Falling in Love Again

Mom_thumbnail FIRST THINGS FIRST: The winner of totally arbitrary, picked blindfolded and by chance NAME THAT HERO drawing is: GRETCHEN F.!

If she will kindly email me her addy, I’ll send her the autographed copy of BRIDE ENCHANTED. This was a great contest! It’s a good thing the prize was awarded on the luck of the draw. If the winner had to be decided on merit I’d have gone mad. SO many good names, so many brilliant suggestions. Thank you, thank you – and you may be sure I’ll use some of those names in future. In fact, if you see my next hero sporting the name you sent, email me and I’ll send you a copy of that new book.

Now, as you might have guessed, I’m writing that new book. Yes, I’m falling in love again. By nature a monogamist, I nevertheless have the most promiscuous imagination, because in order to write about a new lover, I have to fall in love with him myself.

How awkward that can be. After all, I remember all my heroes. The strangest thing is that as I lavish praises on my new love, I feel guilty, hoping my old loves won’t be hurt. Well, sometimes, they are.

HeroThey sit in the shadows of my mind and stare at me reproachfully. There’s Warwick Jones, from my LOVE trilogy, looking at me with his famous, sad, sardonic smile. And by his side, Magnus from A TRUE LADY, shaking his handsome head. There, in a chair, acting like he doesn’t care, is my beloved Alasdair from THE DEVIL’S BARGAIN, and next to him, looking glum, dear Raphael, my redheaded Rafe from THE CHANCE. And I see Christian, from THE RETURN OF THE EARL, frowning. Hero2_3

After all his sufferings in exile, he’s still obviously capable of being wounded. And there’s Drum, Earl of Drummond, from THE CONQUEST, who dearly loves his Alexandria, but who nevertheless stands there, sighing. And arms crossed, shoulders leaning against the wall, watching me always and ever, my first love: Jason, Duke of Torquay, from THE DUKE’S WAGER. They come from far and near – Oh my, but it’s getting crowded!

Why are these gallant gentlemen still concerned about what new man I care about?

Because although I gave them each and every one a wonderful heroine and a devoted wife, they always knew who loved them most: their mommy, their creator, their author: me.

But falling in love again doesn’t mean I ever forget any of them. Truly. I’m not sure they believe me. I don’t understand it myself. But you, Gentle Reader, may. Having read so many romances with so many exciting heroes from so many wonderful authors, don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?

I’d love to know. And believe me, I know they would too.

PS Enjoy the following historical hero movie montage.  I know I did. 🙂

80 thoughts on “Falling in Love Again”

  1. I am an writer although currently unpublished(hey I’m young) as well as a reader. I fall in love with anyone strong. Physically, mentally, those that can control their willful loves. Maybe because I need someone else to take the reins at least for a while. I can’t write someone who is too nice or read a book with a wimpy GENTLEman. Other than that count me in.

    Reply
  2. I am an writer although currently unpublished(hey I’m young) as well as a reader. I fall in love with anyone strong. Physically, mentally, those that can control their willful loves. Maybe because I need someone else to take the reins at least for a while. I can’t write someone who is too nice or read a book with a wimpy GENTLEman. Other than that count me in.

    Reply
  3. I am an writer although currently unpublished(hey I’m young) as well as a reader. I fall in love with anyone strong. Physically, mentally, those that can control their willful loves. Maybe because I need someone else to take the reins at least for a while. I can’t write someone who is too nice or read a book with a wimpy GENTLEman. Other than that count me in.

    Reply
  4. I am an writer although currently unpublished(hey I’m young) as well as a reader. I fall in love with anyone strong. Physically, mentally, those that can control their willful loves. Maybe because I need someone else to take the reins at least for a while. I can’t write someone who is too nice or read a book with a wimpy GENTLEman. Other than that count me in.

    Reply
  5. I am an writer although currently unpublished(hey I’m young) as well as a reader. I fall in love with anyone strong. Physically, mentally, those that can control their willful loves. Maybe because I need someone else to take the reins at least for a while. I can’t write someone who is too nice or read a book with a wimpy GENTLEman. Other than that count me in.

    Reply
  6. Edith,
    I am LOVING Bride Enchanted. It is charming, mesmerizing, lovely! I don’t want it to end!
    As far as heroes go, I am of course forever in love with Sir Anthony Fanshawe from Heyer’s Masqueraders–the big man with the slow smile and the sleepy eyes (that see everything)–the man everyone thinks is the dullest, most upright man in town until he fights a duel and holds up a coach for love of Prudence. . .sigh.
    You know, I do look for him in every hero, but as far as I can tell (or read) Sir Anthony is one of a kind.

