Englishmen Mad About Dogs

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

The English are famously fond of their pooches, and so it's both legitimate and fun to add dogs to our stories.  While I mostly add cat characters, I've also written dogs when they seemed to be the best choice.  

Today's post was inspired by a chat with my friend Sally MacKenzie, who writes light-hearted Regencies for Kensington.  Her current Duchess of Love series has significant animal characters, with three books featuring dogs, and one with a mischievous cat named Reggie.  (No, he was not named after my mischievous cat named Reggie.  I think Reggie is just a mischievous name. <G>)



A black NewfoundlandSally's March 2014 book, Loving Lord Ash, has a VERY LARGE BLACK DOG who looks and acts much like a Newfoundland, though she says that her fictional dog Fluff (yes, really <G>) is probably a mutt.  But, she told me, Newfoundlands, a Canadian breed as the name suggests, were in England in Regency times, and Lord Byron loved them.

Yes!  The fashionable aristocratic poet with the devilishly attractive sneer was an animal lover!  Sally pointed me to the Byron page in the London Dog Forum's Famous Dogs section.  It is filled with delicious tidbits about Byron and his dogs, such as this one:

In Lord Byron’s time it was the custom to give one’s lover a lock of hair, recent DNA analysis has revealed that the locks of hair that Byron handed out to his mistresses were that of a dog, possibly Boatswain.

An Ode to Boatswain

Boatswain was the most beloved of Byron's many pets, and is commemorated at Newstead Abbey with a vast marble monument and a poem.  Here is part of it:

Byrons dog typeEpitaph to A Dog
 
Near this Spot
are deposited the Remains of one
who possessed Beauty without Vanity,
Strength without Insolence,
Courage without Ferosity,
and all the virtues of Man without his Vices.

Though Byron wanted to be buried with Boatswain, that wasn't allowed and he ended up in his family tomb.  But when his body was returned from Greece, where he died, it was accompanied by his Newfie of the time, Lyon.  The Dogs of London site has a picture of a Newfoundland like Boatswain, though the color patches suggest some collie influence.  

Margaret-Thatcher walking her dogThe Prime Minister's Pooch

Dogs of London has other famous dogs and dog lovers listed as well.  Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the infamous Iron Lady, was a dog lover, with a particular fondness for the Cavalier King Charles spaniel.  (If the breed was good enough for King Charles, it's good enough for  a prime minister!)  In her later years, she enjoyed sitting in a park and chatting up any dogs that went by.  

A pugThe Empress's Pug

It's not just the English who love dogs, of course.  The Dogs of London site includes a bit on the Empress Josephine's pug, FortunΓ©.  The pug slept on her bed, and when she married Napoleon Bonaparte, the great man had to share the marital mattress with his lady's pooch. 

 

Writing fictional felines

Lots of romance writers and readers are animal lovers, so it's not surprising that companion animals IMG_0041show up regularly in the books.  The heroine of my 2014 book, Not Quite a Wife, has not one but two cats–her mellow old gray cat, Shadow, in Bristol, who is really my sweet Grady the Gray.  And in London, Laurel makes friends with a large, shy black and white tomcat who came in from the cold to a nice warm kitchen.  He's really my PandaMax (who is a very maximum panda puss <G>) but the name Panda wouldn't make sense in 1813, so he's called Badger in the book.  (Here are Panda and Grady together.)

Dogs on book covers

Here's the cover of Sally's Loving Lord Ash.  Clearly that little terrierish fellow is no Newfoundland!  He's actually Shakespeare, the dog from her previous book, Surprising Lord Jack. LovinglordashShakespeare is the sort of dog who gets into everything.  <G> (And, to be fair, art departments are justly concerned that Very Large Dogs will take over the cover if left unchecked.)

Do you have favorite fictional pest? 

Fictional pets who remind you of your own fur friends? 

And have you ever given a lock of your pet's fur to a sweetheart? <G>

Do share!

Mary Jo

 

100 thoughts on “Englishmen Mad About Dogs”

  1. Fun post! I resisted owning a pet after the kids grew up and left, and was footloose and fancy-free. Now we have a rescue border collie mix named Fitz (for Fitzwilliam Darcy, of course) who has us wrapped around his paws. I don’t have to give a lock of his hair away–it’s everywhere. I stuck him into my new Christmas novella, because why not? Fortunately my oldest daughter petsits when we travel.
    Georgette Heyer was always using dogs and climbing boys to show the humanity of her characters. And I love the Spencer Quinn Chet and Bernie books which are narrated entirely by a dog! They’re hilarious.

