Duchesses!

Duchess the podcastNicola here. I was very interested in Wench Andrea’s blog a week or so ago about Dukes, and the reality of dukes and dukedoms as opposed to what we see on film and read about in books. This prompted me to think about duchesses, particularly as a new podcast called “Duchess” started recently. It’s a show that explores the inspiring women who are running the stately home of Britain. In it, Emma Manners, the Duchess of Rutland, travels the country and talks to a variety of women about their lives caring for historic houses. It’s quite an eye-opening listen (if that isn’t an odd metaphor!) Despite the very modern approach of some of the chatelaines, there were times when I felt I could have been listening to someone talking in the 19th century, particularly when the made reference to “taking care of the staff.” It’s all part and parcel of running a modern estate.

One of the messages that came over clearly from all the participants of the show was that life changes forever when you marry and take on the care of one of Britain’s most historic buildings. Of course you get to live in the most amazing setting and enjoy all the treasures of a grand pile, but you are sharing your home with visitors and need some privacy some of the time.

My favourite of the episodes so far was with Lady Ingilby of Ripley Castle (pictured). Ripley in Yorkshire was one of my favourite places to visit Ripley when I was growing up. I was amused to hear that staff call Lady Ingilby “the boss” but she was very clear that Ripley is a home but it is also a business and has to earn its keep. The desire to pass a castle on in good shape to the next generation came over very strongly in the podcasts. This felt like a very strong duty that all the chatelaines felt keenly. Lady Ingilby also spoke bracingly of the pressure to produce an heir and a spare and that as she had produced not two but four boys that was certainly “job done”!

Today’s duchesses and indeed many of the countesses and other titled ladies who are chatelaines of great houses are there mainly by virtue of their husband’s titles. The argument for abolishing male-preference primogeniture, where a title and estate normally goes to the eldest legitimate son, rumbles on but whilst it was abolished with regard to the monarchy in 2013, it’s not made much headway further down the aristocratic tree.

Arms of NorfolkLooking at women who were duchesses in their own right, it sometimes seems things have gone backwards. In 1397, Margaret, daughter and sole heir of Thomas Earl of Norfolk, became Duchess of Norfolk in her own right and Earl Marshal of England as well. To this day she is the only woman to have held the title of Earl Marshal, which is a hereditary royal and chivalric title.

You have to come forward to 1644 before you find another woman who was created a Duchess in Alice Dudley
her own right, this time Alice, Lady Dudley. Alice Dudley was an interesting woman. I first came across her when researching my current WIP because she was the sister of my heroine Catherine Catesby. She married Robert Dudley, the natural son of Elizabeth I’s royal favourite the Earl of Leicester. Robert junior was obsessed with getting his claim to be legitimate recognised and after the failure of a court case to achieve this, he ran off to the continent in 1605 with his cousin, leaving poor Alice and their brood of children behind.

In 1644, King Charles II somewhat belatedly tried to make it up to Alice by making her a Duchess in her own right. As with Margaret of Norfolk, however, this was only for the space of her lifetime. There was no suggestion of these titles ever becoming hereditary, least of all down the female line.

BarbaraVilliers (1)King Charles II was very fond of duchesses. He made his mistress Barbara Palmer Duchess of Cleveland and another mistress, Louise de Kerouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth. King George I followed suit by creating his mistress Melusine von der Schulenberg Duchess of Munster in 1716. Melusine was in fact the “double duchess” because George gave her the title of Duchess of Kendal three years later!

An interesting case was Cecilia, Duchess of Inverness. Cecilia was born around 1789, the daughter Cecilia_Underwood_duchess_of_Inverness of Arthur Gore, second Earl of Arran. In 1831 the widowed Cecilia married Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, the sixth son of King George III. This marriage, like the prince’s previous one, wasn’t legal under the Royal Marriages Act of 1772 so Queen Victoria made Cecilia a Duchess and the title could be passed on – to her male heirs of course!

Other women have been made peeresses in their own right and in some rare cases these titles can be passed via the female line but this is very rare. In 1818 there were 28 dukedoms, 32 marquessates, 210 earldoms, 66 viscounts and 172 barons. 16 of these were ‘peeresses in their own right” and none of those were duchesses. In 2021 there are 18 peeresses in their own right which is 2.2% of the peerage! You can see why some of the daughters of the nobility are calling for reform!