    Reply
  7. Edith,
    I am LOVING Bride Enchanted. It is charming, mesmerizing, lovely! I don’t want it to end!
    As far as heroes go, I am of course forever in love with Sir Anthony Fanshawe from Heyer’s Masqueraders–the big man with the slow smile and the sleepy eyes (that see everything)–the man everyone thinks is the dullest, most upright man in town until he fights a duel and holds up a coach for love of Prudence. . .sigh.
    You know, I do look for him in every hero, but as far as I can tell (or read) Sir Anthony is one of a kind.

    Reply
  8. Edith,
    I am LOVING Bride Enchanted. It is charming, mesmerizing, lovely! I don’t want it to end!
    As far as heroes go, I am of course forever in love with Sir Anthony Fanshawe from Heyer’s Masqueraders–the big man with the slow smile and the sleepy eyes (that see everything)–the man everyone thinks is the dullest, most upright man in town until he fights a duel and holds up a coach for love of Prudence. . .sigh.
    You know, I do look for him in every hero, but as far as I can tell (or read) Sir Anthony is one of a kind.

    Reply
  9. Edith,
    I am LOVING Bride Enchanted. It is charming, mesmerizing, lovely! I don’t want it to end!
    As far as heroes go, I am of course forever in love with Sir Anthony Fanshawe from Heyer’s Masqueraders–the big man with the slow smile and the sleepy eyes (that see everything)–the man everyone thinks is the dullest, most upright man in town until he fights a duel and holds up a coach for love of Prudence. . .sigh.
    You know, I do look for him in every hero, but as far as I can tell (or read) Sir Anthony is one of a kind.

    Reply
  10. Edith,
    I am LOVING Bride Enchanted. It is charming, mesmerizing, lovely! I don’t want it to end!
    As far as heroes go, I am of course forever in love with Sir Anthony Fanshawe from Heyer’s Masqueraders–the big man with the slow smile and the sleepy eyes (that see everything)–the man everyone thinks is the dullest, most upright man in town until he fights a duel and holds up a coach for love of Prudence. . .sigh.
    You know, I do look for him in every hero, but as far as I can tell (or read) Sir Anthony is one of a kind.

    Reply
  11. I guess I’m pretty promiscuous; I can fall in love with almost any kind of hero. In fact, that is one of the things I most enjoy about your books Edith, that you don’t just keep writing the same characters in each book.
    Give Jason a kiss from me.

    Reply
  12. I guess I’m pretty promiscuous; I can fall in love with almost any kind of hero. In fact, that is one of the things I most enjoy about your books Edith, that you don’t just keep writing the same characters in each book.
    Give Jason a kiss from me.

    Reply
  13. I guess I’m pretty promiscuous; I can fall in love with almost any kind of hero. In fact, that is one of the things I most enjoy about your books Edith, that you don’t just keep writing the same characters in each book.
    Give Jason a kiss from me.

    Reply
  14. I guess I’m pretty promiscuous; I can fall in love with almost any kind of hero. In fact, that is one of the things I most enjoy about your books Edith, that you don’t just keep writing the same characters in each book.
    Give Jason a kiss from me.

    Reply
  15. I guess I’m pretty promiscuous; I can fall in love with almost any kind of hero. In fact, that is one of the things I most enjoy about your books Edith, that you don’t just keep writing the same characters in each book.
    Give Jason a kiss from me.

    Reply
  16. don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?
    As a young teenager I fell in love with d’Artagnan and was devastated when he died at the end of the series of books about the musketeers. Later I saw Cyrano (in the film version, with Gerard Depardieu) and developed a bit of a crush on him. But neither of them had heroines who wanted them. Or rather d’Artagnan’s heroine died long before he did, and Cyrano died before his heroine even realised that it was him she should have loved.
    I don’t fall in love with romance heroes and I think that’s because when I read a novel I tend to enter into it rather fully and feel it’s “real” so (a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero. Maybe that’s a rather weird idea, but I can’t help it. And (c) to be soppy as well as weird, I’ve never met a hero that I’d prefer to my husband. He’s not typical hero material, but he’s just right for me.
    I feel more like a concerned aunt/matchmaker with regards to the hero and heroine. I want them to get together if I feel they’re right for each other, but I have no designs on either of them myself.

