Guest – Emma Jane Holloway

Hi, Jo here interviewing my friend Emma Jane Holloway on A Study in Silks.  Study-in-silks-lo-res-182x300

Jo: Emma Jane, first a bit about you. I'll quote your bio. "Ever since childhood, Emma Jane Holloway refused to accept that history was nothing but facts prisoned behind the closed door of time. Why waste a perfectly good playground coloring within the timelines? Accordingly, her novels are filled with whimsical impossibilities and the occasional eye-blinking impertinence—but always in the service of grand adventure."

You've certainly created a grand adventure here, Emma Jane. It has royalty, balls, magical machines, cunning devices, a murder mystery, and Steam Barons. Yes, it's steampunk, and it's great fun to read, especially with two potential heroes for the wonderful Evelina, one from her humble past, and the other from her new life in high society. Many of the Wench readers won't be familiar with steampunk. Can you give us a brief introduction to it?

EjhEmma Jane: Steampunk is a subgenre of fantasy, but it can have a lot of different elements mixed in—romance (of course!), magic, mystery or science fiction. It’s an exciting genre because there is so much flexibility to let the imagination run.

Here are the main things to know about steampunk stories:
Generally it is set in the Victorian era, but that’s not always the case.
Technology has evolved in new and different ways (such as bizarre steam-powered contraptions, or clockwork monsters, or armies of automatons)
Frequently there are themes of social justice (hence the punk).
The tone can vary from comic to apocalyptic, depending on the author. It’s a good idea to read an excerpt to see if you like his or her style.

My Baskerville Affair trilogy is set in Sherlock Holmes’s London and, yes, Sherlock and Dr. Watson appear as secondary characters. There is magic in my world, too.

Jo: I would describe A Study in Silks as a Steampunk thriller with romantic elements. I thought it worked brilliantly, but did you meet any resistance?

Emma Jane: My series sits at a crossroads between mystery, fantasy, and romance. It uses multiple points of view, which is familiar to fantasy readers but less so with mystery or romance. Most enjoyed the mash-up, but those who normally stick to only one kind of book had some adjusting to do.

Those who like lots of adventure will have a good time. The series has love stories and monsters and explosions and balls and party dresses and a handsome pirate with a talking dirigible. It’s all good. Stind

Jo: It is indeed. Here's a bit from the excerpt on your web page.

 Her fingers lingered on the casket for a moment, caressing her brass and steel creation almost tenderly. Most nights, she retreated to the attic to work in private after the rest of Hilliard House had retired. This was the one place, the one time, she enjoyed the absolute freedom to indulge her talents. No one else came up here, especially not this late.

And yet, she heard the creak of the door at the bottom of the attic stairs, then a footfall. Someone was coming. Odd, because the household had retired early—His Lordship had declared himself and his lady in need of a quiet night in. Therefore, no one dared to so much as rustle a candy wrapper tonight.

So who was up and about? Apprehension prickled along her arms. In the privacy of her own mind, Evelina Cooper gave a very improper curse.

There were any number of reasons why a young lady, gently reared by a respectable grandmamma, did not want to be caught hiding in the attic in the dead of night. First would be the inevitable assumption that she was meeting a lover. Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?

Second, whatever trouble she got into would automatically rebound on her best friend, Imogen Roth. Hilliard House belonged to her schoolmate’s high-and-mighty father, Lord Bancroft, and Evelina was a guest for the Season at Imogen’s request. If she were caught doing anything even mildly scandalous, Lord B was more likely to mount both their heads on his study wall than to listen to excuses.

And an unladylike fascination with mechanics was enough to cause comment. It was time to vanish, thoroughly and quickly.

Jo: Evelina's conventional life includes gentlemen. Tell us more about them.

Emma Jane: At the beginning of the series, Evelina is staying with her friend’s family in the posh Mayfair neighborhood of London. It’s their first Season on the marriage mart. Evelina admires Tobias Roth, her best friend’s brother, and she still has feelings for her childhood sweetheart, Nick. Nick is a dashing performer from the circus and Tobias is the clever, creative heir to a title and estate.

Jo: A love triangle?

Emma Jane: I wouldn’t call this a love triangle as much as a moment when Evelina’s past and future hang in the balance. By the end of Silks, everything is completely altered, and all three characters change radically as the series progresses. The real difference between a ballroom crush and enduring love become abundantly clear. Does Evelina have a happy ending? Yes, but it’s nothing like what she expects at the start of her adventure!

SindarkJo: The intro to A Study in Silks is great. "Evelina Cooper, the niece of the great Sherlock Holmes, is poised to enjoy her first Season in London Society. But there’s a murderer to deal with—not to mention missing automatons, a sorcerer, and a talking mouse." Add ruthless Steam Barons and political plots and it's an enthralling brew.

Emma Jane: Thank you!

Jo: Without too much in the way of spoilers, can you lay out the main problems roiling in the alternate-Victorian London you've created?