Elizabeth_Murray_(1626–1698) _by_Peter_LelyOf course, being a Duchess by right of your husband’s title doesn’t detract at all from the amazing achievements of some special duchesses down the centuries. Elizabeth Murray, Duchess of Lauderdale was a staunch Royalist during the English Civil War and was a member of the secret organisation the Sealed Knot. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, born in 1757, had an interest in political campaigning, chemistry and writing.

On the Duchess podcast, amongst the stories of haunted castles and rich tales of family history, what stands out is that down the ages there have been some remarkable women taking care of Britain’s stately homes – and there still are.

Do you have a favourite historical duchess like Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, whom you admire for their life and their achievements, or a favourite fictional representation of a duchess in a novel? There are certainly plenty of them out there!

115 thoughts on “Duchesses!”

  1. Can I have a least favorite duchess? That would be Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland (Countess of Sutherland in her own right), for her role in the Highland Clearances. She owned most of the Scottish County of Sutherland and took an active part in the management of her estate, which entitled her to the blame for the enthusiasm with which some of her employees cleared out the tenants.

    Reply
  2. Can I have a least favorite duchess? That would be Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland (Countess of Sutherland in her own right), for her role in the Highland Clearances. She owned most of the Scottish County of Sutherland and took an active part in the management of her estate, which entitled her to the blame for the enthusiasm with which some of her employees cleared out the tenants.

    Reply
  3. Can I have a least favorite duchess? That would be Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland (Countess of Sutherland in her own right), for her role in the Highland Clearances. She owned most of the Scottish County of Sutherland and took an active part in the management of her estate, which entitled her to the blame for the enthusiasm with which some of her employees cleared out the tenants.

    Reply
  4. Can I have a least favorite duchess? That would be Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland (Countess of Sutherland in her own right), for her role in the Highland Clearances. She owned most of the Scottish County of Sutherland and took an active part in the management of her estate, which entitled her to the blame for the enthusiasm with which some of her employees cleared out the tenants.

    Reply
  5. Can I have a least favorite duchess? That would be Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland (Countess of Sutherland in her own right), for her role in the Highland Clearances. She owned most of the Scottish County of Sutherland and took an active part in the management of her estate, which entitled her to the blame for the enthusiasm with which some of her employees cleared out the tenants.

    Reply
  6. Hi Lil! Yes, absolutely, least favourite duchess nominations are equally welcome here. I’ve just been reading about Elizabeth’s part in the Highland Clearances and it’s absolutely right she should carry the responsibility for the actions of those on her estates. What a horrible time that was.

    Reply
  7. Hi Lil! Yes, absolutely, least favourite duchess nominations are equally welcome here. I’ve just been reading about Elizabeth’s part in the Highland Clearances and it’s absolutely right she should carry the responsibility for the actions of those on her estates. What a horrible time that was.

    Reply
  8. Hi Lil! Yes, absolutely, least favourite duchess nominations are equally welcome here. I’ve just been reading about Elizabeth’s part in the Highland Clearances and it’s absolutely right she should carry the responsibility for the actions of those on her estates. What a horrible time that was.

    Reply
  9. Hi Lil! Yes, absolutely, least favourite duchess nominations are equally welcome here. I’ve just been reading about Elizabeth’s part in the Highland Clearances and it’s absolutely right she should carry the responsibility for the actions of those on her estates. What a horrible time that was.

    Reply
  10. Hi Lil! Yes, absolutely, least favourite duchess nominations are equally welcome here. I’ve just been reading about Elizabeth’s part in the Highland Clearances and it’s absolutely right she should carry the responsibility for the actions of those on her estates. What a horrible time that was.

    Reply
  11. What an interesting post. I watch a TV show every Sunday about an American lady who married into the aristocracy in England and goes around to various large homes and estates to find out all the different ways each place uses to raise money to keep the place going. It is a very informative and entertaining show, now if only I could remember the name of it!!

    Reply
  12. What an interesting post. I watch a TV show every Sunday about an American lady who married into the aristocracy in England and goes around to various large homes and estates to find out all the different ways each place uses to raise money to keep the place going. It is a very informative and entertaining show, now if only I could remember the name of it!!

