Edith Layton: His Dark and Dangerous Ways & Interview, Part the Second

Cat_243_dover By Mary Jo

Friday Edith and I talked mostly about her wonderful new release, His Dark and Dangerous Ways, from Avon.  (The perceptive will note that another June release is Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways.  Why two Avon historical romances in the same month have Ways in the title is A Mystery.) 

Today I’m asking Edith more about her writing career in general, from earliest stirrings to how she’s grown and changed over the years. 

MJP:  Edith, how did you start writing?  Were you making up stories in kindergarten with a pencil clutched in one chubby fist, or did you come to the trade later?  And might you have ended up an sff writer?

EL: I began writing when I was eight.  I remember the year, because my parents had sent me away to camp – which I hated.  So I wrote a ‘revenge of the camper’ book.  I still recall the plot: Our Heroine is sent away to Camp.  She hates it.  She runs away. ( fade to scene of parents anguishing.  “Oh woe!  Why did we send  her to that terrible camp?  Oh poor us!”)

Our heroine finds a lovely family of “hill-billies” who take her in.  (Hill-Billies?  In upstate New York?) Nonetheless they love Our Heroine.  She explains things to them.  One thing I distinctly remember –  her telling them that lightbulbs are not “little bowls for fish.”

Ah. youth.

Eventually she goes home.  Much celebrating. The fatted knish is served.  Parents vow to never ever send her to Camp again.

Fin.

Edith_daisy A whole, real book!  And I wrote it.  I cheated, though.  I bought a marbleized notebook, and when I ran out of description and dialogue, I illustrated it, so it would fit, cover to cover, like a real book.

It was one of many items thrown away when we moved.  We moved a lot. sigh.

Then I wrote poetry.

When I was eleven I wrote one that I showed to my brother – the English Major at college.  He said it was too good for a child to have written.  That evidently I had read it somewhere and "unconsciously" plagiarized.  (He was also taking an Elementary Psych course)  I tore it up and never wrote poetry again.  It also gave me a lifelong terror of plagiarizing.  Which isn’t all bad.

(Note from MJP: Many people who grow up to become professional writers are accused early of plagiarism because they’re "too good."  It’s a real joy-killer)

Then I wrote short stories.

I also used to write plays, once upon a time, in college.  I was good at it, too!  Had a one act produced and won a prize, even.

But the field was murder to get into.  Especially for a woman.

So then I wrote publicity.  Then, free lance newspaper and magazine features – that were published!

Abandonedbride And then—novels.

One of my first efforts at a novel was Science Fiction.

MJP:  How did you become interested in writing historical novels?

EL: After writing all that freelance stuff I needed more room.  I decided to go with a novel.

I wrote the above mentioned Science Fiction novel, a Mystery, and a Historical Romance (because I so loved Georgette Heyer) and sent them all out.  I loved them all, but decided to go with whatever sold first.  I sometimes wonder what my life and work would have been like if I’d sold one of the others first.

MJP:  What was your first book, and how well do you think it characterizes your latest work?

My first published book was The Duke’s Wager for Signet.  Took me over two years to sell it.  (I’ve told Dukeswager that story too often!)  And then, turns out it was reprinted it a lot.

It’s a “traditional regency.”  In spite of the setting, it’s not much like my latest works.  My style was denser, more circuitous then.  More: "Regency."   A single sentence could run for half a page.

My latest work, like other recent ones, is more modern, freer.  Less “Regency speak,” too.

I guess the difference is if you took one of my pages from Wager and put periods in instead of commas wherever they appear, you’ll get the gist of the difference. 

MJP:  What was the biggest mistake you made when you first began writing?

Starting every book with weather.  Rain.  Or snow.  Or fog.  I  liked to do settings, as in Victorian novels.  I’m not sure that was a mistake, but we just don’t do that anymore.  And I’m not sure if that’s better, actually.

MJP: I loved those moody, scenic introductions!  Not for nothing were you called The Weather Queen.  Which of your characters is your favorite, and why?

