Falling in Love Again. . .

Anne here, and no I'm not talking about a new relationship. Nor am I talking about Marlene Dietrich, though since I wrote that heading, I've had that song playing over and over in my brain.

MarleneDietrich

No, this post is about falling in love again with favorite old books.  Every now and then I take a day or two off writing, pull up the drawbridge and curl up with some favorite old romances. 

Remember them? The books that first made you fall in love with this genre, the authors who made you sigh dreamily at the end, whose stories and characters stayed with you long after you'd finished reading.

How long is it since you reread some of your old favorites? 

Some of mine haven't lived up to my re-reading of them. I find myself reading them more as a writer than a reader, and being more critical of them than I expected to be. But some of them. . . oh, some of them sweep me away just as thoroughly as they first did back when I first discovered the romance genre.

Why reread old favourites, you might ask. Some of these books are ten, twenty, even thirty years old. Hasn't the market has changed so much since they were first published? Aren't they out of date? Old fashioned?

1958-Heinemann-Venetia-Barbosa-jacket-1337x2048Probably, but as long as they still sweep me away, I don't mind, because I'm not reading them to study the market; I'm reading them for me, for my own pleasure, to escape into the world of someone else's imagination.

I also need to remind myself that this writing business is not just a business, not simply a craft, not only a career — that writing involves a little bit of magic.

I seem to need to do it at least once in every book I write — to lose myself in another person's story, to remind myself of the magic, to cleanse my writing palate from the taste of markets and numbers and reviews and deadlines and remind myself again why I fell in love with this genre. And to renew the love affair. Because those old books are a big part of why I became a romance writer in the first place, and I think it's important sometimes to remind yourself of where you came from.

In general, I read pretty widely — I read crime and fantasy and sci fi and historical novels and literary fiction. Good writing is good writing and good storytelling is always magic. But there is something about those old favorites that draws me back again and again to romance.

MadamWillYouTalkAnd even though I say it's not for study or craft-of-writing that I'm rereading them, they always have a beneficial effect on my writing.  Sometimes the experience of diving deep into the world of someone else's story can set my own muse spinning. 

I can be deep in a story written by someone else, and suddenly an idea for a scene or another story will come to me — and there's rarely any similarity between the story I'm reading and the idea that comes for the one I'm writing. I suspect it's something to do with giving the muse a day off, and some fun, and being freed to play, she comes up with the goods.

Sometimes it's just the emotional experience I want — to be plunged into an emotional roller coaster ride, weeping buckets, or breathless with anticipation, or aching for the heroine's plight, and ending on an absolute uplift — the cathartic experience.  

It can enhance a mood and help ready me to write a scene in my own current story. It can remind me of the intensity I want for a scene I'm struggling with, or the joyful abandon I'm seeking. But mostly it gives me a dose of the magic that is the lifeblood of this genre, and reminds me why I love it. Because it's so easy to become jaded, when you've read too many books that failed to move you. 

I've also been digging around in the roots of the genre — and I mean that in a nice way 😉 — and discovering books and authors that are regarded as classics, but which I've never read. I came to reading romance fairly late in life and it wasn't easy to buy romance books (other than Harlequin) in Australia. Then, as now, most local bookshops simply didn't stock them, and those that did didn't have anything near the range and variety that was being published in the US.

JennyJonesOsborne

So I have a lot to catch up on. These days romance novels are so much easier to come by, with old books gaining a new life through e-publishing, as well as the ability to buy out-of-print books from used bookstores in the US. And by reading some of the books that rocked the romance world in their day, I'm finding some utter gems, and rediscovering some of the excitement with which I first experienced romance novels. 

One of the reasons romance has been such a successful genre is that it keeps reinventing itself, and I'm also finding it fascinating to see how the genre has changed over time, and also how some tropes and themes spring eternal. I'm lucky enough to have friends who've been in this business for decades, and who will point me in the direction of some of these classics, usually by way of a comment such as "You've never read X? Oh, my but you have a treat in store for you."  And they've been right.

So whenever you feel a little weary, or disheartened or a little bored with your current reading choices, why not dig out some of your favorite old romances — or ask someone for their recommendations. It might just remind you of why you fell in love with this genre — and with any luck you, too will fall in love all over again. It's a lovely feeling.

What are some classic old romance favorites that would make you fall in love with the genre again? Any recommendations?

 

275 thoughts on “Falling in Love Again. . .”

  1. For the old classic romances, I loved most of Georgette Heyer’s books—too many to name. Desiree by Selinko. Jane Aiken Hodge. Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. Mary Stewart. My Lord Moncrief and others by Jan Coxe Speas. Anything by Roberta Gellis. The Wild Swan series by de Blasis. Beacon at Alexandria by Gillian Bradshaw.

    Reply
  2. For the old classic romances, I loved most of Georgette Heyer’s books—too many to name. Desiree by Selinko. Jane Aiken Hodge. Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. Mary Stewart. My Lord Moncrief and others by Jan Coxe Speas. Anything by Roberta Gellis. The Wild Swan series by de Blasis. Beacon at Alexandria by Gillian Bradshaw.

    Reply
  3. For the old classic romances, I loved most of Georgette Heyer’s books—too many to name. Desiree by Selinko. Jane Aiken Hodge. Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. Mary Stewart. My Lord Moncrief and others by Jan Coxe Speas. Anything by Roberta Gellis. The Wild Swan series by de Blasis. Beacon at Alexandria by Gillian Bradshaw.

    Reply
  4. For the old classic romances, I loved most of Georgette Heyer’s books—too many to name. Desiree by Selinko. Jane Aiken Hodge. Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. Mary Stewart. My Lord Moncrief and others by Jan Coxe Speas. Anything by Roberta Gellis. The Wild Swan series by de Blasis. Beacon at Alexandria by Gillian Bradshaw.

    Reply
  5. For the old classic romances, I loved most of Georgette Heyer’s books—too many to name. Desiree by Selinko. Jane Aiken Hodge. Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. Mary Stewart. My Lord Moncrief and others by Jan Coxe Speas. Anything by Roberta Gellis. The Wild Swan series by de Blasis. Beacon at Alexandria by Gillian Bradshaw.

    Reply
  6. Great post, Anne – everything you say is so true! We do become very jaded sometimes, and it’s comforting to reach for a book you know will give you exactly the experience you crave. When this happens to me, I usually go to my Georgette Heyer shelf, just like Mary K. ‘Cotillion’ never fails to amuse me, and many of the others too. As I blogged about, I also reread her crime stories last year, and loved those too. I love the early Johanna Lindsey books – she has the most satisfying endings! And my all-time favourite Barbara Erskine story – Midnight is a Lonely Place gives me chills and excitement every time. Too many books to choose from!

    Reply
  7. Great post, Anne – everything you say is so true! We do become very jaded sometimes, and it’s comforting to reach for a book you know will give you exactly the experience you crave. When this happens to me, I usually go to my Georgette Heyer shelf, just like Mary K. ‘Cotillion’ never fails to amuse me, and many of the others too. As I blogged about, I also reread her crime stories last year, and loved those too. I love the early Johanna Lindsey books – she has the most satisfying endings! And my all-time favourite Barbara Erskine story – Midnight is a Lonely Place gives me chills and excitement every time. Too many books to choose from!

    Reply
  8. Great post, Anne – everything you say is so true! We do become very jaded sometimes, and it’s comforting to reach for a book you know will give you exactly the experience you crave. When this happens to me, I usually go to my Georgette Heyer shelf, just like Mary K. ‘Cotillion’ never fails to amuse me, and many of the others too. As I blogged about, I also reread her crime stories last year, and loved those too. I love the early Johanna Lindsey books – she has the most satisfying endings! And my all-time favourite Barbara Erskine story – Midnight is a Lonely Place gives me chills and excitement every time. Too many books to choose from!

    Reply
  9. Great post, Anne – everything you say is so true! We do become very jaded sometimes, and it’s comforting to reach for a book you know will give you exactly the experience you crave. When this happens to me, I usually go to my Georgette Heyer shelf, just like Mary K. ‘Cotillion’ never fails to amuse me, and many of the others too. As I blogged about, I also reread her crime stories last year, and loved those too. I love the early Johanna Lindsey books – she has the most satisfying endings! And my all-time favourite Barbara Erskine story – Midnight is a Lonely Place gives me chills and excitement every time. Too many books to choose from!

    Reply
  10. Great post, Anne – everything you say is so true! We do become very jaded sometimes, and it’s comforting to reach for a book you know will give you exactly the experience you crave. When this happens to me, I usually go to my Georgette Heyer shelf, just like Mary K. ‘Cotillion’ never fails to amuse me, and many of the others too. As I blogged about, I also reread her crime stories last year, and loved those too. I love the early Johanna Lindsey books – she has the most satisfying endings! And my all-time favourite Barbara Erskine story – Midnight is a Lonely Place gives me chills and excitement every time. Too many books to choose from!

