHE HOUSE ON THE STRAND by Daphne Du Maurier

I think my father may have introduced me to this one, as it’s one of his own favorites, but it’s always been on our bookshelves at home. From the moment the first-person narrator, Dick Young, decides to experiment with his friend Magnus’s drug and is thrust back in time, I was hooked. In The House on the Strand, Dick finds himself an observer, unable to touch those he’s watching without being forced from the past to the present, but traveling back soon becomes an obsession and Dick finds himself growing ever more firmly entwined with the life of the man he’s observing, drawn into the intrigues of 14h century Cornwall. A fine sense of place and a highly suspenseful, original version of time-travel make this a book to remember long after you’ve turned the last page.

What books would you add to my list?

85 thoughts on “Fantastic History”

  1. WOW! great recommendations. I knew OF Neil Gaimen and Daphne du Maurier, but I hadn’t known they wrote this type of fantasy.
    I hadn’t heard of the other authors.
    Thank you for these recommendations.

    Reply
  2. WOW! great recommendations. I knew OF Neil Gaimen and Daphne du Maurier, but I hadn’t known they wrote this type of fantasy.
    I hadn’t heard of the other authors.
    Thank you for these recommendations.

    Reply
  3. WOW! great recommendations. I knew OF Neil Gaimen and Daphne du Maurier, but I hadn’t known they wrote this type of fantasy.
    I hadn’t heard of the other authors.
    Thank you for these recommendations.

    Reply
  4. WOW! great recommendations. I knew OF Neil Gaimen and Daphne du Maurier, but I hadn’t known they wrote this type of fantasy.
    I hadn’t heard of the other authors.
    Thank you for these recommendations.

    Reply
  5. WOW! great recommendations. I knew OF Neil Gaimen and Daphne du Maurier, but I hadn’t known they wrote this type of fantasy.
    I hadn’t heard of the other authors.
    Thank you for these recommendations.

    Reply
  6. Thanks for the headsup! I’m going to order a couple of these from my library for summer reading.
    Not historical fantasy, but a great time-travel novel is Stephen King’s 11/22/63. I could hardly put it down.
    -Kate

    Reply
  7. Thanks for the headsup! I’m going to order a couple of these from my library for summer reading.
    Not historical fantasy, but a great time-travel novel is Stephen King’s 11/22/63. I could hardly put it down.
    -Kate

    Reply
  8. Thanks for the headsup! I’m going to order a couple of these from my library for summer reading.
    Not historical fantasy, but a great time-travel novel is Stephen King’s 11/22/63. I could hardly put it down.
    -Kate

    Reply
  9. Thanks for the headsup! I’m going to order a couple of these from my library for summer reading.
    Not historical fantasy, but a great time-travel novel is Stephen King’s 11/22/63. I could hardly put it down.
    -Kate

    Reply
  10. Thanks for the headsup! I’m going to order a couple of these from my library for summer reading.
    Not historical fantasy, but a great time-travel novel is Stephen King’s 11/22/63. I could hardly put it down.
    -Kate

    Reply
  11. I really enjoyed the entire Thieftaker series. It’s very well written, and the historical and fantasy elements are both handled well.

    Reply
  12. I really enjoyed the entire Thieftaker series. It’s very well written, and the historical and fantasy elements are both handled well.

    Reply
  13. I really enjoyed the entire Thieftaker series. It’s very well written, and the historical and fantasy elements are both handled well.

    Reply
  14. I really enjoyed the entire Thieftaker series. It’s very well written, and the historical and fantasy elements are both handled well.

    Reply
  15. I really enjoyed the entire Thieftaker series. It’s very well written, and the historical and fantasy elements are both handled well.

    Reply
  16. Fantasy and history, yum! I’ve read several of these and they’re very good. It isn’t quite in the same category, but one of my favorite fantasy novels, Lois McMaster Bujold’s THE CURSE OF CHALION is fabulous and was inspired by Isabella and Ferdinand. It’s great read with the most tortured hero ever. He transforms amazingly.