    Reply
  2. Fun post! I resisted owning a pet after the kids grew up and left, and was footloose and fancy-free. Now we have a rescue border collie mix named Fitz (for Fitzwilliam Darcy, of course) who has us wrapped around his paws. I don’t have to give a lock of his hair away–it’s everywhere. I stuck him into my new Christmas novella, because why not? Fortunately my oldest daughter petsits when we travel.
    Georgette Heyer was always using dogs and climbing boys to show the humanity of her characters. And I love the Spencer Quinn Chet and Bernie books which are narrated entirely by a dog! They’re hilarious.

    Reply
  3. Fun post! I resisted owning a pet after the kids grew up and left, and was footloose and fancy-free. Now we have a rescue border collie mix named Fitz (for Fitzwilliam Darcy, of course) who has us wrapped around his paws. I don’t have to give a lock of his hair away–it’s everywhere. I stuck him into my new Christmas novella, because why not? Fortunately my oldest daughter petsits when we travel.
    Georgette Heyer was always using dogs and climbing boys to show the humanity of her characters. And I love the Spencer Quinn Chet and Bernie books which are narrated entirely by a dog! They’re hilarious.

    Reply
  4. Fun post! I resisted owning a pet after the kids grew up and left, and was footloose and fancy-free. Now we have a rescue border collie mix named Fitz (for Fitzwilliam Darcy, of course) who has us wrapped around his paws. I don’t have to give a lock of his hair away–it’s everywhere. I stuck him into my new Christmas novella, because why not? Fortunately my oldest daughter petsits when we travel.
    Georgette Heyer was always using dogs and climbing boys to show the humanity of her characters. And I love the Spencer Quinn Chet and Bernie books which are narrated entirely by a dog! They’re hilarious.

    Reply
  5. Fun post! I resisted owning a pet after the kids grew up and left, and was footloose and fancy-free. Now we have a rescue border collie mix named Fitz (for Fitzwilliam Darcy, of course) who has us wrapped around his paws. I don’t have to give a lock of his hair away–it’s everywhere. I stuck him into my new Christmas novella, because why not? Fortunately my oldest daughter petsits when we travel.
    Georgette Heyer was always using dogs and climbing boys to show the humanity of her characters. And I love the Spencer Quinn Chet and Bernie books which are narrated entirely by a dog! They’re hilarious.

    Reply
  6. I love pets in fiction. I loved how Coquette was a major character in one of the wenches novels, especially the line about him being a snack for the characters big dogs.
    I’m a cat person, and I love Mary Jo’s kitties as well as Sparky. I drink in cat pictures right now because I am catless. This is a blessing in disguise since I am away from home for an extended period of time, and I don’t have to worry about my kitties and a pet sitter.

    Reply
  7. I love pets in fiction. I loved how Coquette was a major character in one of the wenches novels, especially the line about him being a snack for the characters big dogs.
    I’m a cat person, and I love Mary Jo’s kitties as well as Sparky. I drink in cat pictures right now because I am catless. This is a blessing in disguise since I am away from home for an extended period of time, and I don’t have to worry about my kitties and a pet sitter.

    Reply
  8. I love pets in fiction. I loved how Coquette was a major character in one of the wenches novels, especially the line about him being a snack for the characters big dogs.
    I’m a cat person, and I love Mary Jo’s kitties as well as Sparky. I drink in cat pictures right now because I am catless. This is a blessing in disguise since I am away from home for an extended period of time, and I don’t have to worry about my kitties and a pet sitter.

    Reply
  9. I love pets in fiction. I loved how Coquette was a major character in one of the wenches novels, especially the line about him being a snack for the characters big dogs.
    I’m a cat person, and I love Mary Jo’s kitties as well as Sparky. I drink in cat pictures right now because I am catless. This is a blessing in disguise since I am away from home for an extended period of time, and I don’t have to worry about my kitties and a pet sitter.

