E-publishing and the Victorian era

Anne here. One of the things I find most fascinating about history is that it tends to repeat itself. For instance, most people would scoff at the notion that there are strong parallels between the growth of the e-publishing revolution and publishing in the Victorian era. Laudley

The Victorian era, you say? Parallels with e-publishing? In what way?

In the Victorian era, developments in technology allowed cheap, widespread production of print media which in turn led to a boom in publishing. Fiction also experienced a boom as stories serialized in magazines and newspapers became cheaply and easily available to a much wider audience.

In the 21st century, technological advances in electronic communications have led to a massive e-publishing boom. Serial publishing is also a feature of much current e-publishing.

Mention writers like Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and others and we all nod. Some of us even have their books on our shelves, though they were published more than a hundred years ago. We tend to assume that in the past, people purchased and read complete books, as we have for most of our lifetimes. But in fact, many of the first writers of popular fiction reached their initial audience through serialized stories published in newspapers and magazine.

Charles Dickens is regarded today as an author of classic literature, the grand old man of Victorian-era fiction. He started writing as a journalist, but his career as a novelist began in 1836 with publication of The Pickwick Papers — published in monthly installments in magazines. With each installment his popularity grew, and the final installment of that story sold 40,000 copies. Just one episode.

Dickens wrote as well as published his story in serial form. He evaluated his audience's reaction to each installment and often changed or adjusted characters or the plot accordingly as he wrote the story.

In today's market, a novelist who wrote their first book in serial form and reached a huge audience by the end would be snapped up by a publisher, and from then on, all his/her works would be published as completed novels. Not so with Dickens — or indeed any of his contemporaries.

He continued to write serialized novels (and thus we gained such standards of popular fiction today as the cliff-hanger chapter ending, and so on.) In fact, according to Wikipedia the publication (and writing) or novels in serial form became "the dominant Victorian mode of narrative fiction."

I mentioned Harriet Beecher Stowe before, who wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin, which, whatever you may think of it now, was a huge success at the time. That too was published in serial form, and when a publisher approached her with an offer to turn it into a book, she was doubtful; it having been already read by so many people, she thought the book wouldn't sell.

588747Mary Elizabeth Braddon is a lesser known novelist from this period. Let me tell you a little of her story. Mary had to work to support herself and her mother and, aged 17, began work as an actress but she was at heart, a writer, and after her first novel The Octoroon; or, The Lily of Louisiana (1859) was published she left to become a full time writer.

She met and fell in love with John Maxwell, a publisher and editor who published several of her short stories. He was married, his wife was in an insane asylum in Ireland, and divorce was not possible. Mary moved in with Maxwell and lived with him from then on, as his wife. LadyAudley-1

Mary Elizabeth Braddon wrote more than 80 novels, all of which were serialized in magazines and were hugely popular, as well as numerous essays, poems and articles. Her best known novel was Lady Audley's Secret — and just look at all the different covers. It was a book with a scandalous heroine, and I find it fascinating how the heroine is portrayed on each.

Lady-Audleys-SecretAccording to Allington "She regarded serial writing as a "curse" since it forced her to write more than one novel at once–mere "hand to mouth composition," as she remarked in a letter to Bulwer-Lytton. Serialization, like her youthful reading and seven years on the provincial stage, however, served her well. In terms of narrative pace and construction, sharply defined characterization, narrative flair, and theatrical scene changes, her knowledge of contemporary comedy and melodrama enabled her to write quickly and with emotional intensity." Ladyaudley

Mary Braddon also gave birth to six children whom she raised along with her six step-children. Her relationship with Maxwell meant she, too, was a "scandalous woman" and she was disapproved of by the society of her day. Eventually, a bare month after his wife died in the insane asylum, John Maxwell and Mary Braddon married. It caused a fresh scandal, as it drew attention to the illegitimacy of her children. Her scandalous life is possibly part of the reason she is not as well known today, though you can still find copies of her books both in shops and on-line.