    Reply
  17. Fantasy and history, yum! I’ve read several of these and they’re very good. It isn’t quite in the same category, but one of my favorite fantasy novels, Lois McMaster Bujold’s THE CURSE OF CHALION is fabulous and was inspired by Isabella and Ferdinand. It’s great read with the most tortured hero ever. He transforms amazingly.

    Reply
  18. Fantasy and history, yum! I’ve read several of these and they’re very good. It isn’t quite in the same category, but one of my favorite fantasy novels, Lois McMaster Bujold’s THE CURSE OF CHALION is fabulous and was inspired by Isabella and Ferdinand. It’s great read with the most tortured hero ever. He transforms amazingly.

    Reply
  19. Fantasy and history, yum! I’ve read several of these and they’re very good. It isn’t quite in the same category, but one of my favorite fantasy novels, Lois McMaster Bujold’s THE CURSE OF CHALION is fabulous and was inspired by Isabella and Ferdinand. It’s great read with the most tortured hero ever. He transforms amazingly.

    Reply
  20. Fantasy and history, yum! I’ve read several of these and they’re very good. It isn’t quite in the same category, but one of my favorite fantasy novels, Lois McMaster Bujold’s THE CURSE OF CHALION is fabulous and was inspired by Isabella and Ferdinand. It’s great read with the most tortured hero ever. He transforms amazingly.

    Reply
  21. Wow, three of my faves on your list. I still dream of events in the DuMaurier novel and wonder if I would be so brave. Novik’s book was a glommer once I saw the word “dragon” and I love the subsequent books too. Plus anything by Gaiman delights me, but STARDUST has a special magic. Thanks for the two new recommendations. Off to increase the TBR pile!

    Reply
  22. Wow, three of my faves on your list. I still dream of events in the DuMaurier novel and wonder if I would be so brave. Novik’s book was a glommer once I saw the word “dragon” and I love the subsequent books too. Plus anything by Gaiman delights me, but STARDUST has a special magic. Thanks for the two new recommendations. Off to increase the TBR pile!

    Reply
  23. Wow, three of my faves on your list. I still dream of events in the DuMaurier novel and wonder if I would be so brave. Novik’s book was a glommer once I saw the word “dragon” and I love the subsequent books too. Plus anything by Gaiman delights me, but STARDUST has a special magic. Thanks for the two new recommendations. Off to increase the TBR pile!

    Reply
  24. Wow, three of my faves on your list. I still dream of events in the DuMaurier novel and wonder if I would be so brave. Novik’s book was a glommer once I saw the word “dragon” and I love the subsequent books too. Plus anything by Gaiman delights me, but STARDUST has a special magic. Thanks for the two new recommendations. Off to increase the TBR pile!

    Reply
  25. Wow, three of my faves on your list. I still dream of events in the DuMaurier novel and wonder if I would be so brave. Novik’s book was a glommer once I saw the word “dragon” and I love the subsequent books too. Plus anything by Gaiman delights me, but STARDUST has a special magic. Thanks for the two new recommendations. Off to increase the TBR pile!

    Reply
  26. Interesting list. I have read one of Novik’s books ‘Uprooted’ which i enjoyed so am keen to try the Temeraire series if a good audio version is available . The Daphne Du Maurier book also appeals as do all of them!
    Thinking of older fantasy novels, I especially remember Anne McCaffrey’s brain ships beginning with ‘The Ship Who Sang’. Helva was hopelessly crippled at birth but had a perfect brain. Technology rescued the brain and integrated it with a space ship adding her feminine intelligence to the advanced computers of the ship thus enabling her to roam the galaxy and interact with other civilizations. Not historical fantasy of course but made a big impression on me.
    I also recall Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Deed of Paksenarrion’ series starting with ‘Sheep farmer’s Daughter’. It is the story of a young woman who rises against forces of evil magic to eventually become a Paladin warrior .. also made a very big impression