EL: Ah.  That’s like asking which of my children is my favorite.  I don’t know, can’t say, and besides, my opinion changes every day.   <g>

MJP:  Which book, if any, was the most difficult for you to write, and why?

EL:  No one book in particular.  Some come easy, like fresh laid eggs: immediate, whole and perfect.  Others need constant tinkering.  Some need heaps of research and timelines. 

Fireflower Some were books I wrote for SIGNET: The Crimson Crown, about the Princes in the Tower, The FIreflower, about the Restoration and the Great Fire of London, the “straight” Historical, Queen of Shadows (written as Edith Felber) about Edward Second’s wife, Isabella and more. 

I also had two books set  in Victorian America: The Gilded Cage and The Silvery Moon for SIGNET;  and The Wedding and A True Lady set in Georgian Times for POCKET, and even more. 

Yes, I’ve traveled through time, and love to do it.  Even others set in periods I know very well sometimes give me even more work – if the characters are difficult and rebellious once I start writing them.

MJP:  What do you consider key elements of a great story?

EL:  Great characters.  That, to me, is the most important thing.  And the writer’s “voice.”  My favorite authors give me that.  I try to write that way too.  Plots are important, of course.  But, as with movies I love, it’s the characters that make them great.

MJP:  Are there any trends you hope to see in romance in the next few years?    Lordofdishonor

EL: More history in historical novels.  Not just "wallpaper" for the backgrounds.

MJP:  What is the best part about being a writer?  The most frustrating?

EL:  The best?  I’m doing what I must.  I really don’t think I had a choice.  I write.  That’s that.

My mother tried to write a novel.  My brother was a news writer.  My brother-in-law was a famous comedy writer. 

Two of my kids are writers.  (One is a visual artist, but I’ll stick to the writers today.  <G>)

Schrodingers_ball Adam’s book Schrodinger’s Ball came out last year.

He performs comedy too.  He also writes for Bill Maher on TV, and is on NPR’s WAIT WAIT, DON’T TELL ME.  His website:  www.fanaticalapathy.com

MJP: I love listening to Adam on Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, which is one of the funniest shows on radio. ( http://www.npr.org/programs/waitwait/ ) He’s got a great deep voice, and he’s amazingly good at news quizzing.  When he’s on, he usually wins.

EL:  My daughter Susie performs comedy and writes as well.  She does the TRU TV (formerly Court TV) website, and has a blog on www.babble.comhttp://www.babble.com/cs/blogs/toddlertube/default.aspx  and she also has one at:  http://felberfrolics.blogspot.com/

So I guess it’s really in the blood.  If I don’t write for more than a week, I have nightmares.  True!

The most frustrating thing about writing?  Sometimes the plot, characters and concept turns out altogether different from what I thought it would be.  That’s no necessarily bad, but it is frustrating.  That – and not being able to sell a book (shudder)  of course. <g>

His_dark_and_dangerous_ways MJP:  We haven’t even touched on your wonderfu novellas or lots of other questions, so we’ll have to do this again someday! 

Remember—a signed copy of His Dark and Dangerous Ways goes to someone who comments on either of Edith’s interviews by midnight Wednesday.

Thanks so much for sharing, Edith.  I shall cherish the image of the goose dancers forever. <g>

Mary Jo

105 thoughts on “Edith Layton: His Dark and Dangerous Ways & Interview, Part the Second”

  1. After all these years together NOW you tell me your first book was about a NY’er explaining the world to Southerners?
    I forgive you. I wasn’t even born yet.
    The plagiarism thing is very interesting – I had that experience in high school. I ended up getting transferred to another class (after much drama) because the teacher was determined to see me punished. Still really dislike that woman, and it’s been decades. (Click the URL to see me bald!)