    Reply
  10. I love pets in fiction. I loved how Coquette was a major character in one of the wenches novels, especially the line about him being a snack for the characters big dogs.
    I’m a cat person, and I love Mary Jo’s kitties as well as Sparky. I drink in cat pictures right now because I am catless. This is a blessing in disguise since I am away from home for an extended period of time, and I don’t have to worry about my kitties and a pet sitter.

    Reply
  11. Maggie–
    Isn’t it amazing how are companion animals become dictator animals? *G* As for Heyer–who could forget the Baluchistan Hound?!!! I didn’t even realize there was a Baluchistan until years later. *g*

    Reply
  12. Maggie–
    Isn’t it amazing how are companion animals become dictator animals? *G* As for Heyer–who could forget the Baluchistan Hound?!!! I didn’t even realize there was a Baluchistan until years later. *g*

    Reply
  13. Maggie–
    Isn’t it amazing how are companion animals become dictator animals? *G* As for Heyer–who could forget the Baluchistan Hound?!!! I didn’t even realize there was a Baluchistan until years later. *g*

    Reply
  14. Maggie–
    Isn’t it amazing how are companion animals become dictator animals? *G* As for Heyer–who could forget the Baluchistan Hound?!!! I didn’t even realize there was a Baluchistan until years later. *g*

    Reply
  15. Maggie–
    Isn’t it amazing how are companion animals become dictator animals? *G* As for Heyer–who could forget the Baluchistan Hound?!!! I didn’t even realize there was a Baluchistan until years later. *g*

    Reply
  16. Shannon–
    I’m sorry you’re catless, but it definitely makes travel easier when one is without a pet. And as long as there is an internet, there will be no shortage of Cute Cat Pictures. *G*

    Reply
  17. Shannon–
    I’m sorry you’re catless, but it definitely makes travel easier when one is without a pet. And as long as there is an internet, there will be no shortage of Cute Cat Pictures. *G*

    Reply
  18. Shannon–
    I’m sorry you’re catless, but it definitely makes travel easier when one is without a pet. And as long as there is an internet, there will be no shortage of Cute Cat Pictures. *G*

    Reply
  19. Shannon–
    I’m sorry you’re catless, but it definitely makes travel easier when one is without a pet. And as long as there is an internet, there will be no shortage of Cute Cat Pictures. *G*

    Reply
  20. Shannon–
    I’m sorry you’re catless, but it definitely makes travel easier when one is without a pet. And as long as there is an internet, there will be no shortage of Cute Cat Pictures. *G*

    Reply
  21. Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, in Frederica, my favorite Georgette Heyer novel, is the first one I think of when the subject of dogs in romance novels comes up. Ulysses in Arabella is almost as memorable. Barbara Metzger has great dogs in many of her books. Fitz, the matchmaker with his own POV in The Loyal Companion is particularly adorable. Jennifer Crusie also has some unforgettable dog characters. I’m particularly fond of Fred in Anyone But You. And one of the reasons I always look forward to the next Kristan Higgins book is to see what dog character she’s adding to her long list of dogs with definite personalities.

    Reply
  22. Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, in Frederica, my favorite Georgette Heyer novel, is the first one I think of when the subject of dogs in romance novels comes up. Ulysses in Arabella is almost as memorable. Barbara Metzger has great dogs in many of her books. Fitz, the matchmaker with his own POV in The Loyal Companion is particularly adorable. Jennifer Crusie also has some unforgettable dog characters. I’m particularly fond of Fred in Anyone But You. And one of the reasons I always look forward to the next Kristan Higgins book is to see what dog character she’s adding to her long list of dogs with definite personalities.

    Reply
  23. Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, in Frederica, my favorite Georgette Heyer novel, is the first one I think of when the subject of dogs in romance novels comes up. Ulysses in Arabella is almost as memorable. Barbara Metzger has great dogs in many of her books. Fitz, the matchmaker with his own POV in The Loyal Companion is particularly adorable. Jennifer Crusie also has some unforgettable dog characters. I’m particularly fond of Fred in Anyone But You. And one of the reasons I always look forward to the next Kristan Higgins book is to see what dog character she’s adding to her long list of dogs with definite personalities.