    Reply
  27. Interesting list. I have read one of Novik’s books ‘Uprooted’ which i enjoyed so am keen to try the Temeraire series if a good audio version is available . The Daphne Du Maurier book also appeals as do all of them!
    Thinking of older fantasy novels, I especially remember Anne McCaffrey’s brain ships beginning with ‘The Ship Who Sang’. Helva was hopelessly crippled at birth but had a perfect brain. Technology rescued the brain and integrated it with a space ship adding her feminine intelligence to the advanced computers of the ship thus enabling her to roam the galaxy and interact with other civilizations. Not historical fantasy of course but made a big impression on me.
    I also recall Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Deed of Paksenarrion’ series starting with ‘Sheep farmer’s Daughter’. It is the story of a young woman who rises against forces of evil magic to eventually become a Paladin warrior .. also made a very big impression

    Reply
  28. Interesting list. I have read one of Novik’s books ‘Uprooted’ which i enjoyed so am keen to try the Temeraire series if a good audio version is available . The Daphne Du Maurier book also appeals as do all of them!
    Thinking of older fantasy novels, I especially remember Anne McCaffrey’s brain ships beginning with ‘The Ship Who Sang’. Helva was hopelessly crippled at birth but had a perfect brain. Technology rescued the brain and integrated it with a space ship adding her feminine intelligence to the advanced computers of the ship thus enabling her to roam the galaxy and interact with other civilizations. Not historical fantasy of course but made a big impression on me.
    I also recall Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Deed of Paksenarrion’ series starting with ‘Sheep farmer’s Daughter’. It is the story of a young woman who rises against forces of evil magic to eventually become a Paladin warrior .. also made a very big impression

    Reply
  29. Interesting list. I have read one of Novik’s books ‘Uprooted’ which i enjoyed so am keen to try the Temeraire series if a good audio version is available . The Daphne Du Maurier book also appeals as do all of them!
    Thinking of older fantasy novels, I especially remember Anne McCaffrey’s brain ships beginning with ‘The Ship Who Sang’. Helva was hopelessly crippled at birth but had a perfect brain. Technology rescued the brain and integrated it with a space ship adding her feminine intelligence to the advanced computers of the ship thus enabling her to roam the galaxy and interact with other civilizations. Not historical fantasy of course but made a big impression on me.
    I also recall Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Deed of Paksenarrion’ series starting with ‘Sheep farmer’s Daughter’. It is the story of a young woman who rises against forces of evil magic to eventually become a Paladin warrior .. also made a very big impression

    Reply
  30. Interesting list. I have read one of Novik’s books ‘Uprooted’ which i enjoyed so am keen to try the Temeraire series if a good audio version is available . The Daphne Du Maurier book also appeals as do all of them!
    Thinking of older fantasy novels, I especially remember Anne McCaffrey’s brain ships beginning with ‘The Ship Who Sang’. Helva was hopelessly crippled at birth but had a perfect brain. Technology rescued the brain and integrated it with a space ship adding her feminine intelligence to the advanced computers of the ship thus enabling her to roam the galaxy and interact with other civilizations. Not historical fantasy of course but made a big impression on me.
    I also recall Elizabeth Moon’s ‘Deed of Paksenarrion’ series starting with ‘Sheep farmer’s Daughter’. It is the story of a young woman who rises against forces of evil magic to eventually become a Paladin warrior .. also made a very big impression

    Reply
  31. Have you read Bec Mcmaster, Alleyne? Paranormal/steampunk/vampire stories set in London with a very clever riff off the Regency and Victorian-era “ton” — “the blueblood conspiracy.” Start with Kiss of Steel. She’s won a number of awards, and the series has received starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, with Heart of Iron named one of their Best Romances of 2013.

    Reply
  32. Have you read Bec Mcmaster, Alleyne? Paranormal/steampunk/vampire stories set in London with a very clever riff off the Regency and Victorian-era “ton” — “the blueblood conspiracy.” Start with Kiss of Steel. She’s won a number of awards, and the series has received starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, with Heart of Iron named one of their Best Romances of 2013.