"In 1899, the London newspaper the Daily Telegraph named Lady Audley's Secret, which had been staged in countless adaptations, as one of the world's best one hundred novels, despite the fact that it had been published almost four decades earlier." (Reference)

One thing serialization does is build an audience. I'm an impatient reader, and don't like to wait, so my preference would be to read a story all in one hit. But if a lot of the people I knew were already discussing the story, and speculating about what would happen next, I think I'd be tempted to dig out the episodes so far and read them, just to know what everyone was talking about.

It's not unlike the buzz that came with 50 Shades of Gray — a lot of people read it simply out of curiosity to find out what everyone was talking about. And that book is a perfect example of serialization; it was first written as fan fiction, an episode at a time, and as her reading audience grew, so did the buzz. Without that buzz, I doubt she would ever have published it as a whole book.

Bet you never thought that there could be any similarities between Dickens and 50 Shades, did you?

On our WordWench facebook page (please drop by and "like" us ) we've been posting about underappreciated women from history, and I think Mary Elizabeth Braddon ought to be one of them, don't you?

Note: This blog was inspired by a talk I attended by Peter Armstrong  on e-publishing, in which he spoke about historical parallels, and the importance of serial publishing and the philosophy of his company. Of course, I was fascinated and thought I'd share some of the history, at least, with you here. For his take on it, read this.

What about you — do you like reading serials or are you too impatient to wait? As a writer, would you want to publish your books in serial form? Or do you already? Do you know any other underappreciated women from history? Let's share.

65 thoughts on “E-publishing and the Victorian era”

  1. I’m afraid I’m much too impatient to wait a month for the next installment in a book. I would wait until it had been completed to start reading.
    I think there’s another inheritance from 19th century serials that we still have with us—the notion that a chapter needs to end on a hook. That makes sense if you want to make sure the reader buys the next chapter, but when you’re reading a book and have the whole thing, do you really need a hook to make you turn the page? Either I’m enjoying the book, in which case I keep reading, or I don’t like it, and toss it aside hook or no hook.

    Reply
  2. I’m afraid I’m much too impatient to wait a month for the next installment in a book. I would wait until it had been completed to start reading.
    I think there’s another inheritance from 19th century serials that we still have with us—the notion that a chapter needs to end on a hook. That makes sense if you want to make sure the reader buys the next chapter, but when you’re reading a book and have the whole thing, do you really need a hook to make you turn the page? Either I’m enjoying the book, in which case I keep reading, or I don’t like it, and toss it aside hook or no hook.

    Reply
  3. I’m afraid I’m much too impatient to wait a month for the next installment in a book. I would wait until it had been completed to start reading.
    I think there’s another inheritance from 19th century serials that we still have with us—the notion that a chapter needs to end on a hook. That makes sense if you want to make sure the reader buys the next chapter, but when you’re reading a book and have the whole thing, do you really need a hook to make you turn the page? Either I’m enjoying the book, in which case I keep reading, or I don’t like it, and toss it aside hook or no hook.

    Reply
  4. I’m afraid I’m much too impatient to wait a month for the next installment in a book. I would wait until it had been completed to start reading.
    I think there’s another inheritance from 19th century serials that we still have with us—the notion that a chapter needs to end on a hook. That makes sense if you want to make sure the reader buys the next chapter, but when you’re reading a book and have the whole thing, do you really need a hook to make you turn the page? Either I’m enjoying the book, in which case I keep reading, or I don’t like it, and toss it aside hook or no hook.

    Reply
  5. I’m afraid I’m much too impatient to wait a month for the next installment in a book. I would wait until it had been completed to start reading.
    I think there’s another inheritance from 19th century serials that we still have with us—the notion that a chapter needs to end on a hook. That makes sense if you want to make sure the reader buys the next chapter, but when you’re reading a book and have the whole thing, do you really need a hook to make you turn the page? Either I’m enjoying the book, in which case I keep reading, or I don’t like it, and toss it aside hook or no hook.