Emma Jane: Most of my London’s conflicts stem from the Steam Barons. They’re a bunch of industrialists who have bought up monopolies of coal, steam, railways, ports, manufacturing, and so on. Basically, they want to control anything that produces power and won’t allow any competition. They squeeze all the money they can out of rich and poor alike for everything from clean water to luxury goods.

Jo: And they're not squeamish about how they squeeze!

Emma Jane: Not at all. Their dominance has two main consequences: The barons are growing more powerful than the aristocracy, and they want more and more political control. Also, they have outlawed magic mostly because it’s a power source they can’t buy or sell. Magic users are killed or sent for experimentation at Her Majesty’s Laboratories.

Jo: I found that the scariest part, as the threat hangs over Evelina.

Emma Jane: What the Steam Barons really want is a way to make machines run on magic, but everyone thinks that’s impossible. Oh, except for Evelina, who knows how—but that’s a deep, dark secret.

Jo: This is very much a heroine-centered novel, and Evelina is taking on powerful opponents who'll stop at nothing, as you illustrate in some scenes. What inspired you to create her, and how did she develop. Was she whole when you started, or did she surprise you along the way? (Here's a picture of Emma Jane in Steampunk style. Love the corset effect!) Emma-1

Emma Jane: Evelina first appeared in a sketch I wrote for a YA story featuring her uncle, Sherlock Holmes. Originally, I wanted to write a Holmes story from the viewpoint of a teenaged girl—I thought that would be an interesting battle of wills. It never really went anywhere, so I put that story away and went on to other things. When I started writing A Study in Silks, which has a grown-up version of Evelina, she was a lot more complex. I think the short story never worked because she needed a larger canvas.

Jo: She's a great character because of her complexity. She could be called kick-ass, but she's still interested in silken gowns and dashing men, and she's very intelligent.

Emma Jane: Thanks. She's caught between social classes. Her mother was a Holmes and gentry, but her father’s origins were with the circus. He also had hereditary magical abilities, and she got those as well as the Holmes intelligence. She wants to go to university—ladies’ colleges were just starting around this time—but she isn’t getting much support from her family.

Evelina didn’t surprise me as much as some of the other characters. The one who takes the cake in that department is Tobias, who is one of her love interests. He remains a pivotal character through the series and changes—and matures—the most of any of the cast. My heart broke for him sometimes.

Jo: Yes, at first he can seem your standard handsome, rakish society gentleman, but we soon see so much more to him. That's where the many viewpoints work to make the book stronger, in my opinion.

Emma Jane: Thanks.

Jo: I don't want to imply that the novel is portentous because it's a rip-roaring read, but I saw reflections of the 21st century, when massive corporations can be in power struggles with governments, with some ordinary people hurt in the fight. Would you agree?

Emma Jane: Definitely. I actually got the idea for the Steam Barons from an old Victorian map that divided up London among the power companies of the day. I found it just before the Occupy movement hit the news and it was easy to make the connection between the past and present. We’re still facing the same forces.

But, lest we get too gloomy, Evelina’s era (the late 1880s) saw a lot of interest in political and social reform, including strides in universal education, prison reform, and the prevention of cruelty to animals. All that strife produced some positive things, too.

Jo: Thanks, Emma Jane. The great thing about the Baskerville Affair is that all three books, A Study in Silks, A Study in Darkness, and A Study in Ashes are available now, so once we start, there's no stopping us.

Emma Jane is giving away one book from the series (ebook or autographed print copy) to a commenter who answers one of the following questions:

What is your favorite thing about the Victorian era?

What is your favorite thing about steampunk? Or, if you've never read any, what about this story intrigues you enough to try?

What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes?

You can read more about Emma Jane on her web site and watch a great video trailer there. I love the design of this website, by the way. It feels so steampunk, even to the click buttons. She also has free Baskerville Affair stories for you here and excerpts here.

Cheers,

Jo

205 thoughts on “Guest – Emma Jane Holloway”

  1. Emma and Jo–
    I think the best thing in the Victorian era was the reforming tendencies–the desire to make make life better for everyone. More education, less poverty, better living conditions, yes!!
    OTOH, a nice thing about steampunk is the way it jazzes up the stuffier aspects of the Victorian age.
    As a Word Wench, I don’t qualify for a giveaway–I’ll just go buy the book, which sounds terrific!

    Reply
  2. Emma and Jo–
    I think the best thing in the Victorian era was the reforming tendencies–the desire to make make life better for everyone. More education, less poverty, better living conditions, yes!!
    OTOH, a nice thing about steampunk is the way it jazzes up the stuffier aspects of the Victorian age.
    As a Word Wench, I don’t qualify for a giveaway–I’ll just go buy the book, which sounds terrific!