    Reply
  33. Have you read Bec Mcmaster, Alleyne? Paranormal/steampunk/vampire stories set in London with a very clever riff off the Regency and Victorian-era “ton” — “the blueblood conspiracy.” Start with Kiss of Steel. She’s won a number of awards, and the series has received starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, with Heart of Iron named one of their Best Romances of 2013.

    Reply
  34. Have you read Bec Mcmaster, Alleyne? Paranormal/steampunk/vampire stories set in London with a very clever riff off the Regency and Victorian-era “ton” — “the blueblood conspiracy.” Start with Kiss of Steel. She’s won a number of awards, and the series has received starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, with Heart of Iron named one of their Best Romances of 2013.

    Reply
  35. Have you read Bec Mcmaster, Alleyne? Paranormal/steampunk/vampire stories set in London with a very clever riff off the Regency and Victorian-era “ton” — “the blueblood conspiracy.” Start with Kiss of Steel. She’s won a number of awards, and the series has received starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, with Heart of Iron named one of their Best Romances of 2013.

    Reply
  36. I loved those “ship” books, Quantum — really, any of Anne McCaffrey. Mary Jo also put me onto Sharon Shinn, who’s wonderful, too. And I really like Lois McMaster Bujold.
    I’m off to try the Elizabeth Moon suggestions. Thanks.

    Reply
  37. I loved those “ship” books, Quantum — really, any of Anne McCaffrey. Mary Jo also put me onto Sharon Shinn, who’s wonderful, too. And I really like Lois McMaster Bujold.
    I’m off to try the Elizabeth Moon suggestions. Thanks.

    Reply
  38. I loved those “ship” books, Quantum — really, any of Anne McCaffrey. Mary Jo also put me onto Sharon Shinn, who’s wonderful, too. And I really like Lois McMaster Bujold.
    I’m off to try the Elizabeth Moon suggestions. Thanks.

    Reply
  39. I loved those “ship” books, Quantum — really, any of Anne McCaffrey. Mary Jo also put me onto Sharon Shinn, who’s wonderful, too. And I really like Lois McMaster Bujold.
    I’m off to try the Elizabeth Moon suggestions. Thanks.

    Reply
  40. I loved those “ship” books, Quantum — really, any of Anne McCaffrey. Mary Jo also put me onto Sharon Shinn, who’s wonderful, too. And I really like Lois McMaster Bujold.
    I’m off to try the Elizabeth Moon suggestions. Thanks.

    Reply
  41. I’m a fan of Meljean Brooks, too, Susanna, and well remember when I met both her and you at RT a few years ago, and had some wonderful chats, along with Nalini Singh, whose psy-changeling series is another one I’d recommend.

    Reply
  42. I’m a fan of Meljean Brooks, too, Susanna, and well remember when I met both her and you at RT a few years ago, and had some wonderful chats, along with Nalini Singh, whose psy-changeling series is another one I’d recommend.

    Reply
  43. I’m a fan of Meljean Brooks, too, Susanna, and well remember when I met both her and you at RT a few years ago, and had some wonderful chats, along with Nalini Singh, whose psy-changeling series is another one I’d recommend.

    Reply
  44. I’m a fan of Meljean Brooks, too, Susanna, and well remember when I met both her and you at RT a few years ago, and had some wonderful chats, along with Nalini Singh, whose psy-changeling series is another one I’d recommend.

    Reply
  45. I’m a fan of Meljean Brooks, too, Susanna, and well remember when I met both her and you at RT a few years ago, and had some wonderful chats, along with Nalini Singh, whose psy-changeling series is another one I’d recommend.

    Reply
  46. Elizabeth Moon is a perennial favorite of mine. She has lately written military SciFi, especially the Vatta series, which are well worth a look. No one has mentioned the Tolkien “Lord of the Ring” series, but that is the standard to which I compare all fantasy.

    Reply
  47. Elizabeth Moon is a perennial favorite of mine. She has lately written military SciFi, especially the Vatta series, which are well worth a look. No one has mentioned the Tolkien “Lord of the Ring” series, but that is the standard to which I compare all fantasy.

