Edith, after the storm…

El_iconHey, it’s Edith, and it’s Sunday, and I survived another storm!

Here on Long Island, we get the rag-tag ends of hurricanes almost every year. Once in a while we get a whole hurricane. Everyone is predicting the next “big one,” which hasn’t come in over half a century and is certainly due. So when our storms ride on by us, no matter how bad they were, we feel lucky.

This one wasn’t so bad for my area. And today, in the aftermath, the sun is bright and world smells green and fresh and new.

daisyhib
Daisy today, shielding herself from the sun with my new hibiscus

So, no writing for me today.

And of course, how could I write yesterday, with the storm raging? Why, the computer could have been shut off at any moment! And I had to watch the rain.

And it’s the Labor Day Weekend.

There are three thousand other reasons not to write today.
I got a million of them.
There is only one good one
…and I haven’t found it yet.

A writer needs discipline, and guilt.

Guilt, I got.
Discipline is easier some days than others.

A deadline, a due date, whatever you call it: that’s the best discipline of all, whether it’s self-imposed, or in a contract you’ve signed.

Writing is an escape for the writer and the reader. But some days the world is so beautiful, you don’t want to leave it for a minute, for any reason. So when I get back to the computer I’ll try to keep writing a book that keeps you reading, come rain or come shine. That means writing a book that makes me return to it for the same reason. Forget similes, dialogues and first or third person narratives. Writing a book that competes with the world – that’s the hard part of writing.

A snoopy Edith wants to know: What are the books you couldn’t stop reading, no matter what? And what was that ‘what?’

21 thoughts on “Edith, after the storm…”

  1. What a difficult question to answer. Let’s see, I couldn’t stop reading Mary Jo’s Kiss of Fate. I read it even though I should not be reading it to finish my own story. I couldn’t quit reading Gaelen Foley’s The Duke even though I needed to put it down and go to bed so I could get up for work the next morning. I can never quit reading Diana Gabaldon’s Claire and Jamie saga regardless of what else I have to do. Recently I cannot quit reading Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond chronicles. I didn’t want to read it because the heroine in my wip is from Malta and her uncle is a Knight of St. John. I didn’t want Ms. Dunnet’s research to influence the outcome of my story. As it turns out, I could only hope and pray Ms. Dunnett’s anything would influence me. She’s brilliant and I’ll never achieve such greatness.
    I wrote like mad yesterday. We got the tail end of the hurricane, too. Lots of hard, slanting rain and wind…tree limbs falling to the ground. I love rainy days because I can sit inside and write without feeling guilty about not being outside!

    Reply
  2. What a difficult question to answer. Let’s see, I couldn’t stop reading Mary Jo’s Kiss of Fate. I read it even though I should not be reading it to finish my own story. I couldn’t quit reading Gaelen Foley’s The Duke even though I needed to put it down and go to bed so I could get up for work the next morning. I can never quit reading Diana Gabaldon’s Claire and Jamie saga regardless of what else I have to do. Recently I cannot quit reading Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond chronicles. I didn’t want to read it because the heroine in my wip is from Malta and her uncle is a Knight of St. John. I didn’t want Ms. Dunnet’s research to influence the outcome of my story. As it turns out, I could only hope and pray Ms. Dunnett’s anything would influence me. She’s brilliant and I’ll never achieve such greatness.
    I wrote like mad yesterday. We got the tail end of the hurricane, too. Lots of hard, slanting rain and wind…tree limbs falling to the ground. I love rainy days because I can sit inside and write without feeling guilty about not being outside!

    Reply
  3. What a difficult question to answer. Let’s see, I couldn’t stop reading Mary Jo’s Kiss of Fate. I read it even though I should not be reading it to finish my own story. I couldn’t quit reading Gaelen Foley’s The Duke even though I needed to put it down and go to bed so I could get up for work the next morning. I can never quit reading Diana Gabaldon’s Claire and Jamie saga regardless of what else I have to do. Recently I cannot quit reading Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond chronicles. I didn’t want to read it because the heroine in my wip is from Malta and her uncle is a Knight of St. John. I didn’t want Ms. Dunnet’s research to influence the outcome of my story. As it turns out, I could only hope and pray Ms. Dunnett’s anything would influence me. She’s brilliant and I’ll never achieve such greatness.
    I wrote like mad yesterday. We got the tail end of the hurricane, too. Lots of hard, slanting rain and wind…tree limbs falling to the ground. I love rainy days because I can sit inside and write without feeling guilty about not being outside!