    Reply
  6. I, too, am not a fan of serialization. I read quickly and don’t retain what I’ve read for fun for long. (I read my poli sci and econmics stuff for work, it lingers long after I want it to.) I’d have to go re-read the latest edition.
    There was one author that I collected the three volumes of a trilogy before I read it because I wanted it in all one gulp. I love discovering backlists, so I can read the books in order. When I re-read, I often find out the order of certain collections so I can savor the recurring characters. So serialization would have led to lots and lots of clutter in my 19th century tiny little home.
    As to what Lil said about hooks at ends of chapters, I have come to hate these because it’s no longer possible to read to the end of a chapter and easily close the book. I wonder if anyone does what I do, read to the beginning of a romantic/sex scene. I know something good is going to happen, but for at that moment the hero and heroine are together and it’s going to be good. Click the cover of the Kindle shut. Then I can go water the plants, make the cookies, and get to work on my creative projects.
    We are lucky about the expansion of publication both in the Victorian era and our time. There’s something for everyone to read.

    Reply
  7. I, too, am not a fan of serialization. I read quickly and don’t retain what I’ve read for fun for long. (I read my poli sci and econmics stuff for work, it lingers long after I want it to.) I’d have to go re-read the latest edition.
    There was one author that I collected the three volumes of a trilogy before I read it because I wanted it in all one gulp. I love discovering backlists, so I can read the books in order. When I re-read, I often find out the order of certain collections so I can savor the recurring characters. So serialization would have led to lots and lots of clutter in my 19th century tiny little home.
    As to what Lil said about hooks at ends of chapters, I have come to hate these because it’s no longer possible to read to the end of a chapter and easily close the book. I wonder if anyone does what I do, read to the beginning of a romantic/sex scene. I know something good is going to happen, but for at that moment the hero and heroine are together and it’s going to be good. Click the cover of the Kindle shut. Then I can go water the plants, make the cookies, and get to work on my creative projects.
    We are lucky about the expansion of publication both in the Victorian era and our time. There’s something for everyone to read.

    Reply
  8. I, too, am not a fan of serialization. I read quickly and don’t retain what I’ve read for fun for long. (I read my poli sci and econmics stuff for work, it lingers long after I want it to.) I’d have to go re-read the latest edition.
    There was one author that I collected the three volumes of a trilogy before I read it because I wanted it in all one gulp. I love discovering backlists, so I can read the books in order. When I re-read, I often find out the order of certain collections so I can savor the recurring characters. So serialization would have led to lots and lots of clutter in my 19th century tiny little home.
    As to what Lil said about hooks at ends of chapters, I have come to hate these because it’s no longer possible to read to the end of a chapter and easily close the book. I wonder if anyone does what I do, read to the beginning of a romantic/sex scene. I know something good is going to happen, but for at that moment the hero and heroine are together and it’s going to be good. Click the cover of the Kindle shut. Then I can go water the plants, make the cookies, and get to work on my creative projects.
    We are lucky about the expansion of publication both in the Victorian era and our time. There’s something for everyone to read.

    Reply
  9. I, too, am not a fan of serialization. I read quickly and don’t retain what I’ve read for fun for long. (I read my poli sci and econmics stuff for work, it lingers long after I want it to.) I’d have to go re-read the latest edition.
    There was one author that I collected the three volumes of a trilogy before I read it because I wanted it in all one gulp. I love discovering backlists, so I can read the books in order. When I re-read, I often find out the order of certain collections so I can savor the recurring characters. So serialization would have led to lots and lots of clutter in my 19th century tiny little home.
    As to what Lil said about hooks at ends of chapters, I have come to hate these because it’s no longer possible to read to the end of a chapter and easily close the book. I wonder if anyone does what I do, read to the beginning of a romantic/sex scene. I know something good is going to happen, but for at that moment the hero and heroine are together and it’s going to be good. Click the cover of the Kindle shut. Then I can go water the plants, make the cookies, and get to work on my creative projects.
    We are lucky about the expansion of publication both in the Victorian era and our time. There’s something for everyone to read.