    Reply
  24. Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, in Frederica, my favorite Georgette Heyer novel, is the first one I think of when the subject of dogs in romance novels comes up. Ulysses in Arabella is almost as memorable. Barbara Metzger has great dogs in many of her books. Fitz, the matchmaker with his own POV in The Loyal Companion is particularly adorable. Jennifer Crusie also has some unforgettable dog characters. I’m particularly fond of Fred in Anyone But You. And one of the reasons I always look forward to the next Kristan Higgins book is to see what dog character she’s adding to her long list of dogs with definite personalities.

    Reply
  25. Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, in Frederica, my favorite Georgette Heyer novel, is the first one I think of when the subject of dogs in romance novels comes up. Ulysses in Arabella is almost as memorable. Barbara Metzger has great dogs in many of her books. Fitz, the matchmaker with his own POV in The Loyal Companion is particularly adorable. Jennifer Crusie also has some unforgettable dog characters. I’m particularly fond of Fred in Anyone But You. And one of the reasons I always look forward to the next Kristan Higgins book is to see what dog character she’s adding to her long list of dogs with definite personalities.

    Reply
  26. Of Heyer’s dogs, I’m probably most fond of Ulysses. What a delightful (and dreadful) little mutt he was! My mother has had MANY dogs just like him.
    To date, all of “my” fictional dogs have been based on ones I’ve owned or ones I grew up with, so it’s a lot of Mastiffs, Newfs, Deerhounds, Greyhounds, and other ENORMOUS mutts. I really want to do a Great Dane, but the name issue trips me up (will people know what a Boar Hound is? It sure seems to have confused a lot of Harry Potter readers).

    Reply
  27. Of Heyer’s dogs, I’m probably most fond of Ulysses. What a delightful (and dreadful) little mutt he was! My mother has had MANY dogs just like him.
    To date, all of “my” fictional dogs have been based on ones I’ve owned or ones I grew up with, so it’s a lot of Mastiffs, Newfs, Deerhounds, Greyhounds, and other ENORMOUS mutts. I really want to do a Great Dane, but the name issue trips me up (will people know what a Boar Hound is? It sure seems to have confused a lot of Harry Potter readers).

    Reply
  28. Of Heyer’s dogs, I’m probably most fond of Ulysses. What a delightful (and dreadful) little mutt he was! My mother has had MANY dogs just like him.
    To date, all of “my” fictional dogs have been based on ones I’ve owned or ones I grew up with, so it’s a lot of Mastiffs, Newfs, Deerhounds, Greyhounds, and other ENORMOUS mutts. I really want to do a Great Dane, but the name issue trips me up (will people know what a Boar Hound is? It sure seems to have confused a lot of Harry Potter readers).

    Reply
  29. Of Heyer’s dogs, I’m probably most fond of Ulysses. What a delightful (and dreadful) little mutt he was! My mother has had MANY dogs just like him.
    To date, all of “my” fictional dogs have been based on ones I’ve owned or ones I grew up with, so it’s a lot of Mastiffs, Newfs, Deerhounds, Greyhounds, and other ENORMOUS mutts. I really want to do a Great Dane, but the name issue trips me up (will people know what a Boar Hound is? It sure seems to have confused a lot of Harry Potter readers).

    Reply
  30. Of Heyer’s dogs, I’m probably most fond of Ulysses. What a delightful (and dreadful) little mutt he was! My mother has had MANY dogs just like him.
    To date, all of “my” fictional dogs have been based on ones I’ve owned or ones I grew up with, so it’s a lot of Mastiffs, Newfs, Deerhounds, Greyhounds, and other ENORMOUS mutts. I really want to do a Great Dane, but the name issue trips me up (will people know what a Boar Hound is? It sure seems to have confused a lot of Harry Potter readers).

    Reply
  31. Isobwl–
    You’re definitely a Very Large Dog person!!! Alas, you’re right–a Boar Hound and a Great Dane sound like two different kinds of dogs. But if you describe the Boar Hound, a number of readers would probably think, “Sounds a lot like a Great Dane….”

    Reply
  32. Isobwl–
    You’re definitely a Very Large Dog person!!! Alas, you’re right–a Boar Hound and a Great Dane sound like two different kinds of dogs. But if you describe the Boar Hound, a number of readers would probably think, “Sounds a lot like a Great Dane….”