    Reply
  17. don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?
    As a young teenager I fell in love with d’Artagnan and was devastated when he died at the end of the series of books about the musketeers. Later I saw Cyrano (in the film version, with Gerard Depardieu) and developed a bit of a crush on him. But neither of them had heroines who wanted them. Or rather d’Artagnan’s heroine died long before he did, and Cyrano died before his heroine even realised that it was him she should have loved.
    I don’t fall in love with romance heroes and I think that’s because when I read a novel I tend to enter into it rather fully and feel it’s “real” so (a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero. Maybe that’s a rather weird idea, but I can’t help it. And (c) to be soppy as well as weird, I’ve never met a hero that I’d prefer to my husband. He’s not typical hero material, but he’s just right for me.
    I feel more like a concerned aunt/matchmaker with regards to the hero and heroine. I want them to get together if I feel they’re right for each other, but I have no designs on either of them myself.

    Reply
  18. don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?
    As a young teenager I fell in love with d’Artagnan and was devastated when he died at the end of the series of books about the musketeers. Later I saw Cyrano (in the film version, with Gerard Depardieu) and developed a bit of a crush on him. But neither of them had heroines who wanted them. Or rather d’Artagnan’s heroine died long before he did, and Cyrano died before his heroine even realised that it was him she should have loved.
    I don’t fall in love with romance heroes and I think that’s because when I read a novel I tend to enter into it rather fully and feel it’s “real” so (a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero. Maybe that’s a rather weird idea, but I can’t help it. And (c) to be soppy as well as weird, I’ve never met a hero that I’d prefer to my husband. He’s not typical hero material, but he’s just right for me.
    I feel more like a concerned aunt/matchmaker with regards to the hero and heroine. I want them to get together if I feel they’re right for each other, but I have no designs on either of them myself.

    Reply
  19. don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?
    As a young teenager I fell in love with d’Artagnan and was devastated when he died at the end of the series of books about the musketeers. Later I saw Cyrano (in the film version, with Gerard Depardieu) and developed a bit of a crush on him. But neither of them had heroines who wanted them. Or rather d’Artagnan’s heroine died long before he did, and Cyrano died before his heroine even realised that it was him she should have loved.
    I don’t fall in love with romance heroes and I think that’s because when I read a novel I tend to enter into it rather fully and feel it’s “real” so (a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero. Maybe that’s a rather weird idea, but I can’t help it. And (c) to be soppy as well as weird, I’ve never met a hero that I’d prefer to my husband. He’s not typical hero material, but he’s just right for me.
    I feel more like a concerned aunt/matchmaker with regards to the hero and heroine. I want them to get together if I feel they’re right for each other, but I have no designs on either of them myself.

    Reply
  20. don’t you fall in love with each new hero each time too? Or do you love only once, and keep looking for the same man in each new book you read?
    As a young teenager I fell in love with d’Artagnan and was devastated when he died at the end of the series of books about the musketeers. Later I saw Cyrano (in the film version, with Gerard Depardieu) and developed a bit of a crush on him. But neither of them had heroines who wanted them. Or rather d’Artagnan’s heroine died long before he did, and Cyrano died before his heroine even realised that it was him she should have loved.
    I don’t fall in love with romance heroes and I think that’s because when I read a novel I tend to enter into it rather fully and feel it’s “real” so (a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero. Maybe that’s a rather weird idea, but I can’t help it. And (c) to be soppy as well as weird, I’ve never met a hero that I’d prefer to my husband. He’s not typical hero material, but he’s just right for me.
    I feel more like a concerned aunt/matchmaker with regards to the hero and heroine. I want them to get together if I feel they’re right for each other, but I have no designs on either of them myself.

    Reply
  21. What a fun video to start my day off! Thank you, Edith! I saw so many old loves and new, intriguing ones. I can never get over the cleverness of people who put together such things, and I’ll be humming all day. For me, the heroes make or break the book. I don’t mind variety. Can’t wait to read your next one.

    Reply
  22. What a fun video to start my day off! Thank you, Edith! I saw so many old loves and new, intriguing ones. I can never get over the cleverness of people who put together such things, and I’ll be humming all day. For me, the heroes make or break the book. I don’t mind variety. Can’t wait to read your next one.

    Reply
  23. What a fun video to start my day off! Thank you, Edith! I saw so many old loves and new, intriguing ones. I can never get over the cleverness of people who put together such things, and I’ll be humming all day. For me, the heroes make or break the book. I don’t mind variety. Can’t wait to read your next one.

    Reply
  24. What a fun video to start my day off! Thank you, Edith! I saw so many old loves and new, intriguing ones. I can never get over the cleverness of people who put together such things, and I’ll be humming all day. For me, the heroes make or break the book. I don’t mind variety. Can’t wait to read your next one.