    Reply
  13. What an interesting post. I watch a TV show every Sunday about an American lady who married into the aristocracy in England and goes around to various large homes and estates to find out all the different ways each place uses to raise money to keep the place going. It is a very informative and entertaining show, now if only I could remember the name of it!!

    Reply
  14. What an interesting post. I watch a TV show every Sunday about an American lady who married into the aristocracy in England and goes around to various large homes and estates to find out all the different ways each place uses to raise money to keep the place going. It is a very informative and entertaining show, now if only I could remember the name of it!!

    Reply
  15. What an interesting post. I watch a TV show every Sunday about an American lady who married into the aristocracy in England and goes around to various large homes and estates to find out all the different ways each place uses to raise money to keep the place going. It is a very informative and entertaining show, now if only I could remember the name of it!!

    Reply
  16. I’ve heard about this show! I think it would be extra-interesting to have an American aristocrat’s view on how places are run.

    Reply
  17. I’ve heard about this show! I think it would be extra-interesting to have an American aristocrat’s view on how places are run.

    Reply
  18. I’ve heard about this show! I think it would be extra-interesting to have an American aristocrat’s view on how places are run.

    Reply
  19. I’ve heard about this show! I think it would be extra-interesting to have an American aristocrat’s view on how places are run.

    Reply
  20. I’ve heard about this show! I think it would be extra-interesting to have an American aristocrat’s view on how places are run.

    Reply
  21. The show that Donna H (above) references is “An American
    Aristocrat’s Guide To Great Estates” and I’m afraid it contains all the knowledge I have of REAL aristocrats. Julie Montagu, Vicountess Hitchingbrooke is the guide, and she always includes a history of the previous owners.
    My favorite fictional Duchess has to be Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, only because SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS is my all time favorite Mary Balogh novel. Sorry to admit to my ignorance (smile).

    Reply
  22. The show that Donna H (above) references is “An American
    Aristocrat’s Guide To Great Estates” and I’m afraid it contains all the knowledge I have of REAL aristocrats. Julie Montagu, Vicountess Hitchingbrooke is the guide, and she always includes a history of the previous owners.
    My favorite fictional Duchess has to be Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, only because SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS is my all time favorite Mary Balogh novel. Sorry to admit to my ignorance (smile).

    Reply
  23. The show that Donna H (above) references is “An American
    Aristocrat’s Guide To Great Estates” and I’m afraid it contains all the knowledge I have of REAL aristocrats. Julie Montagu, Vicountess Hitchingbrooke is the guide, and she always includes a history of the previous owners.
    My favorite fictional Duchess has to be Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, only because SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS is my all time favorite Mary Balogh novel. Sorry to admit to my ignorance (smile).

    Reply
  24. The show that Donna H (above) references is “An American
    Aristocrat’s Guide To Great Estates” and I’m afraid it contains all the knowledge I have of REAL aristocrats. Julie Montagu, Vicountess Hitchingbrooke is the guide, and she always includes a history of the previous owners.
    My favorite fictional Duchess has to be Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, only because SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS is my all time favorite Mary Balogh novel. Sorry to admit to my ignorance (smile).

    Reply
  25. The show that Donna H (above) references is “An American
    Aristocrat’s Guide To Great Estates” and I’m afraid it contains all the knowledge I have of REAL aristocrats. Julie Montagu, Vicountess Hitchingbrooke is the guide, and she always includes a history of the previous owners.
    My favorite fictional Duchess has to be Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, only because SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS is my all time favorite Mary Balogh novel. Sorry to admit to my ignorance (smile).

    Reply
  26. I can’t say that I have a favorite duchess, but I’m going to check out the podcast. I love old houses, castles, etc. and I’m super curious. I can’t imagine what it takes to keep those going but I’m always happy for the ones that do so I can go see them.

    Reply
  27. I can’t say that I have a favorite duchess, but I’m going to check out the podcast. I love old houses, castles, etc. and I’m super curious. I can’t imagine what it takes to keep those going but I’m always happy for the ones that do so I can go see them.

    Reply
  28. I can’t say that I have a favorite duchess, but I’m going to check out the podcast. I love old houses, castles, etc. and I’m super curious. I can’t imagine what it takes to keep those going but I’m always happy for the ones that do so I can go see them.

    Reply
  29. I can’t say that I have a favorite duchess, but I’m going to check out the podcast. I love old houses, castles, etc. and I’m super curious. I can’t imagine what it takes to keep those going but I’m always happy for the ones that do so I can go see them.