    Reply
  33. Isobwl–
    You’re definitely a Very Large Dog person!!! Alas, you’re right–a Boar Hound and a Great Dane sound like two different kinds of dogs. But if you describe the Boar Hound, a number of readers would probably think, “Sounds a lot like a Great Dane….”

    Reply
  34. Isobwl–
    You’re definitely a Very Large Dog person!!! Alas, you’re right–a Boar Hound and a Great Dane sound like two different kinds of dogs. But if you describe the Boar Hound, a number of readers would probably think, “Sounds a lot like a Great Dane….”

    Reply
  35. Isobwl–
    You’re definitely a Very Large Dog person!!! Alas, you’re right–a Boar Hound and a Great Dane sound like two different kinds of dogs. But if you describe the Boar Hound, a number of readers would probably think, “Sounds a lot like a Great Dane….”

    Reply
  36. Shannon, thanks for remembering Coquette from A Lady’s Secret. Definitely a fun addition and as is usual with me, she just turned up.
    I’m not (she whispers) really a pet person, so I don’t naturally give them to characters but they do sometimes just turn up and I welcome them.
    Jo

    Reply
  37. Shannon, thanks for remembering Coquette from A Lady’s Secret. Definitely a fun addition and as is usual with me, she just turned up.
    I’m not (she whispers) really a pet person, so I don’t naturally give them to characters but they do sometimes just turn up and I welcome them.
    Jo

    Reply
  38. Shannon, thanks for remembering Coquette from A Lady’s Secret. Definitely a fun addition and as is usual with me, she just turned up.
    I’m not (she whispers) really a pet person, so I don’t naturally give them to characters but they do sometimes just turn up and I welcome them.
    Jo

    Reply
  39. Shannon, thanks for remembering Coquette from A Lady’s Secret. Definitely a fun addition and as is usual with me, she just turned up.
    I’m not (she whispers) really a pet person, so I don’t naturally give them to characters but they do sometimes just turn up and I welcome them.
    Jo

    Reply
  40. Shannon, thanks for remembering Coquette from A Lady’s Secret. Definitely a fun addition and as is usual with me, she just turned up.
    I’m not (she whispers) really a pet person, so I don’t naturally give them to characters but they do sometimes just turn up and I welcome them.
    Jo

    Reply
  41. OMG, I just checked the OED and I can use it!!! I swear I checked before and the use was Victorian.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. 290 The Bull-dog, as Mr. Buffon supposes, is a breed between the small Dane and the English mastiff. The large Dane is the tallest dog that is generally bred in England.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. viii. 292 The great Dane.
    1800 S. Edwards Cynographia Brit. (at cited word), A beautiful variety, called the Harlequin Dane, has a finely marbled coat.

    Reply
  42. OMG, I just checked the OED and I can use it!!! I swear I checked before and the use was Victorian.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. 290 The Bull-dog, as Mr. Buffon supposes, is a breed between the small Dane and the English mastiff. The large Dane is the tallest dog that is generally bred in England.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. viii. 292 The great Dane.
    1800 S. Edwards Cynographia Brit. (at cited word), A beautiful variety, called the Harlequin Dane, has a finely marbled coat.

    Reply
  43. OMG, I just checked the OED and I can use it!!! I swear I checked before and the use was Victorian.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. 290 The Bull-dog, as Mr. Buffon supposes, is a breed between the small Dane and the English mastiff. The large Dane is the tallest dog that is generally bred in England.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. viii. 292 The great Dane.
    1800 S. Edwards Cynographia Brit. (at cited word), A beautiful variety, called the Harlequin Dane, has a finely marbled coat.

    Reply
  44. OMG, I just checked the OED and I can use it!!! I swear I checked before and the use was Victorian.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. 290 The Bull-dog, as Mr. Buffon supposes, is a breed between the small Dane and the English mastiff. The large Dane is the tallest dog that is generally bred in England.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. viii. 292 The great Dane.
    1800 S. Edwards Cynographia Brit. (at cited word), A beautiful variety, called the Harlequin Dane, has a finely marbled coat.

    Reply
  45. OMG, I just checked the OED and I can use it!!! I swear I checked before and the use was Victorian.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. 290 The Bull-dog, as Mr. Buffon supposes, is a breed between the small Dane and the English mastiff. The large Dane is the tallest dog that is generally bred in England.
    1774 O. Goldsmith Hist. Earth III. viii. 292 The great Dane.
    1800 S. Edwards Cynographia Brit. (at cited word), A beautiful variety, called the Harlequin Dane, has a finely marbled coat.

