EAR WORMS

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Pumpkin Princess Pat here:

I don’t believe it’s headline-making news that writers are essentially ADD-impaired thinkers.  (See Mary Jo’s blog prior to this for examples!)  One thought leads to another, which leads to another, which leads to looking up a reference, which leads to two dozen more books, and then to note-taking and before we know it, voila, there’s a book in there somewhere.

Ah, that I could limit my attention-deprived mind to simply reading books. Alas, it also becomes Earwormcartoon
distracted by many, many other things, like ear worms–songs, jingles, and tunes that get stuck inside my head. (cartoon to the right courtesy of bonbell.stumbleupon.com) Do you have any idea how difficult it is to write a straight sentence with “YMCA” kicking and grinding through my poor, worm-eaten brain cells?  I have written an entire book on the basis of a single ear worm that wouldn’t leave me alone. I wrote another more recent one—SMALL TOWN Smalltown
GIRL—that just spilled lines from songs across the page because I was writing about music.  My subconscious is so blighted with ear worms that any phrase can generate a line from some old rock or folk song. Who hasn’t had “We Will Rock You” pounding in their head after accidentally colliding with it in radioland or elsewhere?

You will note the use of a quote from AA Milne’s James James Morrison Morrsion in a previous blog. That did not come because I have memorized Milne. I couldn’t memorize my phone number if you threatened me. But the poem has been set to music and sung by Chad Mitchell and weaves through my mind like a cold in my nose. I’m likely to sneeze it out at any irritation. I mean, who can resist a line like “King John put up a notice: LOST or STOLEN or STRAYED! JAMES JAMES MORRISON’S MOTHER SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN MISLAID.” The whole song just begs to be chanted (loudly) at the drop of a pun. Did I mention how distracting this is when I’m trying to write my own words? (King John said he was sorry…)

I know this plague of bad music sticks in my head for a reason, so—naturally—I went in search of the reason instead of working on the book in progress.  The term ear worm apparently appears in a scientific study summarized at WebMD which acknowledges that these snippets get stuck in the minds of women and obsessives more than others. Everything gets blamed on estrogen, doesn’t it?  Has to be hormones because I don’t have enough memory left to be remember an obsession. My memory cells are eaten out by ear worms. Earworm

And so, of course, marketing latched onto this very lucrative penchant of ours with catchy jingles that we sing in our sleep. But not only that, they can time the type of music to the type of crowd to keep you shopping.  For more, try this 2003 blog http://www.collisiondetection.net/mt/archives/000299.html .  After reading the comments there, I’m thinking I need a copy of Hawaii 50’s theme song to blast these worms right out of my head. 

For me, Simon and Garfunkle’s “My Little Town” is the ultimate ear worm. I have no idea why, but I had it in my head for an entire year. Even though my S&G collection is sacred ground, I was tempted to smash it into toxic dust if it would have rid my brain of that miserable little number. And just when it would start slip, sliding away, my husband would play it again. He’s too handy to have around to stomp into toxic dust, but there were times….

Any of you got ear worms? Theories on why they move in? Or how to get them out? (Don’t ever go down to the end of the town…)

115 thoughts on “EAR WORMS”

  1. …if you don’t go down WITH ME.
    Luv that one. 🙂
    As to ear worms, I have tinnitus and don’t seem to have music that takes residence as long as I did before developing that.

    Reply
  2. …if you don’t go down WITH ME.
    Luv that one. 🙂
    As to ear worms, I have tinnitus and don’t seem to have music that takes residence as long as I did before developing that.

    Reply
  3. …if you don’t go down WITH ME.
    Luv that one. 🙂
    As to ear worms, I have tinnitus and don’t seem to have music that takes residence as long as I did before developing that.

    Reply
  4. …if you don’t go down WITH ME.
    Luv that one. 🙂
    As to ear worms, I have tinnitus and don’t seem to have music that takes residence as long as I did before developing that.

    Reply
  5. …if you don’t go down WITH ME.
    Luv that one. 🙂
    As to ear worms, I have tinnitus and don’t seem to have music that takes residence as long as I did before developing that.

    Reply
  6. I don’t seem to have jingles caught in my mind for anywhere near as long a time. I’m wondering if there’s a connection with what our personal learning modes are. And if for you, there’s a connection with the fact that you hate listening to audiobooks…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. I don’t seem to have jingles caught in my mind for anywhere near as long a time. I’m wondering if there’s a connection with what our personal learning modes are. And if for you, there’s a connection with the fact that you hate listening to audiobooks…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. I don’t seem to have jingles caught in my mind for anywhere near as long a time. I’m wondering if there’s a connection with what our personal learning modes are. And if for you, there’s a connection with the fact that you hate listening to audiobooks…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. I don’t seem to have jingles caught in my mind for anywhere near as long a time. I’m wondering if there’s a connection with what our personal learning modes are. And if for you, there’s a connection with the fact that you hate listening to audiobooks…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. I don’t seem to have jingles caught in my mind for anywhere near as long a time. I’m wondering if there’s a connection with what our personal learning modes are. And if for you, there’s a connection with the fact that you hate listening to audiobooks…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. Ear worms can be very distressing. About the best I can hope for is a change of tune. Something is always perking in there. The explanation I have heard is that your brain likes the tune; the tune apparently soothes or tickles the brain in just the right spot. I once heard of a “nuclear option” to rid yourself of ear worms. It is “The Girl from Ipanema.” Warning: Don’t sing the words, just hum the tune. If you sing the words it will itself become an earworm and there isn’t anything that can remove that! 😉

    Reply
  12. Ear worms can be very distressing. About the best I can hope for is a change of tune. Something is always perking in there. The explanation I have heard is that your brain likes the tune; the tune apparently soothes or tickles the brain in just the right spot. I once heard of a “nuclear option” to rid yourself of ear worms. It is “The Girl from Ipanema.” Warning: Don’t sing the words, just hum the tune. If you sing the words it will itself become an earworm and there isn’t anything that can remove that! 😉

    Reply
  13. Ear worms can be very distressing. About the best I can hope for is a change of tune. Something is always perking in there. The explanation I have heard is that your brain likes the tune; the tune apparently soothes or tickles the brain in just the right spot. I once heard of a “nuclear option” to rid yourself of ear worms. It is “The Girl from Ipanema.” Warning: Don’t sing the words, just hum the tune. If you sing the words it will itself become an earworm and there isn’t anything that can remove that! 😉

    Reply
  14. Ear worms can be very distressing. About the best I can hope for is a change of tune. Something is always perking in there. The explanation I have heard is that your brain likes the tune; the tune apparently soothes or tickles the brain in just the right spot. I once heard of a “nuclear option” to rid yourself of ear worms. It is “The Girl from Ipanema.” Warning: Don’t sing the words, just hum the tune. If you sing the words it will itself become an earworm and there isn’t anything that can remove that! 😉

    Reply
  15. Ear worms can be very distressing. About the best I can hope for is a change of tune. Something is always perking in there. The explanation I have heard is that your brain likes the tune; the tune apparently soothes or tickles the brain in just the right spot. I once heard of a “nuclear option” to rid yourself of ear worms. It is “The Girl from Ipanema.” Warning: Don’t sing the words, just hum the tune. If you sing the words it will itself become an earworm and there isn’t anything that can remove that! 😉

    Reply
  16. I’m a librarian and I often find myself with a song going around in my head and wonder why, only to realize that I’ve walked past a shelf and unconsciously seen a book with a title that is a phrase from a song (think Mary Higgins Clark’s “I’ll Be Seeing You”). In fact, Pat, you have been the cause of “Sweet Home Alabama” going through my head on several occasions. I know your title was “Sweet Home Carolina”, but it was close enough to get that ear worm going!