    Reply
  3. Emma and Jo–
    I think the best thing in the Victorian era was the reforming tendencies–the desire to make make life better for everyone. More education, less poverty, better living conditions, yes!!
    OTOH, a nice thing about steampunk is the way it jazzes up the stuffier aspects of the Victorian age.
    As a Word Wench, I don’t qualify for a giveaway–I’ll just go buy the book, which sounds terrific!

    Reply
  4. Emma and Jo–
    I think the best thing in the Victorian era was the reforming tendencies–the desire to make make life better for everyone. More education, less poverty, better living conditions, yes!!
    OTOH, a nice thing about steampunk is the way it jazzes up the stuffier aspects of the Victorian age.
    As a Word Wench, I don’t qualify for a giveaway–I’ll just go buy the book, which sounds terrific!

    Reply
  5. Emma and Jo–
    I think the best thing in the Victorian era was the reforming tendencies–the desire to make make life better for everyone. More education, less poverty, better living conditions, yes!!
    OTOH, a nice thing about steampunk is the way it jazzes up the stuffier aspects of the Victorian age.
    As a Word Wench, I don’t qualify for a giveaway–I’ll just go buy the book, which sounds terrific!

    Reply
  6. Great interview! So informative! Steampunk is a mystery to me, and I am glad to have read this – now I know a little more. Thanks to Jo for posting this interivew with Emma Jane!
    Lisa McManus Lange

    Reply
  7. Great interview! So informative! Steampunk is a mystery to me, and I am glad to have read this – now I know a little more. Thanks to Jo for posting this interivew with Emma Jane!
    Lisa McManus Lange

    Reply
  8. Great interview! So informative! Steampunk is a mystery to me, and I am glad to have read this – now I know a little more. Thanks to Jo for posting this interivew with Emma Jane!
    Lisa McManus Lange

    Reply
  9. Great interview! So informative! Steampunk is a mystery to me, and I am glad to have read this – now I know a little more. Thanks to Jo for posting this interivew with Emma Jane!
    Lisa McManus Lange

    Reply
  10. Great interview! So informative! Steampunk is a mystery to me, and I am glad to have read this – now I know a little more. Thanks to Jo for posting this interivew with Emma Jane!
    Lisa McManus Lange

    Reply
  11. Thanks for spotlighting this author and series, Jo! I’ve just ordered the trilogy for the library and look forward to introducing several of our regulars to Ms. Holloway. Steampunk has just recently become popular in our area – it offers so many possibilities in an alternate version of our history!
    And Ms. Holloway: Is it okay if we put a link to the free shorts in our catalog for those who inevitably clamor for more in her world?

    Reply
  12. Thanks for spotlighting this author and series, Jo! I’ve just ordered the trilogy for the library and look forward to introducing several of our regulars to Ms. Holloway. Steampunk has just recently become popular in our area – it offers so many possibilities in an alternate version of our history!
    And Ms. Holloway: Is it okay if we put a link to the free shorts in our catalog for those who inevitably clamor for more in her world?

    Reply
  13. Thanks for spotlighting this author and series, Jo! I’ve just ordered the trilogy for the library and look forward to introducing several of our regulars to Ms. Holloway. Steampunk has just recently become popular in our area – it offers so many possibilities in an alternate version of our history!
    And Ms. Holloway: Is it okay if we put a link to the free shorts in our catalog for those who inevitably clamor for more in her world?

    Reply
  14. Thanks for spotlighting this author and series, Jo! I’ve just ordered the trilogy for the library and look forward to introducing several of our regulars to Ms. Holloway. Steampunk has just recently become popular in our area – it offers so many possibilities in an alternate version of our history!
    And Ms. Holloway: Is it okay if we put a link to the free shorts in our catalog for those who inevitably clamor for more in her world?

    Reply
  15. Thanks for spotlighting this author and series, Jo! I’ve just ordered the trilogy for the library and look forward to introducing several of our regulars to Ms. Holloway. Steampunk has just recently become popular in our area – it offers so many possibilities in an alternate version of our history!
    And Ms. Holloway: Is it okay if we put a link to the free shorts in our catalog for those who inevitably clamor for more in her world?

    Reply
  16. I’ve read a few steampunk books & really enjoyed them – after I got over giggling over the word “steampunk”. Who on earth came up with it?! I love fantasy romance & historical romance & steampunk is a nice meld of both.

    Reply
  17. I’ve read a few steampunk books & really enjoyed them – after I got over giggling over the word “steampunk”. Who on earth came up with it?! I love fantasy romance & historical romance & steampunk is a nice meld of both.

    Reply
  18. I’ve read a few steampunk books & really enjoyed them – after I got over giggling over the word “steampunk”. Who on earth came up with it?! I love fantasy romance & historical romance & steampunk is a nice meld of both.

    Reply
  19. I’ve read a few steampunk books & really enjoyed them – after I got over giggling over the word “steampunk”. Who on earth came up with it?! I love fantasy romance & historical romance & steampunk is a nice meld of both.