    Reply
  2. After all these years together NOW you tell me your first book was about a NY’er explaining the world to Southerners?
    I forgive you. I wasn’t even born yet.
    The plagiarism thing is very interesting – I had that experience in high school. I ended up getting transferred to another class (after much drama) because the teacher was determined to see me punished. Still really dislike that woman, and it’s been decades. (Click the URL to see me bald!)

    Reply
  3. After all these years together NOW you tell me your first book was about a NY’er explaining the world to Southerners?
    I forgive you. I wasn’t even born yet.
    The plagiarism thing is very interesting – I had that experience in high school. I ended up getting transferred to another class (after much drama) because the teacher was determined to see me punished. Still really dislike that woman, and it’s been decades. (Click the URL to see me bald!)

    Reply
  4. After all these years together NOW you tell me your first book was about a NY’er explaining the world to Southerners?
    I forgive you. I wasn’t even born yet.
    The plagiarism thing is very interesting – I had that experience in high school. I ended up getting transferred to another class (after much drama) because the teacher was determined to see me punished. Still really dislike that woman, and it’s been decades. (Click the URL to see me bald!)

    Reply
  5. After all these years together NOW you tell me your first book was about a NY’er explaining the world to Southerners?
    I forgive you. I wasn’t even born yet.
    The plagiarism thing is very interesting – I had that experience in high school. I ended up getting transferred to another class (after much drama) because the teacher was determined to see me punished. Still really dislike that woman, and it’s been decades. (Click the URL to see me bald!)

    Reply
  6. Edith, I’ve always loved your stories in the Signet Regency Christmas/Valentine anthologies; any chance that they will be collected and published in one volume?
    Incidentally, I think my all-time favorites of yours are A TRUE LADY and LOVE IN DISGUISE.
    And since we seem to still disagree about the fate of the Princes in the Tower, I suggest we settle it by wrestling naked in a butt of malmsey. Sherrie can sell tickets…

    Reply
  7. Edith, I’ve always loved your stories in the Signet Regency Christmas/Valentine anthologies; any chance that they will be collected and published in one volume?
    Incidentally, I think my all-time favorites of yours are A TRUE LADY and LOVE IN DISGUISE.
    And since we seem to still disagree about the fate of the Princes in the Tower, I suggest we settle it by wrestling naked in a butt of malmsey. Sherrie can sell tickets…

    Reply
  8. Edith, I’ve always loved your stories in the Signet Regency Christmas/Valentine anthologies; any chance that they will be collected and published in one volume?
    Incidentally, I think my all-time favorites of yours are A TRUE LADY and LOVE IN DISGUISE.
    And since we seem to still disagree about the fate of the Princes in the Tower, I suggest we settle it by wrestling naked in a butt of malmsey. Sherrie can sell tickets…

    Reply
  9. Edith, I’ve always loved your stories in the Signet Regency Christmas/Valentine anthologies; any chance that they will be collected and published in one volume?
    Incidentally, I think my all-time favorites of yours are A TRUE LADY and LOVE IN DISGUISE.
    And since we seem to still disagree about the fate of the Princes in the Tower, I suggest we settle it by wrestling naked in a butt of malmsey. Sherrie can sell tickets…

    Reply
  10. Edith, I’ve always loved your stories in the Signet Regency Christmas/Valentine anthologies; any chance that they will be collected and published in one volume?
    Incidentally, I think my all-time favorites of yours are A TRUE LADY and LOVE IN DISGUISE.
    And since we seem to still disagree about the fate of the Princes in the Tower, I suggest we settle it by wrestling naked in a butt of malmsey. Sherrie can sell tickets…

    Reply
  11. I second talpianna’s request. I would love to read all your old Signet Regencies (and Mary Jo’s and Patricia’s and Jo’s (?), they already did Loretta’s because I have them, did I miss anyone?). Finding used copies on the web is almost impossible, and I like brand new copies to keep. And the most important part–you make money on reprints, and nothing on used books :-).