    Reply
  17. I’m a librarian and I often find myself with a song going around in my head and wonder why, only to realize that I’ve walked past a shelf and unconsciously seen a book with a title that is a phrase from a song (think Mary Higgins Clark’s “I’ll Be Seeing You”). In fact, Pat, you have been the cause of “Sweet Home Alabama” going through my head on several occasions. I know your title was “Sweet Home Carolina”, but it was close enough to get that ear worm going!

    Reply
  18. I’m a librarian and I often find myself with a song going around in my head and wonder why, only to realize that I’ve walked past a shelf and unconsciously seen a book with a title that is a phrase from a song (think Mary Higgins Clark’s “I’ll Be Seeing You”). In fact, Pat, you have been the cause of “Sweet Home Alabama” going through my head on several occasions. I know your title was “Sweet Home Carolina”, but it was close enough to get that ear worm going!

    Reply
  19. I’m a librarian and I often find myself with a song going around in my head and wonder why, only to realize that I’ve walked past a shelf and unconsciously seen a book with a title that is a phrase from a song (think Mary Higgins Clark’s “I’ll Be Seeing You”). In fact, Pat, you have been the cause of “Sweet Home Alabama” going through my head on several occasions. I know your title was “Sweet Home Carolina”, but it was close enough to get that ear worm going!

    Reply
  20. I’m a librarian and I often find myself with a song going around in my head and wonder why, only to realize that I’ve walked past a shelf and unconsciously seen a book with a title that is a phrase from a song (think Mary Higgins Clark’s “I’ll Be Seeing You”). In fact, Pat, you have been the cause of “Sweet Home Alabama” going through my head on several occasions. I know your title was “Sweet Home Carolina”, but it was close enough to get that ear worm going!

    Reply
  21. I am a fellow sufferer, Pat. It once took me two weeks to eradicate Garth Brooks’s “Friends in Low Places” from my brain. For some reason, kid songs are the worst for me. The five-year-old grand loves “John Jacob Jingle Heimer Schmidt.” Every time he plays the CD or sings it, it is stuck in my head for days and days and days. . .

    Reply
  22. I am a fellow sufferer, Pat. It once took me two weeks to eradicate Garth Brooks’s “Friends in Low Places” from my brain. For some reason, kid songs are the worst for me. The five-year-old grand loves “John Jacob Jingle Heimer Schmidt.” Every time he plays the CD or sings it, it is stuck in my head for days and days and days. . .

    Reply
  23. I am a fellow sufferer, Pat. It once took me two weeks to eradicate Garth Brooks’s “Friends in Low Places” from my brain. For some reason, kid songs are the worst for me. The five-year-old grand loves “John Jacob Jingle Heimer Schmidt.” Every time he plays the CD or sings it, it is stuck in my head for days and days and days. . .

    Reply
  24. I am a fellow sufferer, Pat. It once took me two weeks to eradicate Garth Brooks’s “Friends in Low Places” from my brain. For some reason, kid songs are the worst for me. The five-year-old grand loves “John Jacob Jingle Heimer Schmidt.” Every time he plays the CD or sings it, it is stuck in my head for days and days and days. . .

    Reply
  25. I am a fellow sufferer, Pat. It once took me two weeks to eradicate Garth Brooks’s “Friends in Low Places” from my brain. For some reason, kid songs are the worst for me. The five-year-old grand loves “John Jacob Jingle Heimer Schmidt.” Every time he plays the CD or sings it, it is stuck in my head for days and days and days. . .

    Reply
  26. They’ve been around forever. And they are distracting.
    The first earworm, I think, was the popular neolithic tune: “bonk, bomp, stomp.” It set the discovery of the wheel back a couple thousand years.
    Actually, the first ear worm depicted in a movie was the one that the villian Ricardo Montalbaum (sp?)put in poor Chekov’s ear in one of the early STAR TREK flix. ugh
    As for me, I am plagued with them. If I don’t catch them in a song, I suddenly remember commericial jingles from my childhood.
    (“bonk, bomp, stomp” is one of them.

    Reply
  27. They’ve been around forever. And they are distracting.
    The first earworm, I think, was the popular neolithic tune: “bonk, bomp, stomp.” It set the discovery of the wheel back a couple thousand years.
    Actually, the first ear worm depicted in a movie was the one that the villian Ricardo Montalbaum (sp?)put in poor Chekov’s ear in one of the early STAR TREK flix. ugh
    As for me, I am plagued with them. If I don’t catch them in a song, I suddenly remember commericial jingles from my childhood.
    (“bonk, bomp, stomp” is one of them.

    Reply
  28. They’ve been around forever. And they are distracting.
    The first earworm, I think, was the popular neolithic tune: “bonk, bomp, stomp.” It set the discovery of the wheel back a couple thousand years.
    Actually, the first ear worm depicted in a movie was the one that the villian Ricardo Montalbaum (sp?)put in poor Chekov’s ear in one of the early STAR TREK flix. ugh
    As for me, I am plagued with them. If I don’t catch them in a song, I suddenly remember commericial jingles from my childhood.
    (“bonk, bomp, stomp” is one of them.

    Reply
  29. They’ve been around forever. And they are distracting.
    The first earworm, I think, was the popular neolithic tune: “bonk, bomp, stomp.” It set the discovery of the wheel back a couple thousand years.
    Actually, the first ear worm depicted in a movie was the one that the villian Ricardo Montalbaum (sp?)put in poor Chekov’s ear in one of the early STAR TREK flix. ugh
    As for me, I am plagued with them. If I don’t catch them in a song, I suddenly remember commericial jingles from my childhood.
    (“bonk, bomp, stomp” is one of them.

    Reply
  30. They’ve been around forever. And they are distracting.
    The first earworm, I think, was the popular neolithic tune: “bonk, bomp, stomp.” It set the discovery of the wheel back a couple thousand years.
    Actually, the first ear worm depicted in a movie was the one that the villian Ricardo Montalbaum (sp?)put in poor Chekov’s ear in one of the early STAR TREK flix. ugh
    As for me, I am plagued with them. If I don’t catch them in a song, I suddenly remember commericial jingles from my childhood.
    (“bonk, bomp, stomp” is one of them.

    Reply
  31. I just wish I knew why it is that if I hear five songs and hate one but love four, it’s always the one I hate that turns into the earworm.
    This happens to me a *lot* at my church, where some of the worship elders are overly fond of what to my ears are maddeningly simple, cloying, and repetitive praise choruses. Maybe that’s the problem–the simpler the lyrics and melody, the easier they stick. Very annoying, though. I’d far rather have Handel or Charles Wesley stuck in my head for half the week–or even the GOOD contemporary church music.
    To fight them, I mostly hum songs I actually like. But when nothing else works, I fight fire with fire–for an SEC football fan like me, “Rocky Top” will make any other earworm surrender and slither away!