    Reply
  20. I’ve read a few steampunk books & really enjoyed them – after I got over giggling over the word “steampunk”. Who on earth came up with it?! I love fantasy romance & historical romance & steampunk is a nice meld of both.

    Reply
  21. I’m sure it’ll be a great fit in your library, Lynne. I like steampunk because it’s so creative and imaginative. Both very good things in fiction, IMO,

    Reply
  22. I’m sure it’ll be a great fit in your library, Lynne. I like steampunk because it’s so creative and imaginative. Both very good things in fiction, IMO,

    Reply
  23. I’m sure it’ll be a great fit in your library, Lynne. I like steampunk because it’s so creative and imaginative. Both very good things in fiction, IMO,

    Reply
  24. I’m sure it’ll be a great fit in your library, Lynne. I like steampunk because it’s so creative and imaginative. Both very good things in fiction, IMO,

    Reply
  25. I’m sure it’ll be a great fit in your library, Lynne. I like steampunk because it’s so creative and imaginative. Both very good things in fiction, IMO,

    Reply
  26. Steampunk is a variation of cyberpunk, or so I’m told. The author KW Jeter came up with the term in the 80s. My favorite is ” bustle punk”–that definitely makes me giggle!

    Reply
  27. Steampunk is a variation of cyberpunk, or so I’m told. The author KW Jeter came up with the term in the 80s. My favorite is ” bustle punk”–that definitely makes me giggle!

    Reply
  28. Steampunk is a variation of cyberpunk, or so I’m told. The author KW Jeter came up with the term in the 80s. My favorite is ” bustle punk”–that definitely makes me giggle!

    Reply
  29. Steampunk is a variation of cyberpunk, or so I’m told. The author KW Jeter came up with the term in the 80s. My favorite is ” bustle punk”–that definitely makes me giggle!

    Reply
  30. Steampunk is a variation of cyberpunk, or so I’m told. The author KW Jeter came up with the term in the 80s. My favorite is ” bustle punk”–that definitely makes me giggle!

    Reply
  31. Thanks for the interview. I understood the steam part of steam punk, but I learned that punk now has to do with social justice. As I look back over my recent binge on steam punk, I now understand why every book had a theme of empowerment for the oppressed. I will of course be looking for that in what I read in the future.
    I think one of my favorite parts of steam punk, aside from the romance and the gadgets–wonderful creations those, is the redrawn maps. America in pieces independent or under French or Spanish dominion, France controlled by Britain (the UK won the 100 years war) or Germany’s. Or when Africa has huge free trade ports. Or there’s the Horde, descended from Genghis Khan.

    Reply
  32. Thanks for the interview. I understood the steam part of steam punk, but I learned that punk now has to do with social justice. As I look back over my recent binge on steam punk, I now understand why every book had a theme of empowerment for the oppressed. I will of course be looking for that in what I read in the future.
    I think one of my favorite parts of steam punk, aside from the romance and the gadgets–wonderful creations those, is the redrawn maps. America in pieces independent or under French or Spanish dominion, France controlled by Britain (the UK won the 100 years war) or Germany’s. Or when Africa has huge free trade ports. Or there’s the Horde, descended from Genghis Khan.

    Reply
  33. Thanks for the interview. I understood the steam part of steam punk, but I learned that punk now has to do with social justice. As I look back over my recent binge on steam punk, I now understand why every book had a theme of empowerment for the oppressed. I will of course be looking for that in what I read in the future.
    I think one of my favorite parts of steam punk, aside from the romance and the gadgets–wonderful creations those, is the redrawn maps. America in pieces independent or under French or Spanish dominion, France controlled by Britain (the UK won the 100 years war) or Germany’s. Or when Africa has huge free trade ports. Or there’s the Horde, descended from Genghis Khan.

    Reply
  34. Thanks for the interview. I understood the steam part of steam punk, but I learned that punk now has to do with social justice. As I look back over my recent binge on steam punk, I now understand why every book had a theme of empowerment for the oppressed. I will of course be looking for that in what I read in the future.
    I think one of my favorite parts of steam punk, aside from the romance and the gadgets–wonderful creations those, is the redrawn maps. America in pieces independent or under French or Spanish dominion, France controlled by Britain (the UK won the 100 years war) or Germany’s. Or when Africa has huge free trade ports. Or there’s the Horde, descended from Genghis Khan.

    Reply
  35. Thanks for the interview. I understood the steam part of steam punk, but I learned that punk now has to do with social justice. As I look back over my recent binge on steam punk, I now understand why every book had a theme of empowerment for the oppressed. I will of course be looking for that in what I read in the future.
    I think one of my favorite parts of steam punk, aside from the romance and the gadgets–wonderful creations those, is the redrawn maps. America in pieces independent or under French or Spanish dominion, France controlled by Britain (the UK won the 100 years war) or Germany’s. Or when Africa has huge free trade ports. Or there’s the Horde, descended from Genghis Khan.