    Reply
  12. I second talpianna’s request. I would love to read all your old Signet Regencies (and Mary Jo’s and Patricia’s and Jo’s (?), they already did Loretta’s because I have them, did I miss anyone?). Finding used copies on the web is almost impossible, and I like brand new copies to keep. And the most important part–you make money on reprints, and nothing on used books :-).

    Reply
  13. I second talpianna’s request. I would love to read all your old Signet Regencies (and Mary Jo’s and Patricia’s and Jo’s (?), they already did Loretta’s because I have them, did I miss anyone?). Finding used copies on the web is almost impossible, and I like brand new copies to keep. And the most important part–you make money on reprints, and nothing on used books :-).

    Reply
  14. I second talpianna’s request. I would love to read all your old Signet Regencies (and Mary Jo’s and Patricia’s and Jo’s (?), they already did Loretta’s because I have them, did I miss anyone?). Finding used copies on the web is almost impossible, and I like brand new copies to keep. And the most important part–you make money on reprints, and nothing on used books :-).

    Reply
  15. I second talpianna’s request. I would love to read all your old Signet Regencies (and Mary Jo’s and Patricia’s and Jo’s (?), they already did Loretta’s because I have them, did I miss anyone?). Finding used copies on the web is almost impossible, and I like brand new copies to keep. And the most important part–you make money on reprints, and nothing on used books :-).

    Reply
  16. This most recent book sounds intriguing. I love the heroine teaching tots to dance.
    Although I’m not a writer, I do understand the idea of feeling a “Calling” in life. It’s a wonderful thing when you get to follow it.

    Reply
  17. This most recent book sounds intriguing. I love the heroine teaching tots to dance.
    Although I’m not a writer, I do understand the idea of feeling a “Calling” in life. It’s a wonderful thing when you get to follow it.

    Reply
  18. This most recent book sounds intriguing. I love the heroine teaching tots to dance.
    Although I’m not a writer, I do understand the idea of feeling a “Calling” in life. It’s a wonderful thing when you get to follow it.

    Reply
  19. This most recent book sounds intriguing. I love the heroine teaching tots to dance.
    Although I’m not a writer, I do understand the idea of feeling a “Calling” in life. It’s a wonderful thing when you get to follow it.

    Reply
  20. This most recent book sounds intriguing. I love the heroine teaching tots to dance.
    Although I’m not a writer, I do understand the idea of feeling a “Calling” in life. It’s a wonderful thing when you get to follow it.

    Reply
  21. One of my favorite short stories no matter what the genre is Edith’s about gingerbread from an old Signet Christmas anthology. The hero talks to almost everyone he knows during his search for the source of the gingerbread smell wafting through his window. I loved how this simple dessert became the vehicle for presenting the joy or sadness of each character’s life. I especially wept for his mistress, who became a fully rounded character in a page and a half, something some other authors (no Wenches, of course) have a problem doing over the course of an entire book.

    Reply
  22. One of my favorite short stories no matter what the genre is Edith’s about gingerbread from an old Signet Christmas anthology. The hero talks to almost everyone he knows during his search for the source of the gingerbread smell wafting through his window. I loved how this simple dessert became the vehicle for presenting the joy or sadness of each character’s life. I especially wept for his mistress, who became a fully rounded character in a page and a half, something some other authors (no Wenches, of course) have a problem doing over the course of an entire book.

    Reply
  23. One of my favorite short stories no matter what the genre is Edith’s about gingerbread from an old Signet Christmas anthology. The hero talks to almost everyone he knows during his search for the source of the gingerbread smell wafting through his window. I loved how this simple dessert became the vehicle for presenting the joy or sadness of each character’s life. I especially wept for his mistress, who became a fully rounded character in a page and a half, something some other authors (no Wenches, of course) have a problem doing over the course of an entire book.

    Reply
  24. One of my favorite short stories no matter what the genre is Edith’s about gingerbread from an old Signet Christmas anthology. The hero talks to almost everyone he knows during his search for the source of the gingerbread smell wafting through his window. I loved how this simple dessert became the vehicle for presenting the joy or sadness of each character’s life. I especially wept for his mistress, who became a fully rounded character in a page and a half, something some other authors (no Wenches, of course) have a problem doing over the course of an entire book.