    Reply
  11. Rereads are comfort blankets in the best possible sense and so Georgette Heyer is obviously at the top of my list. All my copies are currently in store so when they reappear, it will be all my Christmas and Birthdays rolled into one! In my late teens I read and reread a book called The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley. Then it went AWOL when I left home. I sort of looked over the next 30 years and then finally found a copy on eBay or Amazon but not only that, I found Stella had written more books and had recently started writing again. That discovery has brought me great pleasure

    Reply
  12. Rereads are comfort blankets in the best possible sense and so Georgette Heyer is obviously at the top of my list. All my copies are currently in store so when they reappear, it will be all my Christmas and Birthdays rolled into one! In my late teens I read and reread a book called The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley. Then it went AWOL when I left home. I sort of looked over the next 30 years and then finally found a copy on eBay or Amazon but not only that, I found Stella had written more books and had recently started writing again. That discovery has brought me great pleasure

    Reply
  13. Rereads are comfort blankets in the best possible sense and so Georgette Heyer is obviously at the top of my list. All my copies are currently in store so when they reappear, it will be all my Christmas and Birthdays rolled into one! In my late teens I read and reread a book called The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley. Then it went AWOL when I left home. I sort of looked over the next 30 years and then finally found a copy on eBay or Amazon but not only that, I found Stella had written more books and had recently started writing again. That discovery has brought me great pleasure

    Reply
  14. Rereads are comfort blankets in the best possible sense and so Georgette Heyer is obviously at the top of my list. All my copies are currently in store so when they reappear, it will be all my Christmas and Birthdays rolled into one! In my late teens I read and reread a book called The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley. Then it went AWOL when I left home. I sort of looked over the next 30 years and then finally found a copy on eBay or Amazon but not only that, I found Stella had written more books and had recently started writing again. That discovery has brought me great pleasure

    Reply
  15. Rereads are comfort blankets in the best possible sense and so Georgette Heyer is obviously at the top of my list. All my copies are currently in store so when they reappear, it will be all my Christmas and Birthdays rolled into one! In my late teens I read and reread a book called The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley. Then it went AWOL when I left home. I sort of looked over the next 30 years and then finally found a copy on eBay or Amazon but not only that, I found Stella had written more books and had recently started writing again. That discovery has brought me great pleasure

    Reply
  16. What a fun post, Anne!
    I’ll admit that I’m not tempted to reread/recommend any of those 100+ Barbara Cartland romances I owned and loved when I was a teen. Some later discoveries that I would recommend are Morning Glory plus Years by Lavyrle Spencer; Slightly Dangerous by Mary Balogh; Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas; Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale;
    and Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  17. What a fun post, Anne!
    I’ll admit that I’m not tempted to reread/recommend any of those 100+ Barbara Cartland romances I owned and loved when I was a teen. Some later discoveries that I would recommend are Morning Glory plus Years by Lavyrle Spencer; Slightly Dangerous by Mary Balogh; Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas; Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale;
    and Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  18. What a fun post, Anne!
    I’ll admit that I’m not tempted to reread/recommend any of those 100+ Barbara Cartland romances I owned and loved when I was a teen. Some later discoveries that I would recommend are Morning Glory plus Years by Lavyrle Spencer; Slightly Dangerous by Mary Balogh; Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas; Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale;
    and Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  19. What a fun post, Anne!
    I’ll admit that I’m not tempted to reread/recommend any of those 100+ Barbara Cartland romances I owned and loved when I was a teen. Some later discoveries that I would recommend are Morning Glory plus Years by Lavyrle Spencer; Slightly Dangerous by Mary Balogh; Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas; Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale;
    and Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  20. What a fun post, Anne!
    I’ll admit that I’m not tempted to reread/recommend any of those 100+ Barbara Cartland romances I owned and loved when I was a teen. Some later discoveries that I would recommend are Morning Glory plus Years by Lavyrle Spencer; Slightly Dangerous by Mary Balogh; Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas; Flowers from the Storm by Laura Kinsale;
    and Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  21. I too read Stella Riley and still have my original copy of the Marigold Chain and also the Black Madonna, the first of her English Civil War series. I was delighted a few years ago to find she was writing again. I am a member of her Facebook page Stella’s Hussies and have quite a few of her audio books

    Reply
  22. I too read Stella Riley and still have my original copy of the Marigold Chain and also the Black Madonna, the first of her English Civil War series. I was delighted a few years ago to find she was writing again. I am a member of her Facebook page Stella’s Hussies and have quite a few of her audio books

    Reply
  23. I too read Stella Riley and still have my original copy of the Marigold Chain and also the Black Madonna, the first of her English Civil War series. I was delighted a few years ago to find she was writing again. I am a member of her Facebook page Stella’s Hussies and have quite a few of her audio books

    Reply
  24. I too read Stella Riley and still have my original copy of the Marigold Chain and also the Black Madonna, the first of her English Civil War series. I was delighted a few years ago to find she was writing again. I am a member of her Facebook page Stella’s Hussies and have quite a few of her audio books

    Reply
  25. I too read Stella Riley and still have my original copy of the Marigold Chain and also the Black Madonna, the first of her English Civil War series. I was delighted a few years ago to find she was writing again. I am a member of her Facebook page Stella’s Hussies and have quite a few of her audio books

    Reply
  26. Thanks, Christina. I have most of Johanna Lindsey’s books. They were part of my gateway into my discovery of the US published romances of the 80’s. Might have to reread some of them — it’s been years. I don’t know that Barbara Erskine story — will look for it.

    Reply
  27. Thanks, Christina. I have most of Johanna Lindsey’s books. They were part of my gateway into my discovery of the US published romances of the 80’s. Might have to reread some of them — it’s been years. I don’t know that Barbara Erskine story — will look for it.

    Reply
  28. Thanks, Christina. I have most of Johanna Lindsey’s books. They were part of my gateway into my discovery of the US published romances of the 80’s. Might have to reread some of them — it’s been years. I don’t know that Barbara Erskine story — will look for it.

    Reply
  29. Thanks, Christina. I have most of Johanna Lindsey’s books. They were part of my gateway into my discovery of the US published romances of the 80’s. Might have to reread some of them — it’s been years. I don’t know that Barbara Erskine story — will look for it.

    Reply
  30. Thanks, Christina. I have most of Johanna Lindsey’s books. They were part of my gateway into my discovery of the US published romances of the 80’s. Might have to reread some of them — it’s been years. I don’t know that Barbara Erskine story — will look for it.

    Reply
  31. Alice, what fun to rediscover your old Heyers. And how lovely it is when favorite authors are rediscovered and are found to be still writing — or at least republishing their books. So many authors have regained their rights to their books and self-published, making them available to a new generation of readers. I’ve just looked, and The Marigold Chain is also available on Kindle and audio.

    Reply
  32. Alice, what fun to rediscover your old Heyers. And how lovely it is when favorite authors are rediscovered and are found to be still writing — or at least republishing their books. So many authors have regained their rights to their books and self-published, making them available to a new generation of readers. I’ve just looked, and The Marigold Chain is also available on Kindle and audio.

    Reply
  33. Alice, what fun to rediscover your old Heyers. And how lovely it is when favorite authors are rediscovered and are found to be still writing — or at least republishing their books. So many authors have regained their rights to their books and self-published, making them available to a new generation of readers. I’ve just looked, and The Marigold Chain is also available on Kindle and audio.

    Reply
  34. Alice, what fun to rediscover your old Heyers. And how lovely it is when favorite authors are rediscovered and are found to be still writing — or at least republishing their books. So many authors have regained their rights to their books and self-published, making them available to a new generation of readers. I’ve just looked, and The Marigold Chain is also available on Kindle and audio.

    Reply
  35. Alice, what fun to rediscover your old Heyers. And how lovely it is when favorite authors are rediscovered and are found to be still writing — or at least republishing their books. So many authors have regained their rights to their books and self-published, making them available to a new generation of readers. I’ve just looked, and The Marigold Chain is also available on Kindle and audio.

    Reply
  36. Kareni, I’m with you on the Barbara Cartland stories — mostly I read them serialized in magazines my sister bought. But I did fall heavily for LaVyrle Spencer and Morning Glory was a favorite. Mary Balogh is an auto-buy for me and has been ever since I discovered her books, and Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm is one of my all-time faves, too. The Wenches miss Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  37. Kareni, I’m with you on the Barbara Cartland stories — mostly I read them serialized in magazines my sister bought. But I did fall heavily for LaVyrle Spencer and Morning Glory was a favorite. Mary Balogh is an auto-buy for me and has been ever since I discovered her books, and Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm is one of my all-time faves, too. The Wenches miss Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  38. Kareni, I’m with you on the Barbara Cartland stories — mostly I read them serialized in magazines my sister bought. But I did fall heavily for LaVyrle Spencer and Morning Glory was a favorite. Mary Balogh is an auto-buy for me and has been ever since I discovered her books, and Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm is one of my all-time faves, too. The Wenches miss Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  39. Kareni, I’m with you on the Barbara Cartland stories — mostly I read them serialized in magazines my sister bought. But I did fall heavily for LaVyrle Spencer and Morning Glory was a favorite. Mary Balogh is an auto-buy for me and has been ever since I discovered her books, and Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm is one of my all-time faves, too. The Wenches miss Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  40. Kareni, I’m with you on the Barbara Cartland stories — mostly I read them serialized in magazines my sister bought. But I did fall heavily for LaVyrle Spencer and Morning Glory was a favorite. Mary Balogh is an auto-buy for me and has been ever since I discovered her books, and Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm is one of my all-time faves, too. The Wenches miss Joanna Bourne.