    Reply
  25. What a fun video to start my day off! Thank you, Edith! I saw so many old loves and new, intriguing ones. I can never get over the cleverness of people who put together such things, and I’ll be humming all day. For me, the heroes make or break the book. I don’t mind variety. Can’t wait to read your next one.

    Reply
  26. Loved the video, it was fun…did I miss Colin Firth? I love Gerard Depardieu also and he isn’t really a classically handsome fellow, but then I have a thing for actors that are just a bit off in the looks department. I also like hero’s with “sleepy eyes”, those were more prevalent in older novels. What’s the difference between sleepy eyes and bedroom eyes? I think they imply the same thing. And, I do blame you Edith for I think that song is going to be in my head all day.

    Reply
  27. Loved the video, it was fun…did I miss Colin Firth? I love Gerard Depardieu also and he isn’t really a classically handsome fellow, but then I have a thing for actors that are just a bit off in the looks department. I also like hero’s with “sleepy eyes”, those were more prevalent in older novels. What’s the difference between sleepy eyes and bedroom eyes? I think they imply the same thing. And, I do blame you Edith for I think that song is going to be in my head all day.

    Reply
  28. Loved the video, it was fun…did I miss Colin Firth? I love Gerard Depardieu also and he isn’t really a classically handsome fellow, but then I have a thing for actors that are just a bit off in the looks department. I also like hero’s with “sleepy eyes”, those were more prevalent in older novels. What’s the difference between sleepy eyes and bedroom eyes? I think they imply the same thing. And, I do blame you Edith for I think that song is going to be in my head all day.

    Reply
  29. Loved the video, it was fun…did I miss Colin Firth? I love Gerard Depardieu also and he isn’t really a classically handsome fellow, but then I have a thing for actors that are just a bit off in the looks department. I also like hero’s with “sleepy eyes”, those were more prevalent in older novels. What’s the difference between sleepy eyes and bedroom eyes? I think they imply the same thing. And, I do blame you Edith for I think that song is going to be in my head all day.

    Reply
  30. Loved the video, it was fun…did I miss Colin Firth? I love Gerard Depardieu also and he isn’t really a classically handsome fellow, but then I have a thing for actors that are just a bit off in the looks department. I also like hero’s with “sleepy eyes”, those were more prevalent in older novels. What’s the difference between sleepy eyes and bedroom eyes? I think they imply the same thing. And, I do blame you Edith for I think that song is going to be in my head all day.

    Reply
  31. That video left me with tears in my eyes and chills running up and down my spine. Wow! Thank you for sharing it, Edith.
    As for heroes… I like them strong and wounded and hurting and passionate and willing to risk it all even when they know they will loose it all.
    Every hero I write, I fall deeply in love with. It’s good to know I’m not the only woman who have “men” hanging round in her head. I’ve also found that every hero I write has a shadow my real life hero within him.
    As a reader… I think I look for certain traits in my heroes. A sharp wit. An easy smile. He must be sly as a fox, strong as a lion and gentle as a lamb. And he must have a strong awareness of his assets and know how to wield them effectively. 😉
    Nina

    Reply
  32. That video left me with tears in my eyes and chills running up and down my spine. Wow! Thank you for sharing it, Edith.
    As for heroes… I like them strong and wounded and hurting and passionate and willing to risk it all even when they know they will loose it all.
    Every hero I write, I fall deeply in love with. It’s good to know I’m not the only woman who have “men” hanging round in her head. I’ve also found that every hero I write has a shadow my real life hero within him.
    As a reader… I think I look for certain traits in my heroes. A sharp wit. An easy smile. He must be sly as a fox, strong as a lion and gentle as a lamb. And he must have a strong awareness of his assets and know how to wield them effectively. 😉
    Nina

    Reply
  33. That video left me with tears in my eyes and chills running up and down my spine. Wow! Thank you for sharing it, Edith.
    As for heroes… I like them strong and wounded and hurting and passionate and willing to risk it all even when they know they will loose it all.
    Every hero I write, I fall deeply in love with. It’s good to know I’m not the only woman who have “men” hanging round in her head. I’ve also found that every hero I write has a shadow my real life hero within him.
    As a reader… I think I look for certain traits in my heroes. A sharp wit. An easy smile. He must be sly as a fox, strong as a lion and gentle as a lamb. And he must have a strong awareness of his assets and know how to wield them effectively. 😉
    Nina