    Reply
  30. I can’t say that I have a favorite duchess, but I’m going to check out the podcast. I love old houses, castles, etc. and I’m super curious. I can’t imagine what it takes to keep those going but I’m always happy for the ones that do so I can go see them.

    Reply
  31. I will second @Mary T’s choice of Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, as my favorite fictional success.
    Thank you, Nicola, for an informative post.

    Reply
  32. I will second @Mary T’s choice of Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, as my favorite fictional success.
    Thank you, Nicola, for an informative post.

    Reply
  33. I will second @Mary T’s choice of Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, as my favorite fictional success.
    Thank you, Nicola, for an informative post.

    Reply
  34. I will second @Mary T’s choice of Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, as my favorite fictional success.
    Thank you, Nicola, for an informative post.

    Reply
  35. I will second @Mary T’s choice of Christine, Duchess of Bewcastle, as my favorite fictional success.
    Thank you, Nicola, for an informative post.

    Reply
  36. Is the podcast based on the book, Duchesses Living in 21st Century Britain, by Jane Dismore? It’s a fascinating book. I think I have seen an episode of the television show referenced above, but I’m not sure. I try to watch (and read) everything I can find about the great houses and estates of Britain, but they sometimes run together.

    Reply
  37. Is the podcast based on the book, Duchesses Living in 21st Century Britain, by Jane Dismore? It’s a fascinating book. I think I have seen an episode of the television show referenced above, but I’m not sure. I try to watch (and read) everything I can find about the great houses and estates of Britain, but they sometimes run together.

    Reply
  38. Is the podcast based on the book, Duchesses Living in 21st Century Britain, by Jane Dismore? It’s a fascinating book. I think I have seen an episode of the television show referenced above, but I’m not sure. I try to watch (and read) everything I can find about the great houses and estates of Britain, but they sometimes run together.

    Reply
  39. Is the podcast based on the book, Duchesses Living in 21st Century Britain, by Jane Dismore? It’s a fascinating book. I think I have seen an episode of the television show referenced above, but I’m not sure. I try to watch (and read) everything I can find about the great houses and estates of Britain, but they sometimes run together.

    Reply
  40. Is the podcast based on the book, Duchesses Living in 21st Century Britain, by Jane Dismore? It’s a fascinating book. I think I have seen an episode of the television show referenced above, but I’m not sure. I try to watch (and read) everything I can find about the great houses and estates of Britain, but they sometimes run together.

    Reply
  41. As I have said previously, I do not care about ranks as such, but only about character aspects, whether in fiction or factual history.

    Reply
  42. As I have said previously, I do not care about ranks as such, but only about character aspects, whether in fiction or factual history.

    Reply
  43. As I have said previously, I do not care about ranks as such, but only about character aspects, whether in fiction or factual history.

    Reply
  44. As I have said previously, I do not care about ranks as such, but only about character aspects, whether in fiction or factual history.

    Reply
  45. As I have said previously, I do not care about ranks as such, but only about character aspects, whether in fiction or factual history.

    Reply
  46. Here in the US, I suspect that we don’t have a great deal of familiarity with duchesses, except when they are within the pages of, or in the covers of Romance novels. However, I very much enjoyed a public television program on British great houses. This episode focused on Castle Inverary and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. She led the viewer on a tour of this most impressive castle that yes, is also a home. I was fascinated how she was at once the lady of the manor, so to speak, while at the same time managing sales at the Castle gift shop. Not to be outdone, the Duke was signing books in the gift shop, when he wasn’t muscling a piece of heavy machinery in order to shift a downed tree. They seemed like a charming couple. Thanks for a lovely post, Nicola.

    Reply
  47. Here in the US, I suspect that we don’t have a great deal of familiarity with duchesses, except when they are within the pages of, or in the covers of Romance novels. However, I very much enjoyed a public television program on British great houses. This episode focused on Castle Inverary and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. She led the viewer on a tour of this most impressive castle that yes, is also a home. I was fascinated how she was at once the lady of the manor, so to speak, while at the same time managing sales at the Castle gift shop. Not to be outdone, the Duke was signing books in the gift shop, when he wasn’t muscling a piece of heavy machinery in order to shift a downed tree. They seemed like a charming couple. Thanks for a lovely post, Nicola.