    Reply
  4. Books I couldn’t put down…
    MJ’s KISS OF FATE and THE WILD CHILD. I sacrificed an entire night of sleep and went to work the next day.
    MJ’s PETALS IN THE STORM. Lost two days of writing.
    Amelia Atwater-Rhodes’s HAWKSONG. I picked it up in the library, read page one and never put it down. Sacrificed an entire day.
    Peter David’s IMZADI. Anita Diamant’s THE RED TENT. I cried cathartically at the end.
    Why? What drives me to sacrifice when my time is so precious? The characters bid me to do so. Their lives are real. Passionate. Pooled deep with purpose and drive. And they fight–within and without. I can smell what they smell. Feel what they touch. Taste their emotions.
    Touch my senses. All of them. With every scene. This is what drive me onward to the end and leaves me panting for more.
    Nina, salivating for QUEEN OF SHADOWS

    Reply
  5. Books I couldn’t put down…
    MJ’s KISS OF FATE and THE WILD CHILD. I sacrificed an entire night of sleep and went to work the next day.
    MJ’s PETALS IN THE STORM. Lost two days of writing.
    Amelia Atwater-Rhodes’s HAWKSONG. I picked it up in the library, read page one and never put it down. Sacrificed an entire day.
    Peter David’s IMZADI. Anita Diamant’s THE RED TENT. I cried cathartically at the end.
    Why? What drives me to sacrifice when my time is so precious? The characters bid me to do so. Their lives are real. Passionate. Pooled deep with purpose and drive. And they fight–within and without. I can smell what they smell. Feel what they touch. Taste their emotions.
    Touch my senses. All of them. With every scene. This is what drive me onward to the end and leaves me panting for more.
    Nina, salivating for QUEEN OF SHADOWS

    Reply
  6. Books I couldn’t put down…
    MJ’s KISS OF FATE and THE WILD CHILD. I sacrificed an entire night of sleep and went to work the next day.
    MJ’s PETALS IN THE STORM. Lost two days of writing.
    Amelia Atwater-Rhodes’s HAWKSONG. I picked it up in the library, read page one and never put it down. Sacrificed an entire day.
    Peter David’s IMZADI. Anita Diamant’s THE RED TENT. I cried cathartically at the end.
    Why? What drives me to sacrifice when my time is so precious? The characters bid me to do so. Their lives are real. Passionate. Pooled deep with purpose and drive. And they fight–within and without. I can smell what they smell. Feel what they touch. Taste their emotions.
    Touch my senses. All of them. With every scene. This is what drive me onward to the end and leaves me panting for more.
    Nina, salivating for QUEEN OF SHADOWS

    Reply
  7. 1. Most recently: LC’s ‘Mr. Impossible’. I approached it with trepidation (forgive me, Loretta) due to the type of cover I would never of my own free will pick up (metallic purplish pink ? A headless male body with its “working equipment” emphasized to the point of practically being thrust into my face ? Why, oh why ????) but the feedback on a review site was so compelling I dove in. And will be eternally glad I did. Mr. Impossible rocketed straight to my top ten list of best books, right alongside
    2. Elizabeth Peters “Crocodile on the Sandbank”. Same country, sameish time period, just as funny, just as compelling. Sigh.
    3. Yann Martel “Life of Pi”. Unlike anything I have ever come across. Utterly singular protagonist, setting, inner and outer conflicts. Breathtaking and unputdownable. And finally,
    4. Lindsey Davis “The Silver Pigs”. The first in the series about the whipsmart Roman Falco, and his whippersmarter counterpart Helena. So, so good.
    I confess that my irresistable need to find out what happened next in the pages of these books made me neglect reading what happened next in the pages of the books my little boys were engrossed in at the time. I rationalize my selfish behaviour by saying that it wasn’t ‘new’ words I withheld from their eager little minds, but the hundredth (thousandth ?) repetitions of the immortal classics Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham, which they had memorized anyway. Really. Oh all right (points finger at self) Bad Mommy !