    Reply
  46. I’m very fond of the Baluchistan Hound, too — in fact I sometimes used to tell people my Chloe-dog was a Baluchistan Hound, but alas, nobody ever got the reference, and thought I was a bit peculiar when I explained that she was really a kelpie-cross and that the Baluchistan Hound was a joke from a book.
    Adding to the Heyer dogs, there’s also Heyer’s Bouncer, who kept the heroine of The Reluctant Widow tied to her chair for an entire day.
    Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You is a fab dog, too.
    I’ve had a few dogs in my books — and the newest one (not yet finished) has one, too, but when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*

    Reply
  47. I’m very fond of the Baluchistan Hound, too — in fact I sometimes used to tell people my Chloe-dog was a Baluchistan Hound, but alas, nobody ever got the reference, and thought I was a bit peculiar when I explained that she was really a kelpie-cross and that the Baluchistan Hound was a joke from a book.
    Adding to the Heyer dogs, there’s also Heyer’s Bouncer, who kept the heroine of The Reluctant Widow tied to her chair for an entire day.
    Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You is a fab dog, too.
    I’ve had a few dogs in my books — and the newest one (not yet finished) has one, too, but when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*

    Reply
  48. I’m very fond of the Baluchistan Hound, too — in fact I sometimes used to tell people my Chloe-dog was a Baluchistan Hound, but alas, nobody ever got the reference, and thought I was a bit peculiar when I explained that she was really a kelpie-cross and that the Baluchistan Hound was a joke from a book.
    Adding to the Heyer dogs, there’s also Heyer’s Bouncer, who kept the heroine of The Reluctant Widow tied to her chair for an entire day.
    Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You is a fab dog, too.
    I’ve had a few dogs in my books — and the newest one (not yet finished) has one, too, but when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*

    Reply
  49. I’m very fond of the Baluchistan Hound, too — in fact I sometimes used to tell people my Chloe-dog was a Baluchistan Hound, but alas, nobody ever got the reference, and thought I was a bit peculiar when I explained that she was really a kelpie-cross and that the Baluchistan Hound was a joke from a book.
    Adding to the Heyer dogs, there’s also Heyer’s Bouncer, who kept the heroine of The Reluctant Widow tied to her chair for an entire day.
    Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You is a fab dog, too.
    I’ve had a few dogs in my books — and the newest one (not yet finished) has one, too, but when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*

    Reply
  50. I’m very fond of the Baluchistan Hound, too — in fact I sometimes used to tell people my Chloe-dog was a Baluchistan Hound, but alas, nobody ever got the reference, and thought I was a bit peculiar when I explained that she was really a kelpie-cross and that the Baluchistan Hound was a joke from a book.
    Adding to the Heyer dogs, there’s also Heyer’s Bouncer, who kept the heroine of The Reluctant Widow tied to her chair for an entire day.
    Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You is a fab dog, too.
    I’ve had a few dogs in my books — and the newest one (not yet finished) has one, too, but when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*

    Reply
  51. +++ when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*+++=
    LOL! So very true. Fred was wonderful. The only family dog we had was a basset, and I still have a fondness for them.

    Reply
  52. +++ when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*+++=
    LOL! So very true. Fred was wonderful. The only family dog we had was a basset, and I still have a fondness for them.

    Reply
  53. +++ when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*+++=
    LOL! So very true. Fred was wonderful. The only family dog we had was a basset, and I still have a fondness for them.

    Reply
  54. +++ when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*+++=
    LOL! So very true. Fred was wonderful. The only family dog we had was a basset, and I still have a fondness for them.

    Reply
  55. +++ when I write animal characters, I have to be very careful that they don’t take over. As they tend to in real life. *G*+++=
    LOL! So very true. Fred was wonderful. The only family dog we had was a basset, and I still have a fondness for them.