    Reply
  34. That video left me with tears in my eyes and chills running up and down my spine. Wow! Thank you for sharing it, Edith.
    As for heroes… I like them strong and wounded and hurting and passionate and willing to risk it all even when they know they will loose it all.
    Every hero I write, I fall deeply in love with. It’s good to know I’m not the only woman who have “men” hanging round in her head. I’ve also found that every hero I write has a shadow my real life hero within him.
    As a reader… I think I look for certain traits in my heroes. A sharp wit. An easy smile. He must be sly as a fox, strong as a lion and gentle as a lamb. And he must have a strong awareness of his assets and know how to wield them effectively. 😉
    Nina

    Reply
  35. That video left me with tears in my eyes and chills running up and down my spine. Wow! Thank you for sharing it, Edith.
    As for heroes… I like them strong and wounded and hurting and passionate and willing to risk it all even when they know they will loose it all.
    Every hero I write, I fall deeply in love with. It’s good to know I’m not the only woman who have “men” hanging round in her head. I’ve also found that every hero I write has a shadow my real life hero within him.
    As a reader… I think I look for certain traits in my heroes. A sharp wit. An easy smile. He must be sly as a fox, strong as a lion and gentle as a lamb. And he must have a strong awareness of his assets and know how to wield them effectively. 😉
    Nina

    Reply
  36. Hooray for Gretchen F., winner of the drawing (and my mom!)
    Even if she DID try to name me Nigel before I threw a spanner in the works by turning out to be a girl.
    NIGEL. *shudders*

    Reply
  37. Hooray for Gretchen F., winner of the drawing (and my mom!)
    Even if she DID try to name me Nigel before I threw a spanner in the works by turning out to be a girl.
    NIGEL. *shudders*

    Reply
  38. Hooray for Gretchen F., winner of the drawing (and my mom!)
    Even if she DID try to name me Nigel before I threw a spanner in the works by turning out to be a girl.
    NIGEL. *shudders*

    Reply
  39. Hooray for Gretchen F., winner of the drawing (and my mom!)
    Even if she DID try to name me Nigel before I threw a spanner in the works by turning out to be a girl.
    NIGEL. *shudders*

    Reply
  40. Hooray for Gretchen F., winner of the drawing (and my mom!)
    Even if she DID try to name me Nigel before I threw a spanner in the works by turning out to be a girl.
    NIGEL. *shudders*

    Reply
  41. >>a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero.>>
    Oh Laura, you make me feel SO naughty!
    (big ol’ grin)

    Reply
  42. >>a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero.>>
    Oh Laura, you make me feel SO naughty!
    (big ol’ grin)

    Reply
  43. >>a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero.>>
    Oh Laura, you make me feel SO naughty!
    (big ol’ grin)

    Reply
  44. >>a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero.>>
    Oh Laura, you make me feel SO naughty!
    (big ol’ grin)

    Reply
  45. >>a) it would feel morally wrong to me to mentally split up the hero and heroine, who are clearly well suited to each other (b) I’m married now, and I somehow feel it would be imaginary adultery to fall in love with a hero.>>
    Oh Laura, you make me feel SO naughty!
    (big ol’ grin)

    Reply
  46. I don’t usually fall in love with romance heroes, because you get a different hero in each book, and 250-400 pages just isn’t enough for me to make that kind of commitment. 🙂 I read romance for the satisfaction of seeing a well-paired hero and heroine and watching their romance grow.
    So my literary loves tend to be in other genres where you can have a long-running series with the same protagonists. Currently my harem of the mind includes Lord Peter Wimsey, Richard Sharpe, Marcus Didius Falco, and Joscelin Verreuil from Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel series. If I had to pick one, it’d probably be Joscelin. Or maybe Falco–he’d be a fun husband. With Lord Peter I’d be afraid I couldn’t keep up with him intellectually, and much as I adore Sharpe, I think I’d like someone a bit more restful and domesticated for everyday life!
    As for the heroes I invent…well, I’ve got at least one I’m having trouble letting go of. He’s my favorite character of any of I’ve ever created, and I was heartbroken when his book didn’t sell after a couple of near misses. I’ve now switched genres and am working on an alternate history, set about 6 years before that unsold romance. One day I thought idly, “I wonder what Jack (the hero) would be doing in my alternate world.” And then it hit me that he would TOTALLY have been in the right place to be in the center of my invented events, and he was just the right sort to play an Everyman-Warrior foil and ally to my aristocratic protagonist. So I’m recycling the character. When I first told a CP about it, I said I knew it was self-indulgent of me, but, dang it, I’m going to keep writing Jack until an editor buys him, and maybe if I’m very, very lucky, it’ll be in a format where I can give him a dozen or twenty books and have readers fall in love with him the way I have with Sharpe, Wimsey, etc!