    Reply
  36. Great interview, I have to confess that I have never read Steampunk but you’ve made me curious,I especially loved the line, Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?
    Indeed,:)

    Reply
  37. Great interview, I have to confess that I have never read Steampunk but you’ve made me curious,I especially loved the line, Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?
    Indeed,:)

    Reply
  38. Great interview, I have to confess that I have never read Steampunk but you’ve made me curious,I especially loved the line, Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?
    Indeed,:)

    Reply
  39. Great interview, I have to confess that I have never read Steampunk but you’ve made me curious,I especially loved the line, Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?
    Indeed,:)

    Reply
  40. Great interview, I have to confess that I have never read Steampunk but you’ve made me curious,I especially loved the line, Why was it that no one imagined a young lady might have more weighty interests?
    Indeed,:)

    Reply
  41. I adore steampunk and I’ve really enjoyed the Baskerville Affair books, so I don’t need to be entered to win. I just wanted to chime in with how fantastic I think the stories are and if you’ve never read steampunk, give it a try. It’s wonderful!

    Reply
  42. I adore steampunk and I’ve really enjoyed the Baskerville Affair books, so I don’t need to be entered to win. I just wanted to chime in with how fantastic I think the stories are and if you’ve never read steampunk, give it a try. It’s wonderful!

    Reply
  43. I adore steampunk and I’ve really enjoyed the Baskerville Affair books, so I don’t need to be entered to win. I just wanted to chime in with how fantastic I think the stories are and if you’ve never read steampunk, give it a try. It’s wonderful!

    Reply
  44. I adore steampunk and I’ve really enjoyed the Baskerville Affair books, so I don’t need to be entered to win. I just wanted to chime in with how fantastic I think the stories are and if you’ve never read steampunk, give it a try. It’s wonderful!

    Reply
  45. I adore steampunk and I’ve really enjoyed the Baskerville Affair books, so I don’t need to be entered to win. I just wanted to chime in with how fantastic I think the stories are and if you’ve never read steampunk, give it a try. It’s wonderful!

    Reply
  46. I loved “A Study In Silks” and am now reading the second in the series. I love steampunk because I enjoy seeing the different things that combine mechanical items in novel arrangements (especially the sentient machines). I have long loved Sherlock Holmes with his quirky personality and his logical analyses of the world around him. Thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  47. I loved “A Study In Silks” and am now reading the second in the series. I love steampunk because I enjoy seeing the different things that combine mechanical items in novel arrangements (especially the sentient machines). I have long loved Sherlock Holmes with his quirky personality and his logical analyses of the world around him. Thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  48. I loved “A Study In Silks” and am now reading the second in the series. I love steampunk because I enjoy seeing the different things that combine mechanical items in novel arrangements (especially the sentient machines). I have long loved Sherlock Holmes with his quirky personality and his logical analyses of the world around him. Thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  49. I loved “A Study In Silks” and am now reading the second in the series. I love steampunk because I enjoy seeing the different things that combine mechanical items in novel arrangements (especially the sentient machines). I have long loved Sherlock Holmes with his quirky personality and his logical analyses of the world around him. Thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  50. I loved “A Study In Silks” and am now reading the second in the series. I love steampunk because I enjoy seeing the different things that combine mechanical items in novel arrangements (especially the sentient machines). I have long loved Sherlock Holmes with his quirky personality and his logical analyses of the world around him. Thanks for visiting!

    Reply
  51. I’ve never read a steam punk novel, rather put off by the title I think, but reading this interview makes me want to delve deeper.
    It is the use of magic to power machines that particularly interests me. Michael Faraday died in 1867 and during his great exploratory work on electro-magnetism, he must have felt that he was discovering magic, while glimpsing a future with machines powered by his new electrical forces!
    New types of ‘Magic’ as power sources, while fantasy now, might become reality in some future …. that’s the fascination of the Sci-Fi input! LOL

    Reply
  52. I’ve never read a steam punk novel, rather put off by the title I think, but reading this interview makes me want to delve deeper.
    It is the use of magic to power machines that particularly interests me. Michael Faraday died in 1867 and during his great exploratory work on electro-magnetism, he must have felt that he was discovering magic, while glimpsing a future with machines powered by his new electrical forces!
    New types of ‘Magic’ as power sources, while fantasy now, might become reality in some future …. that’s the fascination of the Sci-Fi input! LOL

    Reply
  53. I’ve never read a steam punk novel, rather put off by the title I think, but reading this interview makes me want to delve deeper.
    It is the use of magic to power machines that particularly interests me. Michael Faraday died in 1867 and during his great exploratory work on electro-magnetism, he must have felt that he was discovering magic, while glimpsing a future with machines powered by his new electrical forces!
    New types of ‘Magic’ as power sources, while fantasy now, might become reality in some future …. that’s the fascination of the Sci-Fi input! LOL