    Reply
  10. I, too, am not a fan of serialization. I read quickly and don’t retain what I’ve read for fun for long. (I read my poli sci and econmics stuff for work, it lingers long after I want it to.) I’d have to go re-read the latest edition.
    There was one author that I collected the three volumes of a trilogy before I read it because I wanted it in all one gulp. I love discovering backlists, so I can read the books in order. When I re-read, I often find out the order of certain collections so I can savor the recurring characters. So serialization would have led to lots and lots of clutter in my 19th century tiny little home.
    As to what Lil said about hooks at ends of chapters, I have come to hate these because it’s no longer possible to read to the end of a chapter and easily close the book. I wonder if anyone does what I do, read to the beginning of a romantic/sex scene. I know something good is going to happen, but for at that moment the hero and heroine are together and it’s going to be good. Click the cover of the Kindle shut. Then I can go water the plants, make the cookies, and get to work on my creative projects.
    We are lucky about the expansion of publication both in the Victorian era and our time. There’s something for everyone to read.

    Reply
  11. Fascinating.
    I remember reading serial stories in the “Saterday Evening Post” as a youngster. Clarence Buddington Kelland is one writer that I remember.

    Reply
  12. Fascinating.
    I remember reading serial stories in the “Saterday Evening Post” as a youngster. Clarence Buddington Kelland is one writer that I remember.

    Reply
  13. Fascinating.
    I remember reading serial stories in the “Saterday Evening Post” as a youngster. Clarence Buddington Kelland is one writer that I remember.

    Reply
  14. Fascinating.
    I remember reading serial stories in the “Saterday Evening Post” as a youngster. Clarence Buddington Kelland is one writer that I remember.

    Reply
  15. Fascinating.
    I remember reading serial stories in the “Saterday Evening Post” as a youngster. Clarence Buddington Kelland is one writer that I remember.

    Reply
  16. Lil, I tend to be impatient, too and want to read on regardless. But I’m also curious, and if people were discussing it, I think that would make me jump and in read whatever episodes were available.
    As for ending a chapter with a hook, I do try, though not obsessively, because the idea is to make the reader want to read on. Once someone puts down a book, there’s a change they won’t pick it up again. Writers are anxious beasts. *g*

    Reply
  17. Lil, I tend to be impatient, too and want to read on regardless. But I’m also curious, and if people were discussing it, I think that would make me jump and in read whatever episodes were available.
    As for ending a chapter with a hook, I do try, though not obsessively, because the idea is to make the reader want to read on. Once someone puts down a book, there’s a change they won’t pick it up again. Writers are anxious beasts. *g*

    Reply
  18. Lil, I tend to be impatient, too and want to read on regardless. But I’m also curious, and if people were discussing it, I think that would make me jump and in read whatever episodes were available.
    As for ending a chapter with a hook, I do try, though not obsessively, because the idea is to make the reader want to read on. Once someone puts down a book, there’s a change they won’t pick it up again. Writers are anxious beasts. *g*

    Reply
  19. Lil, I tend to be impatient, too and want to read on regardless. But I’m also curious, and if people were discussing it, I think that would make me jump and in read whatever episodes were available.
    As for ending a chapter with a hook, I do try, though not obsessively, because the idea is to make the reader want to read on. Once someone puts down a book, there’s a change they won’t pick it up again. Writers are anxious beasts. *g*

    Reply
  20. Lil, I tend to be impatient, too and want to read on regardless. But I’m also curious, and if people were discussing it, I think that would make me jump and in read whatever episodes were available.
    As for ending a chapter with a hook, I do try, though not obsessively, because the idea is to make the reader want to read on. Once someone puts down a book, there’s a change they won’t pick it up again. Writers are anxious beasts. *g*

    Reply
  21. Shannon, I also like to read books in order, and if I discover a new-to-me author who I enjoy, I also buy up the backlist and read them in order— that’s especially true if it’s a series. I read a book recently where, if I hadn’t read all the previous ones, the gratuitous references and thumbnail “catching up” sketches scattered throughout the book would have driven me mad. They almost did, even though I had read and enjoyed the previous books.
    I also like to read books in order of writing because I like seeing how an author’s style and skill develops over time.