    Reply
  32. I just wish I knew why it is that if I hear five songs and hate one but love four, it’s always the one I hate that turns into the earworm.
    This happens to me a *lot* at my church, where some of the worship elders are overly fond of what to my ears are maddeningly simple, cloying, and repetitive praise choruses. Maybe that’s the problem–the simpler the lyrics and melody, the easier they stick. Very annoying, though. I’d far rather have Handel or Charles Wesley stuck in my head for half the week–or even the GOOD contemporary church music.
    To fight them, I mostly hum songs I actually like. But when nothing else works, I fight fire with fire–for an SEC football fan like me, “Rocky Top” will make any other earworm surrender and slither away!

    Reply
  33. I just wish I knew why it is that if I hear five songs and hate one but love four, it’s always the one I hate that turns into the earworm.
    This happens to me a *lot* at my church, where some of the worship elders are overly fond of what to my ears are maddeningly simple, cloying, and repetitive praise choruses. Maybe that’s the problem–the simpler the lyrics and melody, the easier they stick. Very annoying, though. I’d far rather have Handel or Charles Wesley stuck in my head for half the week–or even the GOOD contemporary church music.
    To fight them, I mostly hum songs I actually like. But when nothing else works, I fight fire with fire–for an SEC football fan like me, “Rocky Top” will make any other earworm surrender and slither away!

    Reply
  34. I just wish I knew why it is that if I hear five songs and hate one but love four, it’s always the one I hate that turns into the earworm.
    This happens to me a *lot* at my church, where some of the worship elders are overly fond of what to my ears are maddeningly simple, cloying, and repetitive praise choruses. Maybe that’s the problem–the simpler the lyrics and melody, the easier they stick. Very annoying, though. I’d far rather have Handel or Charles Wesley stuck in my head for half the week–or even the GOOD contemporary church music.
    To fight them, I mostly hum songs I actually like. But when nothing else works, I fight fire with fire–for an SEC football fan like me, “Rocky Top” will make any other earworm surrender and slither away!

    Reply
  35. I just wish I knew why it is that if I hear five songs and hate one but love four, it’s always the one I hate that turns into the earworm.
    This happens to me a *lot* at my church, where some of the worship elders are overly fond of what to my ears are maddeningly simple, cloying, and repetitive praise choruses. Maybe that’s the problem–the simpler the lyrics and melody, the easier they stick. Very annoying, though. I’d far rather have Handel or Charles Wesley stuck in my head for half the week–or even the GOOD contemporary church music.
    To fight them, I mostly hum songs I actually like. But when nothing else works, I fight fire with fire–for an SEC football fan like me, “Rocky Top” will make any other earworm surrender and slither away!

    Reply
  36. Well, I can’t claim earworms, but I can claim picture bugs. I have images in my head from when I was 18 months old (Mom verified) in black and white! A psychologist once told me that was because I hadn’t made an association between color and word, yet.
    Needless to say, I need to be very careful what I watch. Since Poltergeist, I can’t duck my head in a swimming pool without seeing decomposing skeletons rising to the surface with me. Ugh.
    Mary Jo’s comment on learning styles got me to thinking. I always thought I was a visual learner, thus my picture bug issue. So I went in search of a free test (http://www.learning-styles-online.com/inventory/) to prove the point. I learned I’m not a visual learner. I’m a Solitary/Social/Verbal learner. Go figure. The really neat thing about this test is that it makes career suggestions to go along with your “type.” I’m actually in the right job for the first time in my life!
    Wow, the things you can learn from romance writers.
    Nina, back to the ms.

    Reply
  37. Well, I can’t claim earworms, but I can claim picture bugs. I have images in my head from when I was 18 months old (Mom verified) in black and white! A psychologist once told me that was because I hadn’t made an association between color and word, yet.
    Needless to say, I need to be very careful what I watch. Since Poltergeist, I can’t duck my head in a swimming pool without seeing decomposing skeletons rising to the surface with me. Ugh.
    Mary Jo’s comment on learning styles got me to thinking. I always thought I was a visual learner, thus my picture bug issue. So I went in search of a free test (http://www.learning-styles-online.com/inventory/) to prove the point. I learned I’m not a visual learner. I’m a Solitary/Social/Verbal learner. Go figure. The really neat thing about this test is that it makes career suggestions to go along with your “type.” I’m actually in the right job for the first time in my life!
    Wow, the things you can learn from romance writers.
    Nina, back to the ms.

    Reply
  38. Well, I can’t claim earworms, but I can claim picture bugs. I have images in my head from when I was 18 months old (Mom verified) in black and white! A psychologist once told me that was because I hadn’t made an association between color and word, yet.
    Needless to say, I need to be very careful what I watch. Since Poltergeist, I can’t duck my head in a swimming pool without seeing decomposing skeletons rising to the surface with me. Ugh.
    Mary Jo’s comment on learning styles got me to thinking. I always thought I was a visual learner, thus my picture bug issue. So I went in search of a free test (http://www.learning-styles-online.com/inventory/) to prove the point. I learned I’m not a visual learner. I’m a Solitary/Social/Verbal learner. Go figure. The really neat thing about this test is that it makes career suggestions to go along with your “type.” I’m actually in the right job for the first time in my life!
    Wow, the things you can learn from romance writers.
    Nina, back to the ms.

    Reply
  39. Well, I can’t claim earworms, but I can claim picture bugs. I have images in my head from when I was 18 months old (Mom verified) in black and white! A psychologist once told me that was because I hadn’t made an association between color and word, yet.
    Needless to say, I need to be very careful what I watch. Since Poltergeist, I can’t duck my head in a swimming pool without seeing decomposing skeletons rising to the surface with me. Ugh.
    Mary Jo’s comment on learning styles got me to thinking. I always thought I was a visual learner, thus my picture bug issue. So I went in search of a free test (http://www.learning-styles-online.com/inventory/) to prove the point. I learned I’m not a visual learner. I’m a Solitary/Social/Verbal learner. Go figure. The really neat thing about this test is that it makes career suggestions to go along with your “type.” I’m actually in the right job for the first time in my life!
    Wow, the things you can learn from romance writers.
    Nina, back to the ms.

    Reply
  40. Well, I can’t claim earworms, but I can claim picture bugs. I have images in my head from when I was 18 months old (Mom verified) in black and white! A psychologist once told me that was because I hadn’t made an association between color and word, yet.
    Needless to say, I need to be very careful what I watch. Since Poltergeist, I can’t duck my head in a swimming pool without seeing decomposing skeletons rising to the surface with me. Ugh.
    Mary Jo’s comment on learning styles got me to thinking. I always thought I was a visual learner, thus my picture bug issue. So I went in search of a free test (http://www.learning-styles-online.com/inventory/) to prove the point. I learned I’m not a visual learner. I’m a Solitary/Social/Verbal learner. Go figure. The really neat thing about this test is that it makes career suggestions to go along with your “type.” I’m actually in the right job for the first time in my life!
    Wow, the things you can learn from romance writers.
    Nina, back to the ms.