    Reply
  48. Elizabeth Moon is a perennial favorite of mine. She has lately written military SciFi, especially the Vatta series, which are well worth a look. No one has mentioned the Tolkien “Lord of the Ring” series, but that is the standard to which I compare all fantasy.

    Reply
  49. Elizabeth Moon is a perennial favorite of mine. She has lately written military SciFi, especially the Vatta series, which are well worth a look. No one has mentioned the Tolkien “Lord of the Ring” series, but that is the standard to which I compare all fantasy.

    Reply
  50. Elizabeth Moon is a perennial favorite of mine. She has lately written military SciFi, especially the Vatta series, which are well worth a look. No one has mentioned the Tolkien “Lord of the Ring” series, but that is the standard to which I compare all fantasy.

    Reply
  51. Great suggestions thank you. I loved Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine; Green Darkness by Anya Seton and even a couple of Mary Stewart’s books. All were travel back in time books and got me hooked on the genre. I also loved Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman about a man who accidentally finds an alternate world beneath the streets of London.
    Great stuff!

    Reply
  52. Great suggestions thank you. I loved Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine; Green Darkness by Anya Seton and even a couple of Mary Stewart’s books. All were travel back in time books and got me hooked on the genre. I also loved Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman about a man who accidentally finds an alternate world beneath the streets of London.
    Great stuff!

    Reply
  53. Great suggestions thank you. I loved Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine; Green Darkness by Anya Seton and even a couple of Mary Stewart’s books. All were travel back in time books and got me hooked on the genre. I also loved Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman about a man who accidentally finds an alternate world beneath the streets of London.
    Great stuff!

    Reply
  54. Great suggestions thank you. I loved Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine; Green Darkness by Anya Seton and even a couple of Mary Stewart’s books. All were travel back in time books and got me hooked on the genre. I also loved Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman about a man who accidentally finds an alternate world beneath the streets of London.
    Great stuff!

    Reply
  55. Great suggestions thank you. I loved Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine; Green Darkness by Anya Seton and even a couple of Mary Stewart’s books. All were travel back in time books and got me hooked on the genre. I also loved Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman about a man who accidentally finds an alternate world beneath the streets of London.
    Great stuff!

    Reply
  56. Oh my word, The House on the Strand, I just LOVE LOVE LOVE this book and I’ve never met anyone else who’s read it!!! It’a a fabulous story and I too was hooked from the word go. Must dig it out and have a reread.

    Reply
  57. Oh my word, The House on the Strand, I just LOVE LOVE LOVE this book and I’ve never met anyone else who’s read it!!! It’a a fabulous story and I too was hooked from the word go. Must dig it out and have a reread.

    Reply
  58. Oh my word, The House on the Strand, I just LOVE LOVE LOVE this book and I’ve never met anyone else who’s read it!!! It’a a fabulous story and I too was hooked from the word go. Must dig it out and have a reread.

    Reply
  59. Oh my word, The House on the Strand, I just LOVE LOVE LOVE this book and I’ve never met anyone else who’s read it!!! It’a a fabulous story and I too was hooked from the word go. Must dig it out and have a reread.

    Reply
  60. Oh my word, The House on the Strand, I just LOVE LOVE LOVE this book and I’ve never met anyone else who’s read it!!! It’a a fabulous story and I too was hooked from the word go. Must dig it out and have a reread.

    Reply
  61. The Mercedes Lackey/Roberta Gellis collaboration that starts, I think, with This Scepter’d Isle is about the intervention of the fae in Tudor England. Another book I love is a kind of past lives memory set during that time period also: Mary Luke’s The Nonesuch Lure.
    I love the Temeraiare books, and just adore anything Bujold writes.

    Reply
  62. The Mercedes Lackey/Roberta Gellis collaboration that starts, I think, with This Scepter’d Isle is about the intervention of the fae in Tudor England. Another book I love is a kind of past lives memory set during that time period also: Mary Luke’s The Nonesuch Lure.
    I love the Temeraiare books, and just adore anything Bujold writes.