    Reply
  56. I love this post!
    We have three pugs that are way too spoiled and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
    I really enjoy stories that have pets in them (preferably dogs, as I am a dog person). I recently read How to Entice and Enchantress by Karen Hawkins and it had SIX pugs in the book. I just about fell out of my chair when reading it. All six pugs had a different personality and it was great! It added so much warmth to the story for me as I am a pug/dog lover.
    The Letter by Sandra Owens had a three legged cat and rabbit that added fun elements to a story that had a lot of pain. It was fabulous.
    I think adding pets to stories shows another layer of depth to characters when you read them interacting with a beloved pet. I feel we can often tell a lot about a person with how they treat their pet and how their pet responds to them.
    Super Post!! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  57. I love this post!
    We have three pugs that are way too spoiled and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
    I really enjoy stories that have pets in them (preferably dogs, as I am a dog person). I recently read How to Entice and Enchantress by Karen Hawkins and it had SIX pugs in the book. I just about fell out of my chair when reading it. All six pugs had a different personality and it was great! It added so much warmth to the story for me as I am a pug/dog lover.
    The Letter by Sandra Owens had a three legged cat and rabbit that added fun elements to a story that had a lot of pain. It was fabulous.
    I think adding pets to stories shows another layer of depth to characters when you read them interacting with a beloved pet. I feel we can often tell a lot about a person with how they treat their pet and how their pet responds to them.
    Super Post!! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  58. I love this post!
    We have three pugs that are way too spoiled and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
    I really enjoy stories that have pets in them (preferably dogs, as I am a dog person). I recently read How to Entice and Enchantress by Karen Hawkins and it had SIX pugs in the book. I just about fell out of my chair when reading it. All six pugs had a different personality and it was great! It added so much warmth to the story for me as I am a pug/dog lover.
    The Letter by Sandra Owens had a three legged cat and rabbit that added fun elements to a story that had a lot of pain. It was fabulous.
    I think adding pets to stories shows another layer of depth to characters when you read them interacting with a beloved pet. I feel we can often tell a lot about a person with how they treat their pet and how their pet responds to them.
    Super Post!! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  59. I love this post!
    We have three pugs that are way too spoiled and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
    I really enjoy stories that have pets in them (preferably dogs, as I am a dog person). I recently read How to Entice and Enchantress by Karen Hawkins and it had SIX pugs in the book. I just about fell out of my chair when reading it. All six pugs had a different personality and it was great! It added so much warmth to the story for me as I am a pug/dog lover.
    The Letter by Sandra Owens had a three legged cat and rabbit that added fun elements to a story that had a lot of pain. It was fabulous.
    I think adding pets to stories shows another layer of depth to characters when you read them interacting with a beloved pet. I feel we can often tell a lot about a person with how they treat their pet and how their pet responds to them.
    Super Post!! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  60. I love this post!
    We have three pugs that are way too spoiled and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
    I really enjoy stories that have pets in them (preferably dogs, as I am a dog person). I recently read How to Entice and Enchantress by Karen Hawkins and it had SIX pugs in the book. I just about fell out of my chair when reading it. All six pugs had a different personality and it was great! It added so much warmth to the story for me as I am a pug/dog lover.
    The Letter by Sandra Owens had a three legged cat and rabbit that added fun elements to a story that had a lot of pain. It was fabulous.
    I think adding pets to stories shows another layer of depth to characters when you read them interacting with a beloved pet. I feel we can often tell a lot about a person with how they treat their pet and how their pet responds to them.
    Super Post!! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  61. Lindsey-
    I completely agree with you on how pets add great new layers to stories and characters. I’ve done cats, dogs, macaws, et al, but not a rabbit that I can recall. Maybe I should get to work on that!

    Reply
  62. Lindsey-
    I completely agree with you on how pets add great new layers to stories and characters. I’ve done cats, dogs, macaws, et al, but not a rabbit that I can recall. Maybe I should get to work on that!

    Reply
  63. Lindsey-
    I completely agree with you on how pets add great new layers to stories and characters. I’ve done cats, dogs, macaws, et al, but not a rabbit that I can recall. Maybe I should get to work on that!

    Reply
  64. Lindsey-
    I completely agree with you on how pets add great new layers to stories and characters. I’ve done cats, dogs, macaws, et al, but not a rabbit that I can recall. Maybe I should get to work on that!

    Reply
  65. Lindsey-
    I completely agree with you on how pets add great new layers to stories and characters. I’ve done cats, dogs, macaws, et al, but not a rabbit that I can recall. Maybe I should get to work on that!

    Reply

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