    Reply
  41. Thanks for posting the quiz, Nina! I’m a verbal/solitary learner, with visual/physical my weakest areas.
    I actually find it a challenge writing characters who are strong at my weak points. That doesn’t stop me from doing it, though. My last heroine was a gifted painter, and some of the major characters in my adventure WIP are brilliant military tacticians, which it seems to me would almost require a visual learner to be able to quickly read the ground and understand an enemy’s position.

    Reply
  42. Thanks for posting the quiz, Nina! I’m a verbal/solitary learner, with visual/physical my weakest areas.
    I actually find it a challenge writing characters who are strong at my weak points. That doesn’t stop me from doing it, though. My last heroine was a gifted painter, and some of the major characters in my adventure WIP are brilliant military tacticians, which it seems to me would almost require a visual learner to be able to quickly read the ground and understand an enemy’s position.

    Reply
  43. Thanks for posting the quiz, Nina! I’m a verbal/solitary learner, with visual/physical my weakest areas.
    I actually find it a challenge writing characters who are strong at my weak points. That doesn’t stop me from doing it, though. My last heroine was a gifted painter, and some of the major characters in my adventure WIP are brilliant military tacticians, which it seems to me would almost require a visual learner to be able to quickly read the ground and understand an enemy’s position.

    Reply
  44. Thanks for posting the quiz, Nina! I’m a verbal/solitary learner, with visual/physical my weakest areas.
    I actually find it a challenge writing characters who are strong at my weak points. That doesn’t stop me from doing it, though. My last heroine was a gifted painter, and some of the major characters in my adventure WIP are brilliant military tacticians, which it seems to me would almost require a visual learner to be able to quickly read the ground and understand an enemy’s position.

    Reply
  45. Thanks for posting the quiz, Nina! I’m a verbal/solitary learner, with visual/physical my weakest areas.
    I actually find it a challenge writing characters who are strong at my weak points. That doesn’t stop me from doing it, though. My last heroine was a gifted painter, and some of the major characters in my adventure WIP are brilliant military tacticians, which it seems to me would almost require a visual learner to be able to quickly read the ground and understand an enemy’s position.

    Reply
  46. From Mary Jo:
    I just got a call from Pat that her cable is out (and the whole St. Louis area is snarled up in traffic jams from an accident–Mercury Retrograde is almost here!)
    Anyhow, she can’t comment until the cable returns. I assured her we were all having a fine time without her. 🙂 Nina, thanks for posting the link to the learning style quiz. I am, not to my surprise, primarily Verbal and Solitary. THough none of the scores are near 20–I guess I just don’t learn well. 🙂
    Anyhow, apologies from Pat–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  47. From Mary Jo:
    I just got a call from Pat that her cable is out (and the whole St. Louis area is snarled up in traffic jams from an accident–Mercury Retrograde is almost here!)
    Anyhow, she can’t comment until the cable returns. I assured her we were all having a fine time without her. 🙂 Nina, thanks for posting the link to the learning style quiz. I am, not to my surprise, primarily Verbal and Solitary. THough none of the scores are near 20–I guess I just don’t learn well. 🙂
    Anyhow, apologies from Pat–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  48. From Mary Jo:
    I just got a call from Pat that her cable is out (and the whole St. Louis area is snarled up in traffic jams from an accident–Mercury Retrograde is almost here!)
    Anyhow, she can’t comment until the cable returns. I assured her we were all having a fine time without her. 🙂 Nina, thanks for posting the link to the learning style quiz. I am, not to my surprise, primarily Verbal and Solitary. THough none of the scores are near 20–I guess I just don’t learn well. 🙂
    Anyhow, apologies from Pat–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  49. From Mary Jo:
    I just got a call from Pat that her cable is out (and the whole St. Louis area is snarled up in traffic jams from an accident–Mercury Retrograde is almost here!)
    Anyhow, she can’t comment until the cable returns. I assured her we were all having a fine time without her. 🙂 Nina, thanks for posting the link to the learning style quiz. I am, not to my surprise, primarily Verbal and Solitary. THough none of the scores are near 20–I guess I just don’t learn well. 🙂
    Anyhow, apologies from Pat–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  50. From Mary Jo:
    I just got a call from Pat that her cable is out (and the whole St. Louis area is snarled up in traffic jams from an accident–Mercury Retrograde is almost here!)
    Anyhow, she can’t comment until the cable returns. I assured her we were all having a fine time without her. 🙂 Nina, thanks for posting the link to the learning style quiz. I am, not to my surprise, primarily Verbal and Solitary. THough none of the scores are near 20–I guess I just don’t learn well. 🙂
    Anyhow, apologies from Pat–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  51. I embrace my earworms. 🙂 In fact, I have something of a morbid fascination with them. Many a morning I have awakened with a song running through my head, making me wonder if it was on a continuous loop all night. How weird! Anyway, earworms do’t really bother me, but I have serious tinnitis, so maybe that’s why.
    Now that I work from home, I no longer awaken to the clock radio blaring out country rock. That kind of music is prime earworm fodder (achy breaky heart, anyone?). Now I listen to classical music and NPR, both low on the earworm scale.
    Earworm incident: I was in a car with 2 friends, when a commercial for a car dealership came on the radio. This dealership has resurrected a jingle they used for years and years back in the ’60s. When the commercial ended and they played their jingle, all 3 of us spontaneously burst into jingle-song, along with the announcer. It was one of those unplanned moments of hilarity, but also pointed out just how effective catchy/annoying jingles are.

    Reply
  52. I embrace my earworms. 🙂 In fact, I have something of a morbid fascination with them. Many a morning I have awakened with a song running through my head, making me wonder if it was on a continuous loop all night. How weird! Anyway, earworms do’t really bother me, but I have serious tinnitis, so maybe that’s why.
    Now that I work from home, I no longer awaken to the clock radio blaring out country rock. That kind of music is prime earworm fodder (achy breaky heart, anyone?). Now I listen to classical music and NPR, both low on the earworm scale.
    Earworm incident: I was in a car with 2 friends, when a commercial for a car dealership came on the radio. This dealership has resurrected a jingle they used for years and years back in the ’60s. When the commercial ended and they played their jingle, all 3 of us spontaneously burst into jingle-song, along with the announcer. It was one of those unplanned moments of hilarity, but also pointed out just how effective catchy/annoying jingles are.

    Reply
  53. I embrace my earworms. 🙂 In fact, I have something of a morbid fascination with them. Many a morning I have awakened with a song running through my head, making me wonder if it was on a continuous loop all night. How weird! Anyway, earworms do’t really bother me, but I have serious tinnitis, so maybe that’s why.
    Now that I work from home, I no longer awaken to the clock radio blaring out country rock. That kind of music is prime earworm fodder (achy breaky heart, anyone?). Now I listen to classical music and NPR, both low on the earworm scale.
    Earworm incident: I was in a car with 2 friends, when a commercial for a car dealership came on the radio. This dealership has resurrected a jingle they used for years and years back in the ’60s. When the commercial ended and they played their jingle, all 3 of us spontaneously burst into jingle-song, along with the announcer. It was one of those unplanned moments of hilarity, but also pointed out just how effective catchy/annoying jingles are.