    Reply
  41. I kinda stick to the “classics” – Heyer’s Georgian/Regencies, Mary Balogh’s very early books (particularly Secrets of the Heart, A Precious Jewel, The Secret Pearl), Jane Austen (particularly Mansfield Park), Tolkien’s The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, Jane Eyre — I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are. Sometimes I read them in print, other times I listen to an audiobook, if it’s well done, but they are always out where I can see them.
    Less often, but still not forgotten, I reach for early science fiction favorites such as Robert A. Heinlein’s juvies, Clifford D. Simak (he was so civiized!), Ursula LeGuin’s The Lathe of Heaven, and The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Edward Ruppelt, which is a piece of real history written at the time and a corker of a mystery as well (we still don’t know what those things are). Or the odd Oz book 🙂
    I also read a great deal of recently written historical romance, particularly regency era, but I regard most of them as light entertainments because so much of so many of them reflect modern attitudes and not those of the era they are set in. I suppose no one can properly express the spirit of an era if they haven’t lived through it, and that only bothers people like me who have had English Lit as a hobby before most of these authors were born 🙂

    Reply
  42. I kinda stick to the “classics” – Heyer’s Georgian/Regencies, Mary Balogh’s very early books (particularly Secrets of the Heart, A Precious Jewel, The Secret Pearl), Jane Austen (particularly Mansfield Park), Tolkien’s The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, Jane Eyre — I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are. Sometimes I read them in print, other times I listen to an audiobook, if it’s well done, but they are always out where I can see them.
    Less often, but still not forgotten, I reach for early science fiction favorites such as Robert A. Heinlein’s juvies, Clifford D. Simak (he was so civiized!), Ursula LeGuin’s The Lathe of Heaven, and The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Edward Ruppelt, which is a piece of real history written at the time and a corker of a mystery as well (we still don’t know what those things are). Or the odd Oz book 🙂
    I also read a great deal of recently written historical romance, particularly regency era, but I regard most of them as light entertainments because so much of so many of them reflect modern attitudes and not those of the era they are set in. I suppose no one can properly express the spirit of an era if they haven’t lived through it, and that only bothers people like me who have had English Lit as a hobby before most of these authors were born 🙂

    Reply
  43. I kinda stick to the “classics” – Heyer’s Georgian/Regencies, Mary Balogh’s very early books (particularly Secrets of the Heart, A Precious Jewel, The Secret Pearl), Jane Austen (particularly Mansfield Park), Tolkien’s The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, Jane Eyre — I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are. Sometimes I read them in print, other times I listen to an audiobook, if it’s well done, but they are always out where I can see them.
    Less often, but still not forgotten, I reach for early science fiction favorites such as Robert A. Heinlein’s juvies, Clifford D. Simak (he was so civiized!), Ursula LeGuin’s The Lathe of Heaven, and The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Edward Ruppelt, which is a piece of real history written at the time and a corker of a mystery as well (we still don’t know what those things are). Or the odd Oz book 🙂
    I also read a great deal of recently written historical romance, particularly regency era, but I regard most of them as light entertainments because so much of so many of them reflect modern attitudes and not those of the era they are set in. I suppose no one can properly express the spirit of an era if they haven’t lived through it, and that only bothers people like me who have had English Lit as a hobby before most of these authors were born 🙂

    Reply
  44. I kinda stick to the “classics” – Heyer’s Georgian/Regencies, Mary Balogh’s very early books (particularly Secrets of the Heart, A Precious Jewel, The Secret Pearl), Jane Austen (particularly Mansfield Park), Tolkien’s The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, Jane Eyre — I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are. Sometimes I read them in print, other times I listen to an audiobook, if it’s well done, but they are always out where I can see them.
    Less often, but still not forgotten, I reach for early science fiction favorites such as Robert A. Heinlein’s juvies, Clifford D. Simak (he was so civiized!), Ursula LeGuin’s The Lathe of Heaven, and The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Edward Ruppelt, which is a piece of real history written at the time and a corker of a mystery as well (we still don’t know what those things are). Or the odd Oz book 🙂
    I also read a great deal of recently written historical romance, particularly regency era, but I regard most of them as light entertainments because so much of so many of them reflect modern attitudes and not those of the era they are set in. I suppose no one can properly express the spirit of an era if they haven’t lived through it, and that only bothers people like me who have had English Lit as a hobby before most of these authors were born 🙂

    Reply
  45. I kinda stick to the “classics” – Heyer’s Georgian/Regencies, Mary Balogh’s very early books (particularly Secrets of the Heart, A Precious Jewel, The Secret Pearl), Jane Austen (particularly Mansfield Park), Tolkien’s The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, Jane Eyre — I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are. Sometimes I read them in print, other times I listen to an audiobook, if it’s well done, but they are always out where I can see them.
    Less often, but still not forgotten, I reach for early science fiction favorites such as Robert A. Heinlein’s juvies, Clifford D. Simak (he was so civiized!), Ursula LeGuin’s The Lathe of Heaven, and The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Edward Ruppelt, which is a piece of real history written at the time and a corker of a mystery as well (we still don’t know what those things are). Or the odd Oz book 🙂
    I also read a great deal of recently written historical romance, particularly regency era, but I regard most of them as light entertainments because so much of so many of them reflect modern attitudes and not those of the era they are set in. I suppose no one can properly express the spirit of an era if they haven’t lived through it, and that only bothers people like me who have had English Lit as a hobby before most of these authors were born 🙂

    Reply
  46. As a teen I was a big reader of Pearl Buck, Jean Plaidy, Victoria Holt and Anya Seton (adored KATHERINE). I have tried reading them, but it’s just not the same. Then came kids, who had time to read? Later in life it was the Regency genre and I found Anne and Mary Jo and was hooked! For the last year I have been going through Betty Neels Harlequin’s, our library has made HOOPLA available and it has 100 of Betty’s novels in digital format. Her plots are so very formulaic, but her books read like travelogues and the fashion magazines of the 60s, so I find them fun.

    Reply
  47. As a teen I was a big reader of Pearl Buck, Jean Plaidy, Victoria Holt and Anya Seton (adored KATHERINE). I have tried reading them, but it’s just not the same. Then came kids, who had time to read? Later in life it was the Regency genre and I found Anne and Mary Jo and was hooked! For the last year I have been going through Betty Neels Harlequin’s, our library has made HOOPLA available and it has 100 of Betty’s novels in digital format. Her plots are so very formulaic, but her books read like travelogues and the fashion magazines of the 60s, so I find them fun.

    Reply
  48. As a teen I was a big reader of Pearl Buck, Jean Plaidy, Victoria Holt and Anya Seton (adored KATHERINE). I have tried reading them, but it’s just not the same. Then came kids, who had time to read? Later in life it was the Regency genre and I found Anne and Mary Jo and was hooked! For the last year I have been going through Betty Neels Harlequin’s, our library has made HOOPLA available and it has 100 of Betty’s novels in digital format. Her plots are so very formulaic, but her books read like travelogues and the fashion magazines of the 60s, so I find them fun.

    Reply
  49. As a teen I was a big reader of Pearl Buck, Jean Plaidy, Victoria Holt and Anya Seton (adored KATHERINE). I have tried reading them, but it’s just not the same. Then came kids, who had time to read? Later in life it was the Regency genre and I found Anne and Mary Jo and was hooked! For the last year I have been going through Betty Neels Harlequin’s, our library has made HOOPLA available and it has 100 of Betty’s novels in digital format. Her plots are so very formulaic, but her books read like travelogues and the fashion magazines of the 60s, so I find them fun.

    Reply
  50. As a teen I was a big reader of Pearl Buck, Jean Plaidy, Victoria Holt and Anya Seton (adored KATHERINE). I have tried reading them, but it’s just not the same. Then came kids, who had time to read? Later in life it was the Regency genre and I found Anne and Mary Jo and was hooked! For the last year I have been going through Betty Neels Harlequin’s, our library has made HOOPLA available and it has 100 of Betty’s novels in digital format. Her plots are so very formulaic, but her books read like travelogues and the fashion magazines of the 60s, so I find them fun.

    Reply
  51. I always loved re-reading “Flowers From the Storm” by Lisa Kleypas, from 2003.
    Anything by Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  52. I always loved re-reading “Flowers From the Storm” by Lisa Kleypas, from 2003.
    Anything by Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  53. I always loved re-reading “Flowers From the Storm” by Lisa Kleypas, from 2003.
    Anything by Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  54. I always loved re-reading “Flowers From the Storm” by Lisa Kleypas, from 2003.
    Anything by Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  55. I always loved re-reading “Flowers From the Storm” by Lisa Kleypas, from 2003.
    Anything by Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  56. Enjoyed this post and the comments. I’m wondering, Anne, which of your rereads have lived up to your expectations? And which tropes have lasted, or not? That second question is probably a post topic of its own.

    Reply
  57. Enjoyed this post and the comments. I’m wondering, Anne, which of your rereads have lived up to your expectations? And which tropes have lasted, or not? That second question is probably a post topic of its own.

    Reply
  58. Enjoyed this post and the comments. I’m wondering, Anne, which of your rereads have lived up to your expectations? And which tropes have lasted, or not? That second question is probably a post topic of its own.

    Reply
  59. Enjoyed this post and the comments. I’m wondering, Anne, which of your rereads have lived up to your expectations? And which tropes have lasted, or not? That second question is probably a post topic of its own.

    Reply
  60. Enjoyed this post and the comments. I’m wondering, Anne, which of your rereads have lived up to your expectations? And which tropes have lasted, or not? That second question is probably a post topic of its own.

    Reply
  61. Janice I liked this: — ” I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are.” I’m the same — there are some books I have several copies of and also one on kindle, because I don’t ever want to be without them.
    Thanks for those recommendations, especially the science fiction. I haven’t read sci-fi for quite a while, but I’m considering some of my old faves as I’m slowly culling my library. But I don’t know several that you mentioned so I might just investigate. Thanks.
    As for the modern-sounding Regencies, I’m afraid they’re with us for good. When I first got a US agent, the first thing she did was cut out some of my Regency slang. It’s a balancing act.

    Reply
  62. Janice I liked this: — ” I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are.” I’m the same — there are some books I have several copies of and also one on kindle, because I don’t ever want to be without them.
    Thanks for those recommendations, especially the science fiction. I haven’t read sci-fi for quite a while, but I’m considering some of my old faves as I’m slowly culling my library. But I don’t know several that you mentioned so I might just investigate. Thanks.
    As for the modern-sounding Regencies, I’m afraid they’re with us for good. When I first got a US agent, the first thing she did was cut out some of my Regency slang. It’s a balancing act.