    Reply
  54. I’ve never read a steam punk novel, rather put off by the title I think, but reading this interview makes me want to delve deeper.
    It is the use of magic to power machines that particularly interests me. Michael Faraday died in 1867 and during his great exploratory work on electro-magnetism, he must have felt that he was discovering magic, while glimpsing a future with machines powered by his new electrical forces!
    New types of ‘Magic’ as power sources, while fantasy now, might become reality in some future …. that’s the fascination of the Sci-Fi input! LOL

    Reply
  55. I’ve never read a steam punk novel, rather put off by the title I think, but reading this interview makes me want to delve deeper.
    It is the use of magic to power machines that particularly interests me. Michael Faraday died in 1867 and during his great exploratory work on electro-magnetism, he must have felt that he was discovering magic, while glimpsing a future with machines powered by his new electrical forces!
    New types of ‘Magic’ as power sources, while fantasy now, might become reality in some future …. that’s the fascination of the Sci-Fi input! LOL

    Reply
  56. My favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes is that he is not some “perfect” hero. He has plenty of faults.
    My favorite thing about the Victorian era is that things had started to change: science was replacing superstition (well, more or less), women were starting to demand for some basic human rights for themselves etc.

    Reply
  57. My favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes is that he is not some “perfect” hero. He has plenty of faults.
    My favorite thing about the Victorian era is that things had started to change: science was replacing superstition (well, more or less), women were starting to demand for some basic human rights for themselves etc.

    Reply
  58. My favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes is that he is not some “perfect” hero. He has plenty of faults.
    My favorite thing about the Victorian era is that things had started to change: science was replacing superstition (well, more or less), women were starting to demand for some basic human rights for themselves etc.

    Reply
  59. My favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes is that he is not some “perfect” hero. He has plenty of faults.
    My favorite thing about the Victorian era is that things had started to change: science was replacing superstition (well, more or less), women were starting to demand for some basic human rights for themselves etc.

    Reply
  60. My favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes is that he is not some “perfect” hero. He has plenty of faults.
    My favorite thing about the Victorian era is that things had started to change: science was replacing superstition (well, more or less), women were starting to demand for some basic human rights for themselves etc.

    Reply
  61. What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes? I have to say it’s his methods of deduction. He always observes and gathers data before rushing to judgement.

    Reply
  62. What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes? I have to say it’s his methods of deduction. He always observes and gathers data before rushing to judgement.

    Reply
  63. What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes? I have to say it’s his methods of deduction. He always observes and gathers data before rushing to judgement.

    Reply
  64. What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes? I have to say it’s his methods of deduction. He always observes and gathers data before rushing to judgement.

    Reply
  65. What is your favorite thing about Sherlock Holmes? I have to say it’s his methods of deduction. He always observes and gathers data before rushing to judgement.

    Reply
  66. Well, Minna, as someone who loves the 18th century I have to say that the change to science and open ideas began there, but yes, we had to wait for the later 19th century for women to really get some rights with teeth.

    Reply
  67. Well, Minna, as someone who loves the 18th century I have to say that the change to science and open ideas began there, but yes, we had to wait for the later 19th century for women to really get some rights with teeth.

    Reply
  68. Well, Minna, as someone who loves the 18th century I have to say that the change to science and open ideas began there, but yes, we had to wait for the later 19th century for women to really get some rights with teeth.

    Reply
  69. Well, Minna, as someone who loves the 18th century I have to say that the change to science and open ideas began there, but yes, we had to wait for the later 19th century for women to really get some rights with teeth.

    Reply
  70. Well, Minna, as someone who loves the 18th century I have to say that the change to science and open ideas began there, but yes, we had to wait for the later 19th century for women to really get some rights with teeth.

    Reply
  71. One great thing about writing this series is that it made me brush up on my science studies. I ran into Faraday researching one of the short stories. There are a lot of great personalities in he history of natural philosophy, as they called it back then.

    Reply
  72. One great thing about writing this series is that it made me brush up on my science studies. I ran into Faraday researching one of the short stories. There are a lot of great personalities in he history of natural philosophy, as they called it back then.

    Reply
  73. One great thing about writing this series is that it made me brush up on my science studies. I ran into Faraday researching one of the short stories. There are a lot of great personalities in he history of natural philosophy, as they called it back then.

    Reply
  74. One great thing about writing this series is that it made me brush up on my science studies. I ran into Faraday researching one of the short stories. There are a lot of great personalities in he history of natural philosophy, as they called it back then.

    Reply
  75. One great thing about writing this series is that it made me brush up on my science studies. I ran into Faraday researching one of the short stories. There are a lot of great personalities in he history of natural philosophy, as they called it back then.

    Reply
  76. As a theoretical physicist I wouldn’t say that. Once a phenomenon is theoretically understood, the magic dissipates.
    Sounds to me like Arthur Clarke of ‘Space Odyssey’ fame. Though I believe he was trained as a scientist before turning to Sci-Fi.