    Reply
  54. I embrace my earworms. 🙂 In fact, I have something of a morbid fascination with them. Many a morning I have awakened with a song running through my head, making me wonder if it was on a continuous loop all night. How weird! Anyway, earworms do’t really bother me, but I have serious tinnitis, so maybe that’s why.
    Now that I work from home, I no longer awaken to the clock radio blaring out country rock. That kind of music is prime earworm fodder (achy breaky heart, anyone?). Now I listen to classical music and NPR, both low on the earworm scale.
    Earworm incident: I was in a car with 2 friends, when a commercial for a car dealership came on the radio. This dealership has resurrected a jingle they used for years and years back in the ’60s. When the commercial ended and they played their jingle, all 3 of us spontaneously burst into jingle-song, along with the announcer. It was one of those unplanned moments of hilarity, but also pointed out just how effective catchy/annoying jingles are.

    Reply
  55. I embrace my earworms. 🙂 In fact, I have something of a morbid fascination with them. Many a morning I have awakened with a song running through my head, making me wonder if it was on a continuous loop all night. How weird! Anyway, earworms do’t really bother me, but I have serious tinnitis, so maybe that’s why.
    Now that I work from home, I no longer awaken to the clock radio blaring out country rock. That kind of music is prime earworm fodder (achy breaky heart, anyone?). Now I listen to classical music and NPR, both low on the earworm scale.
    Earworm incident: I was in a car with 2 friends, when a commercial for a car dealership came on the radio. This dealership has resurrected a jingle they used for years and years back in the ’60s. When the commercial ended and they played their jingle, all 3 of us spontaneously burst into jingle-song, along with the announcer. It was one of those unplanned moments of hilarity, but also pointed out just how effective catchy/annoying jingles are.

    Reply
  56. You too, Sherrie?
    My entire family wakes up with earworms, and on weekends it turns into the earworm wars, as we try and hook our earworm into others. There are certain artists who are banned in our house. The Carpenters and ABBA are considered hitting below the belt.
    Often, if I pay attention to the subject matter of my morning earworm, my subconscious is trying to tell me something. (Get me to listen!)
    One of my worst earworms in recent memory was started over at the Risky Regencies blog by a post titled Take a Letter Maria. I was plagued for days, even now I’m trying hard not to think of the song.
    Here’s wishing speedy return of cable!

    Reply
  57. You too, Sherrie?
    My entire family wakes up with earworms, and on weekends it turns into the earworm wars, as we try and hook our earworm into others. There are certain artists who are banned in our house. The Carpenters and ABBA are considered hitting below the belt.
    Often, if I pay attention to the subject matter of my morning earworm, my subconscious is trying to tell me something. (Get me to listen!)
    One of my worst earworms in recent memory was started over at the Risky Regencies blog by a post titled Take a Letter Maria. I was plagued for days, even now I’m trying hard not to think of the song.
    Here’s wishing speedy return of cable!

    Reply
  58. You too, Sherrie?
    My entire family wakes up with earworms, and on weekends it turns into the earworm wars, as we try and hook our earworm into others. There are certain artists who are banned in our house. The Carpenters and ABBA are considered hitting below the belt.
    Often, if I pay attention to the subject matter of my morning earworm, my subconscious is trying to tell me something. (Get me to listen!)
    One of my worst earworms in recent memory was started over at the Risky Regencies blog by a post titled Take a Letter Maria. I was plagued for days, even now I’m trying hard not to think of the song.
    Here’s wishing speedy return of cable!

    Reply
  59. You too, Sherrie?
    My entire family wakes up with earworms, and on weekends it turns into the earworm wars, as we try and hook our earworm into others. There are certain artists who are banned in our house. The Carpenters and ABBA are considered hitting below the belt.
    Often, if I pay attention to the subject matter of my morning earworm, my subconscious is trying to tell me something. (Get me to listen!)
    One of my worst earworms in recent memory was started over at the Risky Regencies blog by a post titled Take a Letter Maria. I was plagued for days, even now I’m trying hard not to think of the song.
    Here’s wishing speedy return of cable!

    Reply
  60. You too, Sherrie?
    My entire family wakes up with earworms, and on weekends it turns into the earworm wars, as we try and hook our earworm into others. There are certain artists who are banned in our house. The Carpenters and ABBA are considered hitting below the belt.
    Often, if I pay attention to the subject matter of my morning earworm, my subconscious is trying to tell me something. (Get me to listen!)
    One of my worst earworms in recent memory was started over at the Risky Regencies blog by a post titled Take a Letter Maria. I was plagued for days, even now I’m trying hard not to think of the song.
    Here’s wishing speedy return of cable!

    Reply
  61. I get earworms from TV themes more than any other source. The theme from “Cheers” wasn’t too bad, and only lasted three days. M*A*S*H ran around for five after watching a marathon on TV Land. The NCIS theme danced through for two days.
    But the grand winner is the theme from Gilligan’s Island. For some reason it got stuck in my head my first year of grad school, and didn’t leave for over two weeks. Having roommates who sang it periodically kept it alive, until I learned to fight back by singing “It’s a Small World” at 7 AM. 🙂 Once they stopped, the ear worm finally died. To this day I still avoid it as much as I can, just to be safe.

    Reply
  62. I get earworms from TV themes more than any other source. The theme from “Cheers” wasn’t too bad, and only lasted three days. M*A*S*H ran around for five after watching a marathon on TV Land. The NCIS theme danced through for two days.
    But the grand winner is the theme from Gilligan’s Island. For some reason it got stuck in my head my first year of grad school, and didn’t leave for over two weeks. Having roommates who sang it periodically kept it alive, until I learned to fight back by singing “It’s a Small World” at 7 AM. 🙂 Once they stopped, the ear worm finally died. To this day I still avoid it as much as I can, just to be safe.

    Reply
  63. I get earworms from TV themes more than any other source. The theme from “Cheers” wasn’t too bad, and only lasted three days. M*A*S*H ran around for five after watching a marathon on TV Land. The NCIS theme danced through for two days.
    But the grand winner is the theme from Gilligan’s Island. For some reason it got stuck in my head my first year of grad school, and didn’t leave for over two weeks. Having roommates who sang it periodically kept it alive, until I learned to fight back by singing “It’s a Small World” at 7 AM. 🙂 Once they stopped, the ear worm finally died. To this day I still avoid it as much as I can, just to be safe.

    Reply
  64. I get earworms from TV themes more than any other source. The theme from “Cheers” wasn’t too bad, and only lasted three days. M*A*S*H ran around for five after watching a marathon on TV Land. The NCIS theme danced through for two days.
    But the grand winner is the theme from Gilligan’s Island. For some reason it got stuck in my head my first year of grad school, and didn’t leave for over two weeks. Having roommates who sang it periodically kept it alive, until I learned to fight back by singing “It’s a Small World” at 7 AM. 🙂 Once they stopped, the ear worm finally died. To this day I still avoid it as much as I can, just to be safe.