    Reply
  25. One of my favorite short stories no matter what the genre is Edith’s about gingerbread from an old Signet Christmas anthology. The hero talks to almost everyone he knows during his search for the source of the gingerbread smell wafting through his window. I loved how this simple dessert became the vehicle for presenting the joy or sadness of each character’s life. I especially wept for his mistress, who became a fully rounded character in a page and a half, something some other authors (no Wenches, of course) have a problem doing over the course of an entire book.

    Reply
  26. I remember that gingerbread story. I loved those Signet Regency Christmas anthologies. I wish they’d reprint all of them.

    Reply
  27. I remember that gingerbread story. I loved those Signet Regency Christmas anthologies. I wish they’d reprint all of them.

    Reply
  28. I remember that gingerbread story. I loved those Signet Regency Christmas anthologies. I wish they’d reprint all of them.

    Reply
  29. I remember that gingerbread story. I loved those Signet Regency Christmas anthologies. I wish they’d reprint all of them.

    Reply
  30. I remember that gingerbread story. I loved those Signet Regency Christmas anthologies. I wish they’d reprint all of them.

    Reply
  31. I loved those anthologies as well, and still have my copies. My favorite Edith Layton story is the one about the stray puppy who adopts the man who thinks he doesn’t need to offer fidelity to his fiancee and has been rejected after telling her so. The puppy wasn’t actually named as a Bernese Mountain Dog, but having had one, I recognized the markings and believed in the story all the more. I re-read it every now and then and get teary every time.

    Reply
  32. I loved those anthologies as well, and still have my copies. My favorite Edith Layton story is the one about the stray puppy who adopts the man who thinks he doesn’t need to offer fidelity to his fiancee and has been rejected after telling her so. The puppy wasn’t actually named as a Bernese Mountain Dog, but having had one, I recognized the markings and believed in the story all the more. I re-read it every now and then and get teary every time.

    Reply
  33. I loved those anthologies as well, and still have my copies. My favorite Edith Layton story is the one about the stray puppy who adopts the man who thinks he doesn’t need to offer fidelity to his fiancee and has been rejected after telling her so. The puppy wasn’t actually named as a Bernese Mountain Dog, but having had one, I recognized the markings and believed in the story all the more. I re-read it every now and then and get teary every time.

    Reply
  34. I loved those anthologies as well, and still have my copies. My favorite Edith Layton story is the one about the stray puppy who adopts the man who thinks he doesn’t need to offer fidelity to his fiancee and has been rejected after telling her so. The puppy wasn’t actually named as a Bernese Mountain Dog, but having had one, I recognized the markings and believed in the story all the more. I re-read it every now and then and get teary every time.

    Reply
  35. I loved those anthologies as well, and still have my copies. My favorite Edith Layton story is the one about the stray puppy who adopts the man who thinks he doesn’t need to offer fidelity to his fiancee and has been rejected after telling her so. The puppy wasn’t actually named as a Bernese Mountain Dog, but having had one, I recognized the markings and believed in the story all the more. I re-read it every now and then and get teary every time.

    Reply
  36. I adore the gingerbread story – it’s my second favorite after Fireflower. It was so perfectly evocative of a specific surrounding – downright cinematic.

    Reply
  37. I adore the gingerbread story – it’s my second favorite after Fireflower. It was so perfectly evocative of a specific surrounding – downright cinematic.

    Reply
  38. I adore the gingerbread story – it’s my second favorite after Fireflower. It was so perfectly evocative of a specific surrounding – downright cinematic.

    Reply
  39. I adore the gingerbread story – it’s my second favorite after Fireflower. It was so perfectly evocative of a specific surrounding – downright cinematic.