    Reply
  48. Here in the US, I suspect that we don’t have a great deal of familiarity with duchesses, except when they are within the pages of, or in the covers of Romance novels. However, I very much enjoyed a public television program on British great houses. This episode focused on Castle Inverary and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. She led the viewer on a tour of this most impressive castle that yes, is also a home. I was fascinated how she was at once the lady of the manor, so to speak, while at the same time managing sales at the Castle gift shop. Not to be outdone, the Duke was signing books in the gift shop, when he wasn’t muscling a piece of heavy machinery in order to shift a downed tree. They seemed like a charming couple. Thanks for a lovely post, Nicola.

    Reply
  49. Here in the US, I suspect that we don’t have a great deal of familiarity with duchesses, except when they are within the pages of, or in the covers of Romance novels. However, I very much enjoyed a public television program on British great houses. This episode focused on Castle Inverary and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. She led the viewer on a tour of this most impressive castle that yes, is also a home. I was fascinated how she was at once the lady of the manor, so to speak, while at the same time managing sales at the Castle gift shop. Not to be outdone, the Duke was signing books in the gift shop, when he wasn’t muscling a piece of heavy machinery in order to shift a downed tree. They seemed like a charming couple. Thanks for a lovely post, Nicola.

    Reply
  50. Here in the US, I suspect that we don’t have a great deal of familiarity with duchesses, except when they are within the pages of, or in the covers of Romance novels. However, I very much enjoyed a public television program on British great houses. This episode focused on Castle Inverary and the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. She led the viewer on a tour of this most impressive castle that yes, is also a home. I was fascinated how she was at once the lady of the manor, so to speak, while at the same time managing sales at the Castle gift shop. Not to be outdone, the Duke was signing books in the gift shop, when he wasn’t muscling a piece of heavy machinery in order to shift a downed tree. They seemed like a charming couple. Thanks for a lovely post, Nicola.

    Reply
  51. Hi Cynthia! I think the podcast and the book are two different things as the podcast is run by the Duchess of Rutland. I came across the Jane Dismore book when I was researching duchesses and thought it looked very good so now you’ve recommended it as well I will put it on my wish list. Thanks!

    Reply
  52. Hi Cynthia! I think the podcast and the book are two different things as the podcast is run by the Duchess of Rutland. I came across the Jane Dismore book when I was researching duchesses and thought it looked very good so now you’ve recommended it as well I will put it on my wish list. Thanks!

    Reply
  53. Hi Cynthia! I think the podcast and the book are two different things as the podcast is run by the Duchess of Rutland. I came across the Jane Dismore book when I was researching duchesses and thought it looked very good so now you’ve recommended it as well I will put it on my wish list. Thanks!

    Reply
  54. Hi Cynthia! I think the podcast and the book are two different things as the podcast is run by the Duchess of Rutland. I came across the Jane Dismore book when I was researching duchesses and thought it looked very good so now you’ve recommended it as well I will put it on my wish list. Thanks!

    Reply
  55. Hi Cynthia! I think the podcast and the book are two different things as the podcast is run by the Duchess of Rutland. I came across the Jane Dismore book when I was researching duchesses and thought it looked very good so now you’ve recommended it as well I will put it on my wish list. Thanks!

    Reply
  56. Thank you, Binnie, I’m so pleased you liked it! I love the story of the Duke of Argyll signing books in the gift shop! It reminds me of when we went to Highclere Castle with one of the guide dog puppies and the Earl of Caernarvon was in the tea room chatting to people and admired how well behaved the dog was!

    Reply
  57. Thank you, Binnie, I’m so pleased you liked it! I love the story of the Duke of Argyll signing books in the gift shop! It reminds me of when we went to Highclere Castle with one of the guide dog puppies and the Earl of Caernarvon was in the tea room chatting to people and admired how well behaved the dog was!

    Reply
  58. Thank you, Binnie, I’m so pleased you liked it! I love the story of the Duke of Argyll signing books in the gift shop! It reminds me of when we went to Highclere Castle with one of the guide dog puppies and the Earl of Caernarvon was in the tea room chatting to people and admired how well behaved the dog was!