    Reply
  47. I don’t usually fall in love with romance heroes, because you get a different hero in each book, and 250-400 pages just isn’t enough for me to make that kind of commitment. 🙂 I read romance for the satisfaction of seeing a well-paired hero and heroine and watching their romance grow.
    So my literary loves tend to be in other genres where you can have a long-running series with the same protagonists. Currently my harem of the mind includes Lord Peter Wimsey, Richard Sharpe, Marcus Didius Falco, and Joscelin Verreuil from Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel series. If I had to pick one, it’d probably be Joscelin. Or maybe Falco–he’d be a fun husband. With Lord Peter I’d be afraid I couldn’t keep up with him intellectually, and much as I adore Sharpe, I think I’d like someone a bit more restful and domesticated for everyday life!
    As for the heroes I invent…well, I’ve got at least one I’m having trouble letting go of. He’s my favorite character of any of I’ve ever created, and I was heartbroken when his book didn’t sell after a couple of near misses. I’ve now switched genres and am working on an alternate history, set about 6 years before that unsold romance. One day I thought idly, “I wonder what Jack (the hero) would be doing in my alternate world.” And then it hit me that he would TOTALLY have been in the right place to be in the center of my invented events, and he was just the right sort to play an Everyman-Warrior foil and ally to my aristocratic protagonist. So I’m recycling the character. When I first told a CP about it, I said I knew it was self-indulgent of me, but, dang it, I’m going to keep writing Jack until an editor buys him, and maybe if I’m very, very lucky, it’ll be in a format where I can give him a dozen or twenty books and have readers fall in love with him the way I have with Sharpe, Wimsey, etc!

    Reply
  48. I don’t usually fall in love with romance heroes, because you get a different hero in each book, and 250-400 pages just isn’t enough for me to make that kind of commitment. 🙂 I read romance for the satisfaction of seeing a well-paired hero and heroine and watching their romance grow.
    So my literary loves tend to be in other genres where you can have a long-running series with the same protagonists. Currently my harem of the mind includes Lord Peter Wimsey, Richard Sharpe, Marcus Didius Falco, and Joscelin Verreuil from Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel series. If I had to pick one, it’d probably be Joscelin. Or maybe Falco–he’d be a fun husband. With Lord Peter I’d be afraid I couldn’t keep up with him intellectually, and much as I adore Sharpe, I think I’d like someone a bit more restful and domesticated for everyday life!
    As for the heroes I invent…well, I’ve got at least one I’m having trouble letting go of. He’s my favorite character of any of I’ve ever created, and I was heartbroken when his book didn’t sell after a couple of near misses. I’ve now switched genres and am working on an alternate history, set about 6 years before that unsold romance. One day I thought idly, “I wonder what Jack (the hero) would be doing in my alternate world.” And then it hit me that he would TOTALLY have been in the right place to be in the center of my invented events, and he was just the right sort to play an Everyman-Warrior foil and ally to my aristocratic protagonist. So I’m recycling the character. When I first told a CP about it, I said I knew it was self-indulgent of me, but, dang it, I’m going to keep writing Jack until an editor buys him, and maybe if I’m very, very lucky, it’ll be in a format where I can give him a dozen or twenty books and have readers fall in love with him the way I have with Sharpe, Wimsey, etc!

    Reply
  49. I don’t usually fall in love with romance heroes, because you get a different hero in each book, and 250-400 pages just isn’t enough for me to make that kind of commitment. 🙂 I read romance for the satisfaction of seeing a well-paired hero and heroine and watching their romance grow.
    So my literary loves tend to be in other genres where you can have a long-running series with the same protagonists. Currently my harem of the mind includes Lord Peter Wimsey, Richard Sharpe, Marcus Didius Falco, and Joscelin Verreuil from Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel series. If I had to pick one, it’d probably be Joscelin. Or maybe Falco–he’d be a fun husband. With Lord Peter I’d be afraid I couldn’t keep up with him intellectually, and much as I adore Sharpe, I think I’d like someone a bit more restful and domesticated for everyday life!
    As for the heroes I invent…well, I’ve got at least one I’m having trouble letting go of. He’s my favorite character of any of I’ve ever created, and I was heartbroken when his book didn’t sell after a couple of near misses. I’ve now switched genres and am working on an alternate history, set about 6 years before that unsold romance. One day I thought idly, “I wonder what Jack (the hero) would be doing in my alternate world.” And then it hit me that he would TOTALLY have been in the right place to be in the center of my invented events, and he was just the right sort to play an Everyman-Warrior foil and ally to my aristocratic protagonist. So I’m recycling the character. When I first told a CP about it, I said I knew it was self-indulgent of me, but, dang it, I’m going to keep writing Jack until an editor buys him, and maybe if I’m very, very lucky, it’ll be in a format where I can give him a dozen or twenty books and have readers fall in love with him the way I have with Sharpe, Wimsey, etc!