    Reply
  40. I adore the gingerbread story – it’s my second favorite after Fireflower. It was so perfectly evocative of a specific surrounding – downright cinematic.

    Reply
  41. +JMJ+
    It’s really too bad that you lost the notebook with your first story, Edith! =( I’m sure a lot of your fans would be thrilled to read your “juvenalia”!
    Now I’m going to expose myself as someone who hasn’t read as many of your books as I should have with the following question. =P
    Edith, are any of your heroes or heroines also have a natural affinity for writing? I’m always fascinated by characters who are writers; I imagine them as reflections of the writer whose book I’m reading.

    Reply
  42. +JMJ+
    It’s really too bad that you lost the notebook with your first story, Edith! =( I’m sure a lot of your fans would be thrilled to read your “juvenalia”!
    Now I’m going to expose myself as someone who hasn’t read as many of your books as I should have with the following question. =P
    Edith, are any of your heroes or heroines also have a natural affinity for writing? I’m always fascinated by characters who are writers; I imagine them as reflections of the writer whose book I’m reading.

    Reply
  43. +JMJ+
    It’s really too bad that you lost the notebook with your first story, Edith! =( I’m sure a lot of your fans would be thrilled to read your “juvenalia”!
    Now I’m going to expose myself as someone who hasn’t read as many of your books as I should have with the following question. =P
    Edith, are any of your heroes or heroines also have a natural affinity for writing? I’m always fascinated by characters who are writers; I imagine them as reflections of the writer whose book I’m reading.

    Reply
  44. +JMJ+
    It’s really too bad that you lost the notebook with your first story, Edith! =( I’m sure a lot of your fans would be thrilled to read your “juvenalia”!
    Now I’m going to expose myself as someone who hasn’t read as many of your books as I should have with the following question. =P
    Edith, are any of your heroes or heroines also have a natural affinity for writing? I’m always fascinated by characters who are writers; I imagine them as reflections of the writer whose book I’m reading.

    Reply
  45. +JMJ+
    It’s really too bad that you lost the notebook with your first story, Edith! =( I’m sure a lot of your fans would be thrilled to read your “juvenalia”!
    Now I’m going to expose myself as someone who hasn’t read as many of your books as I should have with the following question. =P
    Edith, are any of your heroes or heroines also have a natural affinity for writing? I’m always fascinated by characters who are writers; I imagine them as reflections of the writer whose book I’m reading.

    Reply
  46. Many many thanks for your Christmas novella praises, peoples. But since Signet still owns the rights to them, they’re the folks you should ask about re-issues and new collections. If it were my choice, sure, I’d love to see them out again!
    As for the gingerbread – anyone ever notice that it seldom tastes as good as it smells, or as you think it ought to taste?
    And Christina – I never have had a writing heroine – or hero. Hmmm……….

    Reply
  47. Many many thanks for your Christmas novella praises, peoples. But since Signet still owns the rights to them, they’re the folks you should ask about re-issues and new collections. If it were my choice, sure, I’d love to see them out again!
    As for the gingerbread – anyone ever notice that it seldom tastes as good as it smells, or as you think it ought to taste?
    And Christina – I never have had a writing heroine – or hero. Hmmm……….

    Reply
  48. Many many thanks for your Christmas novella praises, peoples. But since Signet still owns the rights to them, they’re the folks you should ask about re-issues and new collections. If it were my choice, sure, I’d love to see them out again!
    As for the gingerbread – anyone ever notice that it seldom tastes as good as it smells, or as you think it ought to taste?
    And Christina – I never have had a writing heroine – or hero. Hmmm……….

    Reply
  49. Many many thanks for your Christmas novella praises, peoples. But since Signet still owns the rights to them, they’re the folks you should ask about re-issues and new collections. If it were my choice, sure, I’d love to see them out again!
    As for the gingerbread – anyone ever notice that it seldom tastes as good as it smells, or as you think it ought to taste?
    And Christina – I never have had a writing heroine – or hero. Hmmm……….