    Reply
  59. Thank you, Binnie, I’m so pleased you liked it! I love the story of the Duke of Argyll signing books in the gift shop! It reminds me of when we went to Highclere Castle with one of the guide dog puppies and the Earl of Caernarvon was in the tea room chatting to people and admired how well behaved the dog was!

    Reply
  60. Thank you, Binnie, I’m so pleased you liked it! I love the story of the Duke of Argyll signing books in the gift shop! It reminds me of when we went to Highclere Castle with one of the guide dog puppies and the Earl of Caernarvon was in the tea room chatting to people and admired how well behaved the dog was!

    Reply
  61. I do not have a favorite among the aristocracy. Actually, I do, but I just wanted to sound like a down to earth native of the US. I have always wondered how in the world Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire did not become guilty of murder. She must have been a very unusual woman.
    But, then, maybe we down to earth people are just naturally more liable to violence and revenge.
    Thanks for this post. I think I agree with the women who believe titles should be made available to them. After all, if one is a child in the line, then one should be able to inherit.
    But, again, I am not privy to all the ins and outs of the better classes. You know, it seems that women of the better classes had a lot more working against their happiness and success than average women did. The limitations set on them were amazing. And not everyone became a powerful duchess. If I did not know better I would say it almost seems that men were scared to death women would be allowed to succeed too much.
    Thanks again. Hope all are taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  62. I do not have a favorite among the aristocracy. Actually, I do, but I just wanted to sound like a down to earth native of the US. I have always wondered how in the world Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire did not become guilty of murder. She must have been a very unusual woman.
    But, then, maybe we down to earth people are just naturally more liable to violence and revenge.
    Thanks for this post. I think I agree with the women who believe titles should be made available to them. After all, if one is a child in the line, then one should be able to inherit.
    But, again, I am not privy to all the ins and outs of the better classes. You know, it seems that women of the better classes had a lot more working against their happiness and success than average women did. The limitations set on them were amazing. And not everyone became a powerful duchess. If I did not know better I would say it almost seems that men were scared to death women would be allowed to succeed too much.
    Thanks again. Hope all are taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  63. I do not have a favorite among the aristocracy. Actually, I do, but I just wanted to sound like a down to earth native of the US. I have always wondered how in the world Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire did not become guilty of murder. She must have been a very unusual woman.
    But, then, maybe we down to earth people are just naturally more liable to violence and revenge.
    Thanks for this post. I think I agree with the women who believe titles should be made available to them. After all, if one is a child in the line, then one should be able to inherit.
    But, again, I am not privy to all the ins and outs of the better classes. You know, it seems that women of the better classes had a lot more working against their happiness and success than average women did. The limitations set on them were amazing. And not everyone became a powerful duchess. If I did not know better I would say it almost seems that men were scared to death women would be allowed to succeed too much.
    Thanks again. Hope all are taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  64. I do not have a favorite among the aristocracy. Actually, I do, but I just wanted to sound like a down to earth native of the US. I have always wondered how in the world Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire did not become guilty of murder. She must have been a very unusual woman.
    But, then, maybe we down to earth people are just naturally more liable to violence and revenge.
    Thanks for this post. I think I agree with the women who believe titles should be made available to them. After all, if one is a child in the line, then one should be able to inherit.
    But, again, I am not privy to all the ins and outs of the better classes. You know, it seems that women of the better classes had a lot more working against their happiness and success than average women did. The limitations set on them were amazing. And not everyone became a powerful duchess. If I did not know better I would say it almost seems that men were scared to death women would be allowed to succeed too much.
    Thanks again. Hope all are taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  65. I do not have a favorite among the aristocracy. Actually, I do, but I just wanted to sound like a down to earth native of the US. I have always wondered how in the world Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire did not become guilty of murder. She must have been a very unusual woman.
    But, then, maybe we down to earth people are just naturally more liable to violence and revenge.
    Thanks for this post. I think I agree with the women who believe titles should be made available to them. After all, if one is a child in the line, then one should be able to inherit.
    But, again, I am not privy to all the ins and outs of the better classes. You know, it seems that women of the better classes had a lot more working against their happiness and success than average women did. The limitations set on them were amazing. And not everyone became a powerful duchess. If I did not know better I would say it almost seems that men were scared to death women would be allowed to succeed too much.
    Thanks again. Hope all are taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  66. A lovely post Nicola. I love learning about old houses and estates. The podcast sounds very interesting. I’ve actually never listened to one. My daughter keeps pushing me to do it. She says I’d love it because I’m mad into history.