    Reply
  63. Janice I liked this: — ” I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are.” I’m the same — there are some books I have several copies of and also one on kindle, because I don’t ever want to be without them.
    Thanks for those recommendations, especially the science fiction. I haven’t read sci-fi for quite a while, but I’m considering some of my old faves as I’m slowly culling my library. But I don’t know several that you mentioned so I might just investigate. Thanks.
    As for the modern-sounding Regencies, I’m afraid they’re with us for good. When I first got a US agent, the first thing she did was cut out some of my Regency slang. It’s a balancing act.

    Reply
  64. Janice I liked this: — ” I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are.” I’m the same — there are some books I have several copies of and also one on kindle, because I don’t ever want to be without them.
    Thanks for those recommendations, especially the science fiction. I haven’t read sci-fi for quite a while, but I’m considering some of my old faves as I’m slowly culling my library. But I don’t know several that you mentioned so I might just investigate. Thanks.
    As for the modern-sounding Regencies, I’m afraid they’re with us for good. When I first got a US agent, the first thing she did was cut out some of my Regency slang. It’s a balancing act.

    Reply
  65. Janice I liked this: — ” I have more than one copy of most of these and I always know where they are.” I’m the same — there are some books I have several copies of and also one on kindle, because I don’t ever want to be without them.
    Thanks for those recommendations, especially the science fiction. I haven’t read sci-fi for quite a while, but I’m considering some of my old faves as I’m slowly culling my library. But I don’t know several that you mentioned so I might just investigate. Thanks.
    As for the modern-sounding Regencies, I’m afraid they’re with us for good. When I first got a US agent, the first thing she did was cut out some of my Regency slang. It’s a balancing act.

    Reply
  66. I’ve enjoyed rereading many of the books already named. Several of Jo Beverly’s older books are also on my keeper shelf, like Lord Wraybourn’s Betrothed and Emily and the Dark Angel.

    Reply
  67. I’ve enjoyed rereading many of the books already named. Several of Jo Beverly’s older books are also on my keeper shelf, like Lord Wraybourn’s Betrothed and Emily and the Dark Angel.

    Reply
  68. I’ve enjoyed rereading many of the books already named. Several of Jo Beverly’s older books are also on my keeper shelf, like Lord Wraybourn’s Betrothed and Emily and the Dark Angel.

    Reply
  69. I’ve enjoyed rereading many of the books already named. Several of Jo Beverly’s older books are also on my keeper shelf, like Lord Wraybourn’s Betrothed and Emily and the Dark Angel.

    Reply
  70. I’ve enjoyed rereading many of the books already named. Several of Jo Beverly’s older books are also on my keeper shelf, like Lord Wraybourn’s Betrothed and Emily and the Dark Angel.

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Denise, I’m glad you enjoy my books and Mary Jo’s. As for Betty Neels she’s a real comfort read for a lot of people, I know. She wrote over a hundred books and kept writing right into her 90’s, and her “core story” — where a young hard-working woman falls in love with a tall Dutch doctor was very much her own life-long romance. And her books still fly off the shelves.

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Denise, I’m glad you enjoy my books and Mary Jo’s. As for Betty Neels she’s a real comfort read for a lot of people, I know. She wrote over a hundred books and kept writing right into her 90’s, and her “core story” — where a young hard-working woman falls in love with a tall Dutch doctor was very much her own life-long romance. And her books still fly off the shelves.

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Denise, I’m glad you enjoy my books and Mary Jo’s. As for Betty Neels she’s a real comfort read for a lot of people, I know. She wrote over a hundred books and kept writing right into her 90’s, and her “core story” — where a young hard-working woman falls in love with a tall Dutch doctor was very much her own life-long romance. And her books still fly off the shelves.

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Denise, I’m glad you enjoy my books and Mary Jo’s. As for Betty Neels she’s a real comfort read for a lot of people, I know. She wrote over a hundred books and kept writing right into her 90’s, and her “core story” — where a young hard-working woman falls in love with a tall Dutch doctor was very much her own life-long romance. And her books still fly off the shelves.

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Denise, I’m glad you enjoy my books and Mary Jo’s. As for Betty Neels she’s a real comfort read for a lot of people, I know. She wrote over a hundred books and kept writing right into her 90’s, and her “core story” — where a young hard-working woman falls in love with a tall Dutch doctor was very much her own life-long romance. And her books still fly off the shelves.

    Reply
  76. Patricia, I think you mean Laura Kinsale for Flowers from the Storm, and it’s a favorite of mine, too. But Lisa Kleypas is also a favorite, especially The Devil in Winter. And I can never choose a favorite Heyer either.

    Reply
  77. Patricia, I think you mean Laura Kinsale for Flowers from the Storm, and it’s a favorite of mine, too. But Lisa Kleypas is also a favorite, especially The Devil in Winter. And I can never choose a favorite Heyer either.

    Reply
  78. Patricia, I think you mean Laura Kinsale for Flowers from the Storm, and it’s a favorite of mine, too. But Lisa Kleypas is also a favorite, especially The Devil in Winter. And I can never choose a favorite Heyer either.

    Reply
  79. Patricia, I think you mean Laura Kinsale for Flowers from the Storm, and it’s a favorite of mine, too. But Lisa Kleypas is also a favorite, especially The Devil in Winter. And I can never choose a favorite Heyer either.

    Reply
  80. Patricia, I think you mean Laura Kinsale for Flowers from the Storm, and it’s a favorite of mine, too. But Lisa Kleypas is also a favorite, especially The Devil in Winter. And I can never choose a favorite Heyer either.

    Reply
  81. Alison that second question would make a great topic for discussion, I agree. As for which books haven’t lived up to my expectations the second time around? I really couldn’t say, not because I’m being tactful or discreet, but because I haven’t tried to remember them, just cast them aside and moved on.

    Reply
  82. Alison that second question would make a great topic for discussion, I agree. As for which books haven’t lived up to my expectations the second time around? I really couldn’t say, not because I’m being tactful or discreet, but because I haven’t tried to remember them, just cast them aside and moved on.

    Reply
  83. Alison that second question would make a great topic for discussion, I agree. As for which books haven’t lived up to my expectations the second time around? I really couldn’t say, not because I’m being tactful or discreet, but because I haven’t tried to remember them, just cast them aside and moved on.

    Reply
  84. Alison that second question would make a great topic for discussion, I agree. As for which books haven’t lived up to my expectations the second time around? I really couldn’t say, not because I’m being tactful or discreet, but because I haven’t tried to remember them, just cast them aside and moved on.

    Reply
  85. Alison that second question would make a great topic for discussion, I agree. As for which books haven’t lived up to my expectations the second time around? I really couldn’t say, not because I’m being tactful or discreet, but because I haven’t tried to remember them, just cast them aside and moved on.

    Reply
  86. Reading your post, Anne, and all the comments has been a lovely trip down memory lane – and will make me pull out a lot of old favorites for a re-read. I’ll only add that my two favorite comfort reads are Jane Austen‘s Persuasion, and Dorothy L Sayers’ Busman‘s Honeymoon (much more a romance than a mystery, that one). In my early days of reading romance, I loved Judith McNaught’s Almost Heaven, and a recent reread didn’t disappoint.

    Reply
  87. Reading your post, Anne, and all the comments has been a lovely trip down memory lane – and will make me pull out a lot of old favorites for a re-read. I’ll only add that my two favorite comfort reads are Jane Austen‘s Persuasion, and Dorothy L Sayers’ Busman‘s Honeymoon (much more a romance than a mystery, that one). In my early days of reading romance, I loved Judith McNaught’s Almost Heaven, and a recent reread didn’t disappoint.

    Reply
  88. Reading your post, Anne, and all the comments has been a lovely trip down memory lane – and will make me pull out a lot of old favorites for a re-read. I’ll only add that my two favorite comfort reads are Jane Austen‘s Persuasion, and Dorothy L Sayers’ Busman‘s Honeymoon (much more a romance than a mystery, that one). In my early days of reading romance, I loved Judith McNaught’s Almost Heaven, and a recent reread didn’t disappoint.

    Reply
  89. Reading your post, Anne, and all the comments has been a lovely trip down memory lane – and will make me pull out a lot of old favorites for a re-read. I’ll only add that my two favorite comfort reads are Jane Austen‘s Persuasion, and Dorothy L Sayers’ Busman‘s Honeymoon (much more a romance than a mystery, that one). In my early days of reading romance, I loved Judith McNaught’s Almost Heaven, and a recent reread didn’t disappoint.

    Reply
  90. Reading your post, Anne, and all the comments has been a lovely trip down memory lane – and will make me pull out a lot of old favorites for a re-read. I’ll only add that my two favorite comfort reads are Jane Austen‘s Persuasion, and Dorothy L Sayers’ Busman‘s Honeymoon (much more a romance than a mystery, that one). In my early days of reading romance, I loved Judith McNaught’s Almost Heaven, and a recent reread didn’t disappoint.

    Reply
  91. Like you said in your post – you’re in for a treat! It’s a bit scary though so don’t read it on a dark and windy night!

    Reply
  92. Like you said in your post – you’re in for a treat! It’s a bit scary though so don’t read it on a dark and windy night!

    Reply
  93. Like you said in your post – you’re in for a treat! It’s a bit scary though so don’t read it on a dark and windy night!

    Reply
  94. Like you said in your post – you’re in for a treat! It’s a bit scary though so don’t read it on a dark and windy night!

    Reply
  95. Like you said in your post – you’re in for a treat! It’s a bit scary though so don’t read it on a dark and windy night!