    Reply
  63. The Mercedes Lackey/Roberta Gellis collaboration that starts, I think, with This Scepter’d Isle is about the intervention of the fae in Tudor England. Another book I love is a kind of past lives memory set during that time period also: Mary Luke’s The Nonesuch Lure.
    I love the Temeraiare books, and just adore anything Bujold writes.

    Reply
  64. The Mercedes Lackey/Roberta Gellis collaboration that starts, I think, with This Scepter’d Isle is about the intervention of the fae in Tudor England. Another book I love is a kind of past lives memory set during that time period also: Mary Luke’s The Nonesuch Lure.
    I love the Temeraiare books, and just adore anything Bujold writes.

    Reply
  65. The Mercedes Lackey/Roberta Gellis collaboration that starts, I think, with This Scepter’d Isle is about the intervention of the fae in Tudor England. Another book I love is a kind of past lives memory set during that time period also: Mary Luke’s The Nonesuch Lure.
    I love the Temeraiare books, and just adore anything Bujold writes.

    Reply
  66. Totally agree about Neil Gaiman and Daphne du Maurier – loved those! (And Stardust the film is one of my all-time favourites) Similarly, although I don’t think it was based on a book, I adore the film ‘Stargate’ – the blend of history, time travel, romance and Egyptology had me hooked from the very first moment – brilliant!

    Reply
  67. Totally agree about Neil Gaiman and Daphne du Maurier – loved those! (And Stardust the film is one of my all-time favourites) Similarly, although I don’t think it was based on a book, I adore the film ‘Stargate’ – the blend of history, time travel, romance and Egyptology had me hooked from the very first moment – brilliant!

    Reply
  68. Totally agree about Neil Gaiman and Daphne du Maurier – loved those! (And Stardust the film is one of my all-time favourites) Similarly, although I don’t think it was based on a book, I adore the film ‘Stargate’ – the blend of history, time travel, romance and Egyptology had me hooked from the very first moment – brilliant!

    Reply
  69. Totally agree about Neil Gaiman and Daphne du Maurier – loved those! (And Stardust the film is one of my all-time favourites) Similarly, although I don’t think it was based on a book, I adore the film ‘Stargate’ – the blend of history, time travel, romance and Egyptology had me hooked from the very first moment – brilliant!

    Reply
  70. Totally agree about Neil Gaiman and Daphne du Maurier – loved those! (And Stardust the film is one of my all-time favourites) Similarly, although I don’t think it was based on a book, I adore the film ‘Stargate’ – the blend of history, time travel, romance and Egyptology had me hooked from the very first moment – brilliant!

    Reply
  71. They are not set in our world, but I’ll recommend Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor which is a wonderful fantasy with a bit of a steampunk vibe
    and Grace Draven’s Radiance.

    Reply
  72. They are not set in our world, but I’ll recommend Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor which is a wonderful fantasy with a bit of a steampunk vibe
    and Grace Draven’s Radiance.

    Reply
  73. They are not set in our world, but I’ll recommend Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor which is a wonderful fantasy with a bit of a steampunk vibe
    and Grace Draven’s Radiance.

    Reply
  74. They are not set in our world, but I’ll recommend Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor which is a wonderful fantasy with a bit of a steampunk vibe
    and Grace Draven’s Radiance.

    Reply
  75. They are not set in our world, but I’ll recommend Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor which is a wonderful fantasy with a bit of a steampunk vibe
    and Grace Draven’s Radiance.

    Reply
  76. I thought of another fantasy to recommend that has a (not our world) historical vibe: Maria V Snyder’s Poison Study.

    Reply
  77. I thought of another fantasy to recommend that has a (not our world) historical vibe: Maria V Snyder’s Poison Study.

    Reply
  78. I thought of another fantasy to recommend that has a (not our world) historical vibe: Maria V Snyder’s Poison Study.

    Reply
  79. I thought of another fantasy to recommend that has a (not our world) historical vibe: Maria V Snyder’s Poison Study.

    Reply
  80. I thought of another fantasy to recommend that has a (not our world) historical vibe: Maria V Snyder’s Poison Study.

    Reply

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