    Reply
  50. Many many thanks for your Christmas novella praises, peoples. But since Signet still owns the rights to them, they’re the folks you should ask about re-issues and new collections. If it were my choice, sure, I’d love to see them out again!
    As for the gingerbread – anyone ever notice that it seldom tastes as good as it smells, or as you think it ought to taste?
    And Christina – I never have had a writing heroine – or hero. Hmmm……….

    Reply
  51. Do any of you read Nancy Atherton’s cozy mysteries featuring a kindly ghost called Aunt Dimity? She has recipes in them, and one was for traditional gingerbread, complete with gilt.
    Liz M.– Does your mandlebrot come in sets?

    Reply
  52. Do any of you read Nancy Atherton’s cozy mysteries featuring a kindly ghost called Aunt Dimity? She has recipes in them, and one was for traditional gingerbread, complete with gilt.
    Liz M.– Does your mandlebrot come in sets?

    Reply
  53. Do any of you read Nancy Atherton’s cozy mysteries featuring a kindly ghost called Aunt Dimity? She has recipes in them, and one was for traditional gingerbread, complete with gilt.
    Liz M.– Does your mandlebrot come in sets?

    Reply
  54. Do any of you read Nancy Atherton’s cozy mysteries featuring a kindly ghost called Aunt Dimity? She has recipes in them, and one was for traditional gingerbread, complete with gilt.
    Liz M.– Does your mandlebrot come in sets?

    Reply
  55. Do any of you read Nancy Atherton’s cozy mysteries featuring a kindly ghost called Aunt Dimity? She has recipes in them, and one was for traditional gingerbread, complete with gilt.
    Liz M.– Does your mandlebrot come in sets?

    Reply
  56. Mandelbrot in sets? What have I been missing?
    I like the kind with candied cherries in them. I know, not traditional. But O! so yum.
    And gingerbread with gilt? Have read about it, but never seen such treats.

    Reply
  57. Mandelbrot in sets? What have I been missing?
    I like the kind with candied cherries in them. I know, not traditional. But O! so yum.
    And gingerbread with gilt? Have read about it, but never seen such treats.

    Reply
  58. Mandelbrot in sets? What have I been missing?
    I like the kind with candied cherries in them. I know, not traditional. But O! so yum.
    And gingerbread with gilt? Have read about it, but never seen such treats.

    Reply
  59. Mandelbrot in sets? What have I been missing?
    I like the kind with candied cherries in them. I know, not traditional. But O! so yum.
    And gingerbread with gilt? Have read about it, but never seen such treats.

    Reply
  60. Mandelbrot in sets? What have I been missing?
    I like the kind with candied cherries in them. I know, not traditional. But O! so yum.
    And gingerbread with gilt? Have read about it, but never seen such treats.

    Reply
  61. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set
    Math stuff, not yummy. I make mine marbled with melted chocolate and hazelnut & almond powder. Not traditional either, but I often skip toasting it too.

    Reply
  62. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set
    Math stuff, not yummy. I make mine marbled with melted chocolate and hazelnut & almond powder. Not traditional either, but I often skip toasting it too.

    Reply
  63. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set
    Math stuff, not yummy. I make mine marbled with melted chocolate and hazelnut & almond powder. Not traditional either, but I often skip toasting it too.

    Reply
  64. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set
    Math stuff, not yummy. I make mine marbled with melted chocolate and hazelnut & almond powder. Not traditional either, but I often skip toasting it too.

    Reply
  65. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set
    Math stuff, not yummy. I make mine marbled with melted chocolate and hazelnut & almond powder. Not traditional either, but I often skip toasting it too.