    Reply
  50. I don’t usually fall in love with romance heroes, because you get a different hero in each book, and 250-400 pages just isn’t enough for me to make that kind of commitment. 🙂 I read romance for the satisfaction of seeing a well-paired hero and heroine and watching their romance grow.
    So my literary loves tend to be in other genres where you can have a long-running series with the same protagonists. Currently my harem of the mind includes Lord Peter Wimsey, Richard Sharpe, Marcus Didius Falco, and Joscelin Verreuil from Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel series. If I had to pick one, it’d probably be Joscelin. Or maybe Falco–he’d be a fun husband. With Lord Peter I’d be afraid I couldn’t keep up with him intellectually, and much as I adore Sharpe, I think I’d like someone a bit more restful and domesticated for everyday life!
    As for the heroes I invent…well, I’ve got at least one I’m having trouble letting go of. He’s my favorite character of any of I’ve ever created, and I was heartbroken when his book didn’t sell after a couple of near misses. I’ve now switched genres and am working on an alternate history, set about 6 years before that unsold romance. One day I thought idly, “I wonder what Jack (the hero) would be doing in my alternate world.” And then it hit me that he would TOTALLY have been in the right place to be in the center of my invented events, and he was just the right sort to play an Everyman-Warrior foil and ally to my aristocratic protagonist. So I’m recycling the character. When I first told a CP about it, I said I knew it was self-indulgent of me, but, dang it, I’m going to keep writing Jack until an editor buys him, and maybe if I’m very, very lucky, it’ll be in a format where I can give him a dozen or twenty books and have readers fall in love with him the way I have with Sharpe, Wimsey, etc!

    Reply
  51. I’m such a slut I fall in love with both heroes and anti-heroes, too!
    Am still not over dear Severus. “The bravest man I ever knew.” Sniff. I was so broken up I went out and bought the action figure. Even now he’s on my desk, wand raised.
    On only one occasion have I fallen in and out of love with a hero during the course of a novel. That honor belongs to “The Unfortunate Miss Fortunes.” For the curious, the reason why is posted on the book’s blog under “Lizzie’s Best Moment.”
    Just about ready to lose my heart again… bring ’em on!

    Reply
  52. I’m such a slut I fall in love with both heroes and anti-heroes, too!
    Am still not over dear Severus. “The bravest man I ever knew.” Sniff. I was so broken up I went out and bought the action figure. Even now he’s on my desk, wand raised.
    On only one occasion have I fallen in and out of love with a hero during the course of a novel. That honor belongs to “The Unfortunate Miss Fortunes.” For the curious, the reason why is posted on the book’s blog under “Lizzie’s Best Moment.”
    Just about ready to lose my heart again… bring ’em on!

    Reply
  53. I’m such a slut I fall in love with both heroes and anti-heroes, too!
    Am still not over dear Severus. “The bravest man I ever knew.” Sniff. I was so broken up I went out and bought the action figure. Even now he’s on my desk, wand raised.
    On only one occasion have I fallen in and out of love with a hero during the course of a novel. That honor belongs to “The Unfortunate Miss Fortunes.” For the curious, the reason why is posted on the book’s blog under “Lizzie’s Best Moment.”
    Just about ready to lose my heart again… bring ’em on!

    Reply
  54. I’m such a slut I fall in love with both heroes and anti-heroes, too!
    Am still not over dear Severus. “The bravest man I ever knew.” Sniff. I was so broken up I went out and bought the action figure. Even now he’s on my desk, wand raised.
    On only one occasion have I fallen in and out of love with a hero during the course of a novel. That honor belongs to “The Unfortunate Miss Fortunes.” For the curious, the reason why is posted on the book’s blog under “Lizzie’s Best Moment.”
    Just about ready to lose my heart again… bring ’em on!