    Reply
  8. 1. Most recently: LC’s ‘Mr. Impossible’. I approached it with trepidation (forgive me, Loretta) due to the type of cover I would never of my own free will pick up (metallic purplish pink ? A headless male body with its “working equipment” emphasized to the point of practically being thrust into my face ? Why, oh why ????) but the feedback on a review site was so compelling I dove in. And will be eternally glad I did. Mr. Impossible rocketed straight to my top ten list of best books, right alongside
    2. Elizabeth Peters “Crocodile on the Sandbank”. Same country, sameish time period, just as funny, just as compelling. Sigh.
    3. Yann Martel “Life of Pi”. Unlike anything I have ever come across. Utterly singular protagonist, setting, inner and outer conflicts. Breathtaking and unputdownable. And finally,
    4. Lindsey Davis “The Silver Pigs”. The first in the series about the whipsmart Roman Falco, and his whippersmarter counterpart Helena. So, so good.
    I confess that my irresistable need to find out what happened next in the pages of these books made me neglect reading what happened next in the pages of the books my little boys were engrossed in at the time. I rationalize my selfish behaviour by saying that it wasn’t ‘new’ words I withheld from their eager little minds, but the hundredth (thousandth ?) repetitions of the immortal classics Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham, which they had memorized anyway. Really. Oh all right (points finger at self) Bad Mommy !

    Reply
  9. 1. Most recently: LC’s ‘Mr. Impossible’. I approached it with trepidation (forgive me, Loretta) due to the type of cover I would never of my own free will pick up (metallic purplish pink ? A headless male body with its “working equipment” emphasized to the point of practically being thrust into my face ? Why, oh why ????) but the feedback on a review site was so compelling I dove in. And will be eternally glad I did. Mr. Impossible rocketed straight to my top ten list of best books, right alongside
    2. Elizabeth Peters “Crocodile on the Sandbank”. Same country, sameish time period, just as funny, just as compelling. Sigh.
    3. Yann Martel “Life of Pi”. Unlike anything I have ever come across. Utterly singular protagonist, setting, inner and outer conflicts. Breathtaking and unputdownable. And finally,
    4. Lindsey Davis “The Silver Pigs”. The first in the series about the whipsmart Roman Falco, and his whippersmarter counterpart Helena. So, so good.
    I confess that my irresistable need to find out what happened next in the pages of these books made me neglect reading what happened next in the pages of the books my little boys were engrossed in at the time. I rationalize my selfish behaviour by saying that it wasn’t ‘new’ words I withheld from their eager little minds, but the hundredth (thousandth ?) repetitions of the immortal classics Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham, which they had memorized anyway. Really. Oh all right (points finger at self) Bad Mommy !

    Reply
  10. Edith,
    I supposed it would be nice to hear that I couldn’t put one of your books down, but I haven’t read any yet.
    The good news is thatI bought one, thanks to this blog. I will read How to Seduce a Bride as soon as I’m finished my wip… about two weeks.
    Cathy

    Reply
  11. Edith,
    I supposed it would be nice to hear that I couldn’t put one of your books down, but I haven’t read any yet.
    The good news is thatI bought one, thanks to this blog. I will read How to Seduce a Bride as soon as I’m finished my wip… about two weeks.
    Cathy

    Reply
  12. Edith,
    I supposed it would be nice to hear that I couldn’t put one of your books down, but I haven’t read any yet.
    The good news is thatI bought one, thanks to this blog. I will read How to Seduce a Bride as soon as I’m finished my wip… about two weeks.
    Cathy

    Reply
  13. Well, books that I forgot everything for:
    1. JKRowlings – Every Harry Potter book the day it comes out.
    2. Diana Gabaldon – Jamie and Clare’s new books the day they come out.
    3. Mary Jo Putney’s The Rake
    4. Julia Quinn – It’s in His Kiss
    I could go on and on…I am one of THOSE people who given a good book forget that there is a world outside of the pages in front of my nose. I don’t sleep, I don’t eat – I just drink water (got to keep hydrated or the words stop making sense!!!).
    I have been known to go to work (I get off at midnight), come home and start a book and forget to go to sleep…making for a very interesting day at work the next day!! But there was really no way that i could stop before the end of the story.