    Reply
  22. Shannon, I also like to read books in order, and if I discover a new-to-me author who I enjoy, I also buy up the backlist and read them in order— that’s especially true if it’s a series. I read a book recently where, if I hadn’t read all the previous ones, the gratuitous references and thumbnail “catching up” sketches scattered throughout the book would have driven me mad. They almost did, even though I had read and enjoyed the previous books.
    I also like to read books in order of writing because I like seeing how an author’s style and skill develops over time.

    Reply
  23. Shannon, I also like to read books in order, and if I discover a new-to-me author who I enjoy, I also buy up the backlist and read them in order— that’s especially true if it’s a series. I read a book recently where, if I hadn’t read all the previous ones, the gratuitous references and thumbnail “catching up” sketches scattered throughout the book would have driven me mad. They almost did, even though I had read and enjoyed the previous books.
    I also like to read books in order of writing because I like seeing how an author’s style and skill develops over time.

    Reply
  24. Shannon, I also like to read books in order, and if I discover a new-to-me author who I enjoy, I also buy up the backlist and read them in order— that’s especially true if it’s a series. I read a book recently where, if I hadn’t read all the previous ones, the gratuitous references and thumbnail “catching up” sketches scattered throughout the book would have driven me mad. They almost did, even though I had read and enjoyed the previous books.
    I also like to read books in order of writing because I like seeing how an author’s style and skill develops over time.

    Reply
  25. Shannon, I also like to read books in order, and if I discover a new-to-me author who I enjoy, I also buy up the backlist and read them in order— that’s especially true if it’s a series. I read a book recently where, if I hadn’t read all the previous ones, the gratuitous references and thumbnail “catching up” sketches scattered throughout the book would have driven me mad. They almost did, even though I had read and enjoyed the previous books.
    I also like to read books in order of writing because I like seeing how an author’s style and skill develops over time.

    Reply
  26. Louis, when I was a teenager, I used to spend quite a few school holidays up at my oldest sister’s place — she was married with kids — and she used to buy women’s magazines that had serialized novels in them. I used to check that all (or most) of the episodes there, especially the last one, and then spend a happy hour or two, lying on her cool, tiled floor (she lives in a hot part of Australia) blissfully reading. That’s where I first came across Barbara Cartland.
    I also remember radio serials when we lived in the country — we didn’t have TV— and each week, there would be an episode. I loved them.

    Reply
  27. Louis, when I was a teenager, I used to spend quite a few school holidays up at my oldest sister’s place — she was married with kids — and she used to buy women’s magazines that had serialized novels in them. I used to check that all (or most) of the episodes there, especially the last one, and then spend a happy hour or two, lying on her cool, tiled floor (she lives in a hot part of Australia) blissfully reading. That’s where I first came across Barbara Cartland.
    I also remember radio serials when we lived in the country — we didn’t have TV— and each week, there would be an episode. I loved them.

    Reply
  28. Louis, when I was a teenager, I used to spend quite a few school holidays up at my oldest sister’s place — she was married with kids — and she used to buy women’s magazines that had serialized novels in them. I used to check that all (or most) of the episodes there, especially the last one, and then spend a happy hour or two, lying on her cool, tiled floor (she lives in a hot part of Australia) blissfully reading. That’s where I first came across Barbara Cartland.
    I also remember radio serials when we lived in the country — we didn’t have TV— and each week, there would be an episode. I loved them.

    Reply
  29. Louis, when I was a teenager, I used to spend quite a few school holidays up at my oldest sister’s place — she was married with kids — and she used to buy women’s magazines that had serialized novels in them. I used to check that all (or most) of the episodes there, especially the last one, and then spend a happy hour or two, lying on her cool, tiled floor (she lives in a hot part of Australia) blissfully reading. That’s where I first came across Barbara Cartland.
    I also remember radio serials when we lived in the country — we didn’t have TV— and each week, there would be an episode. I loved them.