    Reply
  96. Anne, some of my all-time favorites which I reread when I am between books or just disappointed with some of the newer romance novels (I read mostly historicals):
    Devil in Winter
    A Week to Be Wicked–Tessa Dare
    The Bridal Season–Connie Brockway
    ANYTHING by Joanna Bourne, particularly “The Spymaster’s Lady”
    ANYTHING by Laura Kinsale
    The Secret Pearl–Mary Balogh
    The early Sherry Thomas’s although she’s into mysteries mow which I haven’t read

    Reply
  97. Anne, some of my all-time favorites which I reread when I am between books or just disappointed with some of the newer romance novels (I read mostly historicals):
    Devil in Winter
    A Week to Be Wicked–Tessa Dare
    The Bridal Season–Connie Brockway
    ANYTHING by Joanna Bourne, particularly “The Spymaster’s Lady”
    ANYTHING by Laura Kinsale
    The Secret Pearl–Mary Balogh
    The early Sherry Thomas’s although she’s into mysteries mow which I haven’t read

    Reply
  98. Anne, some of my all-time favorites which I reread when I am between books or just disappointed with some of the newer romance novels (I read mostly historicals):
    Devil in Winter
    A Week to Be Wicked–Tessa Dare
    The Bridal Season–Connie Brockway
    ANYTHING by Joanna Bourne, particularly “The Spymaster’s Lady”
    ANYTHING by Laura Kinsale
    The Secret Pearl–Mary Balogh
    The early Sherry Thomas’s although she’s into mysteries mow which I haven’t read

    Reply
  99. Anne, some of my all-time favorites which I reread when I am between books or just disappointed with some of the newer romance novels (I read mostly historicals):
    Devil in Winter
    A Week to Be Wicked–Tessa Dare
    The Bridal Season–Connie Brockway
    ANYTHING by Joanna Bourne, particularly “The Spymaster’s Lady”
    ANYTHING by Laura Kinsale
    The Secret Pearl–Mary Balogh
    The early Sherry Thomas’s although she’s into mysteries mow which I haven’t read

    Reply
  100. Anne, some of my all-time favorites which I reread when I am between books or just disappointed with some of the newer romance novels (I read mostly historicals):
    Devil in Winter
    A Week to Be Wicked–Tessa Dare
    The Bridal Season–Connie Brockway
    ANYTHING by Joanna Bourne, particularly “The Spymaster’s Lady”
    ANYTHING by Laura Kinsale
    The Secret Pearl–Mary Balogh
    The early Sherry Thomas’s although she’s into mysteries mow which I haven’t read

    Reply
  101. I have 3 large bookcases filled with old favorites and am lucky enough to have several libraries nearby for the new titles I learn about. The computer is handy for visiting with all of you and learning about new to me authors and titles. I am 90 now and have been a reader all my life. There is nothing like a good book to keep me interested in everything. TV is helpful, but not lasting like a book.

    Reply
  102. I have 3 large bookcases filled with old favorites and am lucky enough to have several libraries nearby for the new titles I learn about. The computer is handy for visiting with all of you and learning about new to me authors and titles. I am 90 now and have been a reader all my life. There is nothing like a good book to keep me interested in everything. TV is helpful, but not lasting like a book.

    Reply
  103. I have 3 large bookcases filled with old favorites and am lucky enough to have several libraries nearby for the new titles I learn about. The computer is handy for visiting with all of you and learning about new to me authors and titles. I am 90 now and have been a reader all my life. There is nothing like a good book to keep me interested in everything. TV is helpful, but not lasting like a book.

    Reply
  104. I have 3 large bookcases filled with old favorites and am lucky enough to have several libraries nearby for the new titles I learn about. The computer is handy for visiting with all of you and learning about new to me authors and titles. I am 90 now and have been a reader all my life. There is nothing like a good book to keep me interested in everything. TV is helpful, but not lasting like a book.

    Reply
  105. I have 3 large bookcases filled with old favorites and am lucky enough to have several libraries nearby for the new titles I learn about. The computer is handy for visiting with all of you and learning about new to me authors and titles. I am 90 now and have been a reader all my life. There is nothing like a good book to keep me interested in everything. TV is helpful, but not lasting like a book.

    Reply
  106. In my younger days, I read more for my head than my heart. Whatever was the current best sellers or the classics. They are not where I go when I want a comfort read.
    I discovered the romance genre in my early thirties. While on jury duty, I picked up a paperback from the reading rack. It was THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was in a dark place at the time and it gave me comfort. I used to have several of her books, but I have lost them somewhere along the line.
    Nowadays when I want a comfort read I usually pick Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series. I also re-read a lot of Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger because if I need a comfort read, I usually need a good laugh also.
    Enjoyed the post and all the comments.

    Reply
  107. In my younger days, I read more for my head than my heart. Whatever was the current best sellers or the classics. They are not where I go when I want a comfort read.
    I discovered the romance genre in my early thirties. While on jury duty, I picked up a paperback from the reading rack. It was THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was in a dark place at the time and it gave me comfort. I used to have several of her books, but I have lost them somewhere along the line.
    Nowadays when I want a comfort read I usually pick Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series. I also re-read a lot of Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger because if I need a comfort read, I usually need a good laugh also.
    Enjoyed the post and all the comments.

    Reply
  108. In my younger days, I read more for my head than my heart. Whatever was the current best sellers or the classics. They are not where I go when I want a comfort read.
    I discovered the romance genre in my early thirties. While on jury duty, I picked up a paperback from the reading rack. It was THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was in a dark place at the time and it gave me comfort. I used to have several of her books, but I have lost them somewhere along the line.
    Nowadays when I want a comfort read I usually pick Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series. I also re-read a lot of Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger because if I need a comfort read, I usually need a good laugh also.
    Enjoyed the post and all the comments.

    Reply
  109. In my younger days, I read more for my head than my heart. Whatever was the current best sellers or the classics. They are not where I go when I want a comfort read.
    I discovered the romance genre in my early thirties. While on jury duty, I picked up a paperback from the reading rack. It was THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was in a dark place at the time and it gave me comfort. I used to have several of her books, but I have lost them somewhere along the line.
    Nowadays when I want a comfort read I usually pick Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series. I also re-read a lot of Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger because if I need a comfort read, I usually need a good laugh also.
    Enjoyed the post and all the comments.

    Reply
  110. In my younger days, I read more for my head than my heart. Whatever was the current best sellers or the classics. They are not where I go when I want a comfort read.
    I discovered the romance genre in my early thirties. While on jury duty, I picked up a paperback from the reading rack. It was THE WOLF AND THE DOVE by Kathleen Woodiwiss. I was in a dark place at the time and it gave me comfort. I used to have several of her books, but I have lost them somewhere along the line.
    Nowadays when I want a comfort read I usually pick Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series. I also re-read a lot of Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger because if I need a comfort read, I usually need a good laugh also.
    Enjoyed the post and all the comments.

    Reply
  111. Janice J, I was amazed to see Mara, Daughter of the Nile in your list. That was one of my favorites as a teenager–even then, I loved romances & that’s a good one, along with the adventure & all!
    You say that about sci fi–if I’d seen the movie “Damnation Alley” before buying a copy of the book–I never would have bought or read the book, even if it was written by Roger Zelazny. Happily, I had time before the movie started & was cruising the bookstore in that mall. But my main Sci fi authors: Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey & Tolkein. I discovered Norton’s Witch World series in 9th grade & never looked back. I still have that original copy–pd .35 for it way back then…and laugh at the price differences!

    Reply
  112. Janice J, I was amazed to see Mara, Daughter of the Nile in your list. That was one of my favorites as a teenager–even then, I loved romances & that’s a good one, along with the adventure & all!
    You say that about sci fi–if I’d seen the movie “Damnation Alley” before buying a copy of the book–I never would have bought or read the book, even if it was written by Roger Zelazny. Happily, I had time before the movie started & was cruising the bookstore in that mall. But my main Sci fi authors: Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey & Tolkein. I discovered Norton’s Witch World series in 9th grade & never looked back. I still have that original copy–pd .35 for it way back then…and laugh at the price differences!

    Reply
  113. Janice J, I was amazed to see Mara, Daughter of the Nile in your list. That was one of my favorites as a teenager–even then, I loved romances & that’s a good one, along with the adventure & all!
    You say that about sci fi–if I’d seen the movie “Damnation Alley” before buying a copy of the book–I never would have bought or read the book, even if it was written by Roger Zelazny. Happily, I had time before the movie started & was cruising the bookstore in that mall. But my main Sci fi authors: Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey & Tolkein. I discovered Norton’s Witch World series in 9th grade & never looked back. I still have that original copy–pd .35 for it way back then…and laugh at the price differences!

    Reply
  114. Janice J, I was amazed to see Mara, Daughter of the Nile in your list. That was one of my favorites as a teenager–even then, I loved romances & that’s a good one, along with the adventure & all!
    You say that about sci fi–if I’d seen the movie “Damnation Alley” before buying a copy of the book–I never would have bought or read the book, even if it was written by Roger Zelazny. Happily, I had time before the movie started & was cruising the bookstore in that mall. But my main Sci fi authors: Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey & Tolkein. I discovered Norton’s Witch World series in 9th grade & never looked back. I still have that original copy–pd .35 for it way back then…and laugh at the price differences!

    Reply
  115. Janice J, I was amazed to see Mara, Daughter of the Nile in your list. That was one of my favorites as a teenager–even then, I loved romances & that’s a good one, along with the adventure & all!
    You say that about sci fi–if I’d seen the movie “Damnation Alley” before buying a copy of the book–I never would have bought or read the book, even if it was written by Roger Zelazny. Happily, I had time before the movie started & was cruising the bookstore in that mall. But my main Sci fi authors: Andre Norton, Anne McCaffrey & Tolkein. I discovered Norton’s Witch World series in 9th grade & never looked back. I still have that original copy–pd .35 for it way back then…and laugh at the price differences!

    Reply
  116. Yep, my first discovery of “bodice rippers” was Kathryn’s The Wolf & The Dove. I have a little trouble dealing with the writing style now but still love certain parts of that book, Flame & Flower, & Shanna.