    Reply
  55. I’m such a slut I fall in love with both heroes and anti-heroes, too!
    Am still not over dear Severus. “The bravest man I ever knew.” Sniff. I was so broken up I went out and bought the action figure. Even now he’s on my desk, wand raised.
    On only one occasion have I fallen in and out of love with a hero during the course of a novel. That honor belongs to “The Unfortunate Miss Fortunes.” For the curious, the reason why is posted on the book’s blog under “Lizzie’s Best Moment.”
    Just about ready to lose my heart again… bring ’em on!

    Reply
  56. I have to fall at least a little in love with every hero in order to make it though the book.
    And I have to be totally head-over-heels for the heroes I write, or I’d never put butt in chair and type!
    How does the annoying Mr. Mybug put it in COLD COMFORT FARM? “I am engorgingly in love with you, Miss Post!” That’s how I want to feel about the heroes I write (and read!).

    Reply
  57. I have to fall at least a little in love with every hero in order to make it though the book.
    And I have to be totally head-over-heels for the heroes I write, or I’d never put butt in chair and type!
    How does the annoying Mr. Mybug put it in COLD COMFORT FARM? “I am engorgingly in love with you, Miss Post!” That’s how I want to feel about the heroes I write (and read!).

    Reply
  58. I have to fall at least a little in love with every hero in order to make it though the book.
    And I have to be totally head-over-heels for the heroes I write, or I’d never put butt in chair and type!
    How does the annoying Mr. Mybug put it in COLD COMFORT FARM? “I am engorgingly in love with you, Miss Post!” That’s how I want to feel about the heroes I write (and read!).

    Reply
  59. I have to fall at least a little in love with every hero in order to make it though the book.
    And I have to be totally head-over-heels for the heroes I write, or I’d never put butt in chair and type!
    How does the annoying Mr. Mybug put it in COLD COMFORT FARM? “I am engorgingly in love with you, Miss Post!” That’s how I want to feel about the heroes I write (and read!).

    Reply
  60. I have to fall at least a little in love with every hero in order to make it though the book.
    And I have to be totally head-over-heels for the heroes I write, or I’d never put butt in chair and type!
    How does the annoying Mr. Mybug put it in COLD COMFORT FARM? “I am engorgingly in love with you, Miss Post!” That’s how I want to feel about the heroes I write (and read!).

    Reply
  61. Thank you so much for the delightful heroes film clip. It gives me a jump start in the morning to get cracking on my latest project.
    The more I read and write romance, the more I appreciate heroes. Surprisingly, I find the very traits I’ve read, conjured and appreciated on the written page in the men I love and work with. They save lives in the mountains and make perfect role models for my imaginary “heroes.” I think most men have a hero inside trying to get out.
    Just two of my favorites are Jo Beverly’s Rothgar and Susan Johnson’s General Duras.

    Reply
  62. Thank you so much for the delightful heroes film clip. It gives me a jump start in the morning to get cracking on my latest project.
    The more I read and write romance, the more I appreciate heroes. Surprisingly, I find the very traits I’ve read, conjured and appreciated on the written page in the men I love and work with. They save lives in the mountains and make perfect role models for my imaginary “heroes.” I think most men have a hero inside trying to get out.
    Just two of my favorites are Jo Beverly’s Rothgar and Susan Johnson’s General Duras.

    Reply
  63. Thank you so much for the delightful heroes film clip. It gives me a jump start in the morning to get cracking on my latest project.
    The more I read and write romance, the more I appreciate heroes. Surprisingly, I find the very traits I’ve read, conjured and appreciated on the written page in the men I love and work with. They save lives in the mountains and make perfect role models for my imaginary “heroes.” I think most men have a hero inside trying to get out.
    Just two of my favorites are Jo Beverly’s Rothgar and Susan Johnson’s General Duras.

    Reply
  64. Thank you so much for the delightful heroes film clip. It gives me a jump start in the morning to get cracking on my latest project.
    The more I read and write romance, the more I appreciate heroes. Surprisingly, I find the very traits I’ve read, conjured and appreciated on the written page in the men I love and work with. They save lives in the mountains and make perfect role models for my imaginary “heroes.” I think most men have a hero inside trying to get out.
    Just two of my favorites are Jo Beverly’s Rothgar and Susan Johnson’s General Duras.

    Reply
  65. Thank you so much for the delightful heroes film clip. It gives me a jump start in the morning to get cracking on my latest project.
    The more I read and write romance, the more I appreciate heroes. Surprisingly, I find the very traits I’ve read, conjured and appreciated on the written page in the men I love and work with. They save lives in the mountains and make perfect role models for my imaginary “heroes.” I think most men have a hero inside trying to get out.
    Just two of my favorites are Jo Beverly’s Rothgar and Susan Johnson’s General Duras.

    Reply

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