    Reply
  65. I get earworms from TV themes more than any other source. The theme from “Cheers” wasn’t too bad, and only lasted three days. M*A*S*H ran around for five after watching a marathon on TV Land. The NCIS theme danced through for two days.
    But the grand winner is the theme from Gilligan’s Island. For some reason it got stuck in my head my first year of grad school, and didn’t leave for over two weeks. Having roommates who sang it periodically kept it alive, until I learned to fight back by singing “It’s a Small World” at 7 AM. 🙂 Once they stopped, the ear worm finally died. To this day I still avoid it as much as I can, just to be safe.

    Reply
  66. LOL! Look at what happens when I’m gone! After a truly grim afternoon in which I would have inflicted bodily harm had I been able to reach anyone at tech support (other than a faint Indian accent saying Hellooo and then not replying), your comments have made me laugh aloud.
    Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?
    I can hum “The Girl from Impanema” easily enough, but I’m way too verbal to block out the words. I sing along with the Muzak in malls. So Hawaii 50 it has to be, if I knew what the tune was. Never watched the thing.
    Bonk, bomp, stomp!! I think you’ve created a new dance, Edith. Even I can carry that tune.
    Sorry, Sharon. What good is an ear worm if I can’t affect others? Or is that infect?
    ABBA and Carpenters, yes! Definitely foul play. Wonder if writers can find that kind of rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers? Now there’s a thought for the evening…

    Reply
  67. LOL! Look at what happens when I’m gone! After a truly grim afternoon in which I would have inflicted bodily harm had I been able to reach anyone at tech support (other than a faint Indian accent saying Hellooo and then not replying), your comments have made me laugh aloud.
    Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?
    I can hum “The Girl from Impanema” easily enough, but I’m way too verbal to block out the words. I sing along with the Muzak in malls. So Hawaii 50 it has to be, if I knew what the tune was. Never watched the thing.
    Bonk, bomp, stomp!! I think you’ve created a new dance, Edith. Even I can carry that tune.
    Sorry, Sharon. What good is an ear worm if I can’t affect others? Or is that infect?
    ABBA and Carpenters, yes! Definitely foul play. Wonder if writers can find that kind of rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers? Now there’s a thought for the evening…

    Reply
  68. LOL! Look at what happens when I’m gone! After a truly grim afternoon in which I would have inflicted bodily harm had I been able to reach anyone at tech support (other than a faint Indian accent saying Hellooo and then not replying), your comments have made me laugh aloud.
    Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?
    I can hum “The Girl from Impanema” easily enough, but I’m way too verbal to block out the words. I sing along with the Muzak in malls. So Hawaii 50 it has to be, if I knew what the tune was. Never watched the thing.
    Bonk, bomp, stomp!! I think you’ve created a new dance, Edith. Even I can carry that tune.
    Sorry, Sharon. What good is an ear worm if I can’t affect others? Or is that infect?
    ABBA and Carpenters, yes! Definitely foul play. Wonder if writers can find that kind of rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers? Now there’s a thought for the evening…

    Reply
  69. LOL! Look at what happens when I’m gone! After a truly grim afternoon in which I would have inflicted bodily harm had I been able to reach anyone at tech support (other than a faint Indian accent saying Hellooo and then not replying), your comments have made me laugh aloud.
    Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?
    I can hum “The Girl from Impanema” easily enough, but I’m way too verbal to block out the words. I sing along with the Muzak in malls. So Hawaii 50 it has to be, if I knew what the tune was. Never watched the thing.
    Bonk, bomp, stomp!! I think you’ve created a new dance, Edith. Even I can carry that tune.
    Sorry, Sharon. What good is an ear worm if I can’t affect others? Or is that infect?
    ABBA and Carpenters, yes! Definitely foul play. Wonder if writers can find that kind of rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers? Now there’s a thought for the evening…

    Reply
  70. LOL! Look at what happens when I’m gone! After a truly grim afternoon in which I would have inflicted bodily harm had I been able to reach anyone at tech support (other than a faint Indian accent saying Hellooo and then not replying), your comments have made me laugh aloud.
    Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?
    I can hum “The Girl from Impanema” easily enough, but I’m way too verbal to block out the words. I sing along with the Muzak in malls. So Hawaii 50 it has to be, if I knew what the tune was. Never watched the thing.
    Bonk, bomp, stomp!! I think you’ve created a new dance, Edith. Even I can carry that tune.
    Sorry, Sharon. What good is an ear worm if I can’t affect others? Or is that infect?
    ABBA and Carpenters, yes! Definitely foul play. Wonder if writers can find that kind of rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers? Now there’s a thought for the evening…

    Reply
  71. Hey Pat!
    Glad to see you’re internet is back.
    I’m glad y’all liked the learning styles test. It’s neat to see what everyone is.
    Pat sez >>>”Wonder if writers can find that kind of [music] rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers?”
    I have no idea if rhythm in language creates best sellers, but every h/h I’ve written, I’ve had a song for. When I need to “get in the mood” for that character, I listen to “their” song. Sometimes the lyrics represent the beginning of the character’s arc and sometimes the end. But the music always possesses the character’s primary driving emotion in the story. Anyone else do that?
    Nina, who still gets goose bumps when she hears Handel’s Messiah

    Reply
  72. Hey Pat!
    Glad to see you’re internet is back.
    I’m glad y’all liked the learning styles test. It’s neat to see what everyone is.
    Pat sez >>>”Wonder if writers can find that kind of [music] rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers?”
    I have no idea if rhythm in language creates best sellers, but every h/h I’ve written, I’ve had a song for. When I need to “get in the mood” for that character, I listen to “their” song. Sometimes the lyrics represent the beginning of the character’s arc and sometimes the end. But the music always possesses the character’s primary driving emotion in the story. Anyone else do that?
    Nina, who still gets goose bumps when she hears Handel’s Messiah

    Reply
  73. Hey Pat!
    Glad to see you’re internet is back.
    I’m glad y’all liked the learning styles test. It’s neat to see what everyone is.
    Pat sez >>>”Wonder if writers can find that kind of [music] rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers?”
    I have no idea if rhythm in language creates best sellers, but every h/h I’ve written, I’ve had a song for. When I need to “get in the mood” for that character, I listen to “their” song. Sometimes the lyrics represent the beginning of the character’s arc and sometimes the end. But the music always possesses the character’s primary driving emotion in the story. Anyone else do that?
    Nina, who still gets goose bumps when she hears Handel’s Messiah

    Reply
  74. Hey Pat!
    Glad to see you’re internet is back.
    I’m glad y’all liked the learning styles test. It’s neat to see what everyone is.
    Pat sez >>>”Wonder if writers can find that kind of [music] rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers?”
    I have no idea if rhythm in language creates best sellers, but every h/h I’ve written, I’ve had a song for. When I need to “get in the mood” for that character, I listen to “their” song. Sometimes the lyrics represent the beginning of the character’s arc and sometimes the end. But the music always possesses the character’s primary driving emotion in the story. Anyone else do that?
    Nina, who still gets goose bumps when she hears Handel’s Messiah