    Reply
  77. As a theoretical physicist I wouldn’t say that. Once a phenomenon is theoretically understood, the magic dissipates.
    Sounds to me like Arthur Clarke of ‘Space Odyssey’ fame. Though I believe he was trained as a scientist before turning to Sci-Fi.

    Reply
  78. As a theoretical physicist I wouldn’t say that. Once a phenomenon is theoretically understood, the magic dissipates.
    Sounds to me like Arthur Clarke of ‘Space Odyssey’ fame. Though I believe he was trained as a scientist before turning to Sci-Fi.

    Reply
  79. As a theoretical physicist I wouldn’t say that. Once a phenomenon is theoretically understood, the magic dissipates.
    Sounds to me like Arthur Clarke of ‘Space Odyssey’ fame. Though I believe he was trained as a scientist before turning to Sci-Fi.

    Reply
  80. As a theoretical physicist I wouldn’t say that. Once a phenomenon is theoretically understood, the magic dissipates.
    Sounds to me like Arthur Clarke of ‘Space Odyssey’ fame. Though I believe he was trained as a scientist before turning to Sci-Fi.

    Reply
  81. Emma, may I ask where the inspiration for the magic used for controlling machines originated in your story?
    Much ‘fringe’ science involves experiments where the mind interacts with matter … telepathy, energy healing, psychics changing physical properties like PH values etc. So I’m wondering if your researches led you into these speculative fields.
    Indeed the quantum measuring process itself is full of paradoxes …. see for example Schroedinger’s cat.

    Reply
  82. Emma, may I ask where the inspiration for the magic used for controlling machines originated in your story?
    Much ‘fringe’ science involves experiments where the mind interacts with matter … telepathy, energy healing, psychics changing physical properties like PH values etc. So I’m wondering if your researches led you into these speculative fields.
    Indeed the quantum measuring process itself is full of paradoxes …. see for example Schroedinger’s cat.

    Reply
  83. Emma, may I ask where the inspiration for the magic used for controlling machines originated in your story?
    Much ‘fringe’ science involves experiments where the mind interacts with matter … telepathy, energy healing, psychics changing physical properties like PH values etc. So I’m wondering if your researches led you into these speculative fields.
    Indeed the quantum measuring process itself is full of paradoxes …. see for example Schroedinger’s cat.

    Reply
  84. Emma, may I ask where the inspiration for the magic used for controlling machines originated in your story?
    Much ‘fringe’ science involves experiments where the mind interacts with matter … telepathy, energy healing, psychics changing physical properties like PH values etc. So I’m wondering if your researches led you into these speculative fields.
    Indeed the quantum measuring process itself is full of paradoxes …. see for example Schroedinger’s cat.

    Reply
  85. Emma, may I ask where the inspiration for the magic used for controlling machines originated in your story?
    Much ‘fringe’ science involves experiments where the mind interacts with matter … telepathy, energy healing, psychics changing physical properties like PH values etc. So I’m wondering if your researches led you into these speculative fields.
    Indeed the quantum measuring process itself is full of paradoxes …. see for example Schroedinger’s cat.

    Reply
  86. Thanks so much about telling us more about Steampunk. My daughter is writing a novel using this genre and she wasn’t really sure where it fit in the fiction world. Her heroine also has a famous relative – Nikola Tesla!
    I think the Victorian era is fascinating because of the advances that were made in science and social consciousness. It’s very much of the Old World vs. New World sentiment with the aristocracy giving way to men and women with brains, ambition and wit.

    Reply
  87. Thanks so much about telling us more about Steampunk. My daughter is writing a novel using this genre and she wasn’t really sure where it fit in the fiction world. Her heroine also has a famous relative – Nikola Tesla!
    I think the Victorian era is fascinating because of the advances that were made in science and social consciousness. It’s very much of the Old World vs. New World sentiment with the aristocracy giving way to men and women with brains, ambition and wit.

    Reply
  88. Thanks so much about telling us more about Steampunk. My daughter is writing a novel using this genre and she wasn’t really sure where it fit in the fiction world. Her heroine also has a famous relative – Nikola Tesla!
    I think the Victorian era is fascinating because of the advances that were made in science and social consciousness. It’s very much of the Old World vs. New World sentiment with the aristocracy giving way to men and women with brains, ambition and wit.

    Reply
  89. Thanks so much about telling us more about Steampunk. My daughter is writing a novel using this genre and she wasn’t really sure where it fit in the fiction world. Her heroine also has a famous relative – Nikola Tesla!
    I think the Victorian era is fascinating because of the advances that were made in science and social consciousness. It’s very much of the Old World vs. New World sentiment with the aristocracy giving way to men and women with brains, ambition and wit.

    Reply
  90. Thanks so much about telling us more about Steampunk. My daughter is writing a novel using this genre and she wasn’t really sure where it fit in the fiction world. Her heroine also has a famous relative – Nikola Tesla!
    I think the Victorian era is fascinating because of the advances that were made in science and social consciousness. It’s very much of the Old World vs. New World sentiment with the aristocracy giving way to men and women with brains, ambition and wit.