    Reply
  30. Louis, when I was a teenager, I used to spend quite a few school holidays up at my oldest sister’s place — she was married with kids — and she used to buy women’s magazines that had serialized novels in them. I used to check that all (or most) of the episodes there, especially the last one, and then spend a happy hour or two, lying on her cool, tiled floor (she lives in a hot part of Australia) blissfully reading. That’s where I first came across Barbara Cartland.
    I also remember radio serials when we lived in the country — we didn’t have TV— and each week, there would be an episode. I loved them.

    Reply
  31. I CANNOT read a serialized book. Must wait until I can gulp it down, or I won’t read it. I don’t read books to discuss them with others, any more than I eat dessert to chat about it.
    Delightful post. I love any information that debunks the myth of the Victorian woman as too innocent for her own good, and incapable of thwarting convention. Thanks!

    Reply
  32. I CANNOT read a serialized book. Must wait until I can gulp it down, or I won’t read it. I don’t read books to discuss them with others, any more than I eat dessert to chat about it.
    Delightful post. I love any information that debunks the myth of the Victorian woman as too innocent for her own good, and incapable of thwarting convention. Thanks!

    Reply
  33. I CANNOT read a serialized book. Must wait until I can gulp it down, or I won’t read it. I don’t read books to discuss them with others, any more than I eat dessert to chat about it.
    Delightful post. I love any information that debunks the myth of the Victorian woman as too innocent for her own good, and incapable of thwarting convention. Thanks!

    Reply
  34. I CANNOT read a serialized book. Must wait until I can gulp it down, or I won’t read it. I don’t read books to discuss them with others, any more than I eat dessert to chat about it.
    Delightful post. I love any information that debunks the myth of the Victorian woman as too innocent for her own good, and incapable of thwarting convention. Thanks!

    Reply
  35. I CANNOT read a serialized book. Must wait until I can gulp it down, or I won’t read it. I don’t read books to discuss them with others, any more than I eat dessert to chat about it.
    Delightful post. I love any information that debunks the myth of the Victorian woman as too innocent for her own good, and incapable of thwarting convention. Thanks!

    Reply
  36. What a fascinating post, Anne! I read a number of Stephen King’s novels in serialization and then went back and read them as whole books. However, these days I do prefer to read an entire book at one time. Even with trilogies and series I tend to read the books as soon as they come out rather than waiting.
    And Mary Elizabeth Braddon definitely deserves a spot on the Underappreciated Women’s page!

    Reply
  37. What a fascinating post, Anne! I read a number of Stephen King’s novels in serialization and then went back and read them as whole books. However, these days I do prefer to read an entire book at one time. Even with trilogies and series I tend to read the books as soon as they come out rather than waiting.
    And Mary Elizabeth Braddon definitely deserves a spot on the Underappreciated Women’s page!

    Reply
  38. What a fascinating post, Anne! I read a number of Stephen King’s novels in serialization and then went back and read them as whole books. However, these days I do prefer to read an entire book at one time. Even with trilogies and series I tend to read the books as soon as they come out rather than waiting.
    And Mary Elizabeth Braddon definitely deserves a spot on the Underappreciated Women’s page!

    Reply
  39. What a fascinating post, Anne! I read a number of Stephen King’s novels in serialization and then went back and read them as whole books. However, these days I do prefer to read an entire book at one time. Even with trilogies and series I tend to read the books as soon as they come out rather than waiting.
    And Mary Elizabeth Braddon definitely deserves a spot on the Underappreciated Women’s page!

    Reply
  40. What a fascinating post, Anne! I read a number of Stephen King’s novels in serialization and then went back and read them as whole books. However, these days I do prefer to read an entire book at one time. Even with trilogies and series I tend to read the books as soon as they come out rather than waiting.
    And Mary Elizabeth Braddon definitely deserves a spot on the Underappreciated Women’s page!

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Louisa. I didn’t realize Stephen King’s novels had been serialized — how interesting. I wonder if that came before or after they were published in full book form.
    May Elizabeth Braddon is a remarkable woman, isn’t she? I hadn’t heard of her before I attended Peter Armstrong’s workshop.