    Reply
  75. Hey Pat!
    Glad to see you’re internet is back.
    I’m glad y’all liked the learning styles test. It’s neat to see what everyone is.
    Pat sez >>>”Wonder if writers can find that kind of [music] rhythm in language and that’s what makes bestsellers?”
    I have no idea if rhythm in language creates best sellers, but every h/h I’ve written, I’ve had a song for. When I need to “get in the mood” for that character, I listen to “their” song. Sometimes the lyrics represent the beginning of the character’s arc and sometimes the end. But the music always possesses the character’s primary driving emotion in the story. Anyone else do that?
    Nina, who still gets goose bumps when she hears Handel’s Messiah

    Reply
  76. “Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?”
    Gee, I don’t know, Pat. But, I’d give alot to be as well-rounded as you and MJ. 🙂

    Reply
  77. “Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?”
    Gee, I don’t know, Pat. But, I’d give alot to be as well-rounded as you and MJ. 🙂

    Reply
  78. “Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?”
    Gee, I don’t know, Pat. But, I’d give alot to be as well-rounded as you and MJ. 🙂

    Reply
  79. “Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?”
    Gee, I don’t know, Pat. But, I’d give alot to be as well-rounded as you and MJ. 🙂

    Reply
  80. “Nina, I took your test and gee, guess what? I’m visual solitary. Like MJ, not a 20, though. Does that make me almost well-rounded?”
    Gee, I don’t know, Pat. But, I’d give alot to be as well-rounded as you and MJ. 🙂

    Reply
  81. Pat, my worst ear worm happens at work when I can’t stop humming my college drinking song:
    “Tired of books and boring classes,
    drop your books, pick up your glasses,
    a toast
    to those who boast
    of mixing Greek and Latin with a cool Manhattan. . .” etc etc etc.
    Why, why, why?
    Also took the test from Nina’s link and got a 19 on the Verbal learner category. Absolutely NOT well rounded, LOL.
    Melinda

    Reply
  82. Pat, my worst ear worm happens at work when I can’t stop humming my college drinking song:
    “Tired of books and boring classes,
    drop your books, pick up your glasses,
    a toast
    to those who boast
    of mixing Greek and Latin with a cool Manhattan. . .” etc etc etc.
    Why, why, why?
    Also took the test from Nina’s link and got a 19 on the Verbal learner category. Absolutely NOT well rounded, LOL.
    Melinda

    Reply
  83. Pat, my worst ear worm happens at work when I can’t stop humming my college drinking song:
    “Tired of books and boring classes,
    drop your books, pick up your glasses,
    a toast
    to those who boast
    of mixing Greek and Latin with a cool Manhattan. . .” etc etc etc.
    Why, why, why?
    Also took the test from Nina’s link and got a 19 on the Verbal learner category. Absolutely NOT well rounded, LOL.
    Melinda

    Reply
  84. Pat, my worst ear worm happens at work when I can’t stop humming my college drinking song:
    “Tired of books and boring classes,
    drop your books, pick up your glasses,
    a toast
    to those who boast
    of mixing Greek and Latin with a cool Manhattan. . .” etc etc etc.
    Why, why, why?
    Also took the test from Nina’s link and got a 19 on the Verbal learner category. Absolutely NOT well rounded, LOL.
    Melinda

    Reply
  85. Pat, my worst ear worm happens at work when I can’t stop humming my college drinking song:
    “Tired of books and boring classes,
    drop your books, pick up your glasses,
    a toast
    to those who boast
    of mixing Greek and Latin with a cool Manhattan. . .” etc etc etc.
    Why, why, why?
    Also took the test from Nina’s link and got a 19 on the Verbal learner category. Absolutely NOT well rounded, LOL.
    Melinda

    Reply
  86. Argh on Gilligan’s Island! Another show I never watched but the tune can still haunt my head. I’m trying desperately not to think of it right now.
    I suspect college drinking songs are meant to be sung when asleep. “G”
    Nina, I know of writers who set their books to music, although I’m not sure they set their characters to music. I’m way too impatient to even figure out which of the many songs in my head might apply to my characters. And if I listened to the Messiah, I’d never get any writing done. Work like that transports me to another dimension.

    Reply
  87. Argh on Gilligan’s Island! Another show I never watched but the tune can still haunt my head. I’m trying desperately not to think of it right now.
    I suspect college drinking songs are meant to be sung when asleep. “G”
    Nina, I know of writers who set their books to music, although I’m not sure they set their characters to music. I’m way too impatient to even figure out which of the many songs in my head might apply to my characters. And if I listened to the Messiah, I’d never get any writing done. Work like that transports me to another dimension.

    Reply
  88. Argh on Gilligan’s Island! Another show I never watched but the tune can still haunt my head. I’m trying desperately not to think of it right now.
    I suspect college drinking songs are meant to be sung when asleep. “G”
    Nina, I know of writers who set their books to music, although I’m not sure they set their characters to music. I’m way too impatient to even figure out which of the many songs in my head might apply to my characters. And if I listened to the Messiah, I’d never get any writing done. Work like that transports me to another dimension.

    Reply
  89. Argh on Gilligan’s Island! Another show I never watched but the tune can still haunt my head. I’m trying desperately not to think of it right now.
    I suspect college drinking songs are meant to be sung when asleep. “G”
    Nina, I know of writers who set their books to music, although I’m not sure they set their characters to music. I’m way too impatient to even figure out which of the many songs in my head might apply to my characters. And if I listened to the Messiah, I’d never get any writing done. Work like that transports me to another dimension.

    Reply
  90. Argh on Gilligan’s Island! Another show I never watched but the tune can still haunt my head. I’m trying desperately not to think of it right now.
    I suspect college drinking songs are meant to be sung when asleep. “G”
    Nina, I know of writers who set their books to music, although I’m not sure they set their characters to music. I’m way too impatient to even figure out which of the many songs in my head might apply to my characters. And if I listened to the Messiah, I’d never get any writing done. Work like that transports me to another dimension.

    Reply
  91. I took some codeine based cold medicine once and got the theme song from “Bosom Buddies” playing so loudly in my head that I could not even read!
    I often find myself humming things I haven’t thought of for decades, but which are appropriate to what I’m doing or thinking now. In fact, the songs in my head can be frighteningly diagnostic at times. Seems like the Inner Disc Jockey is more in touch with my feelings than I am! The funny thing is that once an ear worm goes, I often can’t even remember what it was… though I’m not sure I want to, for fear of getting it back.

    Reply
  92. I took some codeine based cold medicine once and got the theme song from “Bosom Buddies” playing so loudly in my head that I could not even read!
    I often find myself humming things I haven’t thought of for decades, but which are appropriate to what I’m doing or thinking now. In fact, the songs in my head can be frighteningly diagnostic at times. Seems like the Inner Disc Jockey is more in touch with my feelings than I am! The funny thing is that once an ear worm goes, I often can’t even remember what it was… though I’m not sure I want to, for fear of getting it back.

    Reply
  93. I took some codeine based cold medicine once and got the theme song from “Bosom Buddies” playing so loudly in my head that I could not even read!
    I often find myself humming things I haven’t thought of for decades, but which are appropriate to what I’m doing or thinking now. In fact, the songs in my head can be frighteningly diagnostic at times. Seems like the Inner Disc Jockey is more in touch with my feelings than I am! The funny thing is that once an ear worm goes, I often can’t even remember what it was… though I’m not sure I want to, for fear of getting it back.