    Reply
  117. Yep, my first discovery of “bodice rippers” was Kathryn’s The Wolf & The Dove. I have a little trouble dealing with the writing style now but still love certain parts of that book, Flame & Flower, & Shanna.

    Reply
  118. Yep, my first discovery of “bodice rippers” was Kathryn’s The Wolf & The Dove. I have a little trouble dealing with the writing style now but still love certain parts of that book, Flame & Flower, & Shanna.

    Reply
  119. Yep, my first discovery of “bodice rippers” was Kathryn’s The Wolf & The Dove. I have a little trouble dealing with the writing style now but still love certain parts of that book, Flame & Flower, & Shanna.

    Reply
  120. Yep, my first discovery of “bodice rippers” was Kathryn’s The Wolf & The Dove. I have a little trouble dealing with the writing style now but still love certain parts of that book, Flame & Flower, & Shanna.

    Reply
  121. I’ve done a great deal of rereading my old favs over the last couple years; in fact, many of us on the Romance Book Lovers website were commenting that we kept going back to the comfort reads instead of reading new titles. I had to force myself to read new titles, even with authors that I love. Then we found an article that said this is a normal reaction to stress & heaven knows, we’ve seen a lot of stress recently, both in public & personal lives.
    Many of my rereads come from Heyer, Elizabeth Lowell, Jayne Ann Krentz in all her manifestations, Nora Roberts/JD Robb and quite a few others. But one book in particular I should be able to quote: Red Adam’s Lady by Doris Sutcliffe Adams writing as Grace Ingram (1973) My hardback copy was disintegrating, long out of print so replacement was way too expensive & hallelujah, it came out in ebk! I do love that story and oh, wanted a Red Adam of my own!

    Reply
  122. I’ve done a great deal of rereading my old favs over the last couple years; in fact, many of us on the Romance Book Lovers website were commenting that we kept going back to the comfort reads instead of reading new titles. I had to force myself to read new titles, even with authors that I love. Then we found an article that said this is a normal reaction to stress & heaven knows, we’ve seen a lot of stress recently, both in public & personal lives.
    Many of my rereads come from Heyer, Elizabeth Lowell, Jayne Ann Krentz in all her manifestations, Nora Roberts/JD Robb and quite a few others. But one book in particular I should be able to quote: Red Adam’s Lady by Doris Sutcliffe Adams writing as Grace Ingram (1973) My hardback copy was disintegrating, long out of print so replacement was way too expensive & hallelujah, it came out in ebk! I do love that story and oh, wanted a Red Adam of my own!

    Reply
  123. I’ve done a great deal of rereading my old favs over the last couple years; in fact, many of us on the Romance Book Lovers website were commenting that we kept going back to the comfort reads instead of reading new titles. I had to force myself to read new titles, even with authors that I love. Then we found an article that said this is a normal reaction to stress & heaven knows, we’ve seen a lot of stress recently, both in public & personal lives.
    Many of my rereads come from Heyer, Elizabeth Lowell, Jayne Ann Krentz in all her manifestations, Nora Roberts/JD Robb and quite a few others. But one book in particular I should be able to quote: Red Adam’s Lady by Doris Sutcliffe Adams writing as Grace Ingram (1973) My hardback copy was disintegrating, long out of print so replacement was way too expensive & hallelujah, it came out in ebk! I do love that story and oh, wanted a Red Adam of my own!

    Reply
  124. I’ve done a great deal of rereading my old favs over the last couple years; in fact, many of us on the Romance Book Lovers website were commenting that we kept going back to the comfort reads instead of reading new titles. I had to force myself to read new titles, even with authors that I love. Then we found an article that said this is a normal reaction to stress & heaven knows, we’ve seen a lot of stress recently, both in public & personal lives.
    Many of my rereads come from Heyer, Elizabeth Lowell, Jayne Ann Krentz in all her manifestations, Nora Roberts/JD Robb and quite a few others. But one book in particular I should be able to quote: Red Adam’s Lady by Doris Sutcliffe Adams writing as Grace Ingram (1973) My hardback copy was disintegrating, long out of print so replacement was way too expensive & hallelujah, it came out in ebk! I do love that story and oh, wanted a Red Adam of my own!

    Reply
  125. I’ve done a great deal of rereading my old favs over the last couple years; in fact, many of us on the Romance Book Lovers website were commenting that we kept going back to the comfort reads instead of reading new titles. I had to force myself to read new titles, even with authors that I love. Then we found an article that said this is a normal reaction to stress & heaven knows, we’ve seen a lot of stress recently, both in public & personal lives.
    Many of my rereads come from Heyer, Elizabeth Lowell, Jayne Ann Krentz in all her manifestations, Nora Roberts/JD Robb and quite a few others. But one book in particular I should be able to quote: Red Adam’s Lady by Doris Sutcliffe Adams writing as Grace Ingram (1973) My hardback copy was disintegrating, long out of print so replacement was way too expensive & hallelujah, it came out in ebk! I do love that story and oh, wanted a Red Adam of my own!

    Reply
  126. I use my old favorites for the times I am in a less than happy place. Or when I simply feel blah with reading. I go to Susan Elizabeth Phillips and early Julie Garwood. They make me laugh and their characters always draw me into the story.
    Until You by Judith McNaught was my first romance. I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back. I read mostly romance, mysteries and some history.
    I have never regretted the fact I have become a fan of romance, and I feel so sorry for those people who have not jumped into the books with both feet. There is nothing like a satisfying Happily Ever After to make a day sunny.
    Thanks so much for this post. Everyone has reminded me of so many wonderful books. And I have also been introduced to books I never knew existed. Thank you everyone.

    Reply
  127. I use my old favorites for the times I am in a less than happy place. Or when I simply feel blah with reading. I go to Susan Elizabeth Phillips and early Julie Garwood. They make me laugh and their characters always draw me into the story.
    Until You by Judith McNaught was my first romance. I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back. I read mostly romance, mysteries and some history.
    I have never regretted the fact I have become a fan of romance, and I feel so sorry for those people who have not jumped into the books with both feet. There is nothing like a satisfying Happily Ever After to make a day sunny.
    Thanks so much for this post. Everyone has reminded me of so many wonderful books. And I have also been introduced to books I never knew existed. Thank you everyone.

    Reply
  128. I use my old favorites for the times I am in a less than happy place. Or when I simply feel blah with reading. I go to Susan Elizabeth Phillips and early Julie Garwood. They make me laugh and their characters always draw me into the story.
    Until You by Judith McNaught was my first romance. I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back. I read mostly romance, mysteries and some history.
    I have never regretted the fact I have become a fan of romance, and I feel so sorry for those people who have not jumped into the books with both feet. There is nothing like a satisfying Happily Ever After to make a day sunny.
    Thanks so much for this post. Everyone has reminded me of so many wonderful books. And I have also been introduced to books I never knew existed. Thank you everyone.

    Reply
  129. I use my old favorites for the times I am in a less than happy place. Or when I simply feel blah with reading. I go to Susan Elizabeth Phillips and early Julie Garwood. They make me laugh and their characters always draw me into the story.
    Until You by Judith McNaught was my first romance. I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back. I read mostly romance, mysteries and some history.
    I have never regretted the fact I have become a fan of romance, and I feel so sorry for those people who have not jumped into the books with both feet. There is nothing like a satisfying Happily Ever After to make a day sunny.
    Thanks so much for this post. Everyone has reminded me of so many wonderful books. And I have also been introduced to books I never knew existed. Thank you everyone.

    Reply
  130. I use my old favorites for the times I am in a less than happy place. Or when I simply feel blah with reading. I go to Susan Elizabeth Phillips and early Julie Garwood. They make me laugh and their characters always draw me into the story.
    Until You by Judith McNaught was my first romance. I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back. I read mostly romance, mysteries and some history.
    I have never regretted the fact I have become a fan of romance, and I feel so sorry for those people who have not jumped into the books with both feet. There is nothing like a satisfying Happily Ever After to make a day sunny.
    Thanks so much for this post. Everyone has reminded me of so many wonderful books. And I have also been introduced to books I never knew existed. Thank you everyone.

    Reply
  131. I have bookshelves with all my keepers – the usual suspects everyone has mentioned- but I haven’t opened them in years. Just looking at them makes me happy & brings back the good memory of reading them the first time. The one exception seems to be Mary Stewart. I have reread hers & love them still.

    Reply
  132. I have bookshelves with all my keepers – the usual suspects everyone has mentioned- but I haven’t opened them in years. Just looking at them makes me happy & brings back the good memory of reading them the first time. The one exception seems to be Mary Stewart. I have reread hers & love them still.

    Reply
  133. I have bookshelves with all my keepers – the usual suspects everyone has mentioned- but I haven’t opened them in years. Just looking at them makes me happy & brings back the good memory of reading them the first time. The one exception seems to be Mary Stewart. I have reread hers & love them still.

    Reply
  134. I have bookshelves with all my keepers – the usual suspects everyone has mentioned- but I haven’t opened them in years. Just looking at them makes me happy & brings back the good memory of reading them the first time. The one exception seems to be Mary Stewart. I have reread hers & love them still.

    Reply
  135. I have bookshelves with all my keepers – the usual suspects everyone has mentioned- but I haven’t opened them in years. Just looking at them makes me happy & brings back the good memory of reading them the first time. The one exception seems to be Mary Stewart. I have reread hers & love them still.