    Reply
  67. A lovely post Nicola. I love learning about old houses and estates. The podcast sounds very interesting. I’ve actually never listened to one. My daughter keeps pushing me to do it. She says I’d love it because I’m mad into history.

    Reply
  68. A lovely post Nicola. I love learning about old houses and estates. The podcast sounds very interesting. I’ve actually never listened to one. My daughter keeps pushing me to do it. She says I’d love it because I’m mad into history.

    Reply
  69. A lovely post Nicola. I love learning about old houses and estates. The podcast sounds very interesting. I’ve actually never listened to one. My daughter keeps pushing me to do it. She says I’d love it because I’m mad into history.

    Reply
  70. A lovely post Nicola. I love learning about old houses and estates. The podcast sounds very interesting. I’ve actually never listened to one. My daughter keeps pushing me to do it. She says I’d love it because I’m mad into history.

    Reply
  71. I hope you find it interesting, Kathie! The people the Duchess interviews are all different ranks of the nobility, which does give it a bit of variety 🙂

    Reply
  72. I hope you find it interesting, Kathie! The people the Duchess interviews are all different ranks of the nobility, which does give it a bit of variety 🙂

    Reply
  73. I hope you find it interesting, Kathie! The people the Duchess interviews are all different ranks of the nobility, which does give it a bit of variety 🙂

    Reply
  74. I hope you find it interesting, Kathie! The people the Duchess interviews are all different ranks of the nobility, which does give it a bit of variety 🙂

    Reply
  75. I hope you find it interesting, Kathie! The people the Duchess interviews are all different ranks of the nobility, which does give it a bit of variety 🙂

    Reply
  76. Hi Annette. That’s such an interesting and, I think, true observation. Many people would envy women of the upper classes but the restrictions on their lives were probably greater than those of women further down the social scale. It’s interesting to see that even in this day and age, men and some women still don’t want equality for women, not just at this level.

    Reply
  77. Hi Annette. That’s such an interesting and, I think, true observation. Many people would envy women of the upper classes but the restrictions on their lives were probably greater than those of women further down the social scale. It’s interesting to see that even in this day and age, men and some women still don’t want equality for women, not just at this level.

    Reply
  78. Hi Annette. That’s such an interesting and, I think, true observation. Many people would envy women of the upper classes but the restrictions on their lives were probably greater than those of women further down the social scale. It’s interesting to see that even in this day and age, men and some women still don’t want equality for women, not just at this level.

    Reply
  79. Hi Annette. That’s such an interesting and, I think, true observation. Many people would envy women of the upper classes but the restrictions on their lives were probably greater than those of women further down the social scale. It’s interesting to see that even in this day and age, men and some women still don’t want equality for women, not just at this level.

    Reply
  80. Hi Annette. That’s such an interesting and, I think, true observation. Many people would envy women of the upper classes but the restrictions on their lives were probably greater than those of women further down the social scale. It’s interesting to see that even in this day and age, men and some women still don’t want equality for women, not just at this level.

    Reply
  81. Hi Teresa. I’m glad you liked the post! I only got into podcasts recently and there are so many of them out there now but if you find a really good one I do think they can be very interesting. I love listening to history ones when I’m on a long journey or doing the ironing!

    Reply
  82. Hi Teresa. I’m glad you liked the post! I only got into podcasts recently and there are so many of them out there now but if you find a really good one I do think they can be very interesting. I love listening to history ones when I’m on a long journey or doing the ironing!

    Reply
  83. Hi Teresa. I’m glad you liked the post! I only got into podcasts recently and there are so many of them out there now but if you find a really good one I do think they can be very interesting. I love listening to history ones when I’m on a long journey or doing the ironing!

    Reply
  84. Hi Teresa. I’m glad you liked the post! I only got into podcasts recently and there are so many of them out there now but if you find a really good one I do think they can be very interesting. I love listening to history ones when I’m on a long journey or doing the ironing!

    Reply
  85. Hi Teresa. I’m glad you liked the post! I only got into podcasts recently and there are so many of them out there now but if you find a really good one I do think they can be very interesting. I love listening to history ones when I’m on a long journey or doing the ironing!

    Reply

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