    Reply
  66. Sorry, Edith, I was making a bad food/math pun.
    Gilded gingerbread was popular at fairs at least as far back as Tudor times, and was also available in medieval days, though probably only at the more aristocratic tables. Haven’t you heard the expression, “Well, that rubs the gilt off the gingerbread!” meaning that that spoils the experience or item?
    Thin sheets of edible gold are still available. I found the recipe from AUNT DIMITY: DETECTIVE on Nancy Atherton’s website:
    http://www.aunt-dimity.com/Pym_Sister_Gingerbread.htm
    Here is a history of gingerbread:
    http://www.geocities.com/margosgingerbread/history.html

    Reply
  67. Sorry, Edith, I was making a bad food/math pun.
    Gilded gingerbread was popular at fairs at least as far back as Tudor times, and was also available in medieval days, though probably only at the more aristocratic tables. Haven’t you heard the expression, “Well, that rubs the gilt off the gingerbread!” meaning that that spoils the experience or item?
    Thin sheets of edible gold are still available. I found the recipe from AUNT DIMITY: DETECTIVE on Nancy Atherton’s website:
    http://www.aunt-dimity.com/Pym_Sister_Gingerbread.htm
    Here is a history of gingerbread:
    http://www.geocities.com/margosgingerbread/history.html

    Reply
  68. Sorry, Edith, I was making a bad food/math pun.
    Gilded gingerbread was popular at fairs at least as far back as Tudor times, and was also available in medieval days, though probably only at the more aristocratic tables. Haven’t you heard the expression, “Well, that rubs the gilt off the gingerbread!” meaning that that spoils the experience or item?
    Thin sheets of edible gold are still available. I found the recipe from AUNT DIMITY: DETECTIVE on Nancy Atherton’s website:
    http://www.aunt-dimity.com/Pym_Sister_Gingerbread.htm
    Here is a history of gingerbread:
    http://www.geocities.com/margosgingerbread/history.html

    Reply
  69. Sorry, Edith, I was making a bad food/math pun.
    Gilded gingerbread was popular at fairs at least as far back as Tudor times, and was also available in medieval days, though probably only at the more aristocratic tables. Haven’t you heard the expression, “Well, that rubs the gilt off the gingerbread!” meaning that that spoils the experience or item?
    Thin sheets of edible gold are still available. I found the recipe from AUNT DIMITY: DETECTIVE on Nancy Atherton’s website:
    http://www.aunt-dimity.com/Pym_Sister_Gingerbread.htm
    Here is a history of gingerbread:
    http://www.geocities.com/margosgingerbread/history.html

    Reply
  70. Sorry, Edith, I was making a bad food/math pun.
    Gilded gingerbread was popular at fairs at least as far back as Tudor times, and was also available in medieval days, though probably only at the more aristocratic tables. Haven’t you heard the expression, “Well, that rubs the gilt off the gingerbread!” meaning that that spoils the experience or item?
    Thin sheets of edible gold are still available. I found the recipe from AUNT DIMITY: DETECTIVE on Nancy Atherton’s website:
    http://www.aunt-dimity.com/Pym_Sister_Gingerbread.htm
    Here is a history of gingerbread:
    http://www.geocities.com/margosgingerbread/history.html

    Reply
  71. From MJP:
    Interesting about the gilt on the gingerbread! I’ve never heard the expression. I can’t say that it sounds as appetizing as a nice warm lemon sauce or some thick clotted cream.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  72. From MJP:
    Interesting about the gilt on the gingerbread! I’ve never heard the expression. I can’t say that it sounds as appetizing as a nice warm lemon sauce or some thick clotted cream.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  73. From MJP:
    Interesting about the gilt on the gingerbread! I’ve never heard the expression. I can’t say that it sounds as appetizing as a nice warm lemon sauce or some thick clotted cream.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  74. From MJP:
    Interesting about the gilt on the gingerbread! I’ve never heard the expression. I can’t say that it sounds as appetizing as a nice warm lemon sauce or some thick clotted cream.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  75. From MJP:
    Interesting about the gilt on the gingerbread! I’ve never heard the expression. I can’t say that it sounds as appetizing as a nice warm lemon sauce or some thick clotted cream.
    Mary Jo

    Reply

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