    Reply
  136. I didn’t discover Georgette Heyer until I was in my late 30’s but I will happily re-read them any time. I read a lot of Mills and Boon in my teens and beyond. Mary Nichols was one of my favourites. I read most of what she wrote and they’re great for re-reads. Another favourite I re-read often is The Chaperon Bride by Nicola Cornick. A lovely story. I also read a lot of Danielle Steel in the 80’s and 90’s and re-read some of those from that time. Unfortunately I’ve given up on her now. Sometimes her books read like someone else has written them.
    This is a brilliant post. Lots of old books to look up.

    Reply
  137. I didn’t discover Georgette Heyer until I was in my late 30’s but I will happily re-read them any time. I read a lot of Mills and Boon in my teens and beyond. Mary Nichols was one of my favourites. I read most of what she wrote and they’re great for re-reads. Another favourite I re-read often is The Chaperon Bride by Nicola Cornick. A lovely story. I also read a lot of Danielle Steel in the 80’s and 90’s and re-read some of those from that time. Unfortunately I’ve given up on her now. Sometimes her books read like someone else has written them.
    This is a brilliant post. Lots of old books to look up.

    Reply
  138. I didn’t discover Georgette Heyer until I was in my late 30’s but I will happily re-read them any time. I read a lot of Mills and Boon in my teens and beyond. Mary Nichols was one of my favourites. I read most of what she wrote and they’re great for re-reads. Another favourite I re-read often is The Chaperon Bride by Nicola Cornick. A lovely story. I also read a lot of Danielle Steel in the 80’s and 90’s and re-read some of those from that time. Unfortunately I’ve given up on her now. Sometimes her books read like someone else has written them.
    This is a brilliant post. Lots of old books to look up.

    Reply
  139. I didn’t discover Georgette Heyer until I was in my late 30’s but I will happily re-read them any time. I read a lot of Mills and Boon in my teens and beyond. Mary Nichols was one of my favourites. I read most of what she wrote and they’re great for re-reads. Another favourite I re-read often is The Chaperon Bride by Nicola Cornick. A lovely story. I also read a lot of Danielle Steel in the 80’s and 90’s and re-read some of those from that time. Unfortunately I’ve given up on her now. Sometimes her books read like someone else has written them.
    This is a brilliant post. Lots of old books to look up.

    Reply
  140. I didn’t discover Georgette Heyer until I was in my late 30’s but I will happily re-read them any time. I read a lot of Mills and Boon in my teens and beyond. Mary Nichols was one of my favourites. I read most of what she wrote and they’re great for re-reads. Another favourite I re-read often is The Chaperon Bride by Nicola Cornick. A lovely story. I also read a lot of Danielle Steel in the 80’s and 90’s and re-read some of those from that time. Unfortunately I’ve given up on her now. Sometimes her books read like someone else has written them.
    This is a brilliant post. Lots of old books to look up.

    Reply
  141. I have a handful of Nortons on my shelf also. I wish we could post pics as those old Ace paperbacks had some great covers 🙂

    Reply
  142. I have a handful of Nortons on my shelf also. I wish we could post pics as those old Ace paperbacks had some great covers 🙂

    Reply
  143. I have a handful of Nortons on my shelf also. I wish we could post pics as those old Ace paperbacks had some great covers 🙂

    Reply
  144. I have a handful of Nortons on my shelf also. I wish we could post pics as those old Ace paperbacks had some great covers 🙂

    Reply
  145. I have a handful of Nortons on my shelf also. I wish we could post pics as those old Ace paperbacks had some great covers 🙂

    Reply
  146. Exactly so. I read new books and reread old favorites during the late covid craze which forced us all (especially the older people) into isolation. Books have always been my friends but I appreciated them more than ever then.

    Reply
  147. Exactly so. I read new books and reread old favorites during the late covid craze which forced us all (especially the older people) into isolation. Books have always been my friends but I appreciated them more than ever then.

    Reply
  148. Exactly so. I read new books and reread old favorites during the late covid craze which forced us all (especially the older people) into isolation. Books have always been my friends but I appreciated them more than ever then.

    Reply
  149. Exactly so. I read new books and reread old favorites during the late covid craze which forced us all (especially the older people) into isolation. Books have always been my friends but I appreciated them more than ever then.

    Reply
  150. Exactly so. I read new books and reread old favorites during the late covid craze which forced us all (especially the older people) into isolation. Books have always been my friends but I appreciated them more than ever then.

    Reply
  151. Add me to the list of Norton and McCafrey fans, in fact I did a big reread of the various McCaffrey series a year or two ago and they did not disappoint at all. I also loved the Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Might read some of them again.

    Reply
  152. Add me to the list of Norton and McCafrey fans, in fact I did a big reread of the various McCaffrey series a year or two ago and they did not disappoint at all. I also loved the Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Might read some of them again.

    Reply
  153. Add me to the list of Norton and McCafrey fans, in fact I did a big reread of the various McCaffrey series a year or two ago and they did not disappoint at all. I also loved the Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Might read some of them again.

    Reply
  154. Add me to the list of Norton and McCafrey fans, in fact I did a big reread of the various McCaffrey series a year or two ago and they did not disappoint at all. I also loved the Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Might read some of them again.

    Reply
  155. Add me to the list of Norton and McCafrey fans, in fact I did a big reread of the various McCaffrey series a year or two ago and they did not disappoint at all. I also loved the Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Might read some of them again.

    Reply
  156. Janice, I think a lot of people rediscovered — or maybe even discovered— the joy of reading during the CoVid lockdown. I think for me, it also prompted me to reread a lot as well.

    Reply
  157. Janice, I think a lot of people rediscovered — or maybe even discovered— the joy of reading during the CoVid lockdown. I think for me, it also prompted me to reread a lot as well.

    Reply
  158. Janice, I think a lot of people rediscovered — or maybe even discovered— the joy of reading during the CoVid lockdown. I think for me, it also prompted me to reread a lot as well.

    Reply
  159. Janice, I think a lot of people rediscovered — or maybe even discovered— the joy of reading during the CoVid lockdown. I think for me, it also prompted me to reread a lot as well.

    Reply
  160. Janice, I think a lot of people rediscovered — or maybe even discovered— the joy of reading during the CoVid lockdown. I think for me, it also prompted me to reread a lot as well.

    Reply
  161. Great selection, Mary. I have also enjoyed finding early Baloghs that are now available as e-books. When they were first out, they mostly weren’t available in Australia. And yes to having a good laugh. I recently reread Heyer’s The Talisman Ring, which wasn’t initially a fave of mine, but when I read it again, I was laughing out loud and grinning quite a bit at its subtle ironic humor.

    Reply
  162. Great selection, Mary. I have also enjoyed finding early Baloghs that are now available as e-books. When they were first out, they mostly weren’t available in Australia. And yes to having a good laugh. I recently reread Heyer’s The Talisman Ring, which wasn’t initially a fave of mine, but when I read it again, I was laughing out loud and grinning quite a bit at its subtle ironic humor.

    Reply
  163. Great selection, Mary. I have also enjoyed finding early Baloghs that are now available as e-books. When they were first out, they mostly weren’t available in Australia. And yes to having a good laugh. I recently reread Heyer’s The Talisman Ring, which wasn’t initially a fave of mine, but when I read it again, I was laughing out loud and grinning quite a bit at its subtle ironic humor.

    Reply
  164. Great selection, Mary. I have also enjoyed finding early Baloghs that are now available as e-books. When they were first out, they mostly weren’t available in Australia. And yes to having a good laugh. I recently reread Heyer’s The Talisman Ring, which wasn’t initially a fave of mine, but when I read it again, I was laughing out loud and grinning quite a bit at its subtle ironic humor.

    Reply
  165. Great selection, Mary. I have also enjoyed finding early Baloghs that are now available as e-books. When they were first out, they mostly weren’t available in Australia. And yes to having a good laugh. I recently reread Heyer’s The Talisman Ring, which wasn’t initially a fave of mine, but when I read it again, I was laughing out loud and grinning quite a bit at its subtle ironic humor.

    Reply
  166. Thanks, Karen, Heyer, Lowell and JAK/Amanda Quick are all staying on my bookshelves, resisting the Great Cull of 2023, even though I have my faves of them in e-book form. I’m about to reread Elizabeth Lowell’s medieval Scottish border series, Forbidden, Untamed and Enchanted.
    I also have Red Adam’s Lady, which my kindle tells me I’ve read, but I have no memory of it, so perhaps I need to read it again.

    Reply
  167. Thanks, Karen, Heyer, Lowell and JAK/Amanda Quick are all staying on my bookshelves, resisting the Great Cull of 2023, even though I have my faves of them in e-book form. I’m about to reread Elizabeth Lowell’s medieval Scottish border series, Forbidden, Untamed and Enchanted.
    I also have Red Adam’s Lady, which my kindle tells me I’ve read, but I have no memory of it, so perhaps I need to read it again.

    Reply
  168. Thanks, Karen, Heyer, Lowell and JAK/Amanda Quick are all staying on my bookshelves, resisting the Great Cull of 2023, even though I have my faves of them in e-book form. I’m about to reread Elizabeth Lowell’s medieval Scottish border series, Forbidden, Untamed and Enchanted.
    I also have Red Adam’s Lady, which my kindle tells me I’ve read, but I have no memory of it, so perhaps I need to read it again.

    Reply
  169. Thanks, Karen, Heyer, Lowell and JAK/Amanda Quick are all staying on my bookshelves, resisting the Great Cull of 2023, even though I have my faves of them in e-book form. I’m about to reread Elizabeth Lowell’s medieval Scottish border series, Forbidden, Untamed and Enchanted.
    I also have Red Adam’s Lady, which my kindle tells me I’ve read, but I have no memory of it, so perhaps I need to read it again.

    Reply
  170. Thanks, Karen, Heyer, Lowell and JAK/Amanda Quick are all staying on my bookshelves, resisting the Great Cull of 2023, even though I have my faves of them in e-book form. I’m about to reread Elizabeth Lowell’s medieval Scottish border series, Forbidden, Untamed and Enchanted.
    I also have Red Adam’s Lady, which my kindle tells me I’ve read, but I have no memory of it, so perhaps I need to read it again.