    Reply
  94. I took some codeine based cold medicine once and got the theme song from “Bosom Buddies” playing so loudly in my head that I could not even read!
    I often find myself humming things I haven’t thought of for decades, but which are appropriate to what I’m doing or thinking now. In fact, the songs in my head can be frighteningly diagnostic at times. Seems like the Inner Disc Jockey is more in touch with my feelings than I am! The funny thing is that once an ear worm goes, I often can’t even remember what it was… though I’m not sure I want to, for fear of getting it back.

    Reply
  95. I took some codeine based cold medicine once and got the theme song from “Bosom Buddies” playing so loudly in my head that I could not even read!
    I often find myself humming things I haven’t thought of for decades, but which are appropriate to what I’m doing or thinking now. In fact, the songs in my head can be frighteningly diagnostic at times. Seems like the Inner Disc Jockey is more in touch with my feelings than I am! The funny thing is that once an ear worm goes, I often can’t even remember what it was… though I’m not sure I want to, for fear of getting it back.

    Reply
  96. This is fascinating! I don’t get ear worms. I have occasionally gotten a song briefly stuck in my head, but they’re so easy to get rid of they’re practically voluntary. My aural score on the learning styles quiz is 2. 🙂 There’s definitely a disconnect between my ears and brain. Movie soundtracks have to be really phenomenal for me to even notice them, and I find it hard to listen to audio books that I haven’t read before. I panic at the sound of an accented voice! My hearing is fine – it’s my hearing comprehension that’s lousy. Being immune to ear worms is a plus I hadn’t thought of.

    Reply
  97. This is fascinating! I don’t get ear worms. I have occasionally gotten a song briefly stuck in my head, but they’re so easy to get rid of they’re practically voluntary. My aural score on the learning styles quiz is 2. 🙂 There’s definitely a disconnect between my ears and brain. Movie soundtracks have to be really phenomenal for me to even notice them, and I find it hard to listen to audio books that I haven’t read before. I panic at the sound of an accented voice! My hearing is fine – it’s my hearing comprehension that’s lousy. Being immune to ear worms is a plus I hadn’t thought of.

    Reply
  98. This is fascinating! I don’t get ear worms. I have occasionally gotten a song briefly stuck in my head, but they’re so easy to get rid of they’re practically voluntary. My aural score on the learning styles quiz is 2. 🙂 There’s definitely a disconnect between my ears and brain. Movie soundtracks have to be really phenomenal for me to even notice them, and I find it hard to listen to audio books that I haven’t read before. I panic at the sound of an accented voice! My hearing is fine – it’s my hearing comprehension that’s lousy. Being immune to ear worms is a plus I hadn’t thought of.

    Reply
  99. This is fascinating! I don’t get ear worms. I have occasionally gotten a song briefly stuck in my head, but they’re so easy to get rid of they’re practically voluntary. My aural score on the learning styles quiz is 2. 🙂 There’s definitely a disconnect between my ears and brain. Movie soundtracks have to be really phenomenal for me to even notice them, and I find it hard to listen to audio books that I haven’t read before. I panic at the sound of an accented voice! My hearing is fine – it’s my hearing comprehension that’s lousy. Being immune to ear worms is a plus I hadn’t thought of.

    Reply
  100. This is fascinating! I don’t get ear worms. I have occasionally gotten a song briefly stuck in my head, but they’re so easy to get rid of they’re practically voluntary. My aural score on the learning styles quiz is 2. 🙂 There’s definitely a disconnect between my ears and brain. Movie soundtracks have to be really phenomenal for me to even notice them, and I find it hard to listen to audio books that I haven’t read before. I panic at the sound of an accented voice! My hearing is fine – it’s my hearing comprehension that’s lousy. Being immune to ear worms is a plus I hadn’t thought of.

    Reply
  101. Thank you for an interesting post. I got an iPod and after two weeks had to give it away because of earworms! It then took me about two weeks to be rid of those two or three refrains that kept rolling around in my head. Just after I got rid of them, my wife returned from guitar camp and started playing ‘Freedom is Just another Word for Nothing less…’ and that became the worse one yet! My own thoughts might not be all that great, but they are valuable to me, and I resent these stupid ‘lyrics’ that force themselves into my mind. Blah. Thanks again. Tim

    Reply
  102. Thank you for an interesting post. I got an iPod and after two weeks had to give it away because of earworms! It then took me about two weeks to be rid of those two or three refrains that kept rolling around in my head. Just after I got rid of them, my wife returned from guitar camp and started playing ‘Freedom is Just another Word for Nothing less…’ and that became the worse one yet! My own thoughts might not be all that great, but they are valuable to me, and I resent these stupid ‘lyrics’ that force themselves into my mind. Blah. Thanks again. Tim

    Reply
  103. Thank you for an interesting post. I got an iPod and after two weeks had to give it away because of earworms! It then took me about two weeks to be rid of those two or three refrains that kept rolling around in my head. Just after I got rid of them, my wife returned from guitar camp and started playing ‘Freedom is Just another Word for Nothing less…’ and that became the worse one yet! My own thoughts might not be all that great, but they are valuable to me, and I resent these stupid ‘lyrics’ that force themselves into my mind. Blah. Thanks again. Tim

    Reply
  104. Thank you for an interesting post. I got an iPod and after two weeks had to give it away because of earworms! It then took me about two weeks to be rid of those two or three refrains that kept rolling around in my head. Just after I got rid of them, my wife returned from guitar camp and started playing ‘Freedom is Just another Word for Nothing less…’ and that became the worse one yet! My own thoughts might not be all that great, but they are valuable to me, and I resent these stupid ‘lyrics’ that force themselves into my mind. Blah. Thanks again. Tim

    Reply
  105. Thank you for an interesting post. I got an iPod and after two weeks had to give it away because of earworms! It then took me about two weeks to be rid of those two or three refrains that kept rolling around in my head. Just after I got rid of them, my wife returned from guitar camp and started playing ‘Freedom is Just another Word for Nothing less…’ and that became the worse one yet! My own thoughts might not be all that great, but they are valuable to me, and I resent these stupid ‘lyrics’ that force themselves into my mind. Blah. Thanks again. Tim

    Reply
  106. iPods, arggghhhh! That’s like sticking a worm in your ear and telling it to feast on your brain cells. Dangerous stuff, that.

    Reply
  107. iPods, arggghhhh! That’s like sticking a worm in your ear and telling it to feast on your brain cells. Dangerous stuff, that.

    Reply
  108. iPods, arggghhhh! That’s like sticking a worm in your ear and telling it to feast on your brain cells. Dangerous stuff, that.

    Reply
  109. iPods, arggghhhh! That’s like sticking a worm in your ear and telling it to feast on your brain cells. Dangerous stuff, that.

    Reply
  110. iPods, arggghhhh! That’s like sticking a worm in your ear and telling it to feast on your brain cells. Dangerous stuff, that.

    Reply

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