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Louisa. I didn’t realize Stephen King’s novels had been serialized — how interesting. I wonder if that came before or after they were published in full book form.
    May Elizabeth Braddon is a remarkable woman, isn’t she? I hadn’t heard of her before I attended Peter Armstrong’s workshop.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Louisa. I didn’t realize Stephen King’s novels had been serialized — how interesting. I wonder if that came before or after they were published in full book form.
    May Elizabeth Braddon is a remarkable woman, isn’t she? I hadn’t heard of her before I attended Peter Armstrong’s workshop.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Louisa. I didn’t realize Stephen King’s novels had been serialized — how interesting. I wonder if that came before or after they were published in full book form.
    May Elizabeth Braddon is a remarkable woman, isn’t she? I hadn’t heard of her before I attended Peter Armstrong’s workshop.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Louisa. I didn’t realize Stephen King’s novels had been serialized — how interesting. I wonder if that came before or after they were published in full book form.
    May Elizabeth Braddon is a remarkable woman, isn’t she? I hadn’t heard of her before I attended Peter Armstrong’s workshop.

    Reply
  46. What a great post! I never really thought about the parallels between early serials and epublishing.
    I am a very impatient reader. I don’t do serializations if I can restrain myself from starting. 🙂

    Reply
  47. What a great post! I never really thought about the parallels between early serials and epublishing.
    I am a very impatient reader. I don’t do serializations if I can restrain myself from starting. 🙂

    Reply
  48. What a great post! I never really thought about the parallels between early serials and epublishing.
    I am a very impatient reader. I don’t do serializations if I can restrain myself from starting. 🙂

    Reply
  49. What a great post! I never really thought about the parallels between early serials and epublishing.
    I am a very impatient reader. I don’t do serializations if I can restrain myself from starting. 🙂

    Reply
  50. What a great post! I never really thought about the parallels between early serials and epublishing.
    I am a very impatient reader. I don’t do serializations if I can restrain myself from starting. 🙂

    Reply
  51. This has been a very interesting post. I did know of the Dickens history but not the others. I would love to be able to serialise. I don’t have the discipline to write a book at a time. Though I finished one but have never gone back to it.

    Reply
  52. This has been a very interesting post. I did know of the Dickens history but not the others. I would love to be able to serialise. I don’t have the discipline to write a book at a time. Though I finished one but have never gone back to it.

    Reply
  53. This has been a very interesting post. I did know of the Dickens history but not the others. I would love to be able to serialise. I don’t have the discipline to write a book at a time. Though I finished one but have never gone back to it.

    Reply
  54. This has been a very interesting post. I did know of the Dickens history but not the others. I would love to be able to serialise. I don’t have the discipline to write a book at a time. Though I finished one but have never gone back to it.

    Reply
  55. This has been a very interesting post. I did know of the Dickens history but not the others. I would love to be able to serialise. I don’t have the discipline to write a book at a time. Though I finished one but have never gone back to it.

    Reply
  56. Felicity, the message of Peter Armstrong’s workshop was that serialization was a good way to go, so why not have a try? You might find that if people are reading your episodes and asking for more, it will give you the impetus you need.

    Reply
  57. Felicity, the message of Peter Armstrong’s workshop was that serialization was a good way to go, so why not have a try? You might find that if people are reading your episodes and asking for more, it will give you the impetus you need.

    Reply
  58. Felicity, the message of Peter Armstrong’s workshop was that serialization was a good way to go, so why not have a try? You might find that if people are reading your episodes and asking for more, it will give you the impetus you need.

    Reply
  59. Felicity, the message of Peter Armstrong’s workshop was that serialization was a good way to go, so why not have a try? You might find that if people are reading your episodes and asking for more, it will give you the impetus you need.

    Reply
  60. Felicity, the message of Peter Armstrong’s workshop was that serialization was a good way to go, so why not have a try? You might find that if people are reading your episodes and asking for more, it will give you the impetus you need.

    Reply

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