    Reply
  171. Annette, this is so true of so many people, including myself. “I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back.”
    It frustrates me so much that the loudest, most dismissive critics of romance are those who haven’t read many — or even any. But they’re the ones missing out, aren’t they?

    Reply
  172. Annette, this is so true of so many people, including myself. “I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back.”
    It frustrates me so much that the loudest, most dismissive critics of romance are those who haven’t read many — or even any. But they’re the ones missing out, aren’t they?

    Reply
  173. Annette, this is so true of so many people, including myself. “I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back.”
    It frustrates me so much that the loudest, most dismissive critics of romance are those who haven’t read many — or even any. But they’re the ones missing out, aren’t they?

    Reply
  174. Annette, this is so true of so many people, including myself. “I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back.”
    It frustrates me so much that the loudest, most dismissive critics of romance are those who haven’t read many — or even any. But they’re the ones missing out, aren’t they?

    Reply
  175. Annette, this is so true of so many people, including myself. “I had been a critic of romances and their readers. Of course I had never read one. Then I fell in love with the entire premise and have not looked back.”
    It frustrates me so much that the loudest, most dismissive critics of romance are those who haven’t read many — or even any. But they’re the ones missing out, aren’t they?

    Reply
  176. Jeanne, my need to cull my books to fit in my new bookshelves has fuelled my rereading of old favorites, and I’ve recently reread a number of Mary Stewarts — Madam Will You Talk, Nine Coaches Waiting, This Rough Magic, The Moonspinners, and more. They are definitely staying.

    Reply
  177. Jeanne, my need to cull my books to fit in my new bookshelves has fuelled my rereading of old favorites, and I’ve recently reread a number of Mary Stewarts — Madam Will You Talk, Nine Coaches Waiting, This Rough Magic, The Moonspinners, and more. They are definitely staying.

    Reply
  178. Jeanne, my need to cull my books to fit in my new bookshelves has fuelled my rereading of old favorites, and I’ve recently reread a number of Mary Stewarts — Madam Will You Talk, Nine Coaches Waiting, This Rough Magic, The Moonspinners, and more. They are definitely staying.

    Reply
  179. Jeanne, my need to cull my books to fit in my new bookshelves has fuelled my rereading of old favorites, and I’ve recently reread a number of Mary Stewarts — Madam Will You Talk, Nine Coaches Waiting, This Rough Magic, The Moonspinners, and more. They are definitely staying.

    Reply
  180. Jeanne, my need to cull my books to fit in my new bookshelves has fuelled my rereading of old favorites, and I’ve recently reread a number of Mary Stewarts — Madam Will You Talk, Nine Coaches Waiting, This Rough Magic, The Moonspinners, and more. They are definitely staying.

    Reply
  181. Thanks, Teresa. Yes Nicola’s earlier romances stand up very well, don’t they? Glad you’re enjoying the post with all the wonderful recommendations in the comments.

    Reply
  182. Thanks, Teresa. Yes Nicola’s earlier romances stand up very well, don’t they? Glad you’re enjoying the post with all the wonderful recommendations in the comments.

    Reply
  183. Thanks, Teresa. Yes Nicola’s earlier romances stand up very well, don’t they? Glad you’re enjoying the post with all the wonderful recommendations in the comments.

    Reply
  184. Thanks, Teresa. Yes Nicola’s earlier romances stand up very well, don’t they? Glad you’re enjoying the post with all the wonderful recommendations in the comments.

    Reply
  185. Thanks, Teresa. Yes Nicola’s earlier romances stand up very well, don’t they? Glad you’re enjoying the post with all the wonderful recommendations in the comments.

    Reply
  186. My favorite Anne McCaffrey book is actually Cooking Out of This World. She asked her science fiction friends to contribute their favorite recipes. Some were straightforward good cooking, others were more adventurous, like Avram Davidson’s recipe for stewed fountain pens. There was a follow up book called Serve It Forth.

    Reply
  187. My favorite Anne McCaffrey book is actually Cooking Out of This World. She asked her science fiction friends to contribute their favorite recipes. Some were straightforward good cooking, others were more adventurous, like Avram Davidson’s recipe for stewed fountain pens. There was a follow up book called Serve It Forth.

    Reply
  188. My favorite Anne McCaffrey book is actually Cooking Out of This World. She asked her science fiction friends to contribute their favorite recipes. Some were straightforward good cooking, others were more adventurous, like Avram Davidson’s recipe for stewed fountain pens. There was a follow up book called Serve It Forth.

    Reply
  189. My favorite Anne McCaffrey book is actually Cooking Out of This World. She asked her science fiction friends to contribute their favorite recipes. Some were straightforward good cooking, others were more adventurous, like Avram Davidson’s recipe for stewed fountain pens. There was a follow up book called Serve It Forth.

    Reply
  190. My favorite Anne McCaffrey book is actually Cooking Out of This World. She asked her science fiction friends to contribute their favorite recipes. Some were straightforward good cooking, others were more adventurous, like Avram Davidson’s recipe for stewed fountain pens. There was a follow up book called Serve It Forth.

    Reply
  191. How interesting, Janice. Ive participated in a couple of author group recipe anthologies before.
    One was called Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer, and was an all-Australian romance collection with a short story and a recipe from each author.
    It was only sold in Australia, but we had a lot of fun doing it, and our group launch was spectacular with authors from all over the country and lots of delicious food.

    Reply
  192. How interesting, Janice. Ive participated in a couple of author group recipe anthologies before.
    One was called Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer, and was an all-Australian romance collection with a short story and a recipe from each author.
    It was only sold in Australia, but we had a lot of fun doing it, and our group launch was spectacular with authors from all over the country and lots of delicious food.

    Reply
  193. How interesting, Janice. Ive participated in a couple of author group recipe anthologies before.
    One was called Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer, and was an all-Australian romance collection with a short story and a recipe from each author.
    It was only sold in Australia, but we had a lot of fun doing it, and our group launch was spectacular with authors from all over the country and lots of delicious food.

    Reply
  194. How interesting, Janice. Ive participated in a couple of author group recipe anthologies before.
    One was called Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer, and was an all-Australian romance collection with a short story and a recipe from each author.
    It was only sold in Australia, but we had a lot of fun doing it, and our group launch was spectacular with authors from all over the country and lots of delicious food.

    Reply
  195. How interesting, Janice. Ive participated in a couple of author group recipe anthologies before.
    One was called Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer, and was an all-Australian romance collection with a short story and a recipe from each author.
    It was only sold in Australia, but we had a lot of fun doing it, and our group launch was spectacular with authors from all over the country and lots of delicious food.

    Reply
  196. Anne, that’s one of my favorite Heyers just because I laugh every time I read it! I’m smiling now just thinking of it! That, Black Sheep, Bath Tangle, and Devil’s Cub are the ones I reach for first when I need a Heyer dose!

    Reply
  197. Anne, that’s one of my favorite Heyers just because I laugh every time I read it! I’m smiling now just thinking of it! That, Black Sheep, Bath Tangle, and Devil’s Cub are the ones I reach for first when I need a Heyer dose!

    Reply
  198. Anne, that’s one of my favorite Heyers just because I laugh every time I read it! I’m smiling now just thinking of it! That, Black Sheep, Bath Tangle, and Devil’s Cub are the ones I reach for first when I need a Heyer dose!

    Reply
  199. Anne, that’s one of my favorite Heyers just because I laugh every time I read it! I’m smiling now just thinking of it! That, Black Sheep, Bath Tangle, and Devil’s Cub are the ones I reach for first when I need a Heyer dose!

    Reply
  200. Anne, that’s one of my favorite Heyers just because I laugh every time I read it! I’m smiling now just thinking of it! That, Black Sheep, Bath Tangle, and Devil’s Cub are the ones I reach for first when I need a Heyer dose!

    Reply
  201. Yeah, I had a Great Cull last year. I had to empty a room for repainting & had 40+ bags stashed under & around the dining room table–seemed like the time to review as they went back–and I did. I donated huge amounts of pbks but certain authors–no way! Those pbks went right back on the shelves and I have most of their bks in ebk format as well!
    Enjoy those rereads! Oh, so good!

    Reply
  202. Yeah, I had a Great Cull last year. I had to empty a room for repainting & had 40+ bags stashed under & around the dining room table–seemed like the time to review as they went back–and I did. I donated huge amounts of pbks but certain authors–no way! Those pbks went right back on the shelves and I have most of their bks in ebk format as well!
    Enjoy those rereads! Oh, so good!

    Reply
  203. Yeah, I had a Great Cull last year. I had to empty a room for repainting & had 40+ bags stashed under & around the dining room table–seemed like the time to review as they went back–and I did. I donated huge amounts of pbks but certain authors–no way! Those pbks went right back on the shelves and I have most of their bks in ebk format as well!
    Enjoy those rereads! Oh, so good!

    Reply
  204. Yeah, I had a Great Cull last year. I had to empty a room for repainting & had 40+ bags stashed under & around the dining room table–seemed like the time to review as they went back–and I did. I donated huge amounts of pbks but certain authors–no way! Those pbks went right back on the shelves and I have most of their bks in ebk format as well!
    Enjoy those rereads! Oh, so good!

    Reply
  205. Yeah, I had a Great Cull last year. I had to empty a room for repainting & had 40+ bags stashed under & around the dining room table–seemed like the time to review as they went back–and I did. I donated huge amounts of pbks but certain authors–no way! Those pbks went right back on the shelves and I have most of their bks in ebk format as well!
    Enjoy those rereads! Oh, so good!

    Reply

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