    Reply
  91. I love steampunk because it changes how I look at established history and the roles different groups played in it, and how that could have changed. I love Holmes’ use of observation and logic. I love the term “bustle punk”!

    Reply
  92. I love steampunk because it changes how I look at established history and the roles different groups played in it, and how that could have changed. I love Holmes’ use of observation and logic. I love the term “bustle punk”!

    Reply
  93. I love steampunk because it changes how I look at established history and the roles different groups played in it, and how that could have changed. I love Holmes’ use of observation and logic. I love the term “bustle punk”!

    Reply
  94. I love steampunk because it changes how I look at established history and the roles different groups played in it, and how that could have changed. I love Holmes’ use of observation and logic. I love the term “bustle punk”!

    Reply
  95. I love steampunk because it changes how I look at established history and the roles different groups played in it, and how that could have changed. I love Holmes’ use of observation and logic. I love the term “bustle punk”!

    Reply
  96. I love how steampunk creates such great alternate realities! The clothing styles are pretty fun too!
    Steampunk and the Victorian Era both have reform as a recurring theme.
    One of my current favorite things about Sherlock Holmes is Robert Downey Jr.

    Reply
  97. I love how steampunk creates such great alternate realities! The clothing styles are pretty fun too!
    Steampunk and the Victorian Era both have reform as a recurring theme.
    One of my current favorite things about Sherlock Holmes is Robert Downey Jr.

    Reply
  98. I love how steampunk creates such great alternate realities! The clothing styles are pretty fun too!
    Steampunk and the Victorian Era both have reform as a recurring theme.
    One of my current favorite things about Sherlock Holmes is Robert Downey Jr.

    Reply
  99. I love how steampunk creates such great alternate realities! The clothing styles are pretty fun too!
    Steampunk and the Victorian Era both have reform as a recurring theme.
    One of my current favorite things about Sherlock Holmes is Robert Downey Jr.

    Reply
  100. I love how steampunk creates such great alternate realities! The clothing styles are pretty fun too!
    Steampunk and the Victorian Era both have reform as a recurring theme.
    One of my current favorite things about Sherlock Holmes is Robert Downey Jr.

    Reply
  101. I believe I enjoy steampunk because it takes a setting that I already think I know and recraft it into a new place that is at once both familiar and strange. As for Sherlock, his sheer unabashed self-confidence and arrogance are so genuinely true to who he is that one cannot fault him for it–he just is.

    Reply
  102. I believe I enjoy steampunk because it takes a setting that I already think I know and recraft it into a new place that is at once both familiar and strange. As for Sherlock, his sheer unabashed self-confidence and arrogance are so genuinely true to who he is that one cannot fault him for it–he just is.

    Reply
  103. I believe I enjoy steampunk because it takes a setting that I already think I know and recraft it into a new place that is at once both familiar and strange. As for Sherlock, his sheer unabashed self-confidence and arrogance are so genuinely true to who he is that one cannot fault him for it–he just is.

    Reply
  104. I believe I enjoy steampunk because it takes a setting that I already think I know and recraft it into a new place that is at once both familiar and strange. As for Sherlock, his sheer unabashed self-confidence and arrogance are so genuinely true to who he is that one cannot fault him for it–he just is.

    Reply
  105. I believe I enjoy steampunk because it takes a setting that I already think I know and recraft it into a new place that is at once both familiar and strange. As for Sherlock, his sheer unabashed self-confidence and arrogance are so genuinely true to who he is that one cannot fault him for it–he just is.

    Reply
  106. I’n my story, the explanation for the animate machines is based on our relationship with the natural universe. We hurt ourselves by compartmentalizing technology and nature as separate entities. I’ve looked into physical research and, while it doesn’t really impact this story so much, it presents a rich field of subject matter for the future!

    Reply
  107. I’n my story, the explanation for the animate machines is based on our relationship with the natural universe. We hurt ourselves by compartmentalizing technology and nature as separate entities. I’ve looked into physical research and, while it doesn’t really impact this story so much, it presents a rich field of subject matter for the future!

    Reply
  108. I’n my story, the explanation for the animate machines is based on our relationship with the natural universe. We hurt ourselves by compartmentalizing technology and nature as separate entities. I’ve looked into physical research and, while it doesn’t really impact this story so much, it presents a rich field of subject matter for the future!

    Reply
  109. I’n my story, the explanation for the animate machines is based on our relationship with the natural universe. We hurt ourselves by compartmentalizing technology and nature as separate entities. I’ve looked into physical research and, while it doesn’t really impact this story so much, it presents a rich field of subject matter for the future!

    Reply
  110. I’n my story, the explanation for the animate machines is based on our relationship with the natural universe. We hurt ourselves by compartmentalizing technology and nature as separate entities. I’ve looked into physical research and, while it doesn’t really impact this story so much, it presents a rich field of subject matter for the future!

    Reply

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