    Reply
  14. Well, books that I forgot everything for:
    1. JKRowlings – Every Harry Potter book the day it comes out.
    2. Diana Gabaldon – Jamie and Clare’s new books the day they come out.
    3. Mary Jo Putney’s The Rake
    4. Julia Quinn – It’s in His Kiss
    I could go on and on…I am one of THOSE people who given a good book forget that there is a world outside of the pages in front of my nose. I don’t sleep, I don’t eat – I just drink water (got to keep hydrated or the words stop making sense!!!).
    I have been known to go to work (I get off at midnight), come home and start a book and forget to go to sleep…making for a very interesting day at work the next day!! But there was really no way that i could stop before the end of the story.

    Reply
  15. Well, books that I forgot everything for:
    1. JKRowlings – Every Harry Potter book the day it comes out.
    2. Diana Gabaldon – Jamie and Clare’s new books the day they come out.
    3. Mary Jo Putney’s The Rake
    4. Julia Quinn – It’s in His Kiss
    I could go on and on…I am one of THOSE people who given a good book forget that there is a world outside of the pages in front of my nose. I don’t sleep, I don’t eat – I just drink water (got to keep hydrated or the words stop making sense!!!).
    I have been known to go to work (I get off at midnight), come home and start a book and forget to go to sleep…making for a very interesting day at work the next day!! But there was really no way that i could stop before the end of the story.

    Reply
  16. For me, it’s more “What book do you finish, then turn over and read again from the beginning, without pause?
    PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
    Anne McCaffrey’s DRAGONSONG
    A couple of books by that Layton person
    The only thing I can recall reading without putting it down (and barely pausing to eat and sleep) was THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

    Reply
  17. For me, it’s more “What book do you finish, then turn over and read again from the beginning, without pause?
    PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
    Anne McCaffrey’s DRAGONSONG
    A couple of books by that Layton person
    The only thing I can recall reading without putting it down (and barely pausing to eat and sleep) was THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

    Reply
  18. For me, it’s more “What book do you finish, then turn over and read again from the beginning, without pause?
    PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
    Anne McCaffrey’s DRAGONSONG
    A couple of books by that Layton person
    The only thing I can recall reading without putting it down (and barely pausing to eat and sleep) was THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

    Reply
  19. I have shelves of keepers which I gobble up everytime I pick
    them up to reread.
    On this trip to Montreal, I brought How to Seduce a Bride. The train ride was 5 hours. I loved the book so I finished it up that night before sleeping.
    Mr. Impossible is another keeper for me. I love the humour. When the next book comes out (this spring?) I will reread Miss Wonderful and Mr. Impossible before gobbling the next book in the series.
    I love Mary Balogh. I reread her early signets each November ending with Christmas Bride. They put me in a loving mood for the season. I usually go on to many of her thicker classics from that. Wulfric is always a treat.
    Actually I have a favourite book or series from all the auhtors at this site which I just discovered.The new Jo Beverley is on my bookstand right now.

    Reply
  20. I have shelves of keepers which I gobble up everytime I pick
    them up to reread.
    On this trip to Montreal, I brought How to Seduce a Bride. The train ride was 5 hours. I loved the book so I finished it up that night before sleeping.
    Mr. Impossible is another keeper for me. I love the humour. When the next book comes out (this spring?) I will reread Miss Wonderful and Mr. Impossible before gobbling the next book in the series.
    I love Mary Balogh. I reread her early signets each November ending with Christmas Bride. They put me in a loving mood for the season. I usually go on to many of her thicker classics from that. Wulfric is always a treat.
    Actually I have a favourite book or series from all the auhtors at this site which I just discovered.The new Jo Beverley is on my bookstand right now.

    Reply
  21. I have shelves of keepers which I gobble up everytime I pick
    them up to reread.
    On this trip to Montreal, I brought How to Seduce a Bride. The train ride was 5 hours. I loved the book so I finished it up that night before sleeping.
    Mr. Impossible is another keeper for me. I love the humour. When the next book comes out (this spring?) I will reread Miss Wonderful and Mr. Impossible before gobbling the next book in the series.
    I love Mary Balogh. I reread her early signets each November ending with Christmas Bride. They put me in a loving mood for the season. I usually go on to many of her thicker classics from that. Wulfric is always a treat.
    Actually I have a favourite book or series from all the auhtors at this site which I just discovered.The new Jo Beverley is on my bookstand right